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Captain Bruce Heyman Takes the Helm of LA Maritime Institute p. 2

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LB City Prosecutor Seeks Reelection, Plans to Address Roots of Crime in 2nd Term p. 5 TE San Pedro’s Hamlet Closes Dec. 21 p. 11

By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

San Pedro Retrieves Time Capsule Buried 25 Years Ago on a Day Filled with Meaning

T

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he burial and retrieval of time capsules is like sending a message in a bottle to your future self, should you forget how awesome or how terrible your present is. The Dec. 5 time capsule opening ceremony went quicker than most functions hosted by the Los Angeles City Council. That’s not a strike against the current Joe Buscaino administration. That’s just the nature of official gatherings in which there’s always a pecking order in who gets to speak and for how long. San Pedro’s remaining living treasures, a bit fewer than the ones who attended the dinner in honor of San Pedro’s 85-years-or-better club back in March, were lined up next to the dais—some of whom were involved in the original 1988 time capsule committee. I resolved to briefly interview at least a couple of the living treasures before the ceremony began, but I was at a loss for what I could possibly ask them to elicit a profound quote. Councilman Buscaino, wanting to do this year’s Christmas tree lighting big, went to the San Pedro Property Business Improvement District for $1,500 to add a couple of extras to this year’s event. The extras turned out to be a snow pile so that local kids could slide down in plastic tubs, with a few bales of hay to stop their momentum. Hot drinks and pastries were included. The minutes taken up by talking heads were kept to a bare minimum. The hole in which the capsule was buried 25 years ago at Peppertree Plaza, at the foot of 6th Street, had already been excavated and covered with wooden boards and a tarp. Serving as emcee of the event, former president of the San Pedro Chamber of Commerce Dennis Lord recalled the day San Pedro buried the time capsule as if it were yesterday. “...you’ll see photos of the ugliest looking hearse that you’ll ever see in your life,” he prefaced his recollection. He recounted watching an 8,000-pound mahogany hearse modeled from a 1938 La Salle chassis. One of Lord’s friends, who lived in Wilmington, owned the vehicle. The time capsule was hoisted onto the hearse while it was parked on Gaffey and 6th streets before proceeding slowly down 6th Street as if it were a New Orleans-style funeral procession—music and all. This went on until it reached the plaza next to the San Pedro City Hall building. Lord, 66, said he wasn’t sure he’d last 25 years to see the capsule dug up, but he was glad to see a number of friends that were present during the burial. Lord invited Gary Larson, the chairman of the original time capsule committee to speak. “I’m not even sure what’s in there anymore. The first thing to go is the mind. I can’t even remember what was planted in there,” Larson said, half jokingly. “It’ll be just as much of a surprise to me as it is to everyone else.”

December 13 - 26, 2013

Los Angeles City Councilman Joe Buscaino pulls out items from a 25year-old time capsule on Dec. 5 at Peppertree Plaza in San Pedro. Photo: Betty Guevara.

Time Capsule Unearthed/ to p. 61


HARBOR AREA

Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

Truckers Strike for Representation Draws Seattle, Atlantic Port Allies By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

“We are willing to do whatever it in order to get our union. Just let us form a union. It’s all we’re asking. And, stop bringing union busters to the company.” —Green Fleet Systems driver Mario Hernandez

December 13 - 26, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Once again, the holiday season is a prime time for labor activism. On Black Friday, Walmart workers and their supporters rallied at more than 1,500 locations nationwide, as Walmart added insult to injury by forcing thousands of workers to leave their families and work on Thanksgiving Day. The next Thursday, Dec. 4, saw the continued explosion of 1-day fast-food strikes spread to 130 cities. But before these two strikes, on Nov. 18, another low-wage sector was hit, as local port truckers staged a 36-hour unfair labor practices strike at three trucking companies serving the local ports—Green Fleet Systems, American Logistics International and Pacific 9 Transportation (Pac 9). It may not have been a nationwide strike, but joining them on the picket line were port truckers from as far away as Seattle, Savannah and New Jersey. Unlike the fast food and Walmart workers, millions of Americans don’t have a first-hand experience of these workers, but without them, there would be almost nothing under the nation’s Christmas trees on Christmas Day. Similarly, their struggle for dignity, a living wage and the right to organize has a powerful, if largely hidden, connection to working families all across America. The conditions they work under represent a floor that needs raising for everyone. “I start all this to have a voice...dignity and respect,” Green Fleet driver Mario Hernandez, 42, a port driver for 15 years, told Random Lengths, adding that he “just would like to have what the Toll drivers have,” referring to port truckers with Australianowned Toll Group, who signed a contract in January, the first U.S. port trucking contract in three decades. Beyond that, Hernandez said, “I see the longshoremen. I see them every day. I talk to them and they tell me how good the job they have. I say, ‘Why only they can get that and I cannot?’ And the reason is because they are union [workers] and I am not. That’s when it started to click for me…. If we work union it’s our best chance to have a decent living.” “The issues are very similar, even though the nominal employment structure of these three companies are different on paper,” said Nick Weiner, director of the Teamsters’ Justice for Port Drivers Campaign. “They’re in practice very much the same.” “Green Fleet has a mix of employee drivers and independent contractors,” Weiner said. “American Logistics has all employee drivers, Pac 09 has all independent contractors, except, even the employee 2

Green Fleet trucker and labor organizer, Mario Hernandez on the picket line. Photo: Betty Guevara.

drivers are paid by the load, so in that sense, the issues are very similar.” Besides low and irregular, unpredictable pay, conditions include wage theft, poor working conditions, unfair labor practices—harassment, intimidation, etc.—and poor or no benefits, even though Green Fleet, for one, likes to tout itself as providing “full” medical coverage. In practice, Hernandez explained, it’s another matter entirely. One of his driver friends had a chest pain, went for a checkup and ended up with a $3,000 bill. “He went just for a checkup,” Hernandez said. “Now he has to pay $3,000…. That’s when he wake up and say ‘wait a minute... I’m going to support to hav[ing] a union.’” Alex Cherin, a spokesman for the companies,

failed to return repeated phone calls from Random Lengths for this story. In other media reports, he claimed that “the overwhelming majority of our drivers” opposed the organizing effort. But Hernandez described conditions of intimidation and harassment which undercut the picture Cherin paints. “Some of my coworkers are afraid of losing their job,” Hernandez said. “The owner of Green Fleet, he likes to control everything and they’re afraid of the situation…. Some of them told me, ‘I really want a union, but I’m afraid. I cannot come out of the shadows.’ And that’s really sad, when they tell me that.” It’s a mindset Hernandez himself once shared. “I was afraid, too,” he said. “I do not want to lie to you. I was afraid at the beginning of

doing this, because, I think it’s mainly that we need more information about the rights we have in this beautiful country and our people doesn’t know that much about it.” The intimidation is further reflected in unfair labor practice complaints that have been filed with the National Labor Relations Board against American Logistics in March (“interfered with, restrained, and coerced its employees”), Green Fleet in October (“coerced...by engaging in unlawful surveillance...retaliated against employees for their union support and activity”), and Pac 9 in November (“retaliated...threatened with discharge... restrained and coerced”). These, in turn, are a continuation of the underlying exploitation, as Weiner described it. “Pac-9 drivers and Green Fleet drivers that are misclassified have filed wage and hours claims with the California Labor Commissioner, and a couple of the Green Fleet drivers had rulings in their favor by the CLC already a few months ago, and there’s a number in the hopper,” Weiner told Random Lengths. More specifically, four cases were settled for a total of $280,882, and six more cases have yet to be heard. At Pac 9, the stakes are much higher. There are 53 claims pending for a total claim of $8,025,553.53, according to information provided by the union. The average claim per month is $5,246, and the average length of claims is 30 months. A crucial aspect of these claims is the issue of unlawful wage deductions which are prohibited by California labor law. At the heart of the ruling in Jose Alejandro Talavera vs. Green Fleet this past February, hearing officer Alonso Silva wrote, “Employers may not lawfully avoid the legal obligations by labeling their workers as independent contractors while treating them as employees, as defendant did.” The case is typical of the entire industry nationwide, said Paul Marvy, one of the coTruckers’ Strike Rallies Allies/ to p. 7

New Director Takes the Helm at LAMI Sandy Smith, Contributing Writer

Captain Bruce Heyman will Heyman has taken over as replace Martyn Clark the next executive director who served as interim of the Los Angeles director for the past year. Maritime Institute, He comes to LAMI from LAMI, the nonprofit that the Maritime Museum operates the Top Sail of San Diego. Youth Program aboard “Bruce will bring the twin brigantines, leadership and creativity Irving Johnson and Exy to our educational Johnson. programs and The Los Angeles community at large,” Maritime Institute and LAMI Board Chairman its tall ships serve as the Eric Johnson said. Official Tall Ships and “He has the breadth Maritime Ambassadors of of perspective to lead the City of Los Angeles. LAMI into the future.” Captain Bruce Heyman is the new executive LAMI’s award-winning director of LAMI. File photo. Founder James Top Sail youth program, Gladson, who was later which just celebrated its 25th year, is a character- joined by Captain Alice Robinson, previously ran building sail-training program that teaches the LAMI and helped it grow from its grass-roots skills required to sail a large sailing vessel; team- beginnings into an award-winning nonprofit. building, problem solving and leadership. As the organization grew, it became clear that

an experienced executive was needed to carry LAMI to the next level. Martyn Clark was named the first executive director. Heyman brings a lifetime of experience and love of sailing ships to LAMI. As a vice president at Motorola, he managed large teams of engineers, and supervised marketing and manufacturing. Since retiring from Motorola, he has been able to combine his experience with his passion for the sea. At the Maritime Museum in San Diego, he was the project manager for the construction of the San Salvador, the historically accurate reproduction of the ship that Cabrillo sailed in the mid-1500s. He also expanded the organization’s volunteer corps by a factor of five. Heyman has a USCG Captain’s license. “Once you see the magic that occurs when kids take these magnificent tall ships to sea, it becomes infectious,” said Heyman. “We’re going to focus on increasing our reach to ensure more youth experience the magic of sail training, and are equipped with the skills needed to succeed in life.”


