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Sheriff Candidate Rogers Talks Reform and Community Policing in Dept. p. 4 Anti-Rancho LPG Activists: Don’t Count on EPA to Fix Rancho, Push L.A. p. 5 FartBarf: Don’t Judge a Band by its Name p. 11

The Icon’s Life Reflects That of Many Women Honored During Women’s History Month By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

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March 21 - April 3, 2014

Capturing the spirit of Frida Kahlo. Photographed by Philip Cooke; model, Lorena Palma; wardrobe by Denise Herrera.

he Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach had its first free Sunday exhibition of the Frida Kahlo. Not long after opening, the parking lot was full; the residential parking in the surrounding neighborhoods was full; the line leading to the gallery hosting the 247 photographs on loan from Frida Kahlo’s Casa Azul archive in Mexico City exhibit snaked around numerous avenues on MoLAA’s campus and buildings despite the summer-like heat. MoLAA’s media director Susan Golden reported that the museum received 4,000 visitors on March 16. Martyrs and heroes are venerated to something close to sainthood. The things that make them so human are whitewashed, and their lives are reduced to a linear line, simplifying their highs and lows, sapping their humanity. Kahlo is neither a martyr nor hero in the strictest sense of those words. Yet Kahlo is an icon 30 years after a biography on her life was published and 20 years after Madonna’s interest elevated Kahlo’s work to pop culture status. As Kahlo’s story has been told and retold, people have connected to her personal biography in innumerable ways. Feminists, political lefties, indigenous folks, same-gender loving folks and women artists saw their own stories written in Kahlo’s biography. Kahlo’s work and her story created a safe place. Considering that March is Women’s History month, I couldn’t help but reflect on the number of awards luncheons and events honoring women, who in one way or another, dedicated their lives to creating safe places for people. One of those events was the March 6 San Pedro Chamber of Commerce luncheon that honored environmental activist Cathy Beauregard, teacher and environmental justice activist Rachel Bruhnke, local proprietor of The Corner Store Peggy Lindquist, director of Service Learning at Marymount California University Susan Garman, and Port of Los Angeles community affairs advocate and longtime president of the Wilmington Neighborhood Council Cecilia Moreno. Beauregard, founder of Adopt-a-Stormdrain, dedicated much of her adult life to preserving local marine life and ecosystems by cleaning up the trash that flows from stormdrains to the ocean, particularly from the Dominguez Channel. For Beauregard, Iconographic Women/ to p. 13


Community Announcements:

Harbor Area 5K For Student Success

Participate in the second annual walk or run 5K For Student Success, from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. March 22, at Los Angeles Harbor College in Wilmington. Cost is $35 per runner. Venue: Los Angeles Harbor College Location: 1111 Figueroa Place, Wilmington Wilmington Health Fair The 2nd Annual Wilmington Health Fair will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 22. There’s no cost to participate. This year’s fair will include free screenings, healthcare open enrollment sign-ups (before the March 31 deadline), live music, good food, and access to more than 50 organizations providing health and wellness services in the Harbor Area. Location: 1355 Broad Ave., Wilmington Women’s History Month Charity Event A charity fund raising luncheon for Mercy Mission Bear Hospital will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 22, at the Torrance Womens Club. Tickets are $65 or $25 for seniors 65 and older; vendor tables are $75. Assembly member Isadore Hall will kick off the event with a Women’s History Month proclamation from President Barack Obama. A series of cultural arts and spoken word presentations will feature women throughout the centuries, including: • Stephanie D. Harris as Beyonce • Traci Griffin as Mahalia Jackson • Tonja Hadinick as Aretha Franklin • Gloria Godet Mitchel as Leontyne Price • Forte Carter and Group, Joyful Noise, as Gospel Jubilee Swingers • Erica Cottrill as Marie Antionette • Cherie Christian Miller as Hillary Clinton • Starlett Quarles as Harriet Tubman • Yvonne Williams as Fannie Lou Hamer

March 21 - April 3, 2014

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Homeboy Industries Honored at Noche de Estrellas By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

Aztec dancers greeted an audience of about 200 people comprised of mostly Latino families, March 14, at the annual Noche de Estrellas (Night of Stars in Spanish) that the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach organizes. Noche de Estrellas is a bilingual evening filled with environmental educational opportunities for all ages, Latino bands, disc jockeys, arts and crafts, food and drinks, and the experience of visiting the Aquarium. This year the aquarium honored Homeboy Industries, an organization serving high-risk, recently incarcerated and former gang members, who are trying to change their lives in Los Angeles. The nonprofit offers tattoo removal, job training, employment, legal services, case management, and mental health and substance abuse services. “Homeboy Industries does so much for so many and they’ve done it for so long that I believe it’s always a good time to honor them,” said Dr. Martha Molina Bernadett, an Aquarium of the Pacific trustee. Jose Osuna, director of employment services at Homeboy Industries, received the award on behalf of the organization. “To be recognized by an institution like the Aquarium of the Pacific is a big honor and it kind of lightens our hearts and re-motivates us to keep doing the work that we are doing,” Osuna said.

Homeboy Industries was honored by the Aquarium of the Pacific on March 14. Picture is Father Gregory Boyle surrounded by staff. Photo courtesy of Aquarium of the Pacific.

Osuna was a gang member for about 25 years of his life. Unfortunately, he was never able to find any support services in Long Beach, so he ended up going to Homeboy Industries for help. “I’m a product of Homeboy Industries and I’m from Long Beach,” Osuna said. “I’m very grateful that Homeboy Industries exists. You know, it’s hard to leave a lifestyle and really not have any support when you want to do it.” While finding help in the city was hard for Osuna, he said there are indications that things might be changing. Centro CHA, a Long Beach nonprofit that’s worked with underrepresented, low-income families in the city since 1992, has been consulting with Homeboy Industries to try

to build a similar model. The gang problem is only a symptom of a sick community that lacks opportunities such employment and lack of health care, which plague the Latino community, he said. “That needs to happen here and I think that we are on the way to doing that here,” he said. “If the right things happen and the right decisions get made by city government, I think that we’ll start to curve the gang problem here in Long Beach the way that it has in LA [where the murder rates have dropped].” See the complete randomlengthsnews.com

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Community Announcements:

ICONOGRAPHIC WOMEN

Harbor Area from previous page Jan B. Tucker, co-president of the San Fernando Valley/Northeast Los Angeles Chapter of the National Organization for Women, will give a speech about his late mentor, Margaret Wright, the first woman and African American to appear on the runoff ballot for president in California. Details: (424) 634-9615; mothernature7@gmail. com Venue: Torrance Womens Club Location: 1422 Engracia St., Torrance

NWSPNC Board Election Candidate Filing Deadline

The deadline to file your application to be a candidate for the Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council Board Election is March 24. The Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council will hold board seat elections May 6. Some key topics they will be focusing on this year may include: • Green and environmental issues • Public safety and security issues • Homelessness Details: www.nwsanpedro.org, http://empowerla. org/nwspnc/nor thwest-san-pedro-nc-2014elections/

Two Weeks of Overnight Road Closures Planned on SR-47/I-110

Photographed by Philip Cooke; model, Lorena Palma; wardrobe by Denise Herrera. From above, Port of Los Angeles High School teacher Rachel Bruhnke, environmental activist Cathy Beauregard, Proprietor of the Corner Store Peggy Lindquist. From left, Marymount California University Director of Service Learning, Susan Garman and Port of Los Angeles Community Affairs Advocate Cecilia Moreno were honored by the San Pedro Chamber, March 6. Photos courtesy of San Pedro Chamber of Commerce.

women resemble Kahlo’s story in that they were ordinary people, wholly given to carving out safe places for their community and for future generations. Frida Kahlo, Her Photos will run through June 8 and can be seen with free admission on Target Sundays. Details: www.molaa.org Venue: Museum of Latin American Art Location: 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

Summer Jobs for Youth

The Office of Mayor Eric Garcetti has arranged for 10,000 paid summer jobs in the public and private sectors for youth of low to moderate economic standing. The youth will have to prove their economic situation and also must have the right to work Community Announcements/ to p. 5

