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hen Robin Tyler spoke as a keynote speaker at the 1993 March on Washington, someone handed her something to sign and she wrote the word, “Dyke” after her name as a joke. She had no idea that that is how they would run her signature. “I was just kidding,” Tyler chuckled. “My mother called me and [asked], ‘What does d-y-k-e mean?’ So I said, ‘don’t worry mom, it means, ‘Doctor of Young Karate Experts.’” Ask Tyler the meaning behind the usually derogatory term, “Dyke,” and she’ll say it means, “Lesbian warrior, it’s a name for strong women.” Tyler’s use of the word, “dyke,” as a political term was intended to be used in the same political sense as the word, “bitch.” Particularly in situations d n a n where women, who exhibit stereotypically-considered r e ial Int r r o t i d powerful male traits are castigated for those attributes. r, E dito Hooke anaging E y r But perhaps what is more important about this word, is o By C s, M k c i r r e J that it helps distinguish the particular civil rights issues Terelle of women, whether they are gay, bisexual or straight. “When you see thousands of women coming together and supporting each other, it’s powerful. It’s to empower ourselves. To not only stand for what power we do have, but for what power we should have. Power is never given, it has to be taken.” Say It Loud, I’m a Dyke and I’m Proud/ to p. 6

May 17 - 30, 2013

Harbor Commission Kills PCAC p. 3 The Whale & Ale’s Andrew Silber Talks Service, Culinary Adventures p. 14 City Approves BNSF Off-Railway Dock Before Election of New Mayor p. 24

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May 17 - 30, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


HARBOR AREA

Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

PCAC Killed with Swift, Secretive Action Did POLA Just Declare a Second 100-Year War? By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

FDA Decides to Leave ’Pedro By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

In September 2011, the GSA issued a solicitation to lease offers to qualified property owners, of which Pacific Place Associates was included. Pacific Place Associates, which was headed by civil engineering investor titan, Ronald Tutor, sent back the proposal designating the 7th floor as the preferred place they want to lease to the FDA—the floor that the FDA occupies. Any unused portion of the requested tenant improvement allowance could be used to reduce the FDA’s rent. “There will be a $37,000 per year cost reduction in addition to a reduction in total square footage and parking space allocation,” wrote GSA spokeswoman Traci Madison in an e-mail about the new lease with The One World Trade Center in Long Beach. “The contract was awarded based on the lowest price technically acceptable proposal.” More than two years before the FDA’s lease FDA Leaves Town/ to p. 5

May 17 - 30, 2013

Downtown San Pedro has never had a significant employer outside of the Port of Los Angeles that provided white collar jobs. But to lose the few that are here could leave the downtown looking like a scene out of an old Western movie with tumbleweeds blowing through the streets of a ghost town. First it was the federal defense contractor, Northrop Grumman, which relocated 250 employees in 2010. In 2012, San Pedro got the news that its local court will be closing June 14. Now, there’s news that the Food and Drug Administration offices in San Pedro will move across the bridge to Long Beach, taking with them about 100 employees and bringing that depiction closer to reality. Who knew the FDA had an office in San Pedro? Well, apparently, the FDA leased office space at the 222 W. 6th Street for its investigators since 1993. That tenure is slated to come to an end by February 2014.

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The rush was eerily reminiscent of the clos“The worst thing would be to stand still and to look at structures of the past to support the ing days of the Richard Riordan administration, democracy of the future,” Harbor Commissioner when the Harbor Commission approved the ChiRobin Kramer said at the Commission’s May 2 na Shipping terminal without benefit of an envimeeting, just moments before voting to abolish ronmental impact report—a decision that proved to be the straw that broke the camel’s back. Maydemocracy entirely. Thus ended Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s or James Hahn subsequently created the PCAC Harbor Commissioner’s 8-year mission to get rid of the Port Community Advisory Committee, abandoning all pretense of making sense, in the last-minute rush to get the dirty deed done. “It’s the last act of getting rid of any vestiges of what [former mayor] Jim Hahn did for this waterfront,” said PCAC co-Chairwoman June Smith during the comment period. “That’s the way some of us perceive Port of Los Angeles Harbor Commissioners pictured (from left): it. That may not be your Commissioner Robin Kramer, Commissioner Dr. Sung Won Sohn, President motivation. It may not be Cindy Miscikowski, Vice President David Arian, and Commissioner Douglas correct. I’m just saying P. Krause. File photo. that is a perception, and I think it’s one you need to be aware of and need in late 2001, in part to put an end to such furtive, to deal with.” irresponsible and costly backroom deal-making, But dealing with the community’s views and when local homeowner activists later sucdidn’t seem to be a concern, given how rushed ceeded in blocking the project in court with the the decision-making process was, not allowing aid of the Natural Resources Defense Council, time for PCAC or any other Brown Act compli- PCAC was substantially strengthened as the veant public body to weigh in. The Fnial Blow to PCAC/ to p. 21

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Community Announcements:

Harbor Area Dyke March

Fight for women’s rights and celebrate all women, starting at 6:30 p.m. May 17, starting at Junipero and 2nd streets in Long Beach. It’s time to hit the streets, make some noise, be visible and be heard.

Long Beach Asthma Resource Fair

The Asthma Resource Fair will provide numerous resources and educational materials for community members to learn more about asthma management and the related services offered in the community, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 18, at Admiral Kidd Park in Long Beach. Venue: Admiral Kidd Park Location: 2125 Santa Fe Ave., Long Beach

La Gran Limpieza

The Friends of the Los Angeles River are hosting the 24th Annual Great LA River Clean Up, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. May 18. Volunteers are needed at 15 river sites. Details: www.folar.org

Coastal SPNC (S)elections

Vote, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 18, at the White Point Nature Preserve Nature Center in San Pedro. Venue: White Point Nature Preserve Nature Location: 1600 W. Paseo Del Mar, San Pedro

WE Labs Free Day Pass

Work Evolution Laboratories is inviting the community to discover the advantages of coworking, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the heart of downtown Long Beach. If you are a community organizer or involved in any activity that you feel makes Long Beach a better place, bring a friend. Details: http://welabs.us Venue: WE Labs Location: 235 E. Broadway, suite 800

Long Beach Pride Rainbow Run

May 17 - 30, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Join the Long Beach Pride Rainbow Run, a 10k and a 5K rainbow extravaganza, at 7 a.m. May 19, starting at Junipero and Ocean Boulevard in Long Beach. Pride Rainbow Run participants have the opportunity to end the race with colors of the rainbow via party leis, color bracelets and other items. To participate, just go through the rainbow stations along the route. If you do not want to participate, with race time being your primary goal, just run/walk past these stations. Proceeds from the run will go directly to LGBTQ and ally serving non-profit organizations. Details: irocktherainbow.com

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Progressive Democratic Club Meeting

Professor Peter Mathews, dues paying member of the Progressive Democratic Club, will be the guest speaker at the May 19 meeting on the growing division of wealth between the very well off (the 1 percent) and the rest of society( the 99 percent). The talk is called, “The Tale of Two Cities: It is the Best of Times and it is the Worst of Times.” The meeting starts at 4 p.m. Details: (310) 508-9234, juliandburger@gmail. com Venue: Denny’s Restaurant Location: 600 E. Carson Plaza Drive, Carson

Youth Service Award Application

SAN PEDRO—The Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council is honoring a student who has performed outstanding community service with a $500 award. Anyone between the ages of 16 to 22 is eligible to apply. The applicants must live, work or attend school within the boundaries of the Northwest Council, or have performed part of their service in that area. The deadline for applications being submitted is May 20. Details: www.nwsanpedro.org

March Against Monsanto

Participate in a march against Monsanto, at 1 p.m. May 25, behind Whole Foods in Long Beach. Bring signs and noisemakers. Venue: Whole Foods Market Long Beach Location: 6550 E. Pacific Coast Highway, Long Beach Community Announcements/ to p. 5


LACCD Run-Off: Labor vs. Green By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

Carson voters are being asked to help decide a race that’s dividing Democrats. Although the May 21 run-off for the Los Angeles Community College District Seat 6 is non-partisan and both candidates are progressive Democrats, some party factions are endorsing and handsomely financing challenger David Vela, while others remain loyal to incumbent Nancy Pearlman. Board of Trustees seats represent the district at large, but candidates are elected to one of seven numbered seats and serve four-year terms. In the March 3 election, Vela beat the incumbent, getting 35.9 percent of the vote to Pearlman’s 28.5 percent. However, two other candidates split the remainder and no one candidate received more

are met. One upcoming item of business includes hiring a new chancellor. Vela’s endorsements include the Los Angeles Democratic Party, the American Federation of Labor and the American Federation of Teachers. He says he’s received at least $50,000 in donations and is expecting at least another $50,000 before the campaign ends. He says the amount is necessary because, “the voter base is really

large” and the money is paying for mailings to at least 200,000 homes. “Fundraising is difficult because I’m not beholden to special interests,” responds Pearlman, who estimates she’s raised about $20,000. Former congressional candidate Marcy Winograd, a Pearlman supporter, asserts, “It seems like a lot of money to spend on an unnecessary race,” considering both candidates are left-leaning Democrats. “Nancy normally leans left but she leans independently,” offers Julian Berger, President of the Progressive Democratic Club, which meets monthly in Carson. “Some people want a rockhard solid vote for labor… That body, the LACCD board, is either pro-administration or pro-

National Crime Victims’ Rights Week” Roundtable Pancake Breakfast

instructor. This year she’s really under the gun. That union, the American Federation of Teachers, they want David Vela in.” Berger also believes Seat 6 to be a swing vote between the board’s factions, adding, “Nancy’s an excellent progressive, intellectually astute, she used to be a Green but gravitated back to being a Democrat.” According to Pearlman’s official bio, she’s bidding for her fourth term and chairs the comLabor vs. Green/ to p. 26

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area from previous page

Community Baby Shower

Donate to the Community Baby Shower, which take place at 3 p.m. May 29, at the Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services. Councilwoman Gerrie Schipske, Long Beach Cares and Long Beach Public Health Nurses host the event to provide “basic going-home newborn kits” for low-income mothers after giving birth in local hospitals. Donation items include diapers, diaper bags, baby wipes, bibs, onesies, socks, blanket, hats and mittens. Monetary contributions also are accepted. Donations can be dropped off Mondays and Wednesdays at 2760 N. Studebaker Road in Long Beach. Details: (562) 570-6932 Venue: Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services Location: 2525 Grand Ave., Long Beach

Call for Candidates to Fill Vacant Board Seat

SAN PEDRO—The Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council is filling a vacant board seat. Candidates are set to turn in their applications by May 31. The selections will commence on June 10. Details: www.nwsanpedro.org

Los Angeles Community College District trustee incumbent, Nancy Pearlman, faces a fierce challenge from David Vela, who outpolled Pearlman in the primary election on March 5. File photo

than 50 percent of votes cast, making this run-off necessary. Trustees’ duties include managing the budget and where resources are allocated, setting policy and ensuring the needs of students and faculty

Justice for Murdered Children hosted a Roundtable Pancake Breakfast, April 27, in memoriam of the victims of the Boston Marathon Bombing. Justice for Murdered Children recognized the connection of the bombings to the massacres that occurred in Newton, Conn., while applauding quick action of law enforcement in assisting victims and their families. Event attendees included Mayor Jim Dear , pictured above, representatives from law enforcement, Justice For Homicide Victims, Project Cry No More, Parents of Murdered Children, as well as the families of victims. Photo by Betty Guevara

from p. 3

FDA Leaves Town

FDA/ to p. 7

May 17 - 30, 2013

FDA’s relocation, furniture and cabling costs. On Feb. 17, 2012, Pacific Place submitted a new proposal designating the sixth floor as the new office space. But by September 2012, the GSA lease with Pacific Place had expired and they had selected The One World Trade Center as the lowest bidder. The government awards to the lowest technically acceptable offer based on a present value analysis. The present value analysis for the awardee was $25.95 usable square foot per year. The awardee’s offer isn’t compared to the lease in place but rather it is compared to all the competing offers (including the current lessor’s proposed terms for a new 10-year lease). Pacific Place Associates present value analysis was $34.05 per usable square foot. There is a $37,000 difference between what the FDA is currently paying in San Pedro and what they will pay at the new lease location in Long Beach. During the lease proposal process, the Pacific Place Associates came in with higher rates for the term of the new lease. When comparing the awardee’s offer to Pacific Place’s final offer, there was about a $2 million difference within the 10 years of the contract. GSA uses a $7 per usable square foot rate to estimate moving ex-

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was to expire, in January of 2010, the FDA asked for modifications of the office space. Pacific Place Associates rendered an estimate of $288,397 or $12 per rentable square foot of a 3,000-rentablesquare-foot space. Rentable square feet is how much space you’re paying for, including shared common areas. (There are several ways to measure square feet. Usable square feet is how much actual space you’ll be able to use. The load factor measurement is the difference between rentable square foot and the usable square foot, expressed as a percentage of usable square foot.) Pacific Place Associates was willing to work around the FDA’s schedule in order to make the needed renovations and mitigate costs. The owners offered to make the improvements on the seventh floor during after-hours or on weekends so that the FDA would have minimal disruptions to its operations. However, on Feb. 15, 2012, the GSA made it clear that they were not willing to operate amidst construction because it would be disruptive to work hours and quality assurance would be compromised. The new total cost of tenant improvements would have been $1.2 million as opposed to the original estimate of $288,397, not including the

penses, which would be about $155,000, Madison explained. The situation is further complicated by the fact that the request for proposals for a new lease went on while Pacific Place Associates (Tutor) was selling the San Pedro building to Jupiter Holdings. “The previous ownership made its bid, not us,” said Edmond St. Geme, managing partner of Jupiter Holdings. “One of the unfortunate things is that we took ownership in early December. We are in the position to offer a much more competitive lease.” Geme said his company could potentially save the FDA between $750,000 and $1 million within 10 years, which is not including the savings on moving costs. “We can offer more competitive rent and terms,” Geme said. “We haven’t offered anything because we don’t have the mechanism to engage in. We can offer them a lower rent than they are paying now and (are) scheduled to pay in Long Beach.” FDA employees are not happy about the move, namely due to parking and security reasons. “The union and employees were not considered in the decision to move,” said Michael Roberts, president of the employee’s union, National Treasury Employees Union. “They weren’t considered in the cost process of moving, specifi-

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from p. 1

Say it Loud, “I’m a Dyke and I’m Proud” Twenty years after the 1993 March on Washington, Tyler was invited to speak at Long Beach’s inaugural Dyke March scheduled May 17. The 1993 march on Washington D.C. was the first Dyke March in the United States and was attended by more than 20,000 women. Long Beach march organizer at Artful Thinking, Denise Penn, said that the Lesbian Avengers-organized march was intended as a women-only event with gay, bisexual, and straight men to cheer on the marchers in solidarity. Artful Thinking is a Long Beach-based nonprofit that provides foundations program funding in tandem with community-based events that will educate, enlighten and assist the community in making informed decisions, specifically in relation to HIV/AIDS and breast cancer. Today, Dyke Marches take place annually in cities all around the nation, including Los Angeles, New York, Seattle, Boston and many more. Historically, the Dyke March takes place the Friday before the LGBT pride parades. The marches are loosely organized to allow a degree of spontaneity and the openness of grassroots activism. “Everyone brings their own specific issue,” Penn said. “It’s not really choreographed or planned. It’s about visibility and empowerment.... It empowers women to come together, and march in the streets for their own issues. And, I think, by doing that, it’s very empowering to get together and just march in the streets. It’s a sign of strength.”