Community Announcements:

Harbor Area Harbor Community Clinic’s Holiday Toy Drive

Harbor Community Clinic is hosting its second Holiday Toy Drive this winter to provide its pediatric patients with gifts for the holiday season. Toy donations will directly impact under-privileged youth served by the community center. Donations of new unwrapped toys may be dropped at center’s two clinic locations in San Pedro during business hours until Dec.13. Toys will be distributed to youth in late December. Gifts for all age groups, babies through teens, are appreciated. Appropriate gifts might include books, games, action figures, dolls, coloring books and crayons, craft supplies, sports equipment, costume jewelry, puzzles, Lego sets, plush toys, or baby blankets. Donation times are from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Details: cchaffin@thehcc.net Venues: Adult Clinic, Pediatric Clinic Locations: 593 W. 6th St., 731 S. Beacon St., San Pedro

Santa Speedo Run

Participate in the first Santa Speedo Run to Benefit The Center and AIDS Food Store, at 12 p.m. Dec. 14, starting at Hamburger Mary’s in Long Beach. ’Tis the season you don your red swimwear. The Santa Speedo Run is a short 1.5 run through Long Beach. Registration is $25. Details: www.facebook.com/LBCSSantaSpeedoRun Venue: Hamburger Mary’s Location: 330 Pine Ave., Long Beach

campaign finance, matching funds, electioneering and political signs. To be eligible for an elective office in Long Beach, a person must be a legally registered voter and resident of city at least 30 days immediately preceding the last day (January 10, 2014) upon which candidates are permitted to file nominating petitions for office with the Long Beach City Clerk. The City Clerk Department invites all interested parties to attend. If the potential candidate does not plan to attend then he/she must complete and issue the Authorization to Receive Candidate Nomination Documents Form (found at http://www.longbeach. gov/civica/filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=32860) to the city clerk staff at the candidate workshop for an authorized agent to receive the Candidate Handbook on your behalf. Details: (562) 570-7479; www.longbeach.gov/ cityclerk Venue: City Hall Location: 333 W. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

Christmas at The Center

Spend Christmas at The Center Long Beach, from 5 to 9 p.m. The Center is committed to ensuring everyone has a place to spend the holidays. Details: (562) 434-4455 Venue: The Center Location: 2017 E. 4th St., Long Beach

Holiday Toy, Food Drive

Harbor Interfaith is collecting unwrapped toys for children of all ages and gift cards for teenagers, Community Announcements/ to p. 5

Gun Buyback

Mayor Eric Garcetti announced that people will be able to turn in firearms—no questions asked—in exchange for up to $200 in Ralphs grocery cards, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 14, at park and ride lot in Wilmington. The amount exchanged per firearm will depend on its type—up to $200 for assault weapons as specified in the State of California and up to $100 for handguns, rifles, and shotguns. The Los Angeles Police Department Gun Unit will be on site to determine the types of firearms surrendered. Venue: South Los Angeles LAPD Harbor Area Park and Ride Parking Lot Location: 1300 W. Pacific Coast Highway, Wilmington

Dirty Birds Toy Give Away

Stop the Clot Walk

The National Blood Clot Alliance announced the first Walk to Stop the Clot for those who have suffered from and those who have been affected by blood clots and clotting disorders, starting at 8 a.m. Dec. 15 at the Shoreline Aquatic Park in Long Beach. Details: www.firstgiving.com/nbca/walk-to-stop-theclot-in-long-beach Venue: Shoreline Aquatic Park Location: 200 Aquarium Way

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Bring your child to the Dirty Birds Toy Give Away from 12 to 4 p.m. Dec. 15 at The Candy Shop in Carson. Venue: The Candy Shop Location: 1952 Gladwick, Carson

Candidate Workshop

A candidate orientation workshop take place, at 10 a.m. Dec. 16, at City Hall Council Chambers. Packets will be issued to potential candidates for city elective offices. The workshop will take about two hours and questions will be answered regarding

December 13 - 26, 2013

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Happy Harbor Area Holidays

From left to right, the annual holiday parade marched through downtown San Pedro; Santa visits Weymouth Corners on Candy Cane Lane and the Main Channel was all lit up for Christmas Afloat boat parade. Photos: Jessie Drezner.

New Districts, New Faces: Green Now Represents Carson in Area 5 By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

December 13 - 26, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Recently voters ousted veteran Lorraine Cervantes in favor of newcomer Lo Wanda Green on the Compton College Community District Board of Trustees. Cervantes represented the old Area 1 for many years. As redrawn under a recent court order, the district’s Area 5 includes a northern section of Carson.

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Green was endorsed by Compton’s popular young mayor, Aja Brown and many other local politicians. Green received 1,145 votes (49.78 percent of votes cast) compared to Cervantes, who received 875 votes (38.04 percent). A third candidate, Janet Melba Earl, received the remainder (280 votes, 12.17 percent). Redrawn areas 2 and 3 were also contested. In Area 2, teacher Leslie Irving won with 70.58 percent of the vote. In Area 3, Sonia Lopez, a staffer for state Sen. Holly Mitchell, won with 55.32 percent of the vote. Under the terms of a controversial voting rights lawsuit settled in 2011, the details of which are available on the district website, four areas were redrawn into five, and all five seats were contested in the Nov. 5 election. Three trustees—those elected in areas 1, 3, and 5—will serve four-year terms. The ones elected in areas 2 and 4 will serve out unexpired terms. Areas 2 and 4 will be up for election again in 2015, the others, in 2017. In two areas candidates ran unopposed. Andres Ramos, who served the old Area 3, now represents the new Area 1. Deborah Le Blanc continues to represent Area 4, which was changed little when the new districts were put in place. Compton Community College District Board meetings take place on the first Tuesday of each month at 1111 E. Artesia Blvd. in Compton.


Doug Haubert Seeks Re-election, Innovation

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area

By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

recognize the social and legal consequences of criminal behavior. The lessons consist of instruction on the criminal justice system and an analytical approach to solving studentacted hypotheticals involving drug use, gang involvement, theft, hate crimes, driving under the influence, truancy, graffiti and other issues. Prosecutors are some of the outside speakers who are invited to present their perspective on the day’s lesson and their role within the criminal justice system. The program culminates in a mock trial put on by the students. The third approach is rehabilitation. The city prosecutor’s office actively looks for people who want to leave a gang to help them out. The office, in partnership with the Long Beach Alliance of Ministers, Centro CHA and other community organizations, has created Operation Opt Out, where people who had been served on a gang injunction, who no longer are involved with gangs can be removed from the injunction. “By creating this pathway off of the injunction, in some family situations, we’ve created hope for turning around their life and we’ve given them an incentive to leave the gang,” he said. All of these programs came at a time when the city prosecutor’s office has had to do more with less, Haubert said. In the past five years the office has lost a third of its prosecutors. Five years ago, the office had 21 prosecutors, now it has 14 prosecutors handling about 14,000 cases per year — or, about 1,000 cases per prosecutor. “We do it because we believe that in the long run, the intervention efforts and the rehabilitation efforts will reduce crime,” he said. “One thing I didn’t expect was to have to deal with shrinking resources every single year.” The prosecutor has overcome those challenges by expanding the community service worker program, a diversion program where lowlevel, first-time offenders are diverted out of the court system and are allowed to do community service. Community service includes cleaning out trash, alley clean-up, tree planting and graffiti abatement. Upon completion of community service, no case gets filed in court. “That program has saved the city hundreds of thousands of dollars, both in not having to

from p. 3

Long Beach City Prosecutor Doug Haubert, left. File photo.

pursue the case, not having to spend the resources to take the cases to court, but also in helping the city clean up workers get far more completed,” he said. “This saves taxpayers probably a quarter of a million to a half a million dollars each year.” Haubert also started a volunteer prosecutor program, where lawyers volunteer in the office

from 9 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Please help us make the holiday special for these children, who otherwise would go without. They also need hams, instant scalloped or mashed potatoes, canned fruit, cake mix and frosting to complete the holiday food baskets. After the holidays, the pantry will be bare, so please consider donating peanut butter, canned tuna, canned soups, oatmeal, rice or canned beef stew. Details: (310) 831-0603, ext. 226 ; aherrera@ harborinterfaith.org Venue: Harbor Interfaith Location: 670 W. 9th St., San Pedro

Second Samoan Congregational Church Collects Winter Coats

The Second Samoan Congregational Church in Long Beach is collecting coats, backpacks, toiletries, sweaters, jackets, gloves, scarves, beanies and undergarments through Dec. 31. Details: (562) 628-9282 Venue: Second Samoan Congregational Church Location: 655 Cedar Ave., Long Beach

Haubert/ to p. 17

Labor411

The Local Publication You Actually Read December 13 - 26, 2013

The man tasked with overseeing the prosecution of all adult misdemeanors in Long Beach is looking to keep his job. “We have accomplished a lot in these threeand-a-half years, but there is more to do,” City Prosecutor Doug Haubert said. “That is why I’m seeking a second term.” Unlike the city attorney’s office which handles civil cases and represents the city, Doug Haubert’s office is in charge of prosecuting a range of criminal misdemeanors from battery, theft and vandalism to drug possession, cruelty to animals and code enforcement. Domestic violence cases are some of the most challenging his office handles, because they are emotionally charged. If re-elected, Haubert also may play a part in drafting a new ordinance on medical marijuana. “When the dust settles, California will have some type of regulatory device that allows cities in a controlled environment, to permit dispensaries,” he said. “And, I believe that is the way Long Beach will go, and when that happens, I will enforce the law at that point.” Haubert believes that the programs he has helped put together in his time in office have made a difference in the city. In his first term, his office has created a gang prevention strategy that includes an aggressive gang suppression program but also includes intervention programs “because we know that gang suppression by itself will never solve our problems,” he said. The strategy consists of three parts. The first part is suppression. The city targets active gang members and leaders, many of which are served an injunction, a court-issued restraining order prohibiting gang members from participating in certain activities. He said violent crime in the city has dropped 15 percent below 2012, so far in 2013. “The FBI’s Gang Threat Assessment says that 48 percent of all violent crime is gang related, so we have increased our gang prosecution effort,” Haubert wrote in an email. “We have increased prosecution of gang members 760 percent in just 4 years. We are seeing the fruits of that effort by enjoying our lowest year of violent crime ever.” The second part is intervention. Together with the Long Beach Unified School District, the prosecutor’s office created the Parent Accountability and Chronic Truancy, or PACT, Program. The program notifies parents when their children miss school. If the children miss 10 percent or more in the school year without any excuse, parents can be prosecuted. Parents aren’t prosecuted right away. Instead, parental meetings and interventions take place to make sure children attend school. So, charges against parents are rare, he said. “Attendance dramatically improves once we meet with the parents,” Haubert said. “So, the goal is not to prosecute any parents…In our first year, those who were referred to us by LBUSD had missed an average of 20 percent of their classes at time of referral. After our program, that average dropped to 6 percent. ” The city prosecutor’s office also participates in a program for fifth-grade students at Edison Elementary, a school in an at risk neighborhood. The program, called Project Legal Enrichment and Decision-Making, or LEAD, is a 20-week law-related class that aims to reduce the likelihood of the children joining gangs by helping them

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San Pedro Time Capsule Unearthed from p. 1

City Attorney Sues Bank of America

Los Angeles—On Dec. 6, City Attorney Mike Feuer filed a suit against Bank of America alleging discriminatory mortgage lending in minority communities. Feuer contends that that led to a wave of foreclosures that continued to diminish property tax revenues and increase the need for and costs of services. In the complaint the city attorney alleges that Bank of America, “…engaged in a continuous pattern and practice of mortgage discrimination in Los Angeles since at least 2004 by imposing different terms or conditions on a discriminatory and legally prohibited basis.” The suit came on the heels of two similar case filings against Citigroup and Wells Fargo Bank. Details: http://tinyurl.com/ CityAttorneyBankSuits

Sheriff’s Deputies Charged with Corruption, Civil Rights Abuses

December 13 - 26, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Los Angeles—On Dec. 9, five criminal cases that charge a total of 18 current or one-time deputy sheriffs of various ranks were unsealed as part of an FBI investigation into allegations of civil rights violations and corruption involving members of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. Four grand jury indictments and one criminal complaint allege crimes that include unjustified beatings of jail inmates and visitors at downtown Los Angeles jail facilities, unjustified detentions and a conspiracy to obstruct a federal investigation into misconduct at the Men’s Central Jail. On Dec. 9, FBI agents took into custody 16 of the 18 defendants named in four indictments and one criminal complaint. Most of the defendants were arrested at various LASD facilities. The five cases, which are part of an ongoing investigation, were unsealed Dec. 9. United States v. Brunsting and Branum, CR13573 Two deputy sheriffs—Bryan Brunsting and Jason Branum—are charged in a six-count indictment with civil rights violations and making false statements in reports. Brunsting, who was a training officer, is charged in relation to an incident in which an inmate allegedly was assaulted and suffered bodily injury. Both Brunsting and Branum are charged in another assault. Following the two incidents, the indictment alleges that Brunsting used deputies he was training to file reports that covered up the abuse.