March 21 - April 3, 2014

of many fundraisers for local non-profits and gathering place for events that have become family traditions in the community. Perhaps most importantly, Peggy has come full circle, mentoring local youth by hiring them—many for the first time—and giving them experience and skills that will benefit them for life, just as Lindquist’s mentor did for her 43 years ago. Whether with the Port of Los Angeles or with Shell Los Angeles Refinery (now known as) Tesoro Refinery before that, Cecilia Moreno has served as a bridge by which residents and Harbor related industries communicate and coexist. A native of Wilmington where she continues to live, Moreno has served on the boards of several organizations including the Wilmington YMCA, Wilmington Chamber of Commerce, and the Harbor Division Community-Police Advisory Board. She co-founded and has co-chaired the Harbor Division Spanish Community-Police Advisory Board since 2004, which fostered a cooperative relationship between the Los Angeles Police Department and the Latino community. The MoLAA exhibit of Kahlo’s select personal photos reveals a broader view of her personal life, from family photographs, formal portraits and candid shots at her home, the Casa Azul in Coyoácan, Mexico City. This exhibit documents the contours of the safe places Kahlo carved out. The biographies of each of these

The Port of Los Angeles has announced the connector from the westbound State Route 47/Vincent Thomas Bridge to Interstate 110 northbound will be closed through March 28, during the hours of 7 p.m. to 6 a.m., as part of a major roadway project to improve the Harbor Freeway and nearby surface streets in San Pedro and Wilmington. The following alternate routes are suggested for traffic travelling westbound on the Vincent Thomas Bridge, heading toward the Harbor Freeway: Preferred Alternate Route (in blue): -Exit at Harbor Boulevard -Left on Front Street. -Right on Pacific Avenue (becomes John S Gibson Boulevard) -Left onto I-110 North on-ramp from John S Gibson Blvd. Additional Alternate Route (in purple): -Exit at Gaffey Street -Right on Gaffey Street -Right on Channel Street -Left on Pacific Avenue (becomes John S. Gibson Boulevard) -Left onto I-110 North on-ramp from John S. Gibson Boulevard For future updates call (310) 732-3362.

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the key to preserving this safe space was mentoring and teaching local students to be good stewards of the environment through monthly cleanups and educational field trips to conduct water and soil tests. She was the vanguard that got the Port of Los Angeles to restore the 22nd Street freshwater wetland and is involved in the restoration of Gardena Willows Wetlands Preserve. She will be starting high school tours of the channel with Carson schools in March to learn hands on about stormwater pollution issues. Beauregard has fought and defended this safe space even as she raised two sons, sending one through UC Berkeley’s Integrated Biology Program and the other to San Pedro High School’s Marine Magnet. Bruhnke’s sense of justice—whether it was labor, environmental or otherwise—and her experience from her travels through the Americas as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer led her to become an activist on behalf of the marginalized and victims of U.S. imperialism. As a coordinator of the Eco Cuba Exchange at the human rights organization Global Exchange, Bruhnke studied political science and Latin American affairs at California State University Long Beach, earning a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in Environmental Resource Engineering from CSU Humboldt after researching renewable energy use in Cuba. She coordinated the filming of The Power of Community: How Cuba Survived Peak Oil, a film of international acclaim and audience. As a Spanish and environmental engineering studies teacher at the Port of Los Angeles High School, Bruhnke has made it her mission to create a safe space for young people to become “active protagonists in improving our world.” The manifestation of this mission is her tireless work with the POLAHS’ Green Festival, the Al Gore Skype-In talk on Climate Change this past year and the local kickoff for the Great March for Climate Action. Bruhnke is the proprietor of Rachel’s Greenhousing, helping people adapt to the local effects of global climate change by becoming more resource-resilient in food, energy and water resources on their properties. She also is the founder of Harbor Farms, which promotes urban agriculture in the Harbor Area. She served on the board of the Diane Middleton Foundation and serves on the board of the Harry Bridges Institute and Witness for Peace Southwest, that focuses on ending military and economic violence in Latin America and the Caribbean. Director of service learning at Marymount California University Susan Garman traveled the world for 15 years through Semester at Sea, a program designed to prepare students to address the challenges of an interdependent world by educating them at sea. In this context, the world is their classroom. In her capacity, she helps faculty members develop class service projects that connect their students to the curriculum through the experience of assisting others. Peggy Lindquist’s early experience in customer service and hospitality while working at a pizzeria portended her opening San Pedro’s Corner Store, a gathering place for locals of every stripe, creed or ideological perspective. Lindquist created a space for local artists to display their work and Bruhnke’s Second Saturday Harbor Farms, where residents can buy and sell produce grown from their yards, while encouraging urban agriculture. The Corner Store has also been the site

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Assistant Sheriff Todd Rogers Aims for the Top Job

Candidate’s Community Policing Ideas Has Plenty of Backing from Birth City, Carson

March 21 - April 3, 2014

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

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It’s not uncommon for a candidate running for sheriff to describe the solution to the Los Angeles County Sheriff Department’s problems as being some variation of the old “tossing out the few bad apples” routine, that if the deputies that are adherents of Sheriff Lee Baca or former Undersheriff Paul Tanaka, they would be dismissed. It’s rare to hear the candidates describe the problems as being both cultural and systemic. Assistant Sheriff Todd Rogers is in some ways no different, except that he is because of his experience and perspective. In a March 1 interview with Random Lengths News, Rogers discussed his thoughts about the department. “Lee Baca trusted the wrong people and they sent messages through the organization, which is the wrong message. You know, ‘you work the gray area; that it’s OK to be a card-carrying member of a racist clique of deputies,’” said Rogers, referencing Tanaka’s connection to the Vikings deputy clique and the pep talks he has allegedly given to deputies over the years. “That attitude, from nearly the highest levels of the organization, permeated down to the front line supervisors. Deputies got that message. And they thought, ‘Wow, this is what we should do when inmates act up and beat their butts and show them who’s boss; show them who is running this jail.’” Rogers acknowledged that law enforcement has to use force whether in the field or in the jails, but that it has to be “constitutional force.” “You use force as a last resort,” he said. “Once you no longer need to use force, you stop. But we have leaders that were not sending the right message. And then, when people were getting out of hand and they weren’t being held accountable. Things fell apart.” Rogers is a 30-year veteran of the department, whose stint includes 6 years as captain of the Carson station and four years as commander of the Central Patrol Division, which includes Avalon, Compton, Marina Del Rey, East Los Angeles and South Los Angeles. After the numbers inmate abuse reports increased, and Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors blue ribbon panel released the Violence in the Men’s Central Jail report, Sheriff Lee Baca appointed Rogers to implement the many of the changes suggested by the panel. Like Tanaka, Rogers has an experienced political hand after serving several terms on the Lakewood City Council since 2001 and winning his latest re-election to the council in 2013. Lakewood is a general law city with a strong city council and rotating mayorship. Rogers has served two 1-year terms as mayor and is currently the vice mayor of Lakewood. Rogers has enthusiastic support in Compton, due primarily to the goodwill the sheriff department has garnered in the falling crime numbers. Roger’s also has significant support from his home town of Carson. Former Carson mayor and political insider Vera DeWitt is on his campaign staff. A whole cadre of Carsonites have lined up behind him, including current and past council members, City Clerk Donesia Gause and City

Assistant Sheriff Todd Rogers. Photo by Terelle Jerricks.

Treasurer Karen Avilla. Rogers fashions himself a strong community policing advocate, and has the credentials to back it up. Following the 1992 Los Angeles Riots, the Carson Station captain asked Rogers to launch a community policing pilot project at the Centerview/Glennarm housing development. “I did all of this research on community policing strategies,” Rogers said. “What made them work, and what made them fail. And we tried to instill those principles up there. It was a monumental success.” Rogers noted that he has continued training police officers for the past 22 years on community policing. One of his brainchildren was the creation of the Regional Community Policing Institute, which formally trains police officers in any region of California on community policing. “I’ve trained thousands,” he said. “We’ve actually created an award too, the James T. Wilson Award for Community Policing to recognize agencies around the state for doing it well. In 2008, we won the award. And, just a week ago, we went to Monterrey and it’s the 15th anniversary of the award. Three agencies were recognized this year.” In the last week of this past February, the Association of Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs had a closed door debate between the candidates running for sheriff. At such an event, you would expect candidates to say all the right things in front of the right audience. The Los Angeles Times, which reported from a recording of the event, quoted Roger’s critique of the sheriffs deputies’ characterization in the media: “This is an amazing time and an amazing race. We have deputies doing what they’re told to do and they get indicted by the federal government ... the L.A. Times keeps telling us that the Sheriff’s Department needs a new leader, someone from the outside with a fresh set of eyes,” said Rogers, one of the two subordinates that outgoing Sheriff Rogers/ to p. 10


Rancho LPG Enforcement Delays Underscore Deeper Problems

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area from p. 3 to apply. These are quality jobs that will expose youth to career opportunities and allow them to develop valuable skills. The online application opens on April 1 at www.summerjobsLA.com. Please take note of the date and prepare your teens as the application will be open for a limited time. The selection process is based on lottery by regional area. In the mean time, there are free workshops with mock interviews and resume building guidance at http://hirelayouth.com/wrc/wrc. html.