“When you see thousands of women coming together and supporting each other, it’s powerful. It’s to empower ourselves. To not only stand for what power we do have, but what for power we should have. Power is never given, it has to be taken.”

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Robin Tyler and wife, Diane Olsen, have been a couple for 20 years. In May 2008, they became the first Los Angeles gay couple to marry. Tyler will be leading national Day of Decision celebrations or protests when the U.S. Supreme Court return with a decision on the anti-gay marriage initiative Proposition 8. Photos: Terelle Jerricks.

Marriage and Activism

These days, Tyler is probably better known as being the other half of Robin Tyler-Diane Olsen, the first Los Angeles gay couple to marry, and perhaps the first California gay couple to file for divorce (though the couple reconciled soon after). Tyler and Olson have known each other for more than 40 years, 20 of which they spent together as a couple. They had gone to the Beverly Hills Courthouse for seven years in a row and been denied a marriage license each time. In June 2008, they finally married, before Proposition 8 passed in November 2008, banning marriage for same-sex couples. Following Prop. 8’s passing, Tyler and Olson filed a brief with the Supreme Court asking to overturn the proposition. Tyler and Olson originally challenged the ban on same-sex marriage after filing a lawsuit through the California Supreme Court. In May 2008, the Supreme Court’s decision, for the first time in American history, recognized gays and lesbians as a “suspect class,” effectively making it more difficult to discriminate against them. However, Tyler’s activism and trail blazing goes decades beyond marriage equality. She’s an old school progressive that been active in continued on following page

Long Beach Pride Turns 30 By Joseph Baroud, Editorial Intern

The Long Beach Lesbian and Gay Pride organization is hosting its 30th annual parade May 19. The event is a two-day festival and parade, filled with attractions, informative booths, an excellent opportunity to communicate with a variety of people and a parade celebrating the history and current accomplishments of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. “This creates networking opportunities, which helps create a stronger and more inclusive community,” said Frank Rubio, a Long Beach Lesbian and Gay Pride board member. With more than 80,000 people in attendance at this past last year’s parade, organizers hope this year’s turnout increases, as more people involved within the LGBT community are finding the strength of acceptance with the strength in numbers. “Our hopes are that we can bring a better understanding of the diversity of our community … that can address the 6 issues that affect us all,” Rubio said.

May 17 - 30, 2013

Long Beach Pride Parade is set to celebrate its 30th year. That Long Beach hasn’t had a Dyke march till now is surprising. “Long Beach has a huge LGBT community,” Penn said. “As you know, there are many Dyke Marches around the country New York, Toronto, Chicago, San Francisco, of course.” Penn took part in the 1994 Dyke March in New York City. “We decided it’s about time for Long Beach to have one,” she said.

Besides raising awareness, the parade serves as an important fiscal benefit to local organizations. All funds received from the festival and parade will be appropriated amongst the various participating organizations. “The Long Beach gay and lesbian community use this supply of philanthropic dollars to [give to] organizations in the community.” Julie Bartolotto, executive director of the Long Beach Historical Society said. “I see it as having a broader purpose than just raising awareness.” The Long Beach Historical Society collects, preserves and exhibits the material history of Long Beach. The Historical Society alternates through exhibits annually. This year’s focus is to shed light on the lesbian and gay rights movement in Long Beach through LGBT History Project, which was unveiled Feb. 23. The project photographs, articles and letters, depicting the early struggles that the LGBT community in Long Beach faced. Some of these will be displayed at the festival. Other gay rights movements across the nation have faced similar opposition with

similar action, but the one in Long Beach holds an authoritative significance. “The fact that there has been a visible and growing community of LGBT people in Long Beach that have growing political power is unique,” Bartolotto said. “Not every big city has that, and that has affected our decision to bring this to life.” In its 30th year, the LGBT community’s celebration carries even more significance, having now 12 states allowing same-sex weddings, six within the past 6 months. Part of the reason for these accomplishments is the growing youth awareness and acceptance.

“The youth of our communities have been a big part of the change,” he said. “With most schools having Gay Straight Alliance groups, this has helped bring a change on how our future community leaders perceive our LGBT community.” California’s battle over marriage equality has revived the LGBT community’s sense of activism and awareness. With California’s anti-equality measure, Proposition 8, still being decided at the U.S. Supreme Court, the equality movement is gaining even more momentum. Marriage equality in California may be decided on in June.


from prvious page

FDA

cally, parking.” The FDA does not have to pay parking at the current site. Were they to move, they would have to pay for parking in an off-site area owned by the Port of Long Beach. While FDA employees now park within the constraints of the building in a 6-story structure. “This is a high cost-of-living area for FDA employees, making it difficult to retain and recruit employees,” Roberts said. That is not to mention how the move would burden taxpayers, he said. “We are spending a lot of money to move that is unnecessary, especially in a time when government is cutting significantly on the budget and with the sequester, including the FDA, where they suspending payments for performance awards,” Roberts said. Another employee concern is the safety. The office in Long Beach would be more easily accessible to the public. “Anyone can come right up to the window,” Roberts said. “Virtually everyone becomes a potential target of some nut.” But Roberts said the GSA seems uncompromising in both the parking issue, of which one alternative would be to have the agency pay for employee parking, and the safety issue. “The FDA’s security requirements will be met by the new lease,” Madison wrote. “The new lease location is within the FDA’s delineated area and is approximately six miles from the previous location.” Regardless of those considerations, a lease, which would have to be broken at a cost, has already been signed. Geme hopes that some type of mechanism could be worked out, bearing in mind that there already is an incumbent building willing to work on its leasing price for an overall savings, by maybe moving another department to The One World Trade Center, for example. “What the community and politicians can do is to try to intervene in the process,” Geme said. “Try to have logic prevail.” While it would be nice to keep the offices filled, it might be more important to keep the spaces filled with “city entities” that have a stake in community, said The Renaissance Group CEO and President Eric Eisenberg.

Stay current with news, announcements and community events at http://tinyurl.com/rlnnews-announcements

Left, investor Ronald Tutor. Formerly owned by the Pacific Place Associates, the 222 W. 6th Street office building was sold to Jupiter Holdings. File photo.

“The potential is enormous for that,” he said. Eisenberg’s company owns more than 100,000 square feet in downtown San Pedro. Eisenberg is optimistic about the growth in the community and the ability to fill out office space in the near future. “The reason we are not attracting those type

of tenants is because we don’t have the businesses to support those tenants,” Eisenberg said. “We need to stop being under the radar San Pedro and wake up and take our place…which I believe we are doing.” Several calls were made to Rep. Janice Hahn’s office without response.

• Custom Printing • Union Printing • Custom Graphic Design 1302 S. Pacific Avenue, San Pedro (310) 519-1442 info@graphictouchdesigns.com

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anti-war, AIDS, and women’s rights movement since the late 1970s. She was operating from civil rights perspective before the movement was widely called a civil rights movement. “We want our civil rights,” said Tyler. “We are a civil rights movement. The head of NAACP said so. So we need to start thinking about ourselves as a civil rights movement as opposed to just a liberation movement. I was very lucky, because I just managed to hit all of these movements, the 60s anti-war movement, the 70s feminist (movement), the 80s gay (movement).” In the late 1980s and early 1990s, with the emergence of the AIDS epidemic, the gay civil rights movement rapidly expanded to include direct action groups such as the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP), Queer Nation and Lesbian Avengers. These groups staged hundreds of marches, acts of civil disobedience, and “outed” prominent members of the LGBT community in the effort of forcing the mainstreaming and acceptance of homosexuality. They accomplished a lot in the face of a very hostile political environment, but did not engage the active participation of most of the LGBT community, which remained relatively apolitical in their daily lives. Tyler argues that the reason why marriage equality has been so successful in galvanizing the LGBT community compared to the movements in the late 80s and 90s is because it focused on the wider fundamental cause of civil rights. “I believe that the tail does wag the dog, not the head. The leadership (of the movement) didn’t want to concentrate on marriage. But all of a sudden when you put out we want to marry because it’s based on love, commitment, and family, all of a sudden our own community said ‘yes’ we want this. “Why shouldn’t we have this?” Tyler asked. “When Prop. 8 won, all of a sudden you had gay youth wake up by the tens of thousands and march here on the streets in Los Angeles. We stayed out on the streets for months. Likening the marriage equality drive to the 1965 Selma to Montgomery marches for black voting rights, Tyler said, “This was the most amount of protesting since what happened in Alabama. It was the shot heard round the world.” The Dyke March culminates with a fundraiser at Hamburger Mary’s. Proceeds will go toward fighting breast cancer.

from p. 5

May 17 - 30, 2013

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What’s Wrong with Ending PCAC:

Why the Port Has Taken a Wrong Turn By James Preston Allen, Publisher

May 17 - 30, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

At its May 2 Harbor Commission meeting, the commissioners, upon the recommendation of the Port of Los Angeles staff, voted to dissolve the Port Community Advisory Committee. The PCAC was the mechanism that helped settle the 100-year war and the China Shipping dispute that ended up costing the port some $65 million in mitigations. Some of those mitigations are now only being accomplished, like the $5 million for Plaza Park restoration across from the U.S. Post Office on Beacon Street. The elimination of the PCAC by the Board of Harbor Commissioners on that Thursday morning meeting came with little notice and no consultation with community groups represented in the PCAC. June Smith, president of the Coastal San Pedro Neighborhood Council, said, “They said it [the PCAC] had been highly successful, so it was time to get rid of it. This is raw politics at its best.” So how is it that in a city that is filled with dysfunction, that an advisory group is dismissed and dissolved because it’s, too successful? This seems to be the message of hypocrisy that the port is sending to the community. Even Pat Nave, a former lawyer for the City of Los Angeles, who worked at the port for many years commented, “The city charter says no commission shall consider something until the neighborhood councils have had a chance to consider the matter. That did not happen here.” This little-used charter section 907, titled, Early Warning System, reads as follows: The Regulations shall establish procedures for receiving input from neighborhood councils prior to decisions by the City Council, City Council Committees and boards and commissions. The procedures shall include, but need not be limited to, notice to neighborhood councils as soon as practical, and a reasonable opportunity to provide input before decisions are made. Notices to be provided include matters to be considered by the City Council, City Council Committees, and City boards or commissions. It is odd that the port and its Board of Harbor Commissioners didn’t seem to follow the city charter in dissolving PCAC. They

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didn’t even inform the presidents of the Harbor Area neighborhood councils, who were meeting with the port’s deputy executive director of external relations, Cynthia Ruiz, that this action was about to take place. We all should have gathered that something was in the wind when Ruiz offered the neighborhood councils a memorandum of understanding regarding neighborhood council input into port affairs. With hindsight being 20/20, it was just a gambit around the existence of PCAC. But does this occasionally monthly meeting meet the standards of the PCAC or have the historical understanding of the critical issues involving the port and its developments? Sadly, the neighborhood council presidents don’t have the expertise of June Smith, who has years of community activism and experience on that port advisory committee. Most of the others involved don’t. What is necessary in response to this unilateral action by the port is that the neighborhood councils now act to form a joint neighborhood council subcommittee that is charged with doing exactly what the PCAC was created to do—watch every move that POLA makes. It is imperative that the Harbor Area communities have a watchdog on this public agency because of it overarching economic and environmental impacts on all of our lives. Yes, it’s great that they are moving towards development of Ports O’Call Village, the Marine Science Center and extending the Waterfront Promenade. But we still aren’t out of the woods on air pollution and toxic materials handling and regulation. It would be far too easy for the port to backslide after having made a decade’s worth of environmental and community outreach changes. We here at Random Lengths News know how hard it was to get the port to change direction in the first place, after having doggedly covered their bad actions for more than three decades. Inherent in this action by the port is the “trust me” factor, which when used in normal business practices means that you are about to be taken advantage of. This action and the offered MOU with the neighborhood councils could rightly be seen as a Trojan horse deal. In the end, the port needs to be much more transparent with what its intentions are and the community should not be lulled into the fantasy of big dreams on our waterfront without having more knowledge and public input. Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIV : No. 10

Assoc. Publisher/Production Coordinator Suzanne Matsumiya info@graphictouchdesigns.com Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks editor@randomlengthsnews.com

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communi- Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila ties of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, reportersdesk@randomlengthsnews.com Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

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Longshore Workers, Officers Protest Medical Claim Delays From the ILWU Dispatcher

Dozens of longshore workers joined with ILWU officers on the morning of April 9 in San Francisco to tell waterfront employers: “Stop fooling around with our health benefits and start paying our medical claims!” Dozens of Local 13 members made their point by travelling all night on a bus from the Los Angeles Harbor Area to the headquarters of the Pacific Maritime Association on Market Street in San Francisco where they were met by pensioners and members of ILWU Locals 10, 34, 75 and 91. ILWU International officers, Coast Committeemen, Coast Benefits staff and local officers greeted members as they arrived and thanked everyone for joining the protest. “Members and pensioners have every right to be fed up with all these delays and denials when it comes to paying legitimate medical bills,” said ILWU International President Bob McEllrath, who mingled with members in front of the PMA headquarters. “We won’t tolerate any members or pensioners being abused by a claims processing company that can’t do their job properly.” McEllrath then led a delegation of ILWU officers up to the third floor of a high-rise office building where PMA executives were braced inside with officials from Zenith American Solutions, the controversial claims-processing company that was hand-picked by the PMA

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and sanctioned by the Coast Arbitrator, over the vehement objections of the ILWU. The company that the Union Trustees wanted to select to replace CIGNA for processing medical claims had a much better reputation for working well with Taft-Hartley Healthcare Plans, Coast Benefits Specialist John Castanho said. He said the problems ILWU members are currently experiencing with claims processing are the same issues that have been experienced by other healthcare plans managed by Zenith in the past. In the meeting inside PMA’s office, ILWU officials confronted PMA and Zenith executives, demanding that they end the delays and red tape that have frustrated so many families because of unpaid or delayed medical bills. As ILWU officials pressured Zenith and PMA on the inside, members outside grew restless. At one point a large group of ILWU members left the plaza and headed up to PMA’s offices where they filled the hallway, making their presence known, and sending company officials scurrying in response to the commotion. The protesting members eventually left the PMA office entrance after making their point, as did ILWU officials after several hours of meeting to demand action steps by Zenith to address the claims processing problem. By the end of the meeting, it was agreed that Zenith would deploy continued on following page

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #0891-6627). All contents Copyright 2013 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.