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News Briefs /to p. 10

Lord adroitly transitioned to the business by thanking Larson for his years of service to the community before moving on to introduce Buscaino and the main event. Wasting no time, Buscaino got through all the expressions of gratitude for the presence of the community and the living treasures before jumping into the now uncovered hole in the ground, gleefully pulling items out from time capsule. Among the items retrieved: • A copy of MAD magazine and the 20th Anniversary edition of Circus magazine featuring the rock band Guns and Roses on its cover. • A photo of astronaut Dr. Anne Fisher • A trophy • Dana Middle School and San Pedro High School yearbooks • A video cassette tape labeled, “Education Problems 1/9/87” Twenty-five years ago, Joan Milke Flores was serving her third term as the District 15 councilwoman, acquiring the reputation of a tough and able legislator willing to take liberal positions of importance to her district despite being a Republican. And, Joe Buscaino was an 8th grader at Dana Middle School. Twenty-five years ago, the South African anti-apartheid divestment movement reached a critical mass that ultimately forced the apartheid regime to dismantle its whites-only rule. At this time, Nelson Mandela was transferred to Victor Verster Prison where he was confined in the relative comfort of a warder’s house with a personal cook from the dark, dank, tuberculosis ridden cell on Robben Island, where he had spent the previous 25 years doing hard labor. Twenty-five years ago, Marguerite Poindexter

Among the items retrieved from the time capsule on Dec. 5, was a photo collage created by Mary Star of the Sea High School students in 1988. Photo: Betty Guevara.

Lamont was a rising star in the Los Angeles Unified School District. She hadn’t yet taken over the principal-ship of George Washington Preparatory High School and built the proteacher reputation that would propel her on to the school board. Also, 25 years ago: • U.S. Vice President George H. W. Bush and CBS News anchor Dan Rather clashed over Bush’s role in the Iran-Contra scandal, during a contentious television interview. • Osama bin Laden founded al Qaeda. • George H.W. Bush became the first sitting vice president to get elected president of the United States in 152 years at that time. • The first prototype B-2 Spirit stealth bomber is revealed. • Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet lost a

Stay current with news, announcements and community events at http://tinyurl.com/rlnnews-announcements

national referendum to extend his rule for another 8 years. He relinquished power two years later. Of course, as of Dec. 5, 25 years later: • Dan Rather’s legacy was bookended with an asterisk following the discrediting of his reporting of President George W. Bush military service record, while the United States still carries the burden of Bush II’s presidency. • Osama bin Laden is dead, al Qaeda is not, and the scars of 9/11 still burn in the consciousness of all Americans. • The B-2 stealth bomber is still used, but drones have taken primacy in air supremacy. • And, Joe Buscaino is the city councilman of the District 15, presiding over the digging up of the old time capsule and the burial of a new one. • Lamont is dead and is remembered for her consistent opposition to former Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s attempted takeover of the LAUSD and charter schools. • Mandela, formerly labeled a terrorist is dead, and in process of being canonized as a patron saint of peace and freedom. I went on to ask a living treasure, in this instance, Mel Bobich, a stupid question anyway. “What piece of advice would you like to give to the future generation, 25 years from now?” I asked. It turned out his simple answer was also the best: “Be happy; laugh a lot; and don’t take yourself seriously,” he said.

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Truckers’ Strike Rallies Allies

from p. 2

authors of The Big Rig: Poverty, Pollution and the Misclassification of Truck Drivers at America’s Ports, the first and only comprehensive study of nationwide port trucking employment practices. “Our research has shown that port trucking companies control even the small details of how drivers work: what they wear, what they’re paid, when they can work,” Marvy told Random Lengths. “But they still call the drivers ‘contractors’ to avoid tax obligations, safety regulations,

another face to face, and got to stick around and walk the picket line, and demonstrate that support amongst port drivers were very enthusiastic about taking that back home,” Weiner said. While the organizing process is more advanced here in Los Angeles and Long Beach, Savannah has gone further in one respect, Weiner explained. “In Savannah, drivers in early June held a big forum, a big community forum with over 300 drivers from Port of

asking…And stop bringing union busters to the company.” In contrast, Cherin told the Press-Telegram that the strikes were “the desperate acts of a group trying to force their agenda on an industry that time and time again has simply rejected them.” “Yes, the industry has rejected drivers time and time again, fighting to keep them from improving their working conditions,” Marvy responded.

“Several companies right now have hired very expensive antiunion consultants to intimidate drivers into accepting the sharecropper arrangement that industry has imposed upon them.” Hernandez said that Green Fleet’s owner hired five unionbusters, and “put them in into the driver’s truck, you know, so they can drive with them, and convince them.” It’s not just intimidating, Hernandez says. “What he’s doing, it’s against the law, and he’s not supposed to do that because

that’s an unfair labor practice,” he said. One final argument the companies made came from a statement released by Green Fleet on the day of the strike. “Green Fleet is discouraged to learn that the organizations behind this strike are continuing to spend their members’ hardearned money to battle an issue that the U.S. Supreme Court has already decided is without merit,” the statement read. Significantly, none of the other media quoting the statement bothered to question

it. First, obviously, unions have repeatedly used membership dues to organize new workers. It’s part of their basic solidaritybuilding function to work on behalf of all workers, not just their own members, whereas dividing workers, one against the other, is the basic function of business. But secondly, the reference to the Supreme Court is “a red herring or really a nonsequitur,” Marvy pointed out, “meant to lump two unrelated talking points into a single Truckers/ to p. 17

Guards facing off against protesters a the Port of Oakland in October, 2013. File Photo.

December 13 - 26, 2013

Savannah with local elected officials moderated by a local TV news reporter. There were clergy leaders and [the] U.S. Department of Labor, labor regional assistant director [Larry Benjamin] was there, who deals with wage and hour issues.” Cauley was one of the drivers who told their stories at that forum. “I can’t afford to go to a doctor,” she told them. “I can’t afford the stuff I transport daily.” A local media report said, “[T]heir stories proved to be an extended revelation for many of the political, governmental, faith and civic leaders on the forum’s panel.” It concluded by reporting that Benjamin said he wanted to meet with truckers to develop some test cases that might allow truckers to challenge their misclassification. “It’s a sad story nationwide what’s going on with the truck drivers,” Hernandez said, reflecting on what he’d heard from the Savannah drivers. But he’s determined in his own activism. “We are willing to do whatever it takes in order to get our union,” he said. “Just let us form a union. It’s all we

The Local Publication You Actually Read

and workforce protections. The result is dangerous, poverty wage jobs that lack the respect these professionals deserve.” It’s the pervasiveness of the problem that’s kept port truckers down for three decades, but now that same pervasiveness is bringing them together. “We were able to bring in drivers from other cities to Los Angeles for a few days and before the strike held the first ever national port drivers summit,” Weiner told Random Lengths. “Drivers from Savannah Georgia, New Jersey and Seattle came to LA, got to meet LA drivers, meet one another, talk about their struggles which were very similar from port to port…. They understood they were in the same struggle and wanted to support one another and spend time with one another.” “The conditions that are faced by drivers here in the ports of LA and Long Beach are the same conditions we face at the port of Savannah,” said Carol Cauley, one of five drivers who attended from that port. “We get deductions for the costs of truck operations and receive no benefits from the companies we work for.” “It was helpful for them to get to spend time with one

7


And Now Let’s talk of Freedom And Justice By James Preston Allen, Publisher

December 13 - 26, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

In 1990, Nelson Mandela walked out of Robben Prison a free man and returned to his lifelong quest to end apartheid in South Africa forever as the leader of the African National Congress. It had been 35 years since the ANC voted on its “freedom charter,” which had been passed around in secret, hand-to-hand, during this time of repression—the first defiant demand, “The people shall govern!” In the ensuing collapse of the apartheid government and the writing of a new South African constitution, the black majority gained suffrage, but lost control of their economic future. Even while the former National Party leader F.W. de Klerk negotiated the terms to end apartheid with Mandela, there was an entirely different but parallel set of negotiations taking place in regards to “economic justice.” This fact, in the end the ANC’s failure to secure economic freedom to go along with the political freedom of black South Africans is never addressed in the ongoing analysis of Mandela’s life and legacy. This surely was one of those things considered in the peaceful transfer of power. Yet, before the ink was even dry on the new charter for freedom much of the economic capital of South Africa decamped. Most notably, De Beers Diamonds SA, the world’s largest diamond monopoly, moved its headquarters to Luxembourg for fear of having their assets nationalized. Today, some 40 percent of South Africa’s population live on a meager two dollars a day and has one of the largest gaps between rich and poor in the world. Naomi Klein in her book, The Shock Doctrine explains: “The ANC failed to protect itself against a far more insidious strategy–in essence, an elaborate insurance plan against the economic clauses in the Freedom Charter ever becoming law in South Africa. ‘The People shall govern!’ would soon become a reality, but the sphere over which they would govern was shrinking fast.” In other words they gained the right to vote, but lost legislative control over their economic future—or as might be understood lost on economic justice. The poor were free to continue to be poor. [For a much expanded understanding of this, see Klein’s Democracy Born In Chains, “Chapter 10— The Shock Doctrine,” 2007.]