Ending Homelessness: Impossible

Mission

Not

Learn about the high costs of chronic homelessness to society, how homelessness is being addressed on local and national policy levels and solutions for the community, at 6 p.m. April 2, at the Grand Annex in San Pedro. Michael S. Brophy, Marymount California University president, will moderate the discussion. Panelists include: Kerry Morrison, director of the Hollywood Property Owner’s Alliance; Jeremy Sidell, chief development and communications officer for PATH, People Assisting the Homeless; and Tahia Hayslet, executive director of San Pedro’s Harbor Interfaith Services. A Q-and-A and networking will follow the panel discussion. The event is free. Details: planning@centralsanpedro.org Venue: Grand Annex Location: 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

Delays in enforcement processes by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Homeland Security at the Rancho LPG facility have only served to expose deeper problems, according to local activists seeking to protect public health and safety. On Feb.19, Lisa Pinto, district director for Rep. Henry Waxman, briefed the Council of Home Owner Associations in Rancho Palos Verdes with a progress report. “According to DHS, the site security plan has now been approved,” said Pinto in an email to community activist Janet Gunter ahead of the meeting. “The approval of the site security plan is the first step in compliance phase…. The facility now enters the compliance phase, which means the facility is responsible for implementing the security measures described in the site security plan and DHS will return to conduct a compliance inspection.” The initial inspections happened at the end of 2013 and the compliance inspection will be “about a year after the security plan is approved,” Pinto said, What that means is utterly opaque in one sense and crystal clear in another, Gunter said.

What’s clear is that Rancho has never previously been in compliance with DHS rules, despite its numerous representations of responsibility. “It means that all these previous years Rancho never had a security plan specific to this facility and its content,” Gunter said. What’s opaque is virtually everything about the plan itself. “We have been so left out for so many years of this whole consideration of our own hazard,” Gunter said. “When do we get to come in and sit in on this? When do we get to decide what we would have agreed to in the way of degree of hazard?” Gunter pointed out that Rancho had been built next to existing homes. “Obviously the whole siting process was deeply, deeply flawed,” she added. “And, we’ve never had the opportunity to even understand what transpired.” Of course, specific security details may have to be classified, but the entire process remains so shrouded in secrecy, there’s no meaningful way for informed public consent. “Where is the assessment of the hazard that should’ve been in advance of the creation of the

security plan?” Gunter asks. “Who went in there and decided the degree of harm? [Who] did a comprehensive risk analysis necessary in order to create a security plan? Does it even exist? Nobody is answering that question.” Then, on Feb. 23, Gunter and other activists teleconferenced with EPA lawyer Andrew Helmlinger for the purposes of clarifying a Freedom of Information Act request for documents related to EPA’s enforcement action announced almost one year ago. “It’s unclear about how a lot of this stuff is getting resolved,” said Earthjustice lawyer Adrian Martinez, who is hopeful that the EPA will provide the requested documents. Noel Weiss, a public policy advocate, who’s crafted a set of Rancho-related proposals for the Rancho Palos Verdes City Council to consider, also was upbeat. “The meeting was very helpful,” Weiss said. Some of what they learned was rather troubling, however. “EPA really doesn’t have any permit requirements here,” Weiss said. “It was more or less happenstance when they even visited Rancho Deeper Problems/ to p 17

Pulse of the Ports

The Port of Long Beach is hosting the Pulse of the Ports, a peak season forecast breakfast, from 7 to 10 a.m. April 2, at the Grand Ballroom in the Long Beach Convention Center. Experts from throughout the supply chain will present the outlook from the view of an economist, importer, exporter, ocean carrier, trucking company executive and more. Details: (562) 283-7755; www.polb.com/ pulsersvp Venue: Long Beach Convention Center Location: 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

Metro Wants Your Feedback

By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

Captain Eddie Rivero (right) and his deputies Lt. Jeff Adams (center) and Sgt. Mike Austin (left) of the Carson Sheriff’s station. Photo by Lyn Jensen

The men were asked to address a hypothetical example. Let’s say the husband, Dan, comes home late, having some issues and beats his wife, Mary. After police are summoned and Dan is arrested, what role does FAIR play? “Our FAIR program folks are going to call Mary and talk to her,” Austin explained. “Once she expresses the need for certain types of resources, they now can present those resources.” The goal, continued Austin, is to “bridge the gap between law enforcement and victims of domestic violence, through a collaboration to ensure that victims are aware of their rights and the resources available to them.” Some domestic violence cases may be categorized as a misdemeanor, but others are handled as aggravated assault, Rivero pointed out. Austin estimated that about half of the Carson station’s caseload of crimes against persons involve domestic violence. He followed up to say the station has handled 163 such aggravated

assault cases in its jurisdiction over the two years of Rivero’s leadership. However, Rivero and his deputies caution that the FAIR program does not set reducing numbers of cases as a goal, because domestic violence happens in every community and law enforcement cannot monitor every family—only respond after the fact. Prevention must be the work of community resources and education. “We have never had an issue where someone couldn’t FAIR Approach/ to p. 10

March 21 - April 3, 2014

While much media attention is being focused on the top of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department—a campaign to elect a new sheriff in the wake of a jailhouse scandal—the Carson sheriff’s station has been quietly implementing a new community-level response to domestic violence. It’s called the Family Abuse Intervention Resource, or FAIR, program, in which three specially trained volunteers, together with case detectives, form a Domestic Violence Response Team. Eddie Rivero has been captain of the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Carson Station for two years. FAIR is one new feature added on his watch. He and two of his deputies, Lt. Jeff Adams and Sgt. Mike Austin, recently took time to explain the program to Random Lengths. “This is something that’s actually very different for our department,” Rivero described. “We can circle back to victims of domestic violence and just offer some support after the case is adjudicated.” However, he gave credit for implementing the change to his station chief, Michael Rothans. “Every year, our chiefs have to have what they call goals,” Rivero explained. “Our current chief took this program — it was in its infancy when he took over as chief — and he just expanded it.” “This program originated prior to this (at another sheriff’s facility) when it wasn’t a departmental-wide program,” added Austin, who is tasked with overseeing FAIR. “Early in 2010 is when the department really took notice of this being a really good program and departmentwide started implementing it.” He also stated it’s funded by the County of Los Angeles.

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The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Metro, is inviting the public to take part in hearing on the toll lanes on the 110 and 10 freeways. Congress passed legislation under the Bush administration allowing for the monetizing of the roadways through tolling projects, and the 110 and 10 “express lanes” project was the first such rollout of toll lanes in Los Angeles County. The “pilot” project was to run a minimum of one year, after which time, Metro would assess how the pilot project has gone, and whether to seek state authority to keep the tolling project operating. These public hearing, therefore, represent an important opportunity for the public to weigh in on the question of tolling itself, and on the impact and implementation of pilot project. Free parking is available on site at each location. March 22, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Council Chamber at City Hall 1700 W. 162nd St. Gardena, CA 90247 Served by Gardena Bus Lines 1x, 2 and 3 March 27, 6 to 8 p.m. Civic Center Library 3301 Torrance Blvd. Torrance, CA 90503 Served by Torrance Transit Lines 1, 2 and 6 April 3, 6 to 8 p.m. Inglewood City Hall Community Room 1 W. Manchester Blvd. Inglewood, CA 90301 Served by Metro Bus Lines 40, 111, 115, 212, 215 and 740 Submit comments by April 7 to: Metro, Congestion Reduction Demonstration, One Gateway Plaza – MS 99-25-1, Los Angeles, CA 90012 Email: expresslanes@metro.net Please enter “It’s About Time” in the subject line.