Opportunity Knocking Loudly

I wish to thank Council Buscaino, his chief Doane Liu and the entire staff for their creative and cost effective solutions to some of the challenges facing downtown San Pedro. Latest being the addition of 88 parking spaces on 5th street using diagonal parking. Normal costs to construct a parking structure can top $25,000 per space and take years to build versus new striping and signs. Diagonal parking and one way streets can be used throughout downtown to further increase parking and also provide space for sidewalk dining, public art, landscaping and other amenities. An equally large challenge will be to successfully connect to the redeveloped waterfront and ensure that downtown draws its fair share of the increased investment and economic activity. Now is the time for the transformation we have been hoping for. Opportunity is knocking louder than ever. To maximize the benefits of this opportunity will require a coordinated effort on the part of the Council office, the Neighborhood Councils, the Chamber of Commerce and the Business Improvement District (PBID) to dramatically reshape what we want downtown to look like in 5, 10 & 20 years! Alan Johnson Jerico Development, Inc.

Maybe This Will Help

For everyone still undecided about how to vote for on May 21

from previous page

Zenith. Imbagliazzo says he has received many reports that Zenith lacked enough staff to handle the claims for ILWU members and pensioners. “That’s something they promised to fix, but people want to see more results and fewer promises from Zenith,” he said. Local and international union officials will be monitoring Zenith’s work to see if there are signs of progress or further problems. Earlier this month, President McEllrath asked International Vice President Ray Familathe and Coast Committeeman Ray Ortiz Jr., to attend Local 13’s “stop-work” meeting so they could gather the concerns of members. Familathe and Ortiz listened respectfully as many members came forward to voice their complaints and frustrations with medical bills that were not being paid by Zenith. “The PMA is responsible for fixing this mess and we intend to hold their feet to the fire,” McEllrath said.

Delays

more staff and send a delegation of claims processors to meet in person with concerned ILWU members and pensioners at Local 13’s dispatch hall. “We intend to hold the PMA and Zenith accountable and take care of the mess they created for so many of our families with unpaid medical bills,” said ILWU Local 13 President Chris Viramontes. “Having all that pressure on the inside and outside made a difference on April 9.” When Zenith claims processors came to the Local 13 hall in mid-April, they got an earful from angry members with unpaid medical bills, some of whom brought piles and piles of unpaid bills with them. Local 13 member and caucus delegate Frank Ponce De Leon had firsthand experience with the frustration caused by Zenith’s bungling of his family’s medical bills. “My son needed an important operation that

Dear Chuck, Not sure if that helps, but thanks anyway. James Preston Allen Publisher

Vote for Garcetti

D, E AND F—the marijuana measures. A few basic facts to understand: medical marijuana has been legal in the state of California since 1996. Nothing in these measures changes that. These 3 measures reflect differences of opinion within the marijuana industry over regulation (how many shops and where) and taxation. According to a summation in the LA Times (April 22, 2013): Prop D caps the number of dispensaries to those opened before 2007/ raises taxes from $50 to $60 per $1,000 of marijuana sold. Prop E although on the ballot has actually been withdrawn by its

backers. Prop F allows dispensaries that opened before and after 2007 plus new ones. Here’s what is tricky: the measure with the most votes wins but only if it receives more than 50% of the vote. I had no idea what to do with all this info but believe that folks are entitled to the relief they can get from medical marijuana (ask cancer patient Councilman Bill Rosendahl) so I asked a friend who was a board member of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws). Answer: Vote YES on D and F. I agree with Random Lengths Moare Letters/ to p. 10

May 17 - 30, 2013

generated hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical bills that Zenith refused to pay,” he explained, noting that some of the bills were heading to collection agencies that could compromise his credit rating. “It’s a mess that has to be straightened-out fast.” De Leon got his chance to keep up the pressure because he was one of 82 Longshore Caucus delegates, who met in San Francisco April 15 through 19, when they discussed plans to keep pushing PMA and Zenith to fix the problems and pay members’ medical claims. Dan Imbagliazzo, Southern California area representative for the Coast Welfare and Pension Benefits Committee, said the problem started when employers chose Zenith to handle claims processing for the ILWU-PMA Coastwise Indemnity Plan. The union wanted another company to do the job, but PMA refused so the matter had to be resolved by Coast Arbitrator John Kagel, who sided with the company’s preference for

for may consider this, your vote is extremely important at the primary only 21 percent of LA voters bother to cast a ballot Naturally, the voters who stayed home remain cynical complainers and may continue to avoid their civic responsibility. Therefore, you realize just how valuable voting is; the direction of the city on any given election day is always hanging in the balance. It’s been 2 years long campaign but dealing some voters still don’t see the clear difference between city controller Wendy Greuel and Council Member Eric Garcetti. The differences are there. They just haven’t noticed, though more than 100 debates and forums, years of public service and a public record. If that’s your situation, maybe this will help. I she loses, Wendy will go back to being a lobbyist at city hall for special interests. If he loses, Eric will go back to being a professor at Occidental and USC. Hope that helps. Chuck Levin Los Angeles

won’t expect special favors from Mayor Greuel? Look at the fact that in her much-touted discovery of $160 million in waste and fraud (unfortunately not discovered during the seven years she sat on the City Council and approved budgets) she did not charge the DWP with even one penny of waste. UNBELIEVABLE !! VOTE FOR ERIC GARCETTI FOR MAYOR Ballot Measure C is also really important. It establishes campaignspending limits (imagine a world without endless TV ads and mailers) and is the city version of “corporations are not people” YES YES YES

The Local Publication You Actually Read

May 21 is voting day in the city of LA. If you are going to the polls or have yet to send in your absentee ballot, please consider the following. In the race for Mayor of

LA, there is really no choice but ERIC GARCETTI. He is smart, progressive, direct and has a personal biography that makes him the epitome of the 21st century Angeleno. The fact that he is the product of such a variety of cultural influences means that he understands that LA is a city of NEIGHBORHOODS that must be reinforced and strengthened. He has vision and direction. He will be a cheerleader for getting us involved in whatever small ways possible to make our immediate surroundings a better place to live and work. As a San Pedro resident, I love the fact that he has is so familiar with our town. He has committed to appointing 3 local residents to the Harbor Commission. He wants to see the port grow but also wants to make the port even greener (he is endorsed by the Sierra Club). As a lawyer, I listen carefully to HOW people answer questions. Garcetti does it in a few straightforward words. Greuel speaks in political doubletalk and is almost frantic trying to cover every base and please everyone while saying nothing. Finally, while I fully support the right of unions to contribute to political campaigns, I am really concerned about the lopsided contributions from the DWP (IBEW union) workers. I don’t want one group of workers to be “sacred cows” that can’t be touched at the expense of other workers doing equally valuable work picking up garbage, trimming trees, working in our schools. Does anyone really think that having contributed $2 million plus (!!!!!!) the DWP

RANDOMLetters

9


Measures D, E and F Courtesy of MedicalJane

On Tuesday, May 21, your rights to safe access as a medical marijuana patient in Los Angeles will again be at risk. Despite repeated efforts by the city to both limit and ban medical marijuana dispensaries in the past three years, there are an estimated 850 dispensaries (possibly upwards of 1,500) operating in Los Angeles. Three proposed ordinances are to be voted on that would regulate these de facto dispensaries in an attempt to bring some austerity to a previously wavering industry. If none of the ballot initiatives pass on May 21, the Los Angeles City Council may revive its efforts to ban dispensaries completely after the California Supreme Court ruling allowed them to do so. To win, a proposition must get more YES votes than NO—obviously. However, if more than one proposition gains support, the one with the highest total of YES votes will be the winner. If the NO votes outweigh all of the YES votes for every proposition, then nothing changes. That is why it is important for you to come out and vote one way or another; your access depends on it.

The Main Differences Between D, E and F

May 17 - 30, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Ordinance E was originally put onto the ballot by the United Food and Commercial Workers, but was pushed to the sideline when its supporters agreed to back Measure D instead. Measure D was crafted by the same Los Angeles City Council that pushed to ban medical marijuana dispensaries in 2012 and has been described as a “Trojan horse” designed to shut down the majority of Los Angeles dispensaries and then force the others out of business through council action and federal raids. Its backers include both mayoral candidates as well as the city attorney. Measure D, or the “Medical Marijuana Collectives Initiative Ordinance” would limit the number of dispensaries allowing only the 135 dispensaries that were operating and registered under city laws before September 2007. The proposition would force almost 90 percent of existing shops (roughly 1,000) out of business. The remaining dispensaries would be forced to pay taxes of $60 per $1,000 of sales, close at 8 p.m., require background checks of their dispensary managers and employees, and would be restricted from opening within certain distances from schools, parks, libraries and other dispensaries. Measure F or “Regulation of Medical Marijuana for Safe Neighborhoods and Safe Access,” was created by patients and members of collectives. In some ways, Measures D and F are similar: they both raise the taxes from $50 to $60 per $1,000 in sales, and both impose zoning restrictions to keep dispensaries away from schools and other certain locations. However, the main difference is that Measure F will allow an unlimited amount of dispensaries. The ordinance would require a 10 p.m. closure, background checks of all managers, employees and volunteers, and each dispensary would be required to file with the city controller an audit of its operations to guarantee compliance with the law. 10

Freedom Riders Honored at UCLA

Additionally, Measure F requires dispensaries to have their medicine tested for harmful pesticides and toxins.

What this Means for Los Angeles

Supporters of Proposition D are aware that the passing of that ordinance would bring about mass federal raids on the state. But they support their ordinance by stating that, “Proposition D would reduce the nuisance that has helped prompt federal action.” According to the Los Angeles Times, a special assistant to City Attorney Carmen Trutanich said that if Proposition D is to pass, the city is not going to seek to shut down dispensaries that are following the law. The assistant, Jane Usher, added that the proposition “has been sanctioned” by the Supreme Court’s recent ruling and that if the court had ruled that municipalities could not legally ban dispensaries, Proposition D could’ve been challenged. Dale Gieringer, director of the California chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, stated that since there is no definite declaration that California dispensaries are permitted in the first place, nothing is going to change as a result of the ruling. This de facto situation is because the task force that was put in charge of clarifying the medical marijuana program that passed in 2003 couldn’t come to a consensus on how the cannabis would be distributed. “We’re hoping that the state will adopt a state regulation system that will calm local concerns about permitting dispensaries and create clear regulations,” Gieringer said. “We’d like to see state regulations like they have in Colorado.” Brad Hertz, the lawyer for Proposition D told the Huffington Post, “From our perspective, Proposition D is the best way to secure access to medical marijuana. If it passes and has the most votes, it means the city council, if they were to amend or repeal the measure, would have to go to voters for any change.” David Welch, the lawyer representing Proposition F (and a number of dispensaries in Los Angeles) argued that Proposition D is only going to lead to an eventual ban on all dispensaries by allowing federal raids on the dispensaries the proposition doesn’t cover. “If (Prop.) D passes, once the dispensaries close, they will never be allowed to open again, eliminating access forever in the City of Los Angeles,” Welch said. While this is true, if none of the propositions pass we are probably going to see a total ban on dispensaries in the city. It’s a lose-lose situation for some people involved. We encourage everyone to call your local dispensaries to get their opinions on the ordinances. Be sure to ask them if they are one of the original 135 dispensaries, this may influence their opinion just a bit. “It’s a matter of trying to work with the city to keep them happy and stay open,” said a manager of Buds & Roses Collective in Studio City, speaking strongly in favor of Proposition D. Buds & Roses Collective is in fact one of the first dispensaries in the city; the 12th she said.

Congratulations to former LA city councilman and San Pedro resident Robert Farrell and Robert Singleton for their historic contributions to civil rights. UCLA’s Undergraduate Students Association Council dedicated a plaque in honor of the UCLA Freedom Riders on May 14, the same day as the burning of a Freedom Rider’s bus in Anniston, Alabama in 1961. Approximately 50 years ago, despite the known dangers involved in this endeavor and warnings from police and other officials, students marched and showed the world the power of coming together. Robert Farrell was among them.

