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Discovering Alabama wins EMMY ® award • Moundville Native American Festival • Lado a Lado Photography Exhibit • Smith Hall Renovation and Restoration • Expedition 32 Uncovers the Foundation of Gorgas Homestead

Alabama Museum of Natural History • Discovering Alabama • Moundville Archaeological Park • Office of Archaeological Research • Gorgas House • Museum Collections

N e w s f r o m t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f A l a b a m a Mu s e u m s • N u m b e r 3 4 • Fa l l 2 0 1 0


S E P T E M B E R

11 Saturday in the Park–Pots and Potters–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 18 Saturday in the Park–Ancient Hunting & Fishing with Cooking–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 25 Saturday in the Park–Finger Weaving–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm

O C T O B E R

2 Natural History with the Experts–Alabama Museum of Natural History–two hours prior to kickoff 2 Saturday in the Park–Billy Whitefox flutes and Linda Prejeant jewelry making– Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 6-9 Moundville Native American Festival–Moundville Archaeological Park 11 Lado a Lado Photographic Exhibit (thru December)–Alabama Museum of Natural History 16 Saturday in the Park–Indian Cooking–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 23 Saturday in the Park–Finger Weaving–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 30 Saturday in the Park–Native American Cultural Demonstrations–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm

N O V E M B E R

6 Saturday in the Park–Fall Harvest (Plants and Cooking)–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 13 Natural History with the Experts–Alabama Museum of Natural History– two hours prior to kickoff 13 Saturday in the Park–Native American Cultural Demonstrations Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 20 Saturday in the Park- Ancient Hunting & Fishing with Cooking–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 27 Saturday in the Park–Native American Cultural Demonstrations–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm

iscovering Alabama, an award-winning nature television series produced by The University of Alabama’s Alabama Museum of Natural History and its Center for Public Television and Radio, has earned an Emmy Award in the 2010 National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Southeast competition.

D E C E M B E R

4 Saturday in the Park–Finger Weaving–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 5 Holiday Open House–Alabama Museum of Natural History 10 Children’s Market–Alabama Museum of Natural History 11 Saturday in the Park–Ancient Hunting & Fishing with Cooking–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 18 Saturday in the Park–Pots and Potters–Moundville Archaeological Park, 10 am–2 pm 25 Merry Christmas

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Chronicle

Dr. Doug Phillips, creator, executive producer and host of the Alabama Public Television series; Wendy Reed, CPTR producer; and Roger Reid, writer, producer and director, won for their efforts in developing the Discovering Alabama episode titled “Alabama in Space.” The program highlights the role Alabama plays in space exploration.

Published periodically during the year by The University of Alabama Museums Robert Clouse, Ph.D. Executive Director The University of Alabama Museums

Board of Regents Ben Barnett, Board President Tuscaloosa, AL

Mike Jenkins Montgomery, AL

Beverly Phifer Tuscaloosa, AL

Larry Taylor, Board Vice President Moundville, AL

Steve Johnson Tuscaloosa, AL

Tom Semmes San Antonio, TX

Prescott Atkinson, Ph. D., M. D. Birmingham, AL

Thomas Joiner Tuscaloosa, AL

Marguerite Smith Short Birmingham, AL

Catherine Sloss Crenshaw Birmingham, AL

Eleanor May Tuscaloosa, AL

Nick Tew, Ph. D. Tuscaloosa, AL

Darla Graves Birmingham, AL

Douglas McCraw Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Terry Waters Tuscaloosa, AL

Tommy Hester Tuscaloosa, AL

Tom McMillan Brewton, AL

Tom Watson Tuscaloosa, AL

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“We put a man on the moon, and there is so much more space science and environmental science that is happening at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,” Phillips said.

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“Discovering Alabama: Alabama in Space” takes viewers behind the scenes at Marshall, the National Space Science and Technology Center and the U.S. Space and Rocket Center. Discovering Alabama was created by Phillips in 1985. For 25 years, it has brought the natural wonders of the state to Alabama Public Television viewers. The series is a production of the Alabama Museum of Natural History and The University of Alabama in cooperation with the Alabama Center for Public Television and Radio. Discovering Alabama programs are correlated with the Alabama Course of Study and, with accompanying Teacher Guides, are used in classrooms throughout the state.

For more information visit www.discoveringalabama.org and www.cptr.org.