Sheriff Takes FAIR Approach to Domestic Violence

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March 21 - April 3, 2014

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


— Instructor Seeks District 5 Council Office Long Beach City Council Race By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

Sutfin is referring to retrofit studies. While most of the city council seems bent on tearing down the existing building and constructing a completely new civic center after they were told that the Long Beach City Hall building is not seismically fit, few have discussed the options of retrofitting the city hall and the Downtown Library, which also has drainage and roof issues. But the biggest issues in his district relate to the economics of the Long Beach Airport and the surrounding area, he said. “When I look at the economic focus or the economic identity of Long Beach, I look at two things: it’s the airport and Boeing, and the Port of Long Beach,” Sutfin said. He aims to bring more high-tech industries to the area. He believes the city must create think tanks and identify its resources and assets. Then, turn around and recruit large engineering industries such as new energy, solar energy, biotech and robotics, for which he cites the city’s local colleges as having talented people to pool from. But higher paying jobs may not solve all of the city’s issues. With more than 4,300 homeless people in Long Beach, finding facilities for the homeless has been a challenge. After the announcement of the army’s base realignment and closure of Schroeder Hall in District 5, in 2005, the idea was to transfer the land to the city so that it could benefit the homeless and mentally ill. However, most communities, including District 5, fought such efforts. Sutfin expressed his disappointment. “The important aspect of this issue is that it followed democratic process,” he said. “I am a little disappointed because the location of Schroeder Hall seemed to be a good place for the non-residential facility. Especially for those in District 5 who would have benefitted from the services. True it would have brought people from the whole city, but it was, as I recall, over a thousand feet from any residence. This is a human issue which requires thoughtful consideration. Those services were ultimately displaced to another part of the city and any potential impact on property values was averted.” Another issue fought by the community is the placing of a cell phone tower at Wardlow Park. “Cell phone towers have been shown to emit electromagnetic waves that can increase the risk of cancer with extended, close range, exposure,” he said. “Any installation should be placed in

Long Beach candidate for city council, Tom Sutfin. Photo courtesty of Tom Sutfin.

such a way that is aesthetically pleasing and creates no opportunity for extended exposure.” He also recognizes that there are obvious field improvements needed with regard to the green belt and Douglas Park. To that end, he would like to see the creation of turf field through privatepublic partnerships. As with education, Sutfin believes public safety is rooted in communication and understanding. He wants to advocate for a water-bearing engine for his district. “The movement of assets in the City of Long Beach and the reduction of force have created a small void in the station of Palos Verdes and Woodruff,” he said. “Right now, there [are] only [emergency medical] services there. There is not a fire engine there…. We ought to bring back some those assets we pulled out early on.” He also would like to create community fairs and/or block parties where youth may do community service, police would present their reports and the fire department would provide information and emergency training. Sutfin recognizes he may not have all the answers, but he is willing to learn in the process. Nevertheless, he believes he has a lot to offer. “The biggest thing is build a community,” he said. “That’s a big part of being a council person….It’s about collaboration; it’s about building community even within the group.” Visit www.randomlengthsnews.com for more Long Beach city elections.

On March 14, about 3,000 members of the ILWU cast their ballots to elect new executive board, resulting in 9 of the 13 races headed for run-offs on March 25. Aside from electing a president, vice president, Labor Relations Committee representative, the union also elects the day business agent, night business agent, trustee, day dispatcher, day flex dispatcher, Casual Hall dispatcher, Casual Hall sergeant-at-arms, chairman of stewards, Grievance Committee and Publicity Committee. For president, former Vice President Bobby Olvera is headed into a runoff against former President Joe Cortez with 37.7 and 36.8 percent, respectively. President Chris Viramontes polled a distant third with 10.9 percent of the vote. Eleven candidates filed to run for vice president, but like the race for the presidency is headed for runoff between Mondo Porras (17.9 percent of the vote) and Alberto Bonilla (14.5 percent). Eric Aldape came in third with 13.5 percent of the vote. Mark Mascola is the representative-elect for the Labor Relations Committee after securing 67.2 percent of the vote against Michael J. Contreras. With labor contract negotiations with the Pacific Maritime Association just around the corner in June, this election was an important one for members frustrated with the distractions related to the ILWU Health Benefits Plans transition from CIGNA to Zenith Solutions and divisions related to equalization of hours between workers from the Dispatch Hall and steadymen, workers exclusively chosen by employers from the Dispatch Hall. Visit www.randomlengthsnews.com to read further coverage related to the ILWU.

Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council Unanimously Passes PCAC Successor Proposal After a one-month delay, on March 11, Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council passed a motion calling for the creation of “a joint committee of the Harbor Area Neighborhood Councils” to review and comment on Port of Los Angeles projects. “It is our intention that this committee will regularly liaise with the Port of Los Angeles Environmental Management Division throughout all stages of proposed projects, from a preCEQA [California Environmental Quality Act] publication stage to project finalization and mitigation condition oversight,” the motion read. “It wasn’t anything too controversial,” said Port Committee Chairman Frank Anderson. “It passed unanimously.” This follows a similar proposal the Coastal San Pedro Neighborhood Council passed in February. News Briefs/ to p. 17

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Most seasoned teachers recall their first year in the profession as being one big blur of preparation, teaching, grading and stress punctuated with fun. For Long Beach Council District 5 candidate Thomas Sutfin, the same can be said of campaigning for public office—except that it’s more stressful. “Kids can be critical, but accept you as long as they know you care,” said Sutfin, who has taught for 23 years. “On the campaign trail it’s easy for people to be critical (they need to) and not know how much you care about the role of being on the city council.” Sutfin has also operated a flight instruction business for the past 6 years. The computer programming teacher at Milikan High School got his first exposure to politics about 8 years ago, when he helped his friend Dave Radford in his bid for the same seat against Gerrie Schipske. One of the things Sutfin admires about Councilwoman Schipske is her fight for more transparency in the city. He said he would like to continue that effort and add more access to the conversation. Taxpayers should have access to how their funds are used. “Government should be both accessible and transparent to the community it serves,” he said. “Improving the city’s Web presence so that services can be rendered more efficiently is one strategy to improve customer service.” The father of two boys considers himself to be fiscally conservative, believing there is much wasteful spending that needs to be reconsidered. He said he decided to run for office after a friend of his responded to Sutfin’s complaints about city spending. His friend’s advice was, “Do something about it.” “After taking that first step, I realized quickly [that] in addition to poor use of city funds, there are a great number of additional issues that have to be addressed,” Sutfin said. “The fundamental thing about fiscal conservancy is, ‘a penny in, a penny out’…If you are going to spend money on something, the people of Long Beach ought to see the results of that; it should be almost a oneto-one correlation.” One expenditure Sutfin is looking at more closely these days is the rebuilding of the Long Beach Civic Center. “There is some information that hasn’t come out yet,” Sutfin said.

ILWU Local 13 Election Ends in Runoffs

March 21 - April 3, 2014

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Connecting Solutions to the Problem

Sales taxes for street repairs is like closing courthouses to provide justice James Preston Allen, Publisher

March 21 - April 3, 2014

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Miguel Santana, the chief administrative officer for Los Angeles, issued a 37-page report on the budget the other day, warning the elected officials about expanding services without having the money to pay for them. Sounds logical. This, as the city grapples with a lingering $242 million deficit and a slowly recovering economy. Meanwhile, Councilman Joe Buscaino, has been promoting an initiative to repair thousands of miles of city streets and sidewalks. But where’s the money for this billion dollar project to come from? The CAO’s suggestion is a sales tax. The week before this report, the City Attorney’s Office, flanked by Los Angeles Police Department Chief Charlie Beck, hosted a news conference saying that the city was now prepared to enforce its ordinance on medical marijuana dispensaries and only allowing for some 100 shops to continue operating. The rest will be forced to close. This announcement, oddly enough, came the Monday after the California Democratic Party convention in Los Angeles, where the party passed a resolution to support the full legalization of marijuana statewide: taxing and regulating it appropriately. Seems like a significant disconnect between politics, policies and law enforcement. An even more curious addition to this disconnect is the address given to the state legislature by the California Supreme Court Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, who warned of a brewing civil rights crisis in the state, due to the continued defunding of the courts and the closing of courthouses (our San Pedro courthouse being one of the victims). “A one-way, three-hour trip to a courthouse can’t be fair in anyone’s book,” she is reported as saying. This, after the legislature has slashed California’s court system by some $1 billion within the past five years. This has affected Los Angeles County and City by the closure of at least five court houses and the logjam of cases causing serious delays in family court, juvenile court and civil cases. I have, in the past, exclaimed that justice delayed is justice denied. Aren’t we the ones who go around the world extolling to other nations, including Russia, that we are the leading example of a “nation of laws and justice?” It would be far too easy to throw up our