RANDOMLetters from p. 9

that we need to take a stand and make our opinions known! Mail your ballots ASAP or go the polls on Tuesday May 21 but VOTE !! Diane L. Middleton San Pedro

Koch LA Media Buy

The Koch brothers may be on the verge of destroying the Los Angeles Times. The billionaire brothers reportedly want to buy all eight Tribune Company newspapers and use these outlets to promote their extreme political agenda. They don’t care one bit about journalism—and they’re hoping to make an offer the Tribune Company can’t refuse. We can’t let this happen: The Tribune Company just emerged from bankruptcy and wants to unload its newspapers as quickly as possible. Let’s set a high bar for who should own the news in our city. Tell the company to sell the Times to a local owner who will: 1. Serve the news and information needs of the whole community. 2. Act as a watchdog against corporate and political corruption. 3. Hire more local reporters and editors. 4. Produce credible and fair journalism that reflects our community’s diversity. Free Press and our allies will deliver your letter to the Tribune Company’s local office and let you know how you can help push officials there to agree to these terms. The best way to stop the Kochs is to make some noise locally. Timothy Karr Free Press

The Bank on Students Loan Fairness Act The biggest banks in the country—the ones that wrecked our economy and cost millions of Americans their jobs—pay next to nothing on the debt they owe the government, while students pay nine times as much. That isn’t right. That’s why I’ve introduced the Bank on Students Loan Fairness Act to let students take advantage of the same low rates offered to banks for one year while Congress finds a fair, long-term solution on student loan interest rates. The interest rate on federal subsidized Stafford student loans is set to increase from 3.4% to 6.8% on July 1st. If Congress doesn’t act soon, millions of college students will see their student loan payments jump. Some argue that it’s too expensive to keep government loans at low interest rates, but the federal government makes low interest loans all the time—just not to everyone. Big banks can borrow money through the Federal Reserve discount window at a rate of about 0.75 percent. That’s why I started a petition on MoveOn’s petition site, which says: Wall Street banks—the ones that wrecked our economy— should not be getting a better interest rate on their government loans than young people trying to go to college. Unlike the big banks, students don’t have armies of lobbyists and lawyers. But they do have us. Let’s do what’s right and bank on students. Elizabeth Warren, U.S. Senator Massachusettes

A Small Project

Of all things great and small; each of us has an idea, a token of a thought on how to save the nation and the economy. For every automobile driven down the highways of this community, there exists one driver and if asked the question, “What is your take on the economy?” And for every driver there is an opinion and each is valid and waiting for the right moment. The solution I propose is both simple and solves much of what is common among us. Here is the solution; in common lay terms. One need is in front of us and is simple to design, and sell and apply. The need is a for a set of universal, small signs for those who are disabled. The small ( stickers if you will ) would indicate if there is a ‘deaf’ or ‘wheelchair bound’ or ‘blind’ or ‘oxygen in use’ person inside a dwelling and would be attached to door, mailbox, or point of entry; for fire fighters, police, rescue workers, emergency teams. The product is small, inexpensive and easily produced. The sales team would be any church, highs school fundraiser and would be instrumental in raising need funds for any project. The beauty of this idea is this, “The idea is now before you, John and Jane public, and is from one of the people driving down your highway.” The beauty of this idea is this, “Your idea is just as valuable and with the newspaper before you, an idea could save a life, change a life or make a difference in the economy of…how many? Sean Graham San Pedro

Fertile Ground

Spring elections are like planting season: we’re investing

More Letters/ to p. 19


by: Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Writer

T

“Everyone that I paint is wearing something of high fashion or couture.” LaMont reveals. “Almost everybody is wearing something that can be traced back to a designer. I am really trying to convey their personalities.” Because of her fascination with couture, LaMont finds fashion a method of conveying these identities. Based in Long Beach, LaMont is a third generation San Pedro native and a completely self-taught artist; living proof that it can be done. After graduating high school she relocated to New York for two years and completely immersed herself in the prolific art scene. “As a kid I did oil paints and acrylics and other mediums, but watercolor was something I always loved the most,” she said. “There is something to that white paper, and that wet color that soaks in, I’m totally hooked.” After leaving New York, she embarked on a museum tour of Europe visiting every museum she could find. She is working on a commission for the Long Beach Museum of Art. She has found support through the museum and the Phoenix group of museum supporters. The commission is a 20foot watercolor on paper that Ron Nelson, the museum’s director has promised to hang for a year, when completed. This will be the largest

ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment ACE • Art, Culture, & Entertainment

he role of artists is to reflect the world we live in, both natural and perceived. Many times the results are far beyond perception, but in the case of artist Lori LaMont, the fantasy she creates is one effortlessly shared. Michael Stearns Gallery 347 has brought us an exhibition of paintings by Lori LaMont, filled with fanciful images of human figures and fantasy works involving birds and animals that tell colorful stories and captivate the viewer; allowing them to draw their own conclusions. LaMont uses large-scale canvases with vibrant watercolors that often require numerous months of full-time work to finish. Many portraits in the exhibition reflect the artist’s fondness for incorporating friends and family into her work. Yet, many of the subjects may be challenged to recognize themselves in LaMont’s imagery. The basis of these images reflects the dark values of our culture. The results are stunning. They connect the fluidity and softness of watercolor with powerful images that compel those who view them to contemplate culture on a unique level. Through their distinctive size and scope, they invite the viewer to come closer, to inspect the process. The portrait of a society maven in a silk Balenciaga print couture is revealed to be the artist’s mother-in-law. The female figure projects the power of her position in society along with the power bestowed through high fashion.

Illusions Continued on page 17.

May 17 – 30, 2013 May 17 – May 30, 2013

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Big Nick’s Pizza

Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800 Boardwalk Grill

May 17 – 30, 2013

Independent And Free.

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551

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Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also offers classic Italian dishes and sauces based on tried-and-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com Catalina Bistro & Express Grill With the soaring span of the Vincent T h o m a s Bridge above and bustling vessel traffic on the Main Channel alongside, the Catalina Bistro and Express Grill in the new Catalina Express terminal is the most exciting place to dine in the Harbor. The Grill is a wonderful surprise for a quick bite or coffee for locals and travelers. The Bistro and adjacent bar make the new Catalina Terminal the place to go for casual dining and drinks on the heated patio. From 1/3lb angus burgers, homemade soups and clam chowder on Fridays you can’t go wrong. Join us for breakfast and lunch daily and dinners on Friday & Saturday nights. Catalina Sea & Air Terminal, Berth 95, San Pedro 310-707-2440

Iron City Tavern

Iron City features a newly renovated dining room and wonderfully restored bar in a modern setting. The most comfor table gastropub in San Pedro, Iron City offers casual dining for lunch and dinner with food service at the bar. Catch all sporting events on seven 50” screens in surround sound and listen to your favorite tunes on our internet jukebox. (Iron City is a supporter of the Black & Gold.) Iron City features authentic Philly cheese steaks, various hot sandwiches and burgers, calamari steaks and a variety of Italian pasta dishes. Hours:10:30 a.m.-2a.m. 7 days a week. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. featuring 1/2 priced appetizers and drink specials. Free parking in rear. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4766 Lighthouse Cafe

The favorite local cafe for the point Fermin area of San Pedro great breakfasts, lunches and even dinner. Serving traditional offering for breakfast along with specialty omelets, espresso and cappuccino. Lunches include a delicious selection of soups, salads, burgers and sandwiches with hearty portions as well as Chef’s Creations. Dinners feature Top Sirloin Steak or Prime Rib as well as a kids menu. Beer and wine are served. Free Wifi and is pet friendly on the patio. Open 7 days a week 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. close to Cabrillo Beach and the Korean Bell, Point Fermin area- 508 West 39th St., San Pedro. 310- 548- 3354 Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash, soups and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crépes and pastas. Take a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com Nazelie’s Lebanese Cuisine

Nazelie’s Lebanese Cuisine is a favorite of the neighborhood for the terrific kabobs, beef or chicken shawarma, lamb dishes and falafel. Nazelie’s chicken and rice soup with lemon is like a warm embrace—it takes chicken soup to a whole new level. Nazelie uses a recipe handed down in her family for generations, starting with homemade chicken broth, and adding a refreshing touch of lemon for taste and nutrients. Nazelie’s Lebanese Café, 1919 S.Pacific Avenue, San Pedro. (310) 519-9122.

PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING Since 1961 we’ve extended a hearty welcome to visitors from ever y corner of the globe. Delight in an aweinspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the AwardWinning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www. Portsocalldining.com San Pedro Brewing Company A microbrewery and American grill, SPBC features hand-crafted award-winning ales and lagers served with creative pastas, bbq, sandwiches, salads and burgers. A full bar with made-fromscratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Live music on Saturdays. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 • www.sanpedrobrewing.com SPIRIT CRUISES An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 548-8080, (562) 495-5884 • www.spiritmarine.com Think Café Think Café is giving downtown San Pedro a taste of sophistication for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Located in the heart of downtown on 5th Street, Think Café is a magnet for locals and business types alike. Enjoy patio dining for a latté in the morning, soup and salad at midday, or a wonderful rendezvous in the evening, perfect for enjoying a selection from the wine list. The Café also boasts a selection of imported beers. Breakfast at the Café offers everthing from bacon and eggs to eggs Benedict, with a wide variety of dishes to awaken your taste buds. 302 W. 5th St. Suite 105, San Pedro • (310) 519-3662

Trusela’s

Southern Italian & California Cuisine • Bob and Josephine Trusela have been awarded the “Most Promising New Restaurant 2010” award and three stars 2011 and 2012, by the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association. Catering available for all ocassions. Hours: Sun. 5 p.m.–Close, Lunch: Tues–Fri 11:30–2:30, Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m.–Closing. 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro • (310) 547–0993 www.truselas.com

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfor table dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, meat pies, salmon, swordfish & vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.-midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 832-0363 • www. whaleandale.com San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure

2013 Edition

Coming Soon!

To Advertise in Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.


ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment

May 17 – 30, 2013

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Silber & The Good Life—

Entertainment May 17

Pink Party The highly anticipated 6th Annual Pink Party will kick of the Long Beach Lesbian & Gay Pride weekend, starting at 8 p.m. May 17, at 1st Street and Linden Avenue. Attendees will flood downtown Long Beach’s East Village Arts District in a sea of pink. A portion of the proceed will benefit the The Center’s MYTE program. Tickets are $10. Tickets are available at www.downtownlongbeach. org/sales/tickets

The Whale & Ale Restaurateur Talks Food, Culinary Adventures By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

I

n 17 years, San Pedro’s favorite pub has become an institution. Walk inside, the lights are dim and the den of conversation wax and wanes depending on how far or close it is to the weekend. On any night of the week, ask the bartender what’s new in their top shelf, you will generally get a good primer on what’s good and why. If you’re not familiar with Northern European cuisine, the wait staff can educate you and you won’t feel silly for asking. This expert level of service at The Whale & Ale is due to the restaurateur, Andrew Silber. “The main thing... is customer service,” Andrew explained. Andrew isn’t the sort that pulls his punches or sugar coats the truth. “When I look at the restaurants I go to, almost universally the food is pretty good or excellent,” he said. “Not many restaurants survive if the food isn’t any good. What sets them apart is how you’re treated when you get there. And you remember vividly places that give you exceptional service.” Andrew, well–traveled, is fluent in three languages and knowledgeable about fine dining and hospitality. It’s a safe bet that if there’s a culinary adventure to be had, he would know where to find it. In a region as diverse as Southern California, Northern European cuisine is a rarity amidst a sea of Asian and Latin American cuisine.

May 18

Playa at the Maya Celebrate Long Beach Pride with an afternoon full of music, food, cocktails, sexy, boys and girls, from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. May 18, at Hotel Maya in Long Beach. Bring your sexy back and wear your colorful swimsuits. This year Play@ Maya is benefiting in part the IT GETS BETTER PROJECT, an organization that gives hope to LGBT youth. Tickets start at $30. Details: w w w. b row np a p e r t i c ke t s . c o m / event/370270 Poseidon at the Queen Mary Long Beach hottest dance party is pack, starting at 9 p.m. May 18, at the Queen Mary. Celebrate Long Beach Lesbian & Gay Pride weekend with the biggest queen in town. Details: www.queenmary.com/poseidon Venue: Queen Mary Location: 1126 Queens Hwy, Long Beach Viktorija Gecyte with Go Trio Viktorija Gecyte with Go Trio is scheduled to perform, at 8 p.m. May 18 at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

May 19

Wirechoir, Nick Mancini on Vibes Wirechoir and Nick Mancini on Vibes are scheduled to perform, at 4 p.m. May 19 at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

Independent And Free.

Continued on page 16.

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Therefore, educating the local palate, without turning diners off, is a challenge. “Most people, even if they haven’t traveled to Northern Europe, they all know what fish and chips are,” Andrew explained. “A lot of them know what shepherd’s pie is or bangers and mash are because they’ve read Sherlock Holmes or seen it in on TV or something. They at least have a vague idea of it. And those who don’t, ask us.” However, Andrew noted that another, albeit (in his words) “minor” challenge, is people’s perception of a pub. “With a pub, there’s all sorts of types,” he said. “It could be a bar with five stools and that’s it. There are some pubs that have three banquet rooms and a dining suite. For people who haven’t visited England or toured around England, some may have a misconception of what a pub is. And the risk then is that they show up and they become disappointed.” Andrew recalled the old pub, Tommy’s Yacht Club, where one of the main attractions was an oscillating liquor cabinet behind the bar. “When we first opened, I think people in the area thought we were going to be like Tommy’s Yacht Club. It had a long bar with lots of alcohol and beer and not much else. So many people didn’t realize that there was food (at The Whale & Ale) —a whole menu and not just chips.” In the past few years, a number of bars that provide food have taken on the moniker, “gastropub,” signifying the advent of gourmet bar food. Some places meet the expectations, while others fall short. When asked about the proliferation of “gastropubs,” Andrew noted that despite the seeming popularity, it hasn’t truly caught on yet, but that the time is coming when it will. “Real gastropub food is taking something like steak and kidney pie and adding foie gras or puree asparagus and making it somewhat jazzyed up, make it more O cuisine. So, it’s pretty innovative.” Andrew opined that the emergence of the gastropub was a reaction against the general terribleness of pub food following World War II, when England suffered through severe shortages and rationing that persisted long after the last shot was fired in that war. “When I was born, 1954, the war had been over nine years,” he said. “We still couldn’t get bananas. We had to get ration books and coupons to buy them.” The gastropub made it a point in turning their reputation around. It is an interesting sort of history. A byproduct of an all boys private school in Kingston, London (the equivalent of high school) majoring in French and Russian, he knew from the very beginning he wanted a career in hotel management. This desire likely came from extensive travel with his father, staying in one hotel after another. Continued on page 18.


ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment

May 17 – 30, 2013

15


Calendar from page 14. Sailing into Spring Senior Comedy Afternoons will be producing its “Sailing Into Spring” A Nautical Comedy Revue and Luncheon May 19, at The Reef Restaurant in Long Beach. “Sailing Into Spring” is a nautical comedy revue and luncheon. Headlining the show will be Emmy award-winning comedienne and writer Monica Piper, who has written and performed for the biggest shows on television such as Roseanne, Mad About You has and opened for Seinfeld, Neil Diamond, and Gloria Estefan, just to name a few. The cost for the show including a 3- course lunch is $45 all-inclusive with advance ticket purchase. Tickets purchased at the door $50. Details: ( 71 4 ) - 91 4 - 2 5 6 5 ; www. seniorcomedyafternoons.com Venue: The Reef Restaurant Location: 880 S. Harbor Scenic Dr., Long Beach

May 25

Kofi Baker Kofi Baker performs a tribute to Cream, at 8 p.m. May 25, at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro Oklahoma Ollie Oklahoma Ollie comes to the Blu Bar at Crowne Plaza, starting at 8 p.m. May 25, in San Pedro. Oklahoma Ollie welcomes all blues fans & West Coast swing dancers to join the fun at the upscale Blu Bar & Lounge. General admission is free. Details: (310) 519-8200 Venue: Blu Bar Location: 601 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro

Community/Family May 17

Independent And Free.

Stung! Join the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium for a lecture and book signing, from 7 to 9 p.m. May 17, at the John M. Olguin Auditorium in San Pedro. Join us for an evening of the gelatinous kind as former CMA volunteer and researcher Dr. Lisa-ann Gershwin debuts her book, Stung!: On Jellyfish Blooms and the Future of the Ocean. Cost is $7. D et a i l s : ( 310 ) 5 4 8 - 7 5 6 2 x 211 ; w w w. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: John M. Olguin Auditorium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro Spoken Word Sandwich # 7 Enjoy the Spoken Word Sandwich #7, from 8 to 11 p.m. May 17, at the Croatian Cultural Center in San Pedro. The Spoke Word Sandwich #7 is an evening of word jazz and poetry. Spoken Word Sandwich #7 will feature music by Garretson & Gorodetsky; L.A. spoken word artist Rich Ferguson; poet/Lummox Press publisher Raindog; and the Circuitry & Poetry of Mona Jean Cedar’s communicative arts of dance, poetry, and sign language, accompanied by Jeff Boynton and his homemade/modified electronic instruments. Weba Garretson and Ralph Gorodetsky will perform “What Must the Hummingbird See?” that is a backyard song cycle of 15 short pieces about the daily occurrences of our urban wilderness, where skunks, opossums, owls, hawks, and cats manage to thrive. The music evokes a multitude of influences --- from Hank Williams to Hanns Eisler. Their program will be divided into four 15-minute sets, and in between each set each poet will perform a 15-minute set, hence the “sandwich” effect. Details: (562) 331-4351; www.croatianculture. org/portal Venue: Croatian Cultural Center Location: 510 W. 7th St., San Pedro

May 17 – 30, 2013

May 18

16

Long Beach Basket Brigade Fundraiser The Long Beach Basket Brigade cordially invites you to its Hope Gala, starting at 5:30 p.m. May 18, at The Grand Event Center in Long Beach. The event includes a silent auction, cocktails, Texas hold’em and bunco tournaments, dinner and a live auction. Details: kym@lbbb.org Venue: The Grand Event Center Location: 4101 E. Willow St., Long Beach Lawns to Gardens Take a special bike tour of converted lawn to garden landscapes of Belmont Shore homes, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 18, as part of the Long Beach Water Department’s Lawn-to-Garden Tour. The Calendar continues on page 17.

Al Williams Jazz Society Serves Up Bebop by: Melina Paris, Contributing Music Writer

I

t was an ideal afternoon for jazz at the beach. As always, the Al Williams Jazz Society was in perfect form. I have been a fortunate observer of Al and his Jazz Society performing on countless occasions and each time I am reminded why. They’re impeccable. They are veterans of the art form who can’t help but teach while they do.

Throughout the years Al has had a variety of players in the band with a constant core of musicians. The gig on April 27 brought Larry Nash, keys and Henry (Skipper) Franklin, upright bass. The core group is comprised of Dr. George Shaw, on flugelhorn and trumpet, Doug Webb, on saxophone, Tony Piongsett, on congas and the legendary Al Williams on drums. They played three sets, the numbers lasting nice and long, allowing for a great listening experience. After all, the world-famous Lighthouse Café is originally a home to jazz in Southern California. While other genres of bands have played that stage throughout the years, the Lighthouse has consistently shined a light on this particular American art form. Al Williams Jazz Society is a band that exemplifies this notion. They performed a chunk of standards, such as Benny Golson’s “Killer Joe,’ Herbie Hancock’s “Cantaloupe Island,” and Miles Davis’ “Milestones.” True to form with these classics, they simultaneously inject their own dynamism into them, reinterpreting a timeless sound with verve. They also include originals like “Norwegian Eyes,” written by Henry Franklin and rearranged for this group. This number sets you deep within its melody and suspends time. Franklin’s upright bass holds pace, while lightly

floating around the rhythms. As Williams explained to me, this can be a challenge for a percussionist but there was no indication of that whatsoever. This group is a finely tuned precision machine. On “Cantaloupe Island,” they treated us to a lot of fun. It started with Shaw’s sky-high trumpet seizing our attention then the congas offering that island flavor followed by Webb’s soaring sax gliding into a funky groove. Nash glides us eloquently along on keys while Williams’ drums come tumbling through like dominoes. Then, Williams and Piongsett, large on drums and congas are in a simpatico rhythm, beating clapping, brushing and tapping along. This jazz society is just the elixir to set the tone for a jovial day. There was a decent–sized crowd through the afternoon, including some friendly “stay-cationers,” from Santa Monica, as they referred to themselves. They just happened into this historical spot between sets. Sitting next to me at the bar, where there’s a perfect view of the stage, they asked me what was happening here. After a giving them a brief introduction on where they were and who they are about to see, they enthusiastically settled in. By two numbers into the set they were giving me the thumbs up, expressing great enjoyment for what they heard. On jazz great, Art Blakey’s, “The Blues March” Williams’ drums rolled in booming and commanding attention. Webb on saxophone, plays like he’s possessed with the spirit of the saxophone, another friendly neighbor plainly observed. Next, Shaw comes in with a shining silver trumpet this time taking us into a staccato rhythm resonating vibrations through your body; followed by Nash swingin’ large on the keys. But it’s not over; here comes Williams raising the ante. He’s escalating the beat, marching, throwing in beats off the rims of his drums, schooling us; as if to say, “Did you like that? I’ll do it again!” To follow was Lee Morgan’s “The Sidewinder.” Here, right about halfway into the song Nash stands out on keys once again. With his take on this definitive number he tickles the ivories, accommodating any kind of groove you can imagine from classic jazz to soulful and funky. What a pleasure he is to listen to, playing so immaculately. Ellington’s “Sophisticated Lady” arrived next, entering smooth, elegant and dramatic. “Masterful,” commented another onlooker. I couldn’t express it better. To start the final set was “Equinox,” by John Coltrane. With their interpretation they injected a swing into this number, adding African rhythms with Piongsett’s congas, a nice flavor for a day on the shore. As Al Williams expressed, “I had a great time, the band sounded wonderful and the people were great. It’s a beautiful day in Hermosa Beach, that’s just what I feel”. The Al Williams Jazz Society contains some of the finest jazz veterans around. Having them within our reach, locally, to witness them perform is a great piece of good fortune for Southern California jazz and music lovers. And, if you’re going to take a daytrip out to the beach, find parking, enjoy a casual meal and the essences of the Pacific Ocean, the Lighthouse Cafe is the elixir to set the tone for the rest of a happy day. Details: alwilliamsjazzsociety.com


Continued from page 11.

Illusions Lori Lamont, file photo.

piece she has done so far, the offer may have been

• Happy Hour •

Blu Bar at Crowne Plaza • $4 Drinks and half off appetizers. (310) 5198200, 601 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro Godmother’s Saloon • (310) 8331589, 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Iron City Tavern • Happy Hour 1/2-price appetizers & drink specials: 4 to 6 p.m. Mon. to Fri. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro; (310) 547-4766 Ports o’ Call • Happy Hour: Mon. to Fri., 3 to 8 p.m. Taco Tuesdays. Oyster shooter & bloody mary Wednesdays. Live jazz from Mike Guerrero Trio every Wed. (310) 833-3553, Berth 76 Ports O’ Call Village, San Pedro San Pedro Brewing Co. • Happy Hour: 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Mon. to Fri. (310) 831-5663, 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Trusela’s • Happy Hour: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., Tues. to Sat. (310) 547-0993, 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro Whale & Ale • Happy Hour: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mon to Fri., 4 to 7 p.m. on Wed. Late Night Happy Hour: 10 p.m. to Midnight, Fri. Only. (310) 832-0363, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro Happy Hour Listings Are Paid Advertising

Calendar continued from page 16. rolling classroom will pass by 30 newly landscaped homes and will be led by Janine Cormier, principal of the Green Genie, a Long Beach landscape and maintenance company. Cormier will spend 10 to 30 minutes at each of five featured homes, describing the drought-tolerant landscapes and answering questions. The bike tour is free to 40 participants, but registration is required. Details: greengeniesocal@yahoo.com Port of Los Angeles Free Public Boat Tours The Port of Los Angeles is offering free boat tours from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 18, starting the Cabrillo Way Marina in San Pedro and Banning Landings in Wilmington. Tours are on the hour and they are first-come first-serve. Tours will be leaving from two locations: From the Cabrillo Way Marina located at Berth 43, 2293 Miner Street in San Pedro and at Banning’s Landing, 100 E. Water Street in Wilmington. Details: www.PortofLosAngeles.org Adobe Day at the Historic Dominguez Rancho Experience a day at the Rancho learning how to make adobe bricks, pan for gold and how to make a branding iron, furniture and other items that were created by a blacksmith, from 1 to 3 p.m. May 18, at the Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum. Details: (310) 603-0088; www.dominguezrancho. org Venue: Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum Location: 18127 S. Alameda St., Rancho Dominguez

May 19

Salt Marsh Open House Marshes are more than mud. Step out into nature at the Salinas de San Pedro salt marsh. Bring your binoculars, camera, sketchpad, journal or just your curiosity. Discover the many animal residents of the salt marsh with guidance from Sea Ranger naturalists and Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Education staff, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 19, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: ?

May 24

Electric Run Be part of the Electric Run, from 8 to 11 p.m. May 24, at the Home Depot Center in Carson. Electric Run is the country’s brightest and most outrageous nighttime 5K run/walk. The event features amazing, artistic light displays, an energized crowd and premiere live musical performances, attracting more than 100,000 participants to date, including Carmen Electra and Seth Rogan. Participants dressed in their brightest running gear will travel through a neon wonderland, with mesmerizing light art installations, glowing neon trees, rainbow-hued tunnels and lip-up lakes. Details: http://electricrun.com/ Venue: Home Depot Center Location: 18400 S. Avalon Blvd., Carson

ACE: Arts • Culture • Entertainment

a challenge to test her skill. Another interest is the corporate influence on animals and sports. “I was watching the Tour de France and it struck me how the bicycle riders appeared to be like animals running in a herd,” LaMont said. “But because each one was smeared with a swarm of corporate labels, the magic of the event seemed lost.” In most of her paintings there is some element of animals, for which she feels a passion. Her

Under the Influence series is animal oriented in that she tells a story about people and society. “There really is no animal that has not been manipulated by people,” she said. “We use them for sport and entertainment. I wanted to be honest about the capitalistic way we use animals.” The birds and horses are covered with corporate logos which represent the collision of classes –as well as sentient beings- in modern society. H e r g r a n d f a t h e r, w h o w a s the president of StarKist Tuna in Puerto Rico and also a San Pedro longshoreman, is the subject of the identity piece in this exhibition. The painting titled, “Good Taste” features her grandparents, Louis and Lucy LaMont, with Charlie the Tuna swimming beneath the couple. Of course, she dresses her grandmother in Louis Vuitton, a play on their motto “Sorry Charlie, StarKist doesn’t want tuna with good taste, but tuna that tastes good!” Because she is unafraid to explore new concepts, Lori challenges her audience to look beyond the surface meaning of her work to discover the unexpected. LaMont has had 30 exhibitions in galleries and museums throughout Southern California, but this is her first show in her hometown of San Pedro. The exhibition will be open until the end of May. Artist Michael Stearns, who owns the gallery on 7th Street, is known to keep his gallery open during the week. If you see the “open” sign hanging, drop in. If not, put this show on your list for the June First Thursday Art Walk in San Pedro. Details: (562) 400.0544 Venue: Michael Stearns Gallery 347 Location: 347 W. 7th St., San Pedro

Theater/Film May 18

Street Dogs of South Central Watch the documentary Street Dogs of South Central, from 2 to 7 p.m. at the Croatian Cultural Center of Greater Los Angeles in San Pedro. The event will include doggie adoptions and lectures. Details: www.croatianculture.org Venue: Croatian Cultural Center of Greater Los Angeles Location: 510 W. 7th St., San Pedro

May 20

Mack & Mabel Music Theatre West announces the one-night-only benefit concert of Jerry Herman’s Mack & Mabel, at 8 p.m. May 20, at the Carpenter Performing Calendar continues on page 18.