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The chairman of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation commission Archbishop Desmond Tutu, summed it up best when he wrote in 2001: “Reconciliation means that those who have been on the underside of history must see that there is a qualitative difference between repression and freedom.…freedom translates into having a supply of clean water, having electricity...; being able to live in a decent home and have a good job; to be able to send your children to school and have accessible health care... what’s the point of having made this transition if the quality of life of these people is not enhanced and improved? If not, the vote is useless.” The lack of critical perspective by the world media on why the current president, Jacob Zuma, of South Africa was booed during his speech at Mandela’s memorial, is only overshadowed by our own lack of understanding of how this set of economic politics plays out in our own country. Yes, we too can elect a dynamic black leader to the presidency of our nation. But if the people don’t see a qualitative difference between their lives before and after, what does it matter if there are no good jobs, affordable education or health care? If the real politics of our nation are negotiated to appease Wall Street bankers and true economic reforms never trickle down to Main Street America, does the vote really matter? There continues to be an aversion to the discussion of “class” in America as it relates to economic justice, as we continue to see a flat line in the real incomes of the diminishing middle class of this country. The issues of race still continue to mask from our public discussion of the core prejudice in America—that of class discrimination—and the inherent inequity of a our capitalist system, where the top one percent now owns more than half of our national wealth. This, while the banks that caused our national financial crisis foreclosed on millions of our citizens and then realized that they could profit from buying them up at bargain prices and renting them back to a population that is starved for rental housing. The next crisis on the horizon is the rising cost of rental housing and Wall Street bankers’ have financialized this market without ever having to take responsibility for creating the last one. Freedom without justice, provides us with neither. Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIV : No. 25

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communities of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

Assoc. Publisher/Production Coordinator Suzanne Matsumiya info@graphictouchdesigns.com Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks editor@randomlengthsnews.com Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila zamna@randomlengthsnews.com

The Meaning of Mandela By Douglas Foster, Agence Global

To fully grasp the meaning of Nelson Mandela’s death, at the age of 95, imagine for a moment that his life had turned out differently. What if he’d perished as a child, like so many youngsters of his generation in the rural backwaters of the Transkei? Think of what might have happened, or not happened, if he’d died in the mines of the City of Gold, Johannesburg, where he arrived as a young man after running away from his village. Of course, he survived not only the privations of apartheid—that savage and extreme system of racial segregation—but also the long liberation struggle as well. Should it go without saying that Mandela was not shot in the back, like demonstrators at Sharpeville in 1960, or gunned down in the streets like young protestors in Soweto during the June 16 uprising in 1976? Though he believed in armed struggle and became a leader of an armed guerrilla insurrection, he escaped the fates of so many other comrades who were killed in the bush, blown to pieces by letter bombs sent by the authorities, poisoned by secret agents or hanged for treason or sabotage, which seemed the likely result when sentence was pronounced for him and other top leaders of the African National Congress, after a long trial back in 1964. Rolihlahla Dalibhunga Mandela was spared the death penalty a half-century ago. He wasn’t forced into exile, like so many others, and did not lose his sanity or have his spirit broken from decades of imprisonment. He managed to survive tuberculosis and prostate cancer, outliving nearly all of the closest friends of his generation. Though it was once illegal to publish his photograph or quote him by name in South

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Africa, his image was picked as the rallying symbol of a global campaign against apartheid in a massive international organizing drive much like the effort to end slavery a century earlier. It was only natural then, and just, that when Mandela emerged from prison in 1990, he felt such a powerful sense of obligation to the fallen. It would be a shame if, in celebrating the remarkable arc of his life, we neglected to mention millions of others not lucky enough to become—like him—exceptions to old rules. Mandela outlived not only his contemporaries but also three of his six children. He survived long enough to witness the first stages of revisionist histories written about his life and politics. This meant having to face up honestly to the myriad ways in which the grand early hopes for radical transformation ran aground. After all, in April of 1994, when democracy arrived in South Africa, advanced global capitalism and AIDS also swept in the door. This meant that structurally high rates of unemployment and rising inequality coincided with massive loss of life from the pandemic which, in turn, conspired against the aerie dream of establishing a nonracial, antisexist, nonhomophobic and more egalitarian society at the southern tip of Africa. Time has exposed Mandela’s own failings. In office, he failed to respond to the rise of HIV/ AIDS. He protected cronies accused of corruption and failed to enforce distinctions between personal favors, party business and government decision-making. His dedication towards the governing party, the African National Congress, meant that he subjected himself to the policies Mandela/ to p. 10 Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #0891-6627). All contents Copyright 2013 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.


RANDOMLetters Andy Foster is Unsafe for California

A Few Ideas that May Help Improve City Traffic Issues

“Let’s stop punishing the poor”, declares the latest edition of Random Lengths News. Who would resist this call? Poverty is a curse, yet the causes remain all too elusive. To blame Republicans and corporations alone will not end poverty. Liberals, for example, argue for a higher minimum wage because many fast-food and entrylevel employees live off food stamps just to survive from month to month. This argument justifies ending the supplemental nutrition assistance program. Besides, wellbodies men and women are taking food stamps even as the economy improves (however slightly). The better question remains: How best to end poverty? Progressives argue that more government spending, greater redistribution of wealth, and a concentrated power structure of the few intelligent elites looking out for the best interests of everyone else will transform the growing masses of poor and struggling into health and wealth. Here are the reforms which will impoverish poverty in our country: 1. Expand school choice for all Americans. The greatest asset for upward mobility in a free society is a free education which our youth can freely choose: free from the recriminations of employee unions,

to college without having to take out a loan? The real question about punishing the poor also includes holding down the middle class. A recent study showed that the top 1 percent of the of our population, owns more that 40 percent of the wealth. Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz points out the richest one percent of Americans now owns 40 percent of the nation’s wealth. This disparity is much worse than it was in the past, as just 25 years ago, the top 1 percent owned 33 percent of national wealth. How much does the bottom 80 percent own? Only 7 percent. This disparity of ownership in a country that

believes in equality and justice will, in the end, sabotage our democracy, corrupt both business and government and, in the end, will destroy the American dream. James Preston Allen, Publisher

Stand For Struggling Families

Across the country, tens of millions of American families struggle to put food on the table every day. We as a nation, have chosen to combat hunger for decades with the food stamp program, now known as SNAP. In the communities I represent alone, 145,000 people rely on the SNAP program to eat. Over

half of them are children. During difficult economic times, we ought to be doing more to help our struggling families, not less. Yet, the budget put forward by the House of Representatives aims to cut SNAP funding by 18 percent, threatening the livelihood of millions of American families. We cannot let this happen. This week, I am asking my colleagues to join me on my letter to budget conferees, Congressman Paul Ryan and Senator Patty Murray, urging them to fund the SNAP program at the higher level designated in the Senate budget. Rep. Janice Hahn Member of Congress, 44th District

December 13 - 26, 2013

San Pedro might consider enacting the pedestrians’ decoy tactic that Glendale police started to catch drivers failing to stop at crosswalks. This program was successful and violators paid stiff fines, which also helped generate revenue needed by the city. LAPD and CHP could make a more visible presence on Gaffey, starting on 9th to 1st streets to enforce speed

How to Stop “Punishing the Poor”

unshackled form the demands of educational bureaucracies 2. Enact Wisconsin’s reforms of public sector unions’ collective bargaining privileges. Every employee has a right to representation, but the power and influence of public sector unions in the state of California have bankrupted the state, forcing today’s legislators to borrow from tomorrow’s children to pay yesterday’s workers. 3. Remove restrictions on fracking and oil-drilling. Energy prices are outrageously high in this country, and specifically in the state of California. Why should working-class Americans have to pay so heavy a price to drive to and from work? The Board of Equalization just raised the gas tax. How is this equity for all Californians? 4. Promote a flat sales tax in place of the state income tax. No one should be punished for making money. Small businesses create most of the jobs in our country, yet rising income tax rates, along with regulations which enrich government workers at the expense of the companies, are hurting profits and preventing meaningful job creation. The standard for ending poverty must be more than getting people off of welfare, but making sure that they can pursue happiness, with respect to their life and liberty. Equality of opportunity, not results, must be the standard for ending poverty in our country, and in our state. Arthur Christopher Schaper Torrance Dear Arthur, Let’s stop bullshitting! When you talk about a free education you are not talking about free of expense as in a free college education. You want to give publiclyfunded vouchers to anyone to pay for a private education, where in upper class families can evacuate public schools. And, oh yes, freedom in your Ayn Rand land means, freedom from unions, freedom from a living wage and freedom from a gradated indexed tax system. The flat tax philosophy is a bit like the flat world concept; it looks good on paper but it’s not the way of the real economy. The flat tax idea sounds fair but in reality it’s just the opposite. Think about it. Say the flat tax is 10 percent. The person who makes $30,000 a year pays $3,000, and the person who makes a million pays $100,000, is the $3,000 of greater importance to the $30,000-worker than the $100,000 is to the millionare? The latter has $900,000 left to live on and the other only $27,000, which one is going to send their children

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Andy Foster is an experienced multi-disciplined fighter who has trained in Mixed Martial Arts since 1997. He is trained in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Taekwondo, Aikido, Judo, Hapkido,Muay Thai, Jeet Kune Do, Sambo, Kickboxing, and Boxing. Foster holds a MMA record of 17-2 (8-0 Amateur and 9-2 Professional—Pro- 2 KOs, 7 Submissions, 1 TKO, 1 Decision). [1] He has a 23-3 Amateur Boxing record; 77-4-2 Sport Grappling record; and 1-2 Amateur Kickboxing record. This guy has trained in Muay Thai, MMA, Taekwondo and Kickboxing, but allows Muay Thai kids as young as five-years-old to strike the head. Also Tae Kwon Do/Karate fighters to kick the head with flying heel kicks and he says this sport is light contact and no need of CSAC regulation. He only requires pro MMA fighters and pro boxers to get brain scanned. For their safety. Pro kickboxers are not required to get brain scanns for their safety. They not only punch the head, they kick the head also. Way more damaging to the head. Amateur kickboxers also do not get brain scanned. Amateur MMA fighters do not get scanned. They kick, punch, knee, elbow just as hard as a pro MMA fighter and fight more times a year than a pro MMA fighter. They also are subject to more knockouts than a pro MMA fighter. He should know this is dangerous to continue. The worst thing he has ever done was put a cease and desist on Kids Pankration where no head strikes are allowed and all competitors wear protective gear. This cease and desist has been on Pankration since July 2013. He is allowing Muay Thai kids as young as 5 years old (November 9th in Sacramento) to continue, where they strike the head. Watch this video. This is a typical Muay Thai/Kickboxing Knockout and our state does not require a brain scan after the knockout. This is why a Draka Kickboxer died in California at the Inglewood Forum. http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=DYpDWCa-wtc Greed before safety in California. This is what happens when you put an ex-fighter in charge of the CSAC. Greg Patschull San Pedro

limits and watch for cars failing to respect pedestrians crossing. More LAPD motorcycle officers could make a visible presence to help clean up these traffic issues. This would send the message that Gaffey is not a racetrack or freefor-all drag strip. San Pedro needs to take the ongoing traffic issues seriously and start getting tougher and aggressive on catching violators speeding, running stop signs, failing to respect pedestrians crossing intersections, drivers’ illegal cell phone usage, texting, etc. Pedestrians always have the right away on the street, crosswalks, etc. But common sense must be practiced when pedestrians are crossing streets and not do anything risky to cause a motorist to have an accident and get themselves injured or killed. Failure to yield right of way to pedestrians in a crosswalk is a costly and serious moving violation in CA. for drivers who don’t obey the law. It is apparent that some drivers do not have an empathetic nature nor regard pedestrian’s safety in the crosswalk as a priority in San Pedro. Steven G. Bartels San Pedro