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hands at all of this and cite this chaos as just one more example of government dysfunction. I disagree. The real malfunction is one of communication by those whom we’ve elected, and their failure to hold a much more holistic debate on revenue sources and expenditures. It would seem like many in government are holding these discussions without any historical context or understanding of the civic imperative that the tax be connected to what it is being levied for. The gas tax, for instance, is used for maintaining our state highways; flood control tax is used for what it’s named for, as are the taxes for schools et cetera. When lawmakers disconnect the tax from its intended use, people end up resenting it. So how do we pay for fixing the streets and sidewalks in Los Angeles you might ask? One might humorously propose taxing car tires and shoes or we might come to the conclusion that all property owners benefit from repair and maintenance of the public right-of-way. There is a direct relation between property values and good streets and sidewalks. Perhaps commercial properties benefit more than residential ones but still there is an inherent value to property owners that comes with well-maintained sidewalks and streets. Similarly, our courthouses are also a kind of infrastructure—an arguably essential one for protecting our civil liberties. They should be funded to the fullest extent as requested by our chief justice, but like all agencies, they must be held to certain standards, not unlike what we are attempting to do with our schools. What kind of grades would lawyers and judges receive today? The decriminalization of marijuana could work to fund the court system and other public safety agencies in a number of ways. First, by regulating and taxing all sales transactions in the city, billions of dollars of black market profits will surface in the above-ground real economy. These profits will eventually be taxed on many levels, including income, licensing and property. Perhaps just as important is the cost savings to the courts, police and the entire criminal justice system by alleviating them from the enforcement of this part of the insane “War on Drugs” that we’ve inherited from the Richard Nixon administration. This “war” has been going on for more than four decades. We’ve spent hundreds of billions of dollars and marijuana, Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXV : No. 6

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communities of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

Assoc. Publisher/Production Coordinator Suzanne Matsumiya info@graphictouchdesigns.com Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks editor@randomlengthsnews.com Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila zamna@randomlengthsnews.com

which comprises some 60 percent of those drugs imported, is nowhere near being eradicated! Can we just admit that this was as a bad idea as prohibition of liquor was before it? America didn’t implode from the decriminalization of alcohol did it? No, we figured out that we needed the tax dollars and then regulated the quality, production and use, and then the time and place of the sales. This couldn’t be easier. However, no one in government today remembers prohibition, nor do they know how to connect the proposed taxes to the problems they are trying to solve.

Quote of the week— “The cities will not be saved by the people who feel condemned to live in them, who can hardly wait to move to Marin…The cities will be saved by the people who like it here. The people who prefer the neighborhood stores to the shopping malls, who go to the plays, and eat in the restaurants, and go to the discos, and worry about the education the kids are getting, even if they don’t have kids of their own.” ­—Harvey Milk, former county supervisor San Francisco

Los Angeles and Its Elected Sheriff By Patrisse Cullors-Brignac Executive Director of Dignity and Power Now/End Sheriff Violence in L.A. Jails Dignity and Power Now is a grassroots organization that Patrisse Cullors-Brignac founded in 2012. The organization fights for the dignity and power of incarcerated people and their families. In doing so, Dignity and Power Now wages a fight for everyone’s life because the prison industrial complex forms one of the imaginative limits on the capacity to even envision something like freedom or liberation. In a short amount of time Dignity and Power Now! has undertaken several projects ranging from the Coalition to End Sheriff Violence to Freedom Harvest artist collective, to a biannual publication. This year, the organization is focusing on two things: pushing for civilian oversight of the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department and voter education for the upcoming sheriff’s election. ​​The seat for Los Angeles Sheriff is often unrecognized, at least in mostly poor, workingclass communities of color.

Columnists/Reporters Lyn Jensen Carson B. Noel Barr Music Dude John Farrell Curtain Call Lori Lyna Hirsch-Stokoe Food Writer Andrea Serna Arts Writer Malina Paris Culture Writer Calendar 14days@randomlengthsnews.com Photographers Terelle Jerricks, Betty Guevara, Philip Cooke, Jessie Drezner Contributors Philip Cooke, Patrisse CullersBrignac, Greggory Moore, Danny Simon

Cartoonists Ann Cleaves, Andy Singer, Matt Wuerker Advertising Production Mathew Highland, Suzanne Matsumiya Advertising Representative Mathew Highland reads@randomlengthsnews.com adv@randomlengthsnews.com Editorial Intern Joseph Baroud Display advertising (310) 519-1442 Classifieds (310) 519-1016 www.randomlengthsnews.com

Many of the constituents in those communities don’t realize the sheriff is elected and often are uninterested. But, the reality is that an elected sheriff in Los Angeles County plays a significant role in the lives of the 10 million people who reside in this county. The sheriff office oversees custody of all eight of the Los Angeles County jail facilities and patrol for 44 contracted cities. All of the unincorporated cities, court services and parks have their own homeland security division and much more. The sheriff of Los Angeles County has a 4-year term and no term limits, which is why Los Angeles County has only seen three elected sheriff’s since 1955—most of whom have been white men. It is rare that one will see a sheriff change in their lifetime. Usually, the sheriff that you are born with is the sheriff you will die with. This is why it is imperative to know who our continued on following page

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #0891-6627). All contents Copyright 2014 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.


RANDOMLetters Mark Bowen Still Mum on Bowing Out of Election

Teachers, staff, and students at LBCC were very proud of Mark Bowen’s lone vote against tbe LBCC vocational program discontinuance last year. Since Bowen has bowed out of another bid for LBCC Trustee, we have endorsed Sunny Zia for District 3, as well as Gregory Slaughter for District 5 and Marshall Blesofsky for District 1. With this slate, there will no longer be a lone vote for the community that LBCC is charged to serve. Help us keep the community in our community college. As representatives of the LBCC Political Action Coalition, we urge you to vote for Zia, Slaughter and Blesofsky on April 8. Thomas Hamilton LBCC Staff, Long Beach Janét Hund LBCC Teacher, Long Beach Kathryn Jennings LBCC Teacher, San Pedro

Man Overboard

From my unique position of living on the water, which I have done for almost twenty years, I see what is happening with the port police and their practices and procedures and am impacted by the harbor department and their attention to detail or the

from previous page

Sheriff

Walking into the 99 Cent Store to pick up some extras I’d forgotten earlier, I saw a car parked outside that had a personalized license and,

seem a small point to make, but I think it has large implications. The increasing non-use of words like “exhilarating,” “fabulous,”“outstanding,” “tremendous,” “phenomenal” and just plain “amazing” impoverish our conversations and the ability to share our excitement, especially when one size fits all and the prevalence of a word once used mostly to describe significant events, natural wonders and cosmic phenomena now seems to cover every trivial thing imaginable, from a new dress to a job promotion to another touchdown at last Sunday’s Super Bowl! Yes, it was a terrific game, but… awesome? Do we now equate a football

game with the majesty of the Himalayas, or with 911 or the dropping of the A-bomb, or an earthquake or a lightning storm? Have we lost, along with our capacity for surprise and wonder, our sense of proportion? Have we become that small? Years ago, in an unpublished poem, I wrote about the trivialization of language as a logical step toward trivializing history and our memory of history. “If thought can corrupt language, language can corrupt thought.” So wrote Orwell in his essay on politics and the English language. Anthony Greeley San Pedro

Errata

In the March 6 edition of Random Lengths, a photo misidentified Azar Lawrence. Pictured is Lawrence.

Investigation and the Citizens’ Commission on Jail Violence 173-page report with 64 recommendations. Winning the position, the new of sheriff of Los Angeles County won’t be as simple as inheriting a well-oiled machine. The densely organized department has undergone significant structural changes with a new assistant sheriff solely in charge of custody, a new inspector general in charge of monitoring and exposing corruption in the department, specifically as it pertains to abuse of force in the jails, 63 newly adopted recommendations initiated by the county and adopted by Baca and a board of county supervisors. The board is seriously considering implementing legally empowered civilian oversight to enforce transparency of a department wrought with freshly exposed human rights abuses. The next sheriff will have to do more than just manage the largest sheriff’s department in the country and the largest jail system in the world. Most important to the people of Los Angeles County, the candidates must be prepared to tackle the monumental task of correcting the large scale moral and systemic failures the department has demonstrated in the past three years; failures that were arguably a central factor in Baca’s timely resignation.