May 17 – 30, 2013

North Country Join this special event featuring Lois Jenson, the inspiration for Charlize Theron’s “Josey Aimes” in the film, North Country, at 6 p.m. May 18, at the Harbor Area YWCA in San Pedro. Jenson is the courageous steelworker whose class action lawsuit forever changed the American workplace for women. Details: www.laborfilms.com Venue: Harbor Area YWCA Location: 439 W. 9th St., San Pedro

17


Calendar from page 17. Arts Center. In Mack & Mabel, famed silent film director Mack Sennett reflects on his artistic legacy – his Bathing Beauties, the Keystone Cops, and of course, Mabel Normand, the waitress from Flatbush that he turned into a movie star. Set against the backdrop of the early days of cinema, this rarely seen musical gem depicts the bittersweet love story between two of film’s early icons. Based on an idea by Leonard Spigelglass, with the original book by Michael Stewart, revised by Francine Pascal, Mack & Mabel features one of the best scores from Jerry Herman (Hello, Dolly!, Mame, La Cage aux Folles) including the songs “I Won’t Send Roses,” “Time Heals Everything,” and “Tap Your Troubles Away.” Tickets start $60. Details: (562) 856-1999 x4; www.musical.org Venue: Carpenter Performing Arts Center Location: 6200 E. Atherton St., Long Beach

Art May 18

Malaga Cove Art Show Bring your family and enjoy a free day of art at the Malaga Cove Art Show and Sale, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 18 and 19, at Malaga Cove Plaza. Chat with the artists and view their work. When you find that perfect painting, photograph, ceramic vase or piece of jewelry you can purchase it with confidence knowing that it is a unique expression of the artist’s vision. About 30 artists affiliated with the Palos Verdes Art Center will show and sell their ceramics, jewelry and acrylic, oil and watercolor paintings. Details: (310) 541-2479; www.pvartcenter.org Venue: Malaga Cove Plaza Location: Palos Verdes Dr. West between Via Corta and Via Chico, Palos Verdes Estates

May 26

Independent And Free.

Student Art Month The Palos Verdes Art Center/Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education proudly presents three student art exhibitions, through May 26, 2013 at the Art Center’s temporary location, Promenade on the Peninsula in Rolling Hills Estates. The culmination of this year’s student art from Art At Your Fingertips, Partners In Art and The Best of High School Art will be exhibited. Details: (310) 541-2479; www.pvartcenter.org Venue: Promenade on the Peninsula Location: 550 Deep Valley Dr., Suite 261, Rolling Hills Estates

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May 17 – 30, 2013

Continued from page 14.

Silber’s Good life

His father was an architect and structural engineer and his mother was a social worker. He knew early on he didn’t want to follow either of their paths. But those years of staying in hotels across Europe, from Switzerland to France served as inspiration. He mentioned his rediscovery of tapas in Barcelona. “I re-found tapas in Barcelona,” he said.

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“They were so good.... There’s a place in Redondo beach called, Tapas y Vino, if you’re looking for a culinary adventure. It’s not what I call top-ofthe-line gourmet, knock-your-socks-off food, but they have a lot of good tapas. Andrew noted there were a lot of places that didn’t have very good tapas, calling them, “kind of generic. A bit like Chinese restaurants, where only when it’s really good, you know it.” He believes it is the same in Mexican and English cuisine. But for some key local restaurants he reserved some particularly high praise. ”I’ll tell you what I really like, Baramee Thai on 6th Street,” he said. “Whoever cooks there does a really good job. And there’s another restaurant on 25th and Western, Sirinat Thai. The food there is pretty good.” Andrew says he always gets sate when he goes to Baramee’s. “Their chicken sate is cooked perfectly every time I’ve had it,” he said. “If you leave it on too long and it becomes hard. But there, it comes out right every time. That says a lot about a restaurant to be that consistent. Especially with something as hard as that to cook.” While there aren’t many chefs whose careers he follows, Andrew has been following the career

of Dustin Trani, who he describes as just incredible and not just because he from Pedro. Another is New Orleans’ celebrity chef, Emeril Lagasse, who is credited with revitalizing CreoleAcadian cooking on StarChefs.com and Chicago’s Chef Charlie Trotter. He and his wife don’t go on vacation often, but when they do, it’s usually a four-day trip to places like Palm Beach, Indianapolis, Portland or Seattle, “so that we could see more of the United States.” “In Seattle, there’s a restaurant called the Pink Door that was excellent, and another called Union,” Andrew noted. “In San Francisco has so many fine restaurants, but my favorite right now is Bix.” Andrew took note of San Francisco’s Piccolino’s and a Wolfgang Puck restaurant in that same city, Postrio’s. “He has some very good restaurants,” he said. “His empire has grown to be much more than just fine dining, which I think hasn’t helped. I think [his restaurants] needs a more hands on approach. But some of it is still excellent.” When longtime Executive Chef David Juarez was still at The Whale & Ale, he and Andrew would take weekend trips to San Francisco just to eat there because it was a fun thing to do. Andrew noted that David was fascinated with food and how it gets to be what it is. And why a chef comes out with those mixtures, flavors and textures. “He loved that stuff,” Andrew said. “That’s what made him a good chef.... So I say, ‘lets spend the night and book hotel and try this restaurant out.’ And I’ve been back since.” At The Whale & Ale, you can always expect to leave in good cheer and well informed on your next destination for your culinary adventure.


IRS Office that Targeted Tea Party Disclosed Confidential Docs from Conservative Groups By Kim Barker and Justin Elliott, ProPublica

to reach them. After receiving the unapproved applications, ProPublica tried to determine why they had been sent. In e-mails, IRS spokespeople said ProPublica shouldn’t have received them. “It has come to our attention that you are in receipt of application materials of organizations that have not been recognized by the IRS as taxexempt,” wrote one spokeswoman, Michelle Eldridge. She cited a law saying that publishing unauthorized returns or return information was a felony punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 and imprisonment of up to five years, or both. In response, ProPublica’s then-general manager and now president, Richard Tofel, said, “ProPublica believes that the information we are publishing is not barred by the statute cited by the IRS, and it is clear to us that there is a strong First Amendment interest in its publication.” ProPublica also redacted parts of the application to omit financial information. Jonathan Collegio, a spokesman for Crossroads GPS, declined to comment on whether he thought the IRS’s release of the group’s application could have been linked to recent news that the Cincinnati office was targeting conservative groups. Last December, Collegio wrote in an e-mail: “As far as we know, the Crossroads application is still pending, in which case it seems that either you obtained whatever document you have illegally, or that it has been approved.” This year, the IRS appears to have changed the office that responds to requests for nonprofits’ applications. Previously, the IRS asked journalists to fax requests to a number with a 513 area code—which includes Cincinnati. ProPublica sent a request by fax on Feb. 5 to the Ohio area code. On March 13, that request was answered by David Fish, a director of Exempt Organizations Guidance, in Washington, D.C. In early April, a ProPublica reporter’s request to the Ohio fax number bounced back. An IRS spokesman said at the time the number had changed “recently.” The new fax number begins with 202, the area code for Washington, D.C.

in our future. We want to see our region blossom under our new leaders’ policies and plans. If the city is our shared garden, we want it nourished, thriving, and beautiful. As far as our county goes, the arts are as invigorating to our cities as rains are to May flowers (and, uncharacteristically of Los Angeles, it’s raining as I write this). The arts nourish the brains of our young people by fostering creativity, collaboration, communication, and critical thinking skills. The arts create jobs and support local businesses to the tune of about $3 billion per year. And the arts connect our communities, supporting the development of safer, more cohesive neighborhoods. When I stood at the podium at ArtsDay last month and asked the crowd of nearly 400 arts advocates present if they voted, the response—their cheering—was overwhelming. People invested in the arts are people invested in their communities. And we vote. Arts for LA’s Arts & Culture Candidate Surveys have been updated for the May 21st elections, complete with new and revised responses from candidates in Districts 1, 9, and 13, new responses for the District 6 special election, and the responses for the top two LA Mayor candidates. Your voice is heard. Let’s continue to build America’s Creative Capital right here in Los Angeles County. Danielle Brazell Executive Director, Art for LA

Important Message from ACJ President Judge Steve White

I am sending you this important message regarding the 2013-2014 Judiciary budget. We anticipate the release of the Governor’s May Revise next week. Alliance members have been engaged in quiet discussion with members and staff of the Legislature and with some within the Executive branch. There has been meaningful concern expressed within the Legislature that the budget cuts to the courts have resulted in a serious erosion of public access to justice. Some restoration of funding is being considered. We anticipate that the Speaker of the Assembly may soon announce the primary budget goals of the Assembly and are optimistic that these will include a proposal for additional trial court funding. We expect the proposal to be coupled with strict demands for transparency and accountability, and a direction that 100 percent of the money be directed to the trial courts. In April the Director of the AOC, Steven Jahr, released a statement that clarified action by the Assembly Budget Subcommittee on April 5. Director Jahr correctly pointed out that the Subcommittee had simply confirmed the Governor’s proposed budget, which continues a permanent, ongoing cut of $535 million to the branch, requiring the trial courts to absorb an additional $261 million in cuts by the end of this fiscal year. Director Jahr’s communication also confirmed that the AOC’s proposed funding solutions this year include a request for a full restoration of funding including: • $475 million restored from the General Fund • $18.5 million to fund appellate court costs • $49.3 million for employee health care and retirement cost increases • Elimination of the 1 percent trial court reserve balance limitation

The Alliance supports these goals, and the efforts of the Chief Justice in pursuing

them. We also recognize there must be buyin of the Legislative and Executive branches. More Letters/ to p. 20

May 17 - 30, 2013

it could find no record of the tax-exempt status of those groups—typically how it responds to requests for unapproved applications.) Just 13 days after ProPublica sent in its request, the IRS responded with the documents on 31 social welfare groups. One of the applications the IRS released to ProPublica was from Crossroads GPS, the largest social-welfare nonprofit involved in the 2012 election. The group, started in part by GOP consultant Karl Rove, promised the IRS that any effort to influence elections would be “limited.” The group spent more than $70 million from anonymous donors in 2012. Applications were sent to ProPublica from five other social welfare groups that had told the IRS that they wouldn’t spend money to sway elections. The other groups ended up spending more than $5 million related to the election, mainly to support Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Much of that money was spent by the Arizona group Americans for Responsible Leadership. The remaining four groups that told the IRS they wouldn’t engage in political spending were Freedom Path, Rightchange.com II, America Is Not Stupid and A Better America Now. The IRS also sent ProPublica the applications of three small conservative groups that told the agency that they would spend some money on politics: Citizen Awareness Project, the YG Network and SecureAmericaNow.org. (No unapproved applications from liberal groups were sent to ProPublica.) The IRS cover letter sent with the documents was from the Cincinnati office, and signed by Cindy Thomas, listed as the manager for Exempt Organizations Determinations, whom a biography for a Cincinnati Bar Association meeting in January says has worked for the IRS for 35 years. (Thomas often signed the cover letters of responses to ProPublica requests.) The cover letter listed an IRS employee named Sophia Brown as the person to contact for more information about the records. We tried to contact both Thomas and Brown but were unable

from p. 10

The Local Publication You Actually Read

The same IRS office that deliberately targeted conservative groups applying for taxexempt status in the run-up to the 2012 election released nine pending confidential applications of conservative groups to ProPublica late this past year. The IRS did not respond to requests following up about that release, and whether it had determined how the applications were sent to ProPublica. In response to a request for the applications for 67 different nonprofits this past November, the Cincinnati office of the IRS sent ProPublica applications or documentation for 31 groups. Nine of those applications had not yet been approved—meaning they were not supposed to be made public. (We made six of those public, after redacting their financial information, deeming that they were newsworthy.) Lois Lerner, the head of the division on tax-exempt organizations, apologized to Tea Party and other conservative groups because the IRS’ Cincinnati office had unfairly targeted them. Tea Party groups had complained in early 2012 that they were being sent overly intrusive questionnaires in response to their applications. That scrutiny appears to have gone beyond Tea Party groups to applicants saying they wanted to educate the public to “make America a better place to live” or that criticized how the country was being run, according to a draft audit cited by many outlets. The full audit, by the Treasury Department’s inspector general for tax administration, will reportedly be released this week. (ProPublica was not contacted by the inspector general’s office.) Before the 2012 election, ProPublica devoted months to showing how dozens of social-welfare nonprofits had misled the IRS about their political activity on their applications and tax returns. Social-welfare nonprofits are allowed to spend money to influence elections, as long as their primary purpose is improving social welfare. Unlike super PACs and regular political action committees, they do not have to identify their donors. In 2012, nonprofits that didn’t have to report their donors poured an unprecedented $322 million into the election. Much of that money —84 percent—came from conservative groups. As part of its reporting, ProPublica regularly requested applications from the IRS’s Cincinnati office, which is responsible for reviewing applications from nonprofits. Social welfare nonprofits are not required to apply to the IRS to operate. Many politically active new conservative groups apply anyway. Getting IRS approval can help with donations and help insulate groups from further scrutiny. Many politically active new liberal nonprofits have not applied. Applications become public only after the IRS approves a group’s tax-exempt status. On Nov. 15, 2012, ProPublica requested the applications of 67 nonprofits, all of which had spent money on the 2012 elections. (Because no social welfare groups with Tea Party in their names spent money on the election, ProPublica did not at that point request their applications. We had requested the Tea Party applications earlier, after the groups first complained about being singled out by the IRS. In response, the IRS said

RANDOMLetters

19


Something’s Fishy:

EPA’s Tests Show Drop of DDT in PV Shelf By Joseph Baroud, Editorial Intern

A Curbed L.A. web article caused a stir when it reported that the presence of DDT insecticide on the Palos Verdes Shelf dropped by 90 percent, or rather 110 tons of DDT contaminants reduced to only 14 tons between 2004 and 2009. Though the study was conducted in 2009, the dramatic decrease got renewed attention this past month ahead of a series of studies to be conducted in 2014. The Environmental Protection Agency has been conducting studies of marine contamination in the Palos Verdes Shelf every five years since 1992.The EPA 2009 study didn’t note anything conclusive about the drop in DDT deposits, but chose to continue capping the DDT deposits with sediment and monitoring the recovery of the Shelf. Nahal Mogharabi, a spokesman for the EPA, said that sediment capping was supposed to reduce DDT concentration levels to 78 milligrams per 1 kilogram of organic carbons and PCB, a toxic environmental contaminant, concentration levels to 7 mg/kg of organic carbons. But subsequent to their decision, the EPA received results from a Baseline Sediment Study conducted in 2009, reporting DDT concentration levels to be at 56 mg/kg of organic carbons and the PCB contamination levels to be at 0.23 mg/kg of

organic carbons. The DDT deposits at the Palos Verdes Shelf are the result of Montrose Chemical Corp. and other industries discharging DDT contaminated wastewater into the Los Angeles County Sanitation District sewers from 1947 to 1982. The DDT and PCB contaminants were discharged through the sewer system into the Palos Verdes Shelf, adversely affecting fish and other wildlife. Environmental groups are warily skeptical of the study’s implications. “I’m worried these latest results don’t depict the contamination levels of the water or the fish, only the sediments in the ocean,” said Urban Program director with Heal the Bay, James Amarillo. The EPA is continuing testing in case the 2009 studies were a fluke. “Studies are being conducted by government agencies and universities on behalf of the EPA for the possibilities of natural dechlorination, biodiffusion from the sediments into the water and sediment transport, being the propelling factors in the declining test results,” Mogharabi said. The EPA estimates that the test results, which