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Mandela

from p. 9 from p. 6

December 13 - 26, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

United States v. Gonzalez, et al., CR13-574 This indictment charges a sergeant and four deputies with civil rights violations that allege they arrested or detained five victims, including the Austrian consul general, when they arrived to visit inmates at the Men’s Central Jail in 2010 and ‘11. The lead defendant in this indictment—Sgt. Eric Gonzalez, who was a supervisor in the jail visiting center, but no longer works for LASD—fostered an atmosphere “that encouraged and tolerated abuses of the law, including through the use of unjustified force and unreasonable searches and seizures by deputy sheriffs he supervised,” the indictment states. Each of the four deputies—Sussie Ayala, Fernando Luviano, Pantamitr Zunggeemoge and Noel Womack—is charged with participating in at least one of the four incidents in which victims allegedly suffered civil rights violations. In one incident, a man suffered a broken arm and a dislocated shoulder that has left him permanently disabled. United States v. Thompson, et al., CR13-819 This six-count indictment that alleges a broad conspiracy to obstruct justice charges seven sworn members of the LASD. This case developed when deputies assigned to the Men’s Central Jail—including Lt. Gregory Thompson, who oversaw LASD’s Operation Safe Jails Program and Lt. Stephen Leavins, who was assigned to the LASD’s Internal Criminal Investigations Bureau— learned that an inmate was an FBI informant and was acting as a cooperator in the FBI’s corruption and civil rights investigation. After learning that the inmate received a cellular phone from a deputy sheriff who took a bribe and that the inmate was part of a civil rights investigation, those allegedly involved in the obstruction scheme took affirmative steps to hide the cooperator from the FBI and the U.S. Marshals Service. As part of the conspiracy, the deputies allegedly altered records to make it appear that the cooperator had been released. Within the course of several weeks, the deputy sheriffs allegedly also attempted to obtain an order from a Los Angeles Superior Court judge that would have compelled the FBI to turn over information about its investigation to LASD. United States v. Piquette, CR13-821 Deputy Richard Piquette is charged in the fourth indictment with illegally building and possessing an assault rifle. The indictment charges Piquette with possessing an unregistered Noveske Rifleworks N-4 .223 caliber rifle with a barrel length of less than 16 inches. The second count in the indictment charges Piquette with manufacturing the Noveske rifle. Piquette, who is currently on leave with LASD, was previously assigned to the Twin Towers Correctional Facility. The investigation in this case was conducted by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. United States v. Khounthavong, et al., 133105M The fifth case unsealed is a criminal complaint that charges three LASD deputies, all of whom are brothers, with conspiracy to make false statements to two banks in connection with a “buy-and-bail” mortgage fraud scheme. The complaint alleges that the three deputies—Billy Khounthavong, Benny Khounthavong, and Johnny Khounthavong— made false statements and reports to Flagstar Bank to purchase a 3,900-squarefoot residence in Corona. The brothers then made additional false statements and reports to Bank of America in relation to another large residence they owned. As a result of the scheme, the brothers allegedly avoided more than $340,000 of unpaid mortgage debt. Benny Khounthavong and Johnny Khounthavong are assigned to LASD jail 10 facilities.

of its “collective leadership” and, after stepping down as president in 1999, supported two flawed successors during election campaigns, tarnishing his own image in the process. In the past decade, quarrels with old comrades also spilled wince-

worthy details of dodgy financial arrangements into public view. There were even lawsuits within the family over money. Even here, though, there was a kind of backhanded tribute: These facts emerged eventually into public view. That, too, was part of Mandela’s legacy, because in spite of a deep reservoir of popular affection for Utata, or Madiba, as he’s known, he and the party never allowed the trappings of the kind of cult of personality upon which so many other liberation struggles in Africa and elsewhere have foundered.Mandela’s personal troubles, like the failures of his party, were part of the public record revealed by a free press. Nineteen years into the South African democratic experiment, there’s a vibrant civic culture that exploded to great effect in protests over the government’s former AIDS policies, an independent, if quite pressurized, judiciary and an impressive, if embattled, media. Mandela’s way of dying also embodied an important lesson, almost as if he intended to

carefully stage his own departure. Eight years ago, he’d begun plotting a long, slow fadeaway from public life. In 2005, he regularly told advisers they should plan more openly for his demise. “Everybody dies,” he began to say repeatedly. In his impish, soft-spoken, teasing way, Mandela did his best to take the sting out. After he stepped down as president in 1999, rumors periodically circulated that he was dead, or dying, and then these rumors led to stockpiling of goods and fear-mongering, particularly among right-wing whites, about incipient violence. By 2013, these were the views of a vanishing few. In 2007, he reinforced the message about his own mortality at a celebration I witnessed of his grandson’s decision to accept the post as Nkosi, or head man, of Mvezo, Mandela’s birthplace. As he struggled to be heard above a howling wind, Mandela said: “Now, I can die in peace.” There was a visible charge that ran through the family and villagers when he said this, but in the intervening years people have come to grudgingly accept the idea that a man in his mid-90s might be ready to fold up his tent. The last time I saw Mandela at his home was after the World Cup three years ago. He greeted my son and me with a well-worn line: “It’s nice that young people still come around to see an old man even though he has nothing new to say.” He loved little jokes, but here the pat phrase revealed a deeper intention, I think, to signal that it was time for young South Africans to step up and take the revolution he’d begun much further. More than half of the South Africa’s population is under 25, which means that young people grew up entirely in the new dispensation. For them, Nelson Mandela was always a grandfatherly figure; after all, he was 72-years-old by the time he was released from prison. As it turned out, this was a subject often on the mind of Mandela’s grandson, who’d taken us to see his grandfather. “Here was a man who came from nothing,” Ndaba Mandela said. “He was a young boy running around on the farms of Xhosaland, and he became something he himself never imagined!” Now, the grandson added, it was time for the next generation to stop relying so heavily on his grandfather’s generation. He thought young South Africans needed to more forcefully tackle the demands of the poor, liberated in terms of political rights by the election of 1994, but still denied economic and social justice in a still savagely unequal society. “We are the ones who created the system,” the younger Mandela said. “The system should not create us. Ultimately, we are in a battle with ourselves.” The elder Mandela had done his best over the years to prepare South Africans for the next stage in the struggle to create a new nation. Now, it was part of his legacy that so many of his countrymen had grown tired, even angry, at being asked whether the dream of establishing a new kind of society would outlive him. Of course, the vision of creating a new kind of nation was always bigger than a single leader. To presume that he was a singular linchpin, whose exceptional qualities alone were responsible for the “miracle” transition to democracy in South Africa during the 1990s, was not only magical realist thinking, but also profoundly ahistorical and even racist. It was perhaps his most enduring gift that this question, asked ritualistically by outsiders, should sound so silly, so wide of the mark, on the day he died. In the end, there was a period but no question mark. Would the dream survive? The answer: It already had.

Douglas Foster is author of After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post Apartheid South Africa and associate professor at the Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University.


By John Farrell, Curtain Call Writer

I

Photo by Terelle Jerricks.

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment ACE • Art, Cuisine, & Entertainment

t takes guts to present Shakespeare’s Hamlet, a play that is both a daunting challenge and one of the finest works in the English language. It takes even more courage to present it as your first local performance. TE San Pedro Rep, the new theater company on 7th Street took on that challenge. Hamlet is the first play they have presented in San Pedro since moving to the community a few months back. They have made a credible success of it in their small, but effective theater just across the alley from the Little Fish Theatre. (On Friday night both theaters were open for business: a good sign for the local community.) TE San Pedro Rep (the “TE” stands for Theatrum Elysium, the company’s first name when they played in La Crescenta) has turned a former doctor’s office on 7th Street into a playing space. The theater company got rid of most of the insides of their building and turned the front half of the building into a spare theatrical room with benches for seats and curtains on three walls that have various entrances for the actors. This is Shakespeare up just about as close as you can get. The actor playing Polonious sat down with the audience and addressed one member directly. Ophelia in her mad scene, plucked imaginary flowers and offered them directly to audience members. Hamlet is dependent on the actors playing the melancholy Dane. In this case Aaron Ganz, the company founder and artistic director, has the right look for the piece. His face seems designed for melancholy. He speaks with a deep resonance and slowly comes to terms with his fate: He must avenge his father. Martin Jago, a Shakespearean expert, directed this production and cut it down (as it is almost always is cut) from its published length to three hours. Unless you find sitting on a bench for a long time uncomfortable, you will not notice the time passing. The cast doubles in some roles, but you won’t mind. Gugun Deep Singh plays Polonius with a depth and richness that is electrifying and he doubles as the Gravedigger, the one comic role in the play with a remarkable change of character. Chris Lang is Claudius. He plays him with a welcoming and refreshing tone at first, until he recognizes that Hamlet wants to kill him because Hamlet knows Claudius killed his brother, Hamlet’s father. Liz Besnak-Arata is Gertrude, Hamlet’s mother now married to Claudius: she seems innocent, showing none Hamlet Continued on page 16.

December 13 – 26, 2013 December 13 – 26, 2013

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Gaucho Grill Plays Central Role In Long Beach A

By: Katrina Guevara, Contributing Writer

Independent And Free.

quick web search shows Gaucho Grill Manager, Gonzalo Miorin, has a point about the lack of Argentinean places in Long Beach. Gaucho Grill is the only restaurant listed on Yelp and Urban Spoon, among other online food directories. “I don’t really know any other places in the

area to try Argentinean food,” Miorin said. For those unfamiliar with the Latin American nation’s foods, Argentina is known for one thing Miorin said. “[It’s] all about the meat,” said Miorin. “We have really good steaks.” The most popular food in Argentina is the asado, which is a type of seared meat or barbecue. Miorin has worked at the Long Beach branch since it opened in 2010. There used to be more branches. “Now there are two Gaucho Grills left with the older branch in Brentwood,” said Miorin. Adrian Amosa opened Gaucho Grill with his wife in Long Beach in 2012. He also decorated the place to have the feel of a restaurant in Argentina’s capital Buenos Aires. Seven barrel halves on the brick wall tower over the full bar. Cowhide rugs frame the cement walls. The chandeliers reflect the wooden tables. Newly settled garden plants stand outside. The

December 13 – 26, 2013

Goucho Grill Continued on page 16.