March 21 - April 3, 2014

Los Angeles County. Retired Comdr. Bob Olmsted worked for the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and had the rank as commander. This is his first time running for any political office. Former Los Angeles Police Department Detective Lou Vince has ran for sheriff twice. Former Los Angeles Sheriff Lt. Patrick Gomez has run for sheriff twice. Both Assistant Sheriff James Hellmold and Assistant Sheriff Todd Rogers (who serves on the Lakewood City Council), are first-time candidates for the position. Lastly, Long Beach Police Chief Jim McDonnell, who formerly worked for the LAPD is also a first time candidate. Los Angeles County residents, June 3 is the primaries. You have the opportunity to cast your vote for the new sheriff of Los Angeles. The third reason that the race for Los Angeles’ next sheriff is of high stakes to the county is the recent exposure of corruption and violence in the department. For the past three years, there has been a continuous spotlight on the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department: the infamous issues of jail violence, deputy involved shootings, the Antelope Valley civil rights lawsuit, the FBI indictments, the Department of Justice

The Awesome Truth

knowing that many people like to utilize some creative originality in choosing their own moniker for the rear bumper, I stopped to read it and saw that the words spelled The Awesome Truth, “AWSMUVU.” It got me started again on an old rant: the overuse, seemingly to exhaustion, of the word “awesome” to the exclusion of other quite readily available adjectives in the language. The word itself, with little time needed to speak it aloud and still less than that for thought, continues to grow in popularity and, with this trend, the rest of the storehouse of diverse and richly expressive modifiers continues down a oneway path to obsolescence. It may

The Local Publication You Actually Read

sheriff is, because not only does he hold one of the largest offices in the county, he also is going to have the longest relationship to the Los Angeles public. The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department is the seventh largest law enforcement agency in the country and the largest sheriff’s department in the world. With little more than a $2.4 billion budget and 17,000 employees, the department is an epicenter for the political landscape of law enforcement. We all know that whatever Los Angeles does, the rest of the world follows. When former Sheriff Leroy Baca stepped down from his role as elected sheriff, many concluded that the sheriff resigned, although Baca said he simply retired. But, his resignation or retirement is relevant for three reasons: 1) Sheriffs rarely retire. 2) It is 2014, the year of the sheriff elections. The moment that Baca stepped down three new candidates stepped in, making the race for sheriff highly competitive. There are seven candidates looking to secure the seat as the next sheriff of Los Angeles. Former Undersheriff Paul Tanaka is the current Mayor of Gardena and this is his first time running for Sheriff of

absence of it. Currently events have placed my home in harm’s way as it has been damaged by the deterioration of the docks, from lack of maintenance or repair. Out of frustration from dealing with the Consumer Protection Division of La, Building and Safety who claim they do not deal with safety issues in the marinas, City of LA Criminal Branch, who suggested I contact the Harbor Dept or the Port Police, and I am sure you see the problem with that, I turned to James. If there is any further interest on behalf of Random Lengths in covering any aspect of this situation please contact me either through return email. Thank you and your publication for any attention paid to this situation which affects approximately one hundred vessels and scores of lives. If it is possible would you send me a receipt notification as that I might be assured of your receiving this document? Thank You. There was an incident in March of 2013, at San Pedro Marina, where one of my neighbors disappeared from his vessel, while tied to the dock and his body was found at the mouth of the harbor around Saint Patrick’s Day. At the time of his disappearance the lighting on the main dock was inoperable and the docks were not in much better shape than they are now. The disposition of

the incident is not know as of this writing but from the dilapidated condition of the marina coupled with the absence of a well lit main dock, which his vessel was tied to, it not unreasonable to wonder if the condition of the marina was a contributing factor in this tragic incident. The existing civil codes call for the walkways to be in sound condition and well lighted. Michael A Griffin San Pedro

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from p. 4

March 21 - April 3, 2014

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Rogers

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Lee Baca tapped to succeed him. “Instead of a fresh set of eyes, our department needs someone with an experienced and credible set of eyes.” Rogers explained his thoughts. “I took exception to the comments being made that the badge being tarnished,” he said. “There are 18,000 people within the organization, and 9,000 wearing the badge. There are some that have tarnished the badge for themselves but the vast majority [of] us have not been involved in any of that.” He said that the actions of the few did not reflect on the other 97 percent of deputies in the department. “I think it’s an unfair characterization to paint the department with a broad brush that Todd Rogers or a particular deputy who is doing the right thing for the right reasons all of the time is somehow corrupt,” he said. “I think that’s fair to defend folks like that.” Rogers chafes at the suggestion that the department needs an outsider, “untainted,” by the problems within the department. “The argument is, ‘Well, we need an outsider with a fresh set of eyes to fix this thing, somebody who doesn’t even know the organization,’” Rogers began. “I say we’re better off finding somebody within the organization, who has never been tainted in his career, ever.” Rogers points to his experience as a deputy and the fact that he has never had to be disciplined by the department for any reason. But he also wears this experience as a kind of badge representing rank file that don’t subscribe to the aggressive policing Tanaka has been associated with by media blue ribbon commission reports and the media. “[Most deputies are] like myself, I’ve never faced not one iota of discipline from day one in the organization,” Rogers said. “[I am one] who also knows the department and so we can fix it that much sooner and that much more effectively. I know the leaders that are doing a good job. I know the leaders that aren’t doing a good job. I know the vestiges of the Paul Tanaka damage. I know the people who are still there, who believe in what he stands for and I can get rid of them a lot quicker.” Unlike police department chiefs, the sheriff is elected and must play the game to have any sort of longevity. For a seasoned politician like Rogers, navigating local politics is not brand new to him. In 2011, Rogers lead a public relations campaign

to defeat a measure that would have reconstituted the old Compton Police Department, an effort lead by former Compton Mayor Eric Perrodin. “I was the one that put up that website, protectcompton.org—one of the first websites I’ve ever built,” Rogers said. “I had to do it myself because I didn’t have any money or any budget to do it. But yeah, support was overwhelming and the Compton station is doing a great job.” Perrodin’s efforts was ultimately abandoned after the city’s precarious financial footing was revealed, following audits of the city’s general fund. To voters, disenchanted with the political process, Rogers hopes voters will rely on the candidates’ track records, both as deputies in the department and in their public lives. “See if there has been any ethics issues or any concerns expressed about my management or how the community responded to me, whether it was Lakewood or Carson, or whatever the case might be,” he said. When pressed further on his ability to remain independent from being candidate to being a sheriff-elect, if elected, he says he never would say something to appease one group that he doesn’t believe in. Come the June 3, election, Rogers hopes he’s the candidate that voters can believe in to turn the sheriff’s department around. from p. 5

FAIR Approach

find a resource,” Rivero responded when asked about the availability of support services. “We have a great support network in Carson.” Three volunteers staff the Carson station’s FAIR program. “Our volunteers are put through a 16-hour training course,” Austin answered when asked about how the program selects its people. “These volunteers are going out in the community, learning what resources there are available in the community and are able to recommend those resources to our victims. We do some follow-up with that, we make phone calls and keep track to ensure that every victim of domestic violence that’s within our jurisdiction, is reached out to.” He further explained the FAIR volunteers are also putting together their own computerbased directory of local resources, and they are constantly updating it. The list includes—for example—shelters, hospitals, drug rehabilitation services, and relevant government agencies.


By Katrina Guevara, Music Columnist

E veryone may pass gas, but when it comes to Fartbarf,

March 21 – April 3, 2014 March 21 – April 3, 2014

not everyone passes judgment. Synthesizer and vocoder player Dan Burley, synthesizer and vocoder player Josh McLeod, and drummer Brian Brunac make up the computer-via-analog trio. Josh and Dan grew up in Redondo Beach, while Brian is a native of San Pedro. Fartbarf started in 2008 and has since toured everywhere from local South Bay backyard parties to Scotland’s 2010 RockNess Festival. Now in their mid-30s, Brunac recently recalled the life and times of alternative music and the current cult of personality with Random Lengths News. Random Lengths News: How did the area shape your musical talents and taste? Brian Brunac: Speaking for myself, San Pedro now has a strong independent musical community. We don’t have very many venues, but there is definitely a collective of musicians and people who just enjoy music, creating and helping each

other’s bands out, along with touring bands. Growing up, it was fairly difficult finding people of the same age to play music with. That’s not to say people weren’t playing music. But, for me, prior to Nirvana blowing up, I think all of us kids who played instruments all knew each other. There weren’t many of us and [we] were all in each others bands at one point or another. The circle was small. That changed when Nirvana broke big. It seemed as though everyone took up an instrument. The musical scene, and I’m not speaking only of punk, or what was labeled as alternative at the time, but everything kind of exploded musically. I’m sure it was just as fertile of a time for Josh and Dan musically. I later found out that their bands and the bands I was in were playing some of the same shows or the same venues. So we all had these pockets of friends who were into punk, and/or thrash, alternative, college rock, etc., and would introduce each other to new or just ‘new-to-us’ music. I feel everyone’s collective musical tastes expanded