A topographical map of the Palos Verdes Shelf.

include water column, sediment flux, fish tissue, fish tracking, sediment movement and DDTtracking tests, will be in their possession by the fall of 2013. “Depending on the results of the investigation, EPA may re-initiate the cap, or re-evaluate the selected interim remedy and develop an alternate solution.” Mogharabi said in an e-mail message. Biodiffusion is the relocation of substances from an area with high concentrations to an area with a lower one. In that case, contaminants do not disappear, but spread throughout the ocean. If biodiffusion has occurred and contaminants

RANDOMLetters

Another of “the Greatest Generation” Ascends:

Helen DiMaggio “Star” of Star Fisheries

May 17 - 30, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Helen Lucille (Fistonich) DiMaggio died April 25, 2013 in San Pedro. Recently named one of San Pedro’s “Living Treasures” at a ceremony in March commemorating the 125th anniversary of the seaside town, she was a respected lifetime member of the Harbor community. In the 1990’s she was named to “Who’s Who” Born June 1, 1919, she was the eldest child of immigrant parents Andrew and Mary Fistonich. Fostonich, founder of Star Fisheries in 1921, was one of the pioneers of the commercial fish markets now located at 22nd Street, Mrs. DiMaggio matriculated through local schools graduating from San Pedro High School in 1937. As a girl she worked in the family business alongside her father, as did her sister Anita (Fistonich) Mardesich and their brother, the late Andrew Fistonich. Although she was awarded a scholarship to UCLA, she chose to continue working in the family business and in 1938 married

20

Neno DiMaggio. Her husband worked for Star Fisheries ultimately taking over the helm of the company on the passing of his father-in-law. Mrs. DiMaggio remained active in the business as a director of the company for more than six decades Known for her warmth, strong spiritual nature, elegant attire and witty humor Mrs. DiMaggio was a staunch supporter of charitable associations. In the 1950s and 60s she was actively involved with numerous social and philanthropic community organization including San Pedro Peninsula Cancer Guild, Little Sisters of the Poor Auxiliary, the Assistance League of San Pedro, Mary Star of the Sea Church and Holy Trinity Church. She is past president of the Rotary Ann’s and was a member of the former San Pedro Women’s Chamber of Commerce. “My parents were proud immigrants who came to America to have opportunities that our country represents. They worked hard and raised us with strong family values of kindness,

were naturally transferred from the sediments in the ocean to the water, then the degree and the proximity of affected areas will be difficult to track. It would also render the EPA’s latest findings obsolete. Amarillo has expressed concern with the way the EPA is handling the situation. He said that the EPA’s main concern is making sure the public is aware of the issue. Amarillo says that the EPA surveys fishermen, testing their awareness and knowledge of the contamination in local waters. According to the EPA Feasibility Study that was conducted in May 2009, the total cost for the capping project would be $61.2 million. The EPA is claiming almost 90 tons of DDT in the Palos Verdes Shelf to have disappeared. If so, where did it go? Without further analysis, the only assumption that can be made, is that the contaminants have transferred and spread. The EPA will be dealing with a whole lot of unknowns if that were the case, which doesn’t bode well when dealing with the environment.

from p. 19

commitment to community and sharing prosperity with those less fortunate,” she related in a recent conversation upon being designated a “Living Treasure” Preceded in death by her husband and her sons Anthony DiMaggio and Michael DiMaggio, she is survived by her sister Anita; nephews Nick Mardesich and Andrew Fistonich; niece Marie (Larry) Guerrero; cousin Martina (Ante) Butorovic; and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and a multitude of friends. A funeral mass will be celebrated, at 10 a.m. May 8, at Holy Trinity Church, 1292 W. Santa Cruz St., San Pedro. Visitation, from 4 to 7 p.m. May 7, at McNerney’s Mortuary 570 W. 5th, San Pedro. Interment will be at Green Hills Memorial Park in Rancho Palos,Verdes. In lieu of flowers donations may be sent to San Pedro Peninsula Cancer Guild, c/o Phyllis Trujillo, 7 Wagon Lane, Rolling Hills, CA 90274.

Having these considerations very much in mind, we have not made any specific budget proposals while awaiting the Governor’s May Revise and the stated positions of the two legislative houses. After the May revise, and especially if, as we expect, it does not propose additional trail court funding, we plan to offer meaningful options for restoring branch funding. Throughout the state, our courtrooms are shutting down. We are no longer able to provide essential services to our communities, the people who elect us to serve justice. At least 200 courtrooms have closed and 2500 court workers have lost their jobs. For the first time in our history, our core ethic—the adjudication of cases and controversies—is threatened. This did not happen even in the Great Depression. This cannot abide. The priorities of this branch must be revisited. I would like to close with a laudatory reference to the important action taken by Judge Laurie Earl’s subcommittee of the Trial Court Working Group. The committee proposed a new allocation model for funding the trial courts, which has now been “adopted” by the Judicial Council. We understand and agree with the effort to recast the existing historic funding model that may perpetuate inequities. However, trial court funding is a function of the Legislature. It is a creature of statute, not a constitutional function of the Judicial Council. This change was not mandated by the Legislature or the Department of Finance. Such an important change requires a fuller and more inclusive vetting and more input than occurred in the closed committee process. Just as in the federal courts and the other state courts, the Legislative and Executive branches also play an important role in this. Judges should not presume that we can make such significant changes without the buy-in of our sister branches. This is as it should be. Even for those who wish it were otherwise, the three branches of government are necessarily part of the decision. Judge Steve White President The Alliance of California Judges


from p. 3

Harbor Commission Deals Final Blow to PCAC

First Blood on Waterfront Dedication On May 15, the International ILWU, and officials from the Port of Los Angeles and the City of Los Angeles joined together for a dedication ceremony to honor the martyrdom of John Knudsen and Dickie Parker with a monument at the Wilmington Waterfront Park.

The two longshore workers were killed by private security guards when Local 13 raided a camp of replacement workers in the lead up to the 1934 general strike. That strike led to the founding of the ILWU and a series of labor gains that workers enjoy today that includes collective bargaining. With contracts talks due in 2014, Former Local 13 President and Harbor Commissioner Dave Arian noted the coming of automation to the ports in the coming negotiations. Following the dedication ceremony, the union held a march from Harbor Blvd. and 22nd St. to Monument Row on Harbor and 6th St. where a bust of Harry Bridges

and the monument containing the names of longshore workers who’ve died on waterfront sits. Photos: Terelle Jerricks.

May 17 - 30, 2013

cil. “One right we have is to be advised in advance. None of us were informed.” Coastal is one of four neighborhood councils represented on PCAC. Third, if PCAC really had transformed the port, then an open, deliberative process would have been used to create a robust democratic successor process and/or entity in the event that PCAC really did need to be replaced. Along these lines, former port lawyer Pat Nave asked, “Why didn’t the port call and say, ‘Look, we’re all going to go to Room 522 and we’re going to hammer out what a consultative model looks like and then we’re going to come back to the board’? It could have happened. It didn’t happen.” Nave also stressed a related point—that port staff seems oblivious to the difference between publicity and democracy. “My real fear is that left to it’s own devices that the port will use, staff will use an outreach model and not a consultative model,” Nave said. “We have plenty examples of where the outreach idea, of going to the community, presenting something and then coming back, and so forth, ends up in litigation, or ends up in trouble, and plenty of examples where you sit down together, work something out and you get a good model.” With the port’s ‘PCAC-is-so-successful-wedon’t-need-it-anymore’ narrative in tatters by the end of the public comment period, Commission President Cindy Miscikowski switched gears in her summary remarks, suddenly rediscovering PCAC’s original purpose—a first in eight years of the Antonio Villaraigosa administration—but without also rediscovering the Harbor Commission’s own culpability in undermining it. “PCAC was meant to be across the board--the tug-and-pull, the good debates, but having representatives from various viewpoints,” Miscikowski said, and the loss of participation, primarily by business groups, means a loss of “those other entities that should have been a part of an overall community/citizen advisory committee to this board, and that some of the give and take, and tug and pull, and maybe knock-down, drag-out fights would occur in the PCAC forum itself, as it would be presented to us with, then, sort of a synthesized consensus.” However, she then noted, “The evolution of PCAC has gone away from that.” That “evolution” did not just happen, though. In 2005, Villaraigosa’s first Harbor Commission President Daniel Freeman, refused to fill PCAC’s Harbor Commission co-chair slot, which Camilla Townsend had previously occupied, thereby sending the clear signal that PCAC’s input was not valued by the commission, and that others should not value it, either. As Reed said in her comments, “If commissioners do not think the PCAC is an important committee to attend, why would business and other community members believe PCAC is important?” There was nothing stopping Miscikowski from reversing Freeman’s decision when she took over and appointing a new commissioner co-chair, but she did nothing— and now she’s lamenting the predictable results with crocodile tears. By using the foreseeable results of Freeman’s controversial decision eight years ago to kill off PCAC today, Miscikowski only reinforced the widespread perception that the Villarai-

no longer meet on port property; even water for meetings was withdrawn (sounds like a [Victor] Hugo novel)” Under these conditions, Smith asked, “Why should anyone keep coming to these committees much less business and union leaders who [already] had access to staff and the Port?” And so, it was that malign neglect provided the port its final excuse for abandoning what limited democracy James Hahn committed it to 12 years ago, bringing about a temporary, limited ceasefire in the so-called “100-Year War.” Whether there will be another “100-Year War” ahead of us will be up to the new mayor to be elected shortly—that is, if the Harbor Area is even on their radar. Perhaps another seismic lawsuit will do the trick. (See “LA Approves SCIG, Lawsuits Ahead?” p. 24)

The Local Publication You Actually Read

hicle for implementing core aspects of the settlement that followed in 2003. That time-frame, starting 12 long years ago, appeared to mark the beginning of the end of the so-called “100-Year War” between the Port of Los Angeles and the community. But the hurried demise of PCAC now threatens to bring it back for an indefinite encore—this time with much slicker public relations than ever before. As an example, praising PCAC to death was POLA’s preferred mode of assassination—using praise as a cover to misconstrue PCAC’s purpose, the more easy to bury it. “PCAC has accomplished its mission,” said Cynthia Ruiz, the port’s point person. Commission President Cindy Miscikowski and Vice President David Arian both echoed her approach. But the claim was an obvious lie on at least three basic counts, which community members exposed in the limited comment time available: First, that PCAC’s mission is explicitly openended, and thus cannot ever be considered “accomplished.” Smith took this on directly, citing specific items from PCAC’s mission. “‘Number one: ‘Assess the impacts of port developments on Harbor communities and to recommend suitable mitigation measures to the board for such impacts.’ That’s been completed? It’s gone away? We’re never going to have that again?” she asked, incredulously. “Number two: ‘To review past, present and future environmental documents in an open public process—and I want to emphasize that. ‘To make recommendations to the board to ensure the impacts on communities have been appropriately mitigated in accordance with the law.’ That is going to go away?” she asked. “If we still have a port, we need PCAC,” summed up Olive Reed, president of the Harbor City Neighborhood Council. The second basis on which ‘PCAC-has-completed-its-mission’ is a lie is that part of the reason PCAC was created was to put an end to insular, anti-democratic decision-making—precisely the sort of process that was being used to get rid of PCAC. “There was not a consultative process even in this example about what to do about PCAC,” said Diana Nave, President of the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council. “Our neighborhood council for years raised concerns abut the structure of PCAC and has made recommendations over the years about how we thought it should be restructured,” she said. “There’s never been any action on any of those recommendations.” What’s more, she added, “I can’t stand up here today with a position from our neighborhood council because we did not have adequate time to weigh in on this particular recommendation that is before you today.” Similar concerns also expressed by PCAC member Chuck Hart—who cited a litany of PCAC’s own recommendations for reforming its bylaws and functioning within the past five years, all ignored by the port—and by Reed, who asked, “Why is there such a rush to make this a done deal?” She then added, “It concerns me that perhaps the Brown Act has been violated with this issue.” “Under the charter, neighborhood councils have certain rights and duties,” added Bob Gelfand, of Coastal San Pedro Neighborhood Coun-

gosa administration has wanted to get rid of PCAC all along. Random Lengths asked June Smith about Miscikowski’s comments, and she replied extensively, mostly by re-emphasizing with added detail points she and others made before the commissioners, but which Miscikowski ignored— such as the fact that PCAC had been without a commissioner co-chair for eight years, and the long list of PCAC-initiated reform proposals that had been ignored. Smith did add that in making up the scope of PCAC, Commissioner Townsend “spent many hundreds of hours interviewing people across the board…about the best composition” for PCAC and that business and labor groups had limited interest in participating from the start. She also pointed out that “Staff support was slowly withdrawn from committees…PCAC members could

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DBA Filings Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013056859 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Harbor Foot and Ankle Podiatric Medical Group, 1360 W. 6th Street #150W, San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Bruce D. Levine DPM. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above March 13, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Bruce D. Levine, president. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 13, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS from previous page under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13,

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Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013048326 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Local 420 Patients Collective, 600 S. Pacific Ave., #104. County of Los Angeles. Articles of incorporation: 46-1717368. Registered owner(s): General Organics, 11 Hillrise, Dove Canyon, CA 92679, California. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above February 15, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Peter Jason Cappely, president. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 12, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13,

04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013062328 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Soderstrom Garage Doors, 1221 Lyndon St., #10, South Pasadena, CA 91030. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Derek

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013056860 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Zelaya Services, 7606 S. Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90047. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Mauricio Zelaya, 7606 S. Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90047. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Mauricio Zelaya. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 21, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13, 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013044529 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Babes Secret Stash, 1767 W. Chandeleur Dr., San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Connie Lepkosky, 1767 W. Chandeleur Dr., San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Connie Lepkosky. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 6, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires

04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013038133 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Absolute Supervision, 1714 W. 238th St., Los Angeles, CA 90501. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Robert Anthony Torres, 1714 W. 238th St., Los Angeles, CA 90501. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Robert Anthony Torres. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Jan. 1, 2008. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13,