OPENS

Lado a Lado (Side by Side) is a photographic exhibit by UA Photographer Chip Cooper and Nester Marti of Havana, Cuba. The 96 spectacular photographs depict scenes from the perspective of the two artists who have been working together for nearly 10 years.  Lado a Lado will be on exhibit from October to December in the Mezzanine Gallery of the Alabama Museum of Natural History. The exhibit is part of the Cuba Week celebration at the University of Alabama. M

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Moundville native

october 6

Choctaw performers of all ages share their social dances.

Carl Etheridge talks about different ways of fletching arrows.

One of the few male Choctaw weavers, Ramsey King is noted for his double weave Rivercane baskets.

Sterling Holbrook demonstrates bow and arrow making.

A Choctaw child from the AlaHinte Dancers dons an eagle mask.

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Noel Grayson discusses brain tanning deerskins.

School kids learn about vultures and other birds of prey.

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Visitors join the Warriors of AniKituhwa, one of the festival’s favorite dance groups.


americaN festival Lifecast figures from the exhibit are clothed and ornamented with artwork from modern Native American artisans.

6-9, 2010

With the opening of the newly renovated Jones Archaeological Museum, the 22nd Moundville Native American Festival, hosted October 6 through 9, hopes to be one of the best ever held. Celebrating the culture and heritage of Southeastern Indians, the festival’s many components will dovetail nicely with the new displays. According to festival director, Betsy Irwin, “The new exhibits explicitly show what Mississippians and the people of Moundville were like. The festival and our stunning new displays will play well against one another, helping visitors gain a much broader understanding of what was and now is Southeastern Indian culture.” Many school reservations are already on the books. Additionally, Tuscaloosa City and County Schools begin their fall break on Friday of the festival and there isn’t an Alabama football game scheduled that weekend. Our staff looks forward to hosting one of best attended festivals in several years. So mark your calendars. We hope to see you there! Charlotte Haygood shows kids how to make corn shuck dolls.

A small visitor learns how to grind corn.

Knapper Guy Meador explains how stone points are made.

Twined bags and double weave baskets like those found in the new exhibits are available in the Knotted Bird Gift Shop located in the Jones Archaeological Museum at Moundville. Living historian John Hall assumes the character of one time naturalist, William Bartram.

Mary T. Newman lets little ones play with clay as she demonstrates pottery making.

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Charles VanHorn Retires from Moundville Archaeological Park

Museum member, Dr. Helen Robinson of Huntsville, AL works on uncovering part of the foundation while participating in Week 3 of the Museum Expedition.

Expedition 32 Uncovers the Foundation of Gorgas Homestead in Brierfield, AL More than 140 years after construction, participants with the 32nd annual Alabama Museum of Natural History Museum Expedition took part in an archaeological dig to uncover the foundation of the home that Josiah Gorgas and his family lived in for about four years following the end of the Civil War. The house site is located on property owned by the Briefield Ironworks Historical State Park.  Archaeologist Dr. Jack Bergstresser believes that the information obtained during the dig will help “tell the story” of Gorgas and his effort to operate the Brierfield Ironworks and rolling mill on a large production scale.

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Charles VanHorn retired on July 30 from Moundville Park after 26 years of dedicated service. Known to friends as “Tee,” Mr. Vanhorn started with the UA Museums in the Office of Archaeological Research in 1984. After a couple of years, he began working in the park’s maintenance and grounds department. Charles has always appreciated the significance of the Moundville site and worked hard to keep the park beautiful for the visiting public. The occasion was marked with a special lunch with family, friends, and co-workers at the park’s Nelson Jones Conference Building. Charles is looking forward to spending more time with his children and grandchildren.

The house was located on a hill above Mayhan Creek and overlooked the rolling mill that used iron smelted at Brierfield furnace.  Rolling mills produced sheet iron, extensively used for making iron clad ships during the Civil War. Participants spent two weeks working at the site and uncovered some of the exterior walls and the floor of a double fireplace that was situated in the center of the house. For Gorgas the ironworks were a failure, but for participants at the Expedition it was a treasure trove of opportunity to learn more about the rich cultural heritage of Alabama.

smith hall Restorations

The most striking component of the changes is the restoration of the original heart pine floors that now more closely reflect the original museum. Smith Hall houses the Alabama Museum of Natural History.