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment ACE • Art, Cuisine, & Entertainment

Dan Burley, Brian Brunac and Josh McLeod are the men behind the Neanderthal masks of Fartbarf. Photo by Emily Shur.

as our pockets or scenes expanded and overlapped. Skating facilitated that greatly, too. RLn: What do you think of music project Gorillaz and the likes of Daft Punk and the mystique behind their image? BB: Popular culture is fascinated by celebrity. There isn’t much mystery or mystique anymore, unfortunately. It is definitely harder to pull off now, when everyone has a camera in their pocket, along with the means to upload it to a broader audience. KISS’s anonymity wouldn’t have lasted long. Both Gorillaz and Daft Punk have been figured out or have come out, but generally speaking, having some mystery or that little bit of a buffer between the band and their audience is and was a good thing. Don’t get me wrong, it’s great too to be able to reach people who are into what you’re doing on that immediate level offered through social media, but that mystery of getting new music that you enjoy and being totally foreign to the band, and, their history or life story, can be just as intimate as you sort out what is drawing you to this band or music without any preconceived notions. RLn: What’s currently on your playlist? BB: We are all over the place when it comes to what we listen to. We overlap on a lot of music, but we have pretty varied musical tastes. At a show a few months ago prior to soundcheck, we were tailgating in the parking lot to Slayer, the Isley Brothers and Hall and Oates. Currently, I’ve been spinning a David Ruffin LP I bought, along with rediscovering the bands Shellac, Gray Matter and Guided By Voices. I guess those aren’t very current. RLn: What can we expect at every Fartbarf show? BB: Probably an out of tune oscillator or three. RLn: Tell us about the craziest show experience. BB: We usually bring our own sound system to our shows. It is a pain in the ass, but we usually don’t know what kind of sound system the venue has. We played a show a few years ago where the sound guy set the levels on the club’s system and walked away. One of our songs has a particular frequency sweep and when we hit it, all of the tweeters in the onstage monitors caught on fire. We had no idea what was going on at the time. We all smelled electrical burning and saw smoke coming from the speakers. The sound guy later came in and smelled the smoke, but was unaware of what happened. The speakers still worked but he had no idea the treble was gone. It was a very Spinal Tap moment. RLn: Give us three hashtags to describe your music in its evolving state. BB: #UsuallyLoud, #WallOfAntiquatedAnalogSynth, #fun. RLn: Any upcoming musical projects? BB: We finally have our record coming out on April 1. It’s taken a while to where people were getting angry at us, but it’s difficult doing it on your own and self-financing everything. RLn: Is Fartbarf your full-time “job”? If so, what message do you have for people pursuing a musical career? BB: Fartbarf is not our full time job. As much as we believe you should get paid for what you do artistically, I think making your passion a job can kind of kill it. I understand what you mean as in a job being what sustains you financially, but I guess my advice would be: Don’t go into anything you enjoy doing solely for financial purposes. If it is what you’re passionate about, focus that passion towards improving in that field. If you’re focused on a paycheck or making it a career, you’re probably not focusing on your craft as much as you should, or you’re not working towards creating something new or interesting. It’d be nice to get paid enough to do Fartbarf solely, but we never set out with that goal. We never really set out to play live. We did one show for a friend and fortunately it’s kept going since.

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Entrée News

By Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Writer

Feeling a Little Hungry?

March 21 – April 3, 2014

Independent And Free.

I

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f you are in the mood for a scrumptious meal, April is looking very good for you. Three local restaurants are rolling out the red carpet for food lovers in San Pedro. Top of the list is the exciting news that restaurateur Bob Trusela has launched Otto Trattoria in the iconic former location of Papadakis Taverna, on the corner of 6th and Centre streets. A complete remodel has revitalized the location and added a warm Sicilian feeling to the location. Rich custom-wood furnishings, which a local carpenter made, complement the comfortable inside and out earth tones. The fixtures are designed perfectly to hold a vast collection of fine Italian and California wines. The resulting interior recalls the dining experience of an old-school, East Coast Italian restaurant. A recent visit for a delicious dinner of baby artichokes, ravioli and a nice glass of pinot noir led to conversation with an enthusiastic and excited staff, preparing for the grand opening which happened March 14. Trusela’s history in the restaurant business brings the promise of a top-notch fine dining experience in downtown. Besides his former location at the eponymous Trusela Restaurant, he has had years of practice opening many fine restaurants in downtown Long Beach. Anyone who may have eaten at L’Opera, The Sky Room or The Madison will know that the opening of Otto Trattoria is exciting news. Trusela is eager to show downtown what he can do with Sicilian food. Five kitchen stations and seating for 100 give him plenty of room to entertain large crowds. “Everyone down here, Trani’s, Neals and Rafaello’s, they want to show off what they know,” Trusela said. “Our regions in Italy are all different and the differences are huge. There is so much regional cuisine in Italy that people don’t understand. And, we want the opportunity to show them.” Trusela imagines San Pedro dining in the model of Little Italy in San Diego, lined with a variety of fine Italian restaurants. “I feel in my soul that we can do that here,” Trusela said. “We are on the verge of doing that here in San Pedro.” He gives much credit to his mentor John Papadakis for supporting his efforts through the remodel. He also praises 15th District Councilman Joe Buscaino for going out of his way and being instrumental in helping him navigate the myriad regulations that are required to opening a business

in Los Angeles. “Joe Buscaino and John Papadakis want to see this location revitalized and turned back to the era that we remember,” Trusela said. “[They want it] turned back into a place where people love to come. That is the purpose of this and that is why we chose this location. This area deserves to have the attention again.” The opening will be launched in phases. Initial plans are to be open Tuesday through Sunday for dinner. Lunch will be served beginning in May and plans are in store for lively happy hour. Otto Trattoria should be open for private parties in the banquet room by late spring. Otto Trattoria is at 310 W. 6th St. in San Pedro. Reservations can be made at (310) 548-6886.

Sonny Ramirez and his wife of Think Café recently took over the Blue Grotto, formerly known as Think Bistro. Photo by Terelle Jerricks.

Another fixture in the San Pedro restaurant scene, Sonny Ramirez of Think Café on 5th Street is opening Sonny’s Café on Western Avenue at the shortlived Blue Grotto Bistro. The former bistro was owned by partners Paul Aghilipour and Frank Ravalli, who in turn bought the restaaurant formerly known as Think Bistro from Paul’s brother, Kashi Aghilipour. Think Café is well known for delicious and creative seafood, pasta and steak dishes. Sonny Feeling a Little Hungry? continued on page 16.


Art Openings | Fine Dining | Live Music | Special Performances | Food Trucks Studio Gallery 345 Spring Fling

Pat Woolley and Gloria D Lee present paintings, prints, books and cards. Open 6-9 pm on 1st Thursday and by appointment: For more information call Gloria at 310.545.0832 or Pat at 310.374.8055 • 345 W. 7th Street San Pedro

The Loft Gallery San Pedro’s Treasures

Featuring work by Murial Olguin and Eugene Daub. Loft Artists: Candice Gawne, Carol Hungerford, Sam Arno, Daniel Porras, Murial Olguin, Jan Govaerts, Anne Marie Rawlinson, & Nancy Towne Schultz. • Open First Thursday 6–9 p.m. Open Saturdays & Sundays 2-5 p.m. • 401 S. Mesa St. • 310.831.5757

Michael Stearns Studio 347 Came to Believe

TE San Pedro Rep Proudly Presents...

Wouldn’t it be lovely? A Modern Fairytale

Conceived and directed by Aaron Ganz. Adapted from George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion” and the stage musical “My Fair Lady.” April 4th - May 10th, Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat., at 7:30 pm. Special Sat. matinee April 5 and May 3 at 2 pm. For reservations (424) 2645747 or www.SanPedroRep.org. 311 W. 7th St., San Pedro.