04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013068852 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Alpha Omega Arts & Designs, 455 W. 6th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Thomas T. Asuncion, Jr. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above April 1, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Thomas T. Asuncion, Jr, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 5, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/18/13,

05/02/13, 05/16/13, 05/30/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013062323 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fantasy Spa mobile Pet Grooming, 2671 S. Cabrillo Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Adrian Garcia, 2671 S. Cabrillo Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. Erica Garcia, 2671 S. Cabrillo Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by a married couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above April 1, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Adrian Garcia, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 5, 2013. NoticeIn accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13, 05/30/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013092453 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  San Pedro Elks #966, 1748 Cumbre Drive, San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): 966 Corporation, 1748 Cumbre Drive, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in 1963. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Caspar DeJong, Trustee. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 6, 2013. NoticeIn accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013089373 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Kraakevik Patti Receiver/Conservator, (2) Kraakevik Patti Calif. Probate Referee.15915 Ventura Blvd., Encino, CA, 91436. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Kraakevik Corporation, 15915 Ventura Blvd., Encino, CA, 91436. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name

or names listed above 1986. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Patti Kraakevik, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 1, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13,

05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013089290 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  (1) A-Delta Realty, (2) Properties West Investment Real Estate.15915 Ventura Blvd. #303, Encino, CA, 91436. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Kraakevik Corporation, 15915 Ventura Blvd., Encino, CA, 91436. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 1. 2003, 2. 1977. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Patti Kraakevik, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 1, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13,

05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013093221 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Wheaton’s Eatins, 2017 Lomita Blvd #2025, Lomita, CA, 90717. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Donald R. Wheaton, 25409 Eshelman Ave, Lomita, CA 90717. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above 1993. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Donald R. Wheaton, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 7, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920,

where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13,

05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013094423 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  WorkInnLA, 455 B. West 6th Street, San Pedro, C 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Managed Career Solution Inc., 3333 Wilshire Blvd., #405, Los Angeles, CA, 90010. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above Feb. 28, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Philip Starr, Executive Director. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 8, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13,

05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013094424 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  (1) Godmothers 302 SRK, (2) Godmother’s Saloon, 302 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA, 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Godmothers 302 SRK, 302 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA, 90731. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above Feb. 26, 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Sandra C. Marchioli, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 8, 2013. NoticeIn accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13,

05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013094489 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  (1) Abryus Nursing Services, 146 W. 232nd Place, Carson, CA 90745. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Teresita R. Sanchez, 146 W. 232nd Place, Carson, CA 90745. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Teresita R. Sanchez, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 8, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013089375 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  (1) CPR a Breath of Life, 7606 S. Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, CA, 90047. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Veronica Valazquez, 7606 S. Harvard Blvd., Los Angeles, CA, 90047. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Veronica Valazquez, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 1, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 05/16/13, 05/30/13, 06/13/13, 06/27/13

May 17 - 30, 2013

04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

04/18/13, 05/02/13, 05/16/13

at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13,

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013056858 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Myfunkysocks, 4005 Admirable Dr., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s): Kerry Rizzo, 4005 Admirable Dr., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above October 1, 2010. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Peter Jason Cappely, president. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 21, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13,

Soderstrom, 1221 Lyndon St., #10, South Pasadena, CA 91030. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above October 1, 2010. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Derek Soderstrom. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 29, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 04/04/13,

23


Countdown To Catastrophe? San Bruno; Richmond; West, Texas; San Pedro? By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

May 17 - 30, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

At about 7:30 p.m. on April 17, two days after the Boston Marathon bombing, a fire broke out in West, Texas at the West Chemical and Fertilizer Company plant. Twenty minutes later, the plant exploded, killing 15 people, mostly first responders, shaking houses as far as 50 miles away, and registering as if it were a 2.1-magnitude earthquake. Because it was merely “an accident”—although it involved massive regulatory violations—this much more powerful and more deadly explosion was vastly under-reported in the media obsession over the Marathon bombing. But, some observed, if terrorists want people to notice them, and corporate criminals want to be ignored, the media managed to give all the bad actors exactly what they wanted most. It’s troubling enough as a national immorality play, but unfortunately it cuts quite close to home here in the Harbor Area, where the parallels with West, Texas are too troubling to ignore. In a report on the explosion, the New York Times noted that there appeared to be some who knew “that there were tons of dangerously combustible ammonium nitrate inside, but others did not,” and then added, “The uncertainty over who was aware of the chemical at the plant and who was not, both at the site and in Washington, illustrates the patchwork regulatory world the plant operated in and the ways in which it slipped through bureaucratic cracks at the federal, state and local levels.” The story went on to note that “Many safety decisions—including movers in recent years to build homes, schools and a nursing home not far from the decades-old plant -- were left to local officials who often did not have the expertise to assess the dangers.... ‘The whole thing may have fallen through a number of regulatory cracks,’ said a federal official whose agency helped regulate the plant.” An almost identical story could be written about San Pedro someday, if an accident were to happen at the Rancho LPG facility, according former oil industry consultant Connie Rutter. The chemicals involved are very different, but the deliberately fragmented and failed regulatory environment is one and the same, and the end result could be even more deadly by a factor of 10, 100 or more. “The chemicals are different in what they are, but the effects are the same - a massive explosion,” Rutter said. “And the confusion on the part of the public, - citizens and politicians and regulators - is the same. I’m sure most of the citizens of West thought the plant was safe, probably even the workers, or they’d have been more careful about the fire which triggered the explosion, apparently.” “That’s exactly what we have here concerning Rancho,” she added. There are plenty of ways to gain insight into how intentional neglect laid the foundations for this deadly “accident.” MSNBC’s Chris Hayes provided a damning account of how one Bush official, Dick Cheney’s son-in-law Phillip Perry, blocked the efforts of two Bush cabinet officers—Tom Ridge and Christine ToddWhitman—to reduce the threat of chemical plant explosions (including fertilizer plants) 24 after 9/11, while reporting fellow Lee Fang

Bhopal disaster in India, and the formation of the Department of Homeland Security after the Trade Center bombings. “Second, the laws usually regulate something they needn’t and fail to regulate something they should. This is due, I think to lawmakers not really understanding what they’re working on, as well as the effect of lobbyists and lawsuits from the affected industries.” “This second reason has only gotten worse in the latest years,” she adds. An example of over-regulating is the required reporting of ammonia used as a cleaning agent, continued on following page

The West, Texas fertilizer plant explosion. File photo.

blogged at The Nation website about how the twin manias for austerity and deregulation have only made matters worse. But Rutter takes a longer view, stretching back to the 1960s and 70s, and sees similar patterns repeat themselves again and again. “I have three convictions about laws in the U.S.,” she said, “First, laws in the U.S. are mostly passed after some occurrence or disaster.”

Examples include the hazardous waste laws (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) after Love Canal, the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act after the

San Bruno, California. File photo.

LA Approves SCIG, Lawsuits Ahead? By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

It was deja vu all over again, at the Los Angeles City Council on May 8. The council voted 11-2 to approve the controversial SCIG off-dock railyard project, less than two weeks before a new mayor will be elected. Twelve years ago, in its waning weeks, the Richard Riordan administration rushed through approval of the China Shipping terminal project without benefit of an environmental impact report. The lawsuit that followed eventually transformed the port in many ways, but not enough, it appears, as the Harbor Commission’s closed session agenda the week before the council vote included seven potential Southern California International Gateway-based lawsuits from appellants who were heard—and ignored—by the Los Angeles City Council. How many lawsuits will actually result is anybody’s guess. But three salient points of historical comparison can provide some guidance. First, the Natural Resources Defense Council successfully represented the China Shipping litigants who challenged the similar rushed decision 12 years ago, and has already promised further legal challenges to SCIG. Second is the historical example of the TraPac Terminal expansion, in which litigation was avoided by a negotiation process that created a community benefits mitigation fund—a parallel Long Beach

Mayor Bob Foster has repeatedly invoked. Third is the unprecedented action already taken by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, as explained in Executive Officer Barry Wallerstein’s testimony, “The AQMD has in its entire history never appeared before anybody to oppose a project until today,” Wallerstein said. “We took this step because the pollution from the SCIG will harm public health and because the project does not include feasible mitigation measures as required under CEQA [the California Environmental Quality Act].” On the first point, Wallerstein disputed the port’s claim that “pollution levels in the adjacent communities will be lower.” “Our review with our air quality experts indicates that that is not so,” he said. “The EIR overstates future pollution levels without SCIG, making the project appear more beneficial. “More importantly, the EIR finds that SCIG will cause community nitrogen dioxide levels to exceed the federal outdoor air quality standards for nitrogen dioxide. That could potentially subject our region to federal sanctions.” It’s the AQMD’s job to make sure this doesn’t happen. On the second point, Wallerstein stressed, “The lease does not require two feasible measures that would greatly reduce emissions: Tier 4 locomotives and zero-emission trucks. The lease does not even implement the port’s own goals

for these technologies in the port’s Clean Air Action Plan. “They claim the lease requires zero emission trucks, but there is no requirement stated in the lease, no schedule to adopt a requirement, no implementation schedule, and vague criteria for possible future decisions, that provide much opportunity for disagreement with BNSF.” The locomotive situation was similar, he said. “In essence there is no pressure of any type to make these things happen.” In his testimony, which included arguments paralleling AQMD’s, NRDC senior lawyer David Pettit gave clear warning of legal challenges to come. “Overall, this is a civil rights issue,” Pettit said. “The EIR frankly admits that there will be a much worse impact of this project on the neighboring low-income communities of color than anywhere else. If this goes to litigation, we’re going to file a Title 6 complaint with the [U.S.] Department of Transportation, a civil rights claim in the state court, and I don’t think anyone on this council wants to have that as their legacy as part of this project. If appeals are denied, that’s what’s going to happen.” It’s a disturbing legacy for the first Latino mayor of Los Angeles since the 19th century. But nobody can say that they weren’t amply warned.


from preevious page

while the opposite can be seen in the exempting of reporting explosives under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. An example of a weakening of the law was allowing LPG facilities like Rancho to limit their ‘worst case’ to a 10-minute release. This occurred after a suit of the EPA by the American Petroleum Institute. “Third, affected industries will lobby hard during and after the lawmaking process to make the laws less of a problem for their industry. This last corollary often has the effect of subverting the purpose of the law. And the public has no lobbying group.” Examples include the Chemical Safety Information, Site Security, and Fuels Regulatory Relief Act, which attempted to exempt propane (a very flammable and volatile gas) from the risk management requirements under the claim that it was a fuel for sale. After some thought, Rutter added a fourth point. “Another problem is that as technology advances, fewer people understand the ramifications. A result of this lack of knowledge is that the laws and rules are either not enforced at all or only rarely. This was a factor in the West explosion; they were visited by OSHA only once and that was 28 years ago, according to the NY Times. Rancho had not been visited by either OSHA or CalOSHA in its 41 years, until our group bugged CalOSHA.” “Some citizens have told me they think our objection is the same as NIMBY—‘not in my back yard.’” Rutter said. “But a large LPG facility like Rancho should not be in anybody’s backyard.” Just like the chemical plant in West, Texas.

The Local Publication You Actually Read May 17 - 30, 2013

25


from p. 5

Green vs. Labor

mittee charged with reviewing all construction projects. She claims to have overseen “the largest green building program in the country, a model for other districts.” Before being elected to her first term in 2001, she was a part-time instructor in anthropology and broadcasting at district colleges. She runs a media consulting firm, has her own radio show, “Environmental Directions,” and her own cable TV show, “Eco News.” Vela contends he’s running to provide more students with access to higher education. He’s served on the Montebello Unified School District board since 2007. There he created College Bound Today for students having problems transferring to institutions including the Los Angeles

Community College District. “Change starts with the board,” he charges. “My opponent has had all this time on the board. She cannot work with the other members of the board. She’s had political battles on the board for 12 years. I can build consensus.” “He’s a puppet of the Democratic party’s political machine,” Pearlman retorts. “The political machine sees the trustees’ seat as a starting point for other offices including the state legislature.” “My opponent has had the opportunity to work with stakeholders and relationships need to be nurtured,” argues Vela. “You can say, sorry, I can’t support you but she may not have communicated that to her stakeholders.” “How could I have done it differently?” Pearlman retorts. She further contends the Democratic leadership has never “liked” her “green environmental stance” or simply that she’s an “outspoken woman.” Another Pearlman supporter, Jan Tucker of the Same Page Coalition, says of labor’s oppo-

David Vela is in running against Nancy Pearlman for Seat 6 on the LA Community College District board.

sition, “Just crass politics…She didn’t vote correctly and some of the unions used that to say she did not support them.” Tucker summarizes his view of the battle with, “Nancy isn’t in their social circles. They wanted to create a position for David Vela. The other thing they say is, she isn’t a lifelong Democrat. They need to make room in their big tent.” Pearlman’s campaign site is www.nancypearlman.net and her campaign phone is (310) 202-7553. She has an environmental advocacy site at www.ecoprojects.org regarding her radio

and TV shows. Vela’s campaign site is www.electdavidvela. com and his campaign phone is (213) 949-2651. Visit www.laccd.edu for details on the Los Angeles Community College District and its Board of Trustees. For general details on the May 21 run-off including location of polling places, visit http:// clerk.lacity.org/elections or call (888) 873-1000. For voter registration details, call the Los Angeles County Registrar/Recorder at (800) 815-2666.

May 17 - 30, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Local Restaurants Help Fight Blood Cancer in Children

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On May 5, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Man and Woman of the Year organization kicked off a series of fundraisers to fight children’s blood cancer in honor of Devin Hamilton at Big Nick’s Pizzeria. The restaurant donated 15 percent of gross sales between 5 and 9 p.m. to the cancer research charity. Random Lengths Lengths News chronicled Devin’s fight against cancer in Nov. 2009. In Jan. 2010, she died. There will be another fundraiser at Rizzo’s Pizza on May 23. The restaurant will donate 20 percent of sales from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. On May 30, Dominic’s Pizza will host a fundraiser donating 15 percent from 5-9 p.m.


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May 17 - 30, 2013

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May 17 - 30, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


RLn 05-16-13 Edition