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ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

December 13 – 26, 2013

13


Entertainment December 13

Frank Unzueta Trio The Frank Unzueta Trio performs, at 8 p.m. Dec. 13, at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro Because It’s Christmas The South Coast Chorale, Long Beach’s LGBTQaffirming choir, will celebrate the holidays in style, at 8 p.m. Dec. 13, at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Long Beach. Details: http://sccsingers.com/ Venue: St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Location: 525 E. 7th St. Long Beach

December 14

Jim Kimo West Jim Kimo West performs, at 8 p.m. Dec. 14, at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro Handel’s Messiah Rolling Hills United Methodist Church presents Handel’s Messiah, starting at 7 p.m. Dec. 14. Tickets are $10. Details: (310) 377-6771; www.RHUMC.org/ MusicConcerts.asp Venue: Rolling Hills United Methodist Church Location: 26438 Crenshaw Blvd., Rolling Hills Estates

December 15

David Garfield David Garfield presents “Calamari,” at 4 p.m. Dec. 15, at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

December 21

Independent And Free.

The Long Run The Long Run performs, at 5 and 8 p.m. Dec. 21, at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro Varese Sarabande 35th Anniversary Holiday Gala Beginning at 8 p.m. Dec. 21, the Golden State Pops Orchestra and Chorale, with Maestro Steven Allen Fox, artistic director, will stage the “Varese Sarabande 35th Anniversary Holiday Gala,” a festive evening celebrating holiday film favorites, at the Warner Grand Theatre in San Pedro. Details: www.gspo.com Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

December 22

Led Zepagain Led Zepagain performs, at 4 p.m. Dec. 22, at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

Community/Family

December 13 – 26, 2013

December 13

14

It’s Snow Much Fun Enjoy District 5’s Winter Wonderland at Good Neighbor Park, from 5 p.m. Dec. 13 through 8 p.m. Dec. 14, complete with real snow, snow sleds, holiday contests, live music and visits from Santa Claus and The Grinch. The event will highlight the tree lighting, play in the snow, and a visit by Santa Claus, a gingerbread house decorating contest and an ugly holiday sweater contest and snow for all-day sledding. Details: (562) 570-6932; district5@longbeach. gov Venue: Good Neighbor Park Location: 2800 Studebaker Rd., Long Beach 12 Days of Craftmas: Flower Pencil Wrap The 12 Days of Craftmas will be hosting another workshop, from 1 to 3 p.m. Dec. 13, at Crafted. The workshop will be focusing on how to make flower pencil wraps. The event will take place in Calendar continued on page 15.

Big Nick’s Pizza

Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800 Boardwalk Grill

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551 Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also offers classic Italian dishes and sauces based on tried-and-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com Iron City Tavern

Iron City features a newly renovated dining room and wonderfully restored bar in a modern setting. The most comfortable gastropub in San Pedro, Iron City offers casual dining for lunch and dinner with food service at the bar. Catch all sporting events on seven 50” screens in surround sound and listen to your favorite tunes on our internet jukebox. (Iron City is a supporter of the Black & Gold.) Iron City features authentic Philly cheese steaks, various hot sandwiches and burgers, calamari steaks and a variety of Italian pasta dishes. Hours:10:30 a.m.-2a.m. 7 days a week. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. featuring 1/2 priced appetizers and drink specials. Free parking in rear. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4766

Lighthouse Cafe

The favorite local cafe for the point Fermin area of San Pedro great breakfasts, lunches and even dinner. Serving traditional offering for breakfast along with specialty omelets, espresso and cappuccino. Lunches include a delicious selection of soups, salads, burgers and sandwiches with hearty portions as well as Chef’s Creations. Dinners feature Top Sirloin Steak or Prime Rib as well as a kids menu. Beer and wine are served. Free Wifi and is pet friendly on the patio. Open 7 days a week 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. close to Cabrillo Beach and the Korean Bell, Point Fermin area- 508 West 39th St., San Pedro. 310- 548- 3354 Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash, soups and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crépes and pastas. Take a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING S i n c e 1 9 61 we’ve extended a hearty welcome to visitors from every corner of the globe. Delight in an aweinspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the Award-Winning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www. Portsocalldining.com San Pedro Brewing Company A microbrewery and American grill, SPBC features hand-crafted award-winning ales and lagers served with creative pastas, bbq, sandwiches, salads and burgers. A full bar with made-from-scratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Live music on Saturdays. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 • www. sanpedrobrewing.com

SPIRIT CRUISES An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 548-8080, (562) 495-5884 • www.spiritmarine.com Trusela’s

Bob and Josephine Trusela invite you to eat, drink and relax in their welcoming and intimate dining room. Whether it’s fo r a ro m a n t i c dinner for two or a Sunday night family feast, Trusela’s serves Southern Italian inspired and California cuisines made with hand selected, fresh and seasonal ingredients. Trusela’s offers an extensive wine and imported beer selection. Catering and banquets from elegant to casual for all occasions. Reservations recommended. Call for holiday catering (310) 547-0993, www.truselas.com.

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfortable dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, meat pies, salmon, swordfish & vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.-midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 8320363 • www.whaleandale.com

Keep An Eye Out for San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure

To Advertise in Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.


Calendar from page 14. the creation station. A small fee may apply. Details: (310) 732-1270; www.craftedportla.com Venue: Crafted, Port of Los Angeles, Warehouse 10 Location: 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

December 14

Somberton Senior Residence Presents The Nutcracker: Still the Best Third Time Around By John Farrell, Curtain Call Writer

I

Gyotaku Cabrillo Marine Aquarium staff will offer a holiday workshop to teach participants Gyotaku, the ancient art of Japanese fish printing, from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Dec. 14, in the marine laboratory. The lab will double as an artist’s studio where beginners and experienced fish printers can create one of a kind holiday gifts. After a brief introduction to this Japanese art form, participants will select from a variety of local fish, paints and brushes that will be provided in class. Participants may bring: t-shirts, aprons, towels, pillow cases or specialty papers they wish to print on to create gifts for themselves or others. This workshop is limited to participants 10 years of age and older. The workshop fee is $18 ($16 Friends member) per person. Pre-registration is required as space is limited. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

December 15

12 Days of Craftsmas: Bead Snowflakes The 12 Days of Craftsmas is once again taking place, from 12 to 2 p.m. Dec. 15, at Crafted. The class will offer lessons on how to make bead snowflakes. The class will take place in the creation station. A small fee may apply. Details: (310) 732-1270; www.craftedportla.com Venue: Crafted, Port of Los Angeles, Warehouse 10 Location: 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

December 18

Carolyn’s Crew: Crochet and Knitting Club The San Pedro Library is hosting Carolyn’s Crew: A Crochet and Knitting Club at 3 p.m., Dec. 18. The club is open to all ages. If you would like to learn crochet, you are encouraged to bring a size “I” hook and if you wish to learn how to knit, we advise you to bring a needle size 8. Details: (310) 548-7779; www.lapl.org Venue: San Pedro Public Library Location: 931 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro

December 19

Pre-school Without Walls Pre-school Without Walls will be at the San Pedro Library from 1 to 2:30 p.m., Dec. 19. This is a free bilingual preschool class for parents and their children. No registration required. Details: (310) 548-7779; www.lapl.org Venue: San Pedro Public Library Location: 931 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro

Crafted, Port of Los Angeles, Warehouse

Location:

112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

December 21

12 Days of Craftsmas: Holiday Magnets Crafted is hosting the 12 Days of Craftsmas workshops, from 12 to 2 p.m. Dec. 21, at Crafted. The workshops will show participants how to make holiday magnets. The class will take place in the creation station. A small fee may apply. Details: (310) 732-1270; www.craftedportla.com Venue: Crafted, Port of Los Angeles, Warehouse 10 Location: 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro Holiday Block Party On Dec. 21, Harbor Interfaith Services will host a holiday block party, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tenth Street will be closed off for games and crafts. About 400 families will be served food. Details: (310) 831-0603, extension 105 Venue: Harbor Interfaith Services Location: 663 W. 10th St., San Pedro Salt Marsh Open House Marshes are more than mud. Step out into nature at the Salinas de San Pedro salt marsh, from 1 to 3 p.m. Dec. 21. Bring your binoculars, camera, sketch pad, journal or just your curiosity. Discover the many animal residents of the salt marsh with guidance from Sea Ranger naturalists and Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Educators. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

December 22

12 Days of Craftsmas: Candy Cane Reindeer The 12 Days of Craftsmas will conclude with its 12th class, from 12 to 2 p.m. Dec. 22, at Crafted. The final class will teach participants how to make candy cane reindeers. The workshop will take place in the creation station. A small fee may apply. Details: (310) 732-1270; www.craftedportla.com Venue: Crafted, Port of Los Angeles, Warehouse 10 Location: 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

Theater/Film December 14

The Nutcracker The San Pedro City Ballet will entertain thousands in its 20th annual production of Tchaikovsky’s classic, The Nutcracker, Dec. 14 and 15, at the Warner Grand Theatre in San Pedro. San Pedro City Ballet’s production of The Nutcracker will feature company members, as well as a supporting cast of 125 ranging from 4 years old to adult. Performances will be Dec. 14 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. and Dec.15 at 2 p.m. Tickets start at $18. D e t a i l s : s a n p e d r o c i t y b a l l e t . o r g , w w w. brownpapertickets.com/event/460440. Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro A Christmas Carol The Long Beach Playhouse is hosting A Christmas Carol from Dec. 14 through Dec. 22. This is a tale of Ebenezer Scrooge, the miser who finds the meaning of Christmas in his heart after visits by three spirits. The opening performance is at 8 p.m. Dec. 14. Details: (562) 494-1014; www.lbplayhouse.org Venue: Long Beach Playhouse Location: 5021 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

December 15

White Christmas The musical stage adaptation of Irving Berlin’s beloved 1954 holiday film White Christmas comes to the Norris Center for the Performing Arts at 8 p.m. through Dec.15. This lavish romantic comedy Calendar continued on page 16.