Smith Hall visitors will receive a new experience after a renovation of the Grand Gallery and Mezzanine which occurred this summer.

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SMITH HALL TIME CAPSULE Museum member and artist Charlie Munoz, pictured here with his son, Jesse, and wife Linda, crafted the new time capsule container to be replaced in the cornerstone of Smith Hall.  The new container is handcrafted of copper and features The University of Alabama “A” on the top. The new capsule will be opened in the year 2110.

Contents of the 1907 Smith Hall time capsule.

university of alabama museums membership

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giving levels & benefits uch of the natural beauty of Alabama is found among its many rivers. To recognize the vital role these rivers play in making our state unique, the University of Alabama Museums has designated gift membership levels with the names of some of Alabama’s best-known and beloved rivers.

All membership levels are important to the Museum. We hope you will be as generous as your circumstances allow. third Level

First Level

Alabama River $40 • Unlimited admission (except for special events) to: Moundville Archaeological Park Alabama Museum of Natural History Gorgas House Paul W. Bryant Museum • Membership newsletter • Discounts on Museum programs and Summer Expedition • Membership card and decal • Recognition in newsletter • Invitations to special member events

second Level

B l a c k warr i o r R i v e r $100 • Receive Discovering Alabama DVDs • 10% discount at University of Alabama Museum Shops • Other benefits as listed in previous level

fifth Level

cahaba River $250

Sipsey River $1000

• Free admission to Moundville Native American Festival • Unlimited admission to Museums for member and 5 guests • Gift membership for one year at Alabama level • 20% discount at University of Alabama Museum Shops • Other benefits as listed in previous level

• Unlimited admission to Museums for member and 10 guests • Three gift memberships for one year at Black Warrior level • Other benefits as listed in previous level

sixth Level

eugene allen smith society $5000

fourth Level

coosa River $500 • Unlimited admission to Museums for member and 7 guests • Book on natural history from The University of Alabama Press • Reduced rental rates for Museum facilities • Other benefits as listed in previous level

• Special recognition in Smith Hall foyer • Special Museum excursion lead by Executive Director of The University of Alabama Museums • Unlimited admission to Museums for member and 15 guests • Other benefits as listed in previous level

Yes, I/we want to support The University of Alabama Museums Alabama River $40 B l a c k W arr i o r R i v e r $ 1 0 0 Ca h a b a R i v e r $ 2 5 0 Coosa River $500 Sipsey River $1000 Eugene Allen Smith Society $5000

Charge to: MasterCard

Visa

Account Number_______________________________________________ Expiration Date_ _______________________________________________ My Signature__________________________________________________ Name(s)______________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________

My/our membership is enclosed

Phone_______________________________________________________

My employer will match this gift

E-mail_ ______________________________________________________

Please make checks payable to the University of Alabama Museums and mail to: Box 870340 • Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0340 Your annual gift is tax deductible to the extent provided by law. Thank you for your support.

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tuscaloosa al permit #16

Box 870340 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487–0340 (205) 348-7550 museums.ua.edu museum.programs@ua.edu

Volunteer at the

MOUNDVILLE NATIVE AMERICAN FESTIVAL ical eolog l a h c r tiva lle A undvi erican Fes ions o M t m pt A ga teerin ille Native be many o to the n u l o v ill a, oundv dering n’s are here w Consi his year’s Mt started. T the childre museum. T e Park? at way to g year, from renovated em is e ly age th ake r u is a gr se from th to the new o c o , to m nd en to cho istory area teers a volunteers n u l h o g livin past v n our te our e depend o a i c e r p We ap up again. Wss. n and n ce is ope Warrior g c i s u m s u to a e stival l Mus Black our fe logica ts and the o e a h f i rc nes A Bird G ates The Jo s Knotted celebr e . d d y u n l n a c a 9 n p i er 6ge. e Com Octob and herita s Coffe i l a v the sti ure ng at a i ar’s fe ndian cult r e e y e t s i Th nI laudi volun easter about t, contact C n o South i t ocen forma call ore in become a d ua.edu, or m r o F ming@ l or to festiva ings at ccum Cumm 71-8732. 3 (205)

Moundville docent Tom Potter educates museum visitors about Moundville ceramics.

moundville.ua.edu


Museum Chronicle 34 Fall 2010