December 20

12 Days of Craftsmas: The Peanut Reindeer Crafted is hosting one of the 12 Days of Craftsmas, from 2 to 4 p.m. Dec. 20, at Crafted. The class will teach participants how to make a peanut reindeer. The class will take place in the creation station and a small fee may apply. Details: (310) 732-1270; www. craftedportla.com

December 13 – 26, 2013

home?’ I emailed him back and said ‘It’s brilliant. Let’s do it!” “John is a prolific writer and in no time we had a large script. I worked with him to edit it down for our company. It is really his script, I just helped cut it some.” The premise for the story is simple enough. The comedy is in the characters. At the Somberton Senior Residence, the residents are a sorry lot. They are unwilling participants in Kevin Gillespie’s (Cameron Moore) attempt to get them to perform Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker ballet. Gillespie is doing this because he has to complete community hours to work off a traffic ticket. It is a situation built for a crash, but, perhaps not surprisingly, he gets a performance from the residents that, if not quite the whole ballet, is an uplifting and rousing success. Most of the others return from past productions. He had to work with people who know their roles and their improvisational shtick. “Cameron Moore is the new guy and it was like wrangling cats when he started,” DeMoss said. “He passed the test.” Much of the success of this Nutcracker is based on the music and choreography, both the responsibility of Lauren Nave. “I don’t know much about the music,” DeMoss said. “Lauren came up with the music by Tchaikovsky and all the jazzy parts as well.” “When the choreography came in, this made for a real fun time,” Nave said in an email. “The actors already moved like their characters, which made the dance steps fun to do, as we had to work in the abilities or disabilities that are inherent in their characters. “It has been exciting to watch the actors bring even more to their characters each year. They seem to have a deeper knowledge of who they are. The most interesting part is watching them grow older into these roles. We first presented this play in 2010 and believe me, a few years does make a difference in the ability to move and to remember.” This is the third time around for Somberton, and I’m still willing to say that it will be your best Christmas memory. Unless, of course, you can’t stand to miss Tiny Tim. Tickets are $15. Performances are at 8:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through January 4, with 2:30 p.m. matinees Dec. 8, 15, 29 and Jan 5. Details: (562) 433-3363; www.foundtheatre.org Venue: Found Theatre Location: 599 Long Beach Blvd, Long Beach

Tidepool Wonders Explore low tides on the rocky shore with Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Dec. 14 and from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Dec. 15. Bring family and friends to the aquarium’s John M. Olguin Auditorium for an informative slide show, followed by a Cabrillo Marine Aquarium education staff-led walk to the nearby Point Fermin Tidepools. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

10

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

’ve seen a lot of Christmas plays over the past 30 years. I’ve seen more Christmas Carols than Dickens could imagine, variations on every well-known movie (radio dramatizations are very popular) and some that are not-so-well known (Parfumerie, which inaugurated the Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts in Beverly Hill last week, was one). And, I’ve seen at least a dozen Nutcracker ballets, including two at the Los Angeles Music Center, the Long Beach Ballet’s version and San Pedro Ballets entry into the crowded field, too. No complaints. That’s a critic’s life. (Although we do swap horror stories to each other at intermission—professional secret.) And, the glut of Christmas stories, Christmas pageants, Christmas dance concerts, Christmas ballets, is understandable. People who don’t go to the theater the rest of the year are in a warm and fuzzy mood in December—for the most part—and going to see a play. Taking the children to see a play is a part of the tradition. So, what I’m going to say here is backed by a little authority. Somberton Senior Residence Presents “The Nutcracker,” which opened at Long Beach’s gutsy Found Theatre (it has performances through the first week of January) is far and away the best version of that Holiday classic I’ve ever seen. I called it “The one Christmas show you should see” and I still stand by that. The Found Theatre must agree because it is reviving that show for the third time in four years. It expects a lot of folks to come back to see the production again, maybe more than once. “Everyone at the Found Theatre loves the show” said Virginia DeMoss, artistic director of the company. “The Nutcracker is hugely popular with our audiences. People are always asking when we are going to do it again. Every other theater has a traditional holiday show that they present in December. We figured we should have one too.” The show is an original with the Found Theatre, which has been doing plays written in house. Many of the plays were written by their late founder Cynthia Galles and then by others in the theater’s creative team. “Once we decided we needed a Christmas season show we were trying to come up with a concept, but with no luck,” DeMoss said. “Then I heard from John Sturgeon, a long-time company member. He sent me an email saying, ‘How about a show about the Nutcracker being done in a rest

12 Days of Craftsmas: Holiday Hair Barrette The 12 Days of Craftsmas will again be going on, from 1 to 3 p.m. Dec. 14, at Crafted. Attendees will learn how to craft holiday hair barrettes. The workshop will take place in the creation station. A small fee may apply. Details: (310) 732-1270; www.craftedportla.com Venue: Crafted, Port of Los Angeles, Warehouse 10 Location: 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro

Venue:

15


Calendar from page 15. is an all-singing, all-dancing evening of theater that includes some of the greatest songs ever written, and even a live snowfall on stage and a visit from Santa at matinee performances. Tickets are $45 for adults and $25 for children. Details: (310) 544-0403; www.norriscenter.com Venue: The Norris Theatre Location: 27570 Norris Center Dr., Rolling Hills Estates

Must Have Music for Your Christmas List By B. Noel Barr, Music Writer Dude

December 19

Long Beach is Sinking The Garage Theatre is hosting Long Beach is Sinking at 8 p.m., Dec. 19. The show is filled with thrills and spills. Join the cast in learning that hard time is definitely easier than a lifetime of injustice. Free ice cream will be given at intermission. Tickets are $12 for children and $15 for adults. The show will be running until Dec. 22. Details: (562) 433-8337; www.thegaragetheatre. org Venue: The Garage Theatre Location: 251 E. 7th St., Long Beach

December 22

A Coptic Christmas Event The Warner Grand is hosting A Coptic Christmas Event at 5 p.m. Dec. 22. This is a holiday celebration with a choir and a play presented by members of the Coptic Christian Orthodox Church. Tickets range between $10 and $30. Details: (310) 548-2493; johnocla@yahoo.com Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

Art

Independent And Free.

December 14

La VIRGEN Join Picture This Gallery and see all the different versions of La Virgen during the month of December. An artist reception is scheduled, from 4 to 8 p.m. Dec. 14. The exhibit runs through Dec. 28. The Virgin Mary is known by many titles (Blessed Mother, Virgin, Madonna, Our Lady), epithets (Star of the Sea, Queen of Heaven, Cause of Our Joy), invocations (Theotokos, Panagia, Mother of Mercy) and other names (Our Lady of Loreto, Our Lady of Guadalupe). All of these titles refer to the same individual named Mary, and are used variably by Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and some Anglicans. A few of the titles given to Mary are dogmatic in nature. Many other titles are poetic or allegorical and have lesser or no canonical status, but which form part of popular piety, with varying degrees of acceptance by the clergy. Yet more titles refer to depictions of Mary in the history of art. The event is free. Details: (562) 425-486147 Venue: Picture This Gallery Location: 4130 N. Norse Way, Long Beach Peace Be With You Peace Be With You is a Craig Antrim, Betsy Lohrer Hall, Yoon Jin Kim, Judith Turner Kunda, Neil Nagy and Jill Sykes group exhibition. Runs through Jan. 25, 2014. Saturdays and Sundays from 2 to 5 p.m. and First Thursday Artwalk. Details: (310) 831-5757 Venue: The Loft Galleries Location: 401 S. Mesa St., San Pedro

December 13 – 26, 2013

Sharing the Gifts of Wilfred Davis Fletcher This exhibition, which runs through Jan. 26, 2014, features selections from the diverse collection of Wilfred Davis Fletcher, whose gifts to both the Long Beach Museum of Art and the Boise Art Museum are included. Fletcher’s passionate collecting of paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, glass, ceramics and wood reflect his eclectic interests in contemporary art. Details: www.lbma.org Venue: Long Beach Museum of Art Location: 2300 E. Ocean Blvd, Long Beach

16

Gallery 478 Large format photography show, exhibiting the work of husband and wife team Ray and Arnée Carafano. Shot with a Canon ELS 600 T3, Arnée’s abstract series reflects images extracted from reality. A former painter, she applies a painterly aspect to her work, allowing the viewer to come to their own conclusions. Ray’s photography is an extension of his Broken Dreams series. The photographer has been documenting the beauty and decay of the Mojave Desert for 20 years. Details: ray@carafano.co Venue: Gallery 478 Location: 478 W. 7th St., San Pedro

KELP! Andy Hill, Renee Safier

Andy Hill and Renee Safier, along with coconspirator producer Marty Rifken released a new album, KELP! this year. The cover art is a send up to the Beatles iconic album, HELP! The title song, “KELP,” starts with Marty Rifken’s bodacious slide on pedal guitar, followed by some beautiful boogie that has you up and jumping. Musically, this song is absolutely wicked. When the lyrics kick in, I’m on the floor rolling with laughter when Hill sings: I wouldn’t say you’re a bad lover at all. I wouldn’t say you used me as a means to an end. I just want to know why when you made love to me. You were calling the names of my friends…. You left me wiggling like a big green glob of Kelp on the beach… Continued from page 12.

Gaucho Grill

entire space accommodates parties of people and even musicians to play everything from tango to Brazilian music. Many immigrants from countries such as Spain, Italy and Germany populate Argentina. The food is just as diverse, as a result. Italians have brought along their pastas dishes. Meanwhile, the Spanish have brought their empanada appetizers. Miorin said Gaucho Grill is for meat lovers. “This is the place to be,” added Miorin. “It’s romantic, but still appropriate for kids and big parties.” The restaurant serves authentic Argentinean food amidst the authentic atmosphere. “The most traditional food dish can be found in our ‘Parrillada,’” said Amoso. “It is fantastic.” The Parrillada is served on a table grill and can feed two to three people with an asado de tira, skirt steak, chorizo, one-fourth of a chicken, mollejas, chicken skewer, veggies and two side dishes. The popular steak item is the “Entraña a la Parrilla.” It is certified Angus beef, 10 ounces grilled skirt steak. The most traditional steak, served under “Specialties,” is called Asado de Tira. The famous

The next track, Safier sings the lead in the country tune, “Quit Playing Hard To Get.” In it, Safier plays the part of the woman wondering why she likes a guy that acts questionably with the lyrics: The morning is much clearer, though the evening’s not as fun as the few we shared with you, Yeah, you, the gorgeous dumbass, with one hand on a whiskey and the other on the thigh of…. Honey, I’d quit playing hard to get tomorrow, if tonight you quit playing so hard to want... All 11 tracks on KELP! are fun from beginning to end, from performance to production. The performance is beyond reproach, each track beautifully executed. Andy Hill and Renee Safier can be seen, from 6 to 8:30 p.m., every Wednesday at The Buffalo Fire Department in Torrance and from 8:30 to 11:30 p.m. Nov. 29 at The El Dorado Bar & Grill. To purchase KELP! Or to find out more about Andy and Renee go to www.andyandrenee.com Details: (310) 320-2332 Venue: Buffalo Fire Department Location: 1261 Cabrillo Ave., Torrance (562) 421-4590 Venue: El Dorado Bar & Grill Location: 3014 Studebaker Rd., Long Beach Details:

I Like it Like That, Robert Wuagneux

Listening to I Like it Like That is like turning on the radio and hearing one of your favorite songs, except you’ve never heard it before. grilled short ribs come with a choice of two sides from black beans to rice grilled onions. There are also plenty of vegetarian items, salads and appetizers. The mozzarella Caprese comes with fresh mozzarella cheese, roma tomatoes, basil, extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. The Griega salad comes with lettuce, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, peppers, olives and feta cheese with house dressing. There is also the gaucho pancake served with homemade dulce de leche for those with a sweet tooth. The Long Beach and Brentwood locations serve the same items. “We always try to improve our menu by adding and switching items such as lamb and mahi mahi,” said Miorin. “We’re always changing our seafood dishes.” Gaucho Grill is not only in the heart of Downtown Long Beach, but it also plays a central role in the community. “We always try to involve ourselves with the community such as Taste of Long Beach and the end of the year block party showcase.” Details: www.gauchogrillusa.com, (562) 590-5000 Venue: Gaucho Grill Location: 200 N. Pine Ave., Long Beach

Robert Wuagneux (Pronounced One -You) does that to you. Though an adjunct professor at Castleton State College in Castleton Vt., Robert is also a lifelong singer with a passion for pop and doo–wop. He spent his youth basking in Spain and other places around the world, honing his craft before landing in Miami’s hot music scene in the late 1970s. “Doody Doody/I Want Ya” is a rockin’ story about one couple that spent a lifetime together in love. This song just hits you right between the eyes with its driving rhythm followed by piano and organ. Then, there’s Robert’s voice... Robert has a voice like Jay Black of Jay and The Americans. Part of the boomer generation, his voice is that of a 20 year old. I know, I rode the countrysides of Vermont with Robert, who was singing perfect high harmonies to himself over the speakers while we listened to his rough mix of his next CD. Robert, coming from the old school of rhythm and blues singers, caught the tail end of the doo–wop scene. His doo–wop vocal style became a part of his skill sets along with 50s rock ’n’ roll and jazz music. Robert’s CD exudes a relentless, upbeat positivity. After working with Robert and watching him perform on numerous occasions, I know this isn’t just an act. “Skirts Go Flyin’ - I Like It like That,” is pure 50s rock ’n’ roll from one end of the track to the other. It is an original sounding, fresh take on a true American form of 50s rock ’n’ roll of American music. The fourth track, “Strange Voodoo,” is a huge OMG moment. “Strange Voodoo” opens with the saxophone followed by a very jazzy piano alongside this very exciting rhythm. The track was pure sex. This was followed by “Falling Down,” a hard rocking, punkish kind of song that’s very cool to pogo to. On this album, there’s just too many cherries to pick. After one listen, you’ll want a copy for yourself. Details: www.robertwuagneux.com

Continued from page 11.

Hamlet

of the sexual passion that drives her to accept murder. Paris Langle is effective as Horatio, Hamlet’s deep friends, and Reuben Uy is effective as Laertes, who kills Hamlet and dies himself in the final duel. This is delicious theater, and TE San Pedro Rep deserves support and playgoers who want to see Hamlet performed with grace and sometimes even a little neatness. On the night this reviewer attended there were only six or so in the audience. Go and support local theater. Tickets are $25 and $20 for students. Performances are Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m., with Saturday matinees at 2 p.m., through Dec. 21. Details: (424) 264-5747; www.sanpedrorep.org Venue: TE San Pedro Rep Location: 311 W. 7th St., San Pedro


Haubert

“We need more programs where people can get substance abuse help, job training, counseling, instead of being sentenced to jail for crimes that could be prevented,” he said. “We are not talking about hardened criminals, who really do need to be locked up for as long as possible. I’m talking about those who can learn from their mistakes and become better people.” Another area Haubert says he wants to work on is the roots of homelessness in Long Beach, such as mental illness and/ or drug and alcohol addiction. To do all of this he must first be re-elected. So far, he’s been endorsed

by District Attorney Jackie Lacey, former District Attorney Steve Cooley, Rep. Alan Lowenthal, the Long Beach Police Officers Association, among other leaders. He believes he is the best candidate for the job because he has the most experience, not just as a city prosecutor but in different areas of law. “I’ve worked in the public sector and in the private sector,” Haubert said. “And, I have a wide background in a number of legal areas…Though this particular job involves criminal prosecution, the fact that I have a lot of experience with land use, zoning, planning, police and other areas of municipal law, has made me a better prosecutor.”

from p. 7

The fact that neither KTLA, the Los Angeles Times nor the Journal of Commerce raised any red flags about this nonsense argument is a telling indication of which side they are on. It’s not just that they didn’t understand the incoherent argument being made. They didn’t even care if it made any sense or not. In closing, Hernandez had a simple message for the public. “We want to have a union,” he reiterated. “We want to have respect dignity and decent wages and that’s the

reason we’re fighting, and that’s the reason we are doing the strike, and we would like them to support us in this fight.” He also has a simple message for other port truckers as well. “Tell them there are laws in this country,” he said. “They do have a lot of rights. “Don’t be afraid…Don’t believe me. Find it out by yourself,” suggesting that drivers use Yahoo and Google to find out about the rights they have that are being denied. “Come out of the shadows,” he urged them. A holiday greeting for one and all.

from p. 5

from p. 10

for four months on a full-time basis. Volunteer prosecutors are trained in trial work, evidence code and presenting cases to a judge during that time. “That program has essentially given us more workers on a volunteer basis to help supplement what’s been cut by the city’s budget crisis,” he said. “What I’m known for is innovation…. Most people are surprised at what I’ve been able to accomplish with reduced resources.” If re-elected, Haubert wants to look at instituting more diversion programs.

Truckers

mishmash sentence. “It’s nonsense,” Marvy said. “To unpack that: presumably, he means the Port of LA v. ATA [American Trucking Associations] case. But the Court’s decision about the application of the market participant exception to federal trucking preemption to LA’s truck program has no bearing on whether drivers at Green Fleet can organize and it certainly wasn’t a judgment on that.”

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS & LEGAL FILINGS

11/28/13, 12/12/13

11/28/13, 12/12/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013218455 The following person is doing business as: Empire Fashion, 417 N. Mesa Street, CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Yen Nguyen, 1840 S. Gaffey St., #119, San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Yen Nguyen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Oct. 21, 2013. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 11/14/13, 11/28/13,

12/12/13, 12/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013225914 The following person is doing business as:(1) Harris Realty, (2) Harris Enterprises, (3) Golden Greek Leasing, (4) Golden Greek Charters, 870 W. 9th St. #200, San Pedro, CA 90731. Los Angeles County. Registered owners: George J. Harris Inc., 870 W. 9th St. #200, San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by a corporation. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: May 1976. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Roger C McGrath. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Nov. 8, 2013. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 11/14/13, 11/28/13, 12/12/13, 12/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013232113 The following person is doing business as:(1) Family Chiropractic and Acupuncture, 732 W. 9th St, Ste#205, San Pedro CA 90731. Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Roger C. McGath, D.C. L.A.C., 3558 Lees Ave., Long Beach, CA 90808. This Business is conducted by an indi-

vidual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Roger C. McGath. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Nov 8, 2013. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 11/14/13, 11/28/13, 12/12/13, 12/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013228637 The following person is doing business as:(1) San Pedro Firewood, 1166 W. 24th St., #2, San Pedro, Ca 90731. Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Kevin Christy, 1166 W. 24th St., #2, San Pedro, Ca 90731.. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: 10/21/13. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Kevin Christy. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Nov 8, 2013. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement

pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 11/14/13, 11/28/13, 12/12/13, 12/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013234861 The following person is doing business as: Barricade Services, 3602 S. Cabrillo Ave., CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: David W. Cheek, 3602 S. Cabrillo Ave., CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. David W. Cheek. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Nov. 13, 2013. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 11/27/13, 12/12/13, 12/23/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013246109 The following person is doing business as: Lex Litigation Support,788 W.9th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731, Los Angeles

County. Registered owners: Da’ad Makhlouf, P.O. Box 6067, CA 90734. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Da’ad Makhlouf, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Dec. 2, 2013. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 11/27/13, 12/12/13,

Cannery Street, Terminal Island CA.

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION The City of Los Angeles Harbor Department (LAHD) has prepared this Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration (IS/MND) to address the environmental effects of the Fisherman’s Pride Fish Processing Facility Project (hereafter ``proposed project``). The project site is in the Berth 265 area of Fish Harbor within the Port of Los Angeles, bounded by Cannery Street to the north, Ways Street to the west, Sardine Street to the south, and Barracuda to the east.

Comments on the IS/ MND should be submitted in writing prior to the end of the 30-day public review period and must be postmarked by January 8, 2014. Please submit written comments to: Christopher Cannon, Director, City of Los Angeles Harbor Department, Environmental Management Division, 425 S. Palos Verdes Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. Written comments may also be sent via email to ceqacomments@portla. org. Comments sent via email should include the project title in the subject line and a valid mailing address in the email. For additional information, please contact the LAHD Environmental Management Division at (310) 732-3675.

12/23/13, 1/9/14, 1/23/14

The primary goal of the proposed project is to construct and operate a seafood processing and freezing operations in Buildings 9, 10, and 12 at 338

Key objectives of the proposed project include the following: * Eliminate truck traffic associated with current operations * Construct a state-of-the-art seafood processing facility * Improve operational efficiency This IS/MND includes a discussion of the proposed project’s effects on the existing environment, including the identification of mitigation measures to reduce potential impacts. No significant effects that could not be mitigated to a less than significant level were identified. In accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act Statutes and Guidelines, the IS/MND is being circulated for a period of 30 days for public review and comment. The 30-day review period will start on December 10, 2013 and end on January 8, 2014. A copy of the document is available for public review on the Port of Los Angeles’ website at: http://www. portoflosangeles.org; the LAHD Environmental Management Division located at 222 West 6th Street, San Pedro; the Los Angeles City Library San Pedro Branch at 931 S. Gaffey Street; and at the Los Angeles City Library Wilmington Branch at 1300 North Avalon, Wilmington.

December 13 - 26, 2013

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013219701 The following person is doing business as: Smart Motors, 439 N. Leland Street, San Pedro, CA 90732, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: California Visitation Monitors LLC, 439 N. Leland Street, San Pedro, CA 90732. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: NA I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of

a crime.) S/. Scott Macfullivray. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Oct. 22, 2013. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 10/31/13, 11/14/13,

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013215805 The following person is doing business as: Desi’s Landscaping, 862 W. Denni St., Wilmington, CA 90744, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Desiderio Ruvalcaba, 862 W. Denni St., Wilmington, CA 90744. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: Sept. 1, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Desiderio Ruvalcaba. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Oct. 16, 2013. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 10/31/13, 11/14/13,

17


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December 13 - 26, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


Rln 12 13 13 edition