April 4 - May 10 311 W. 7th Street San Pedro 424-264-5747 SanPedroRep.org

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

A new exhibition at Michael Stearns Studio 347 featuring the work of artist Tim Brown. Brown carefully selects altars, assembles images, found objects and cast-offs . When combined they explore the challenges and successes on his journey through sobriety. Each tightly constructed and well executed assemblage reflects not only Brown’s artistic statements; they also resonate with specific references to recovery and personal growth. Opening reception Thursday, April 4, 6 - 9 pm. Michael Stearns Studio 347 is located at 347 W. 7th St., San Pedro 90731. Contact 562-400-0544 or michael@michaelstearnsstudio.com

March 21 – April 3, 2014

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Entertainment March 20

Tony White Improvisation Music Clinic Alvas Showroom will be hosting an improvisation music clinic at 7 p.m., March 20. The clinic will be put on by Tony White and John Ehlis. Musical improvisation is known to make musicians more well-rounded. White is a professional jazz musician and musical director. The show will include a short performance by White and Ehlis. Students will also be given the chance to demonstrate their skills. Participants are encouraged to bring their instruments. This clinic is a free event. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom.com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro A Dancer on the Rise - Brett Coppa Fundraiser A Dancer on the Rise, a Brett Coppa Fundraiser, is taking place at Alvas Showroom at 6:45 and 8 p.m., March 20. Coppa is a student from Peninsula High School who will be competing in the Youth America Grand Prix Ballet in New York City. He will be performing his repertoire at Alvas. Cost is $25. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom.com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

March 21

Mimi Zulu and Kool Keith Mimi Zulu and Kool Keith will be performing at Harvelle’s at 9 and 10 p.m., March 21. Zulu will be on stage first. She is a lyricist, singer and poet. The genres of music she specializes in are spoken word, jazz, soul, blues, hip hop, trip hop, psychedelic, electronica, funk and rhythm and blues. Details: (562) 239-3700; longbeach.harvelles. com Venue: Harvelle’s Location: 201 E. Broadway, Long Beach

March 21 – April 3, 2014

Independent And Free.

Bernie Pearl CD Release Concert The Bernie Pearl CD Release Concert is taking place, at 8 p.m. March 21, at Alvas Showroom. The lineup consists of Bernie Pearl on the guitar, Bobby Spencer on the sax, Mike Berry on the bass and Albert Trepagnier on the drums. The concert will revolve around the CD Pearl released on Feb. 15, titled, Take your Time. Tickets will be on sale for $20. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom.com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

14

Seatbelt Seatbelt is performing, at 9 p.m. March 21, at the Godmothers Saloon. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon.com Venue: Godmothers Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Caveman Voicebox Caveman Voicebox is performing, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. March 21, at San Pedro Brewing Company. The band will be performing rock and acoustic music. The cover charge is $3. Details: (310) 831-5663; www.sanpedrobrewing.com Venue: San Pedro Brewing Company Location: 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Calendar continued on page 15.

Barbara Morrison and Bernie Pearl. File photo.

Bernie Pearl’s CD Take Your Time Embodies Blues By B. Noel Barr, Music Writer Dude

B

lues as a genre at best tells a good story with an instrument or voice responding to a call from the singer or storyteller. It is very rare that you have a blues record these days that is as intimate and vital as Bernie Pearl’s Take Your Time. From the opening notes,

“Worried Life Blues,” the timbre and pluck of the strings sets you up mentally for something special to come. Then, Bernie’s baritone voice comes through exact and true. This is followed by Miss Barbara Morrison’s vocal on the track, which adds to the music, — something that is sublime.

What we have is an album of blues songs that are very real and relevant in today’s world. This blues album, Take your Time, is a masterpiece. The CD is very organic sounding—none of the edgy digital sound. It is clean and dazzlingly brilliant. The performances of the players typifies the music these people make at every show I’ve seen. Now, what we have is raw essence of the blues, presented only slightly refined to adjust to the technology of the day. Pearl has incorporated the country style of blues into the modern in a very subtle way. Playing on this album besides Mr. Pearl and Miss Morrison is a rhythm section that makes this recording pop as much as the principals. Mike Berry, who plays bass (upright and electric), and Albert Trepagnier, who plays the drums, work these songs, underpinning the melodic structure. Layered on top of that is Bobby “Hurricane” Spencer on sax, who again elevates the pitch of the music. Bernie Pearl’s CD Take Your Time is the definitive blues CD. Bernie Pearl brings to the table 50-plus years of playing and living the blues. The man is a walking talking encyclopedia of the blues because he has played with or has interviewed the most important people in the blues throughout those 50 years. If you were to buy one blues CD for your personal collection ever, Take Your Time is the one to buy. Bernie Pearl will be appearing at Alvas March 21, performing this CD live in San Pedro for the first time in it’s entirety. Miss Morrison is not scheduled to appear on this date. www.cdbaby.com www.berniepearl.com www.alvasshowroom.com


Lindsey Hundley. Photo courtesy of Lindsey Hundley.

Lindsey Hundley is Lady of Jazz By Melina Paris, Music and Culture Writer

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March 22

Azar Lawrence Quartet at the Seabird Lounge John Beasley, piano; Marvin “Smitty” Smith, drums; Jeff Littleton, bass, and guest vocalist Windy Barnes will be performing. The cover is $15 and starts at 9:30p.m. Details: seabirdjazzlounge.com Venue: Seabird Lounge Location: 730 E. Broadway, Long Beach

March 28

Harbor Grooves Harbor Grooves is performing, at 9 p.m. March 28, at Godmothers Saloon. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon.com Venue: Godmothers Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

March 29

Revolver Revolver is performing, from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. March 29, at the San Pedro Brewing Company. They will be playing rock music. The cover charge is $3. Details: (310) 831-5663; www.sanpedrobrewing.com Venue: San Pedro Brewing Company Location: 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro

Community/Family March 22

Ranger Guided Family Walk at the White Point Nature Preserve Free family hike guided by LA City Rangers through the beautiful 102-acre White Point Nature Preserve, every second Saturday. Details: www.pvplc.org Venue: White Point Nature Preserve Location: 1600 W. Paseo del Mar, San Pedro Pine Needle Basket Artistry Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum is welcoming the public to their basketry workshop on from 1 to 3 p.m. March 22 and 29. The museum welcomes the public to the traditional and beautiful practice of pine needle basketry. Using natural materials collected from the Rancho, the workshop will introduce you to this ancient coiling construction technique. When you come to enjoy the carriage house on the serene historic Dominguez Rancho, you will learn to build your own basket with native Californian Janice Guerrero. Each class contains new techniques and materials, as well as special guests, work time, music and light refreshments. Adult members pay $45.00 and non-members $50.00 (includes all classes, materials, tools and preparation). Details: dominguezrancho.org Venue: Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum Location: 18127 S. Alameda St., Compton

March 28

What A Pair: Creating a Means of Support What A Pair is presented by Soroptimist International of LA Harbor (SILAH), a group of local activists, committed to a world where women and girls together achieve their individual and collective potential, realize aspirations and have an equal voice in creating strong, peaceful communities. What A Pair is a way to raise funding and awareness; in order to give underserved women in the Harbor Area easier access to mammography services. The sixth annual event will include a live model, sketched by local artists, as well as the display and auction of an array of decorated bras and art works. The event runs from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Details: www.whatapairsanpedro.org Venue: Croatian Cultural Center Location: 510 W. 7th Street, San Pedro

April 5

Toberman Gala Honors Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Toberman is honoring Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, 19time NBA All-Star, best-selling author, U.S. cultural Calendar continued on page 16.

March 21 – April 3, 2014

“Latin jazz has a lot of complexity to it, whether it’s from a cultural or technical standpoint,” Hundley said. “When you really start to understand more about the style of music it blows your mind. Latin jazz has the religious influence at the core of the percussion. It’s intriguing to me, because I approach the piano as not only a melodic expressive instrument but also a percussive instrument.” Hundley plays a solo performance at Fourth Street Vine Wine Bar on First Fridays in Long Beach. The most recent time she performed she was playing jazz standards, when suddenly, all the people were singing the songs she played. They danced to them for the entire second set. That kind of connection is important to Hundley. “The energy was amazing,” she said. “I connect to the music, but through music I like to connect to people. That’s how I feel like I really can communicate”. Hundley plans to release an album later this year. She currently has an EP she put out with her own recycled packaging. She will take her favorite original tracks from it to add to her full album. She is an instructor as well, saying she always likes to have a few students. She believes in the phrase, “Each one teach one,” especially so to pass down jazz because it is an American art form. Hundley is also passionate about efficient technique. She teaches students how to most effectively use their body with their instrument so they do not sustain injuries. Hundley has a residency at The Seabird Jazz Lounge in downtown Long Beach performing a few times a month with either her quartet or the Lady Jazz ensemble. When it comes to performing, Hundley’s approach is to have an energetic element to keep things fresh. “It doesn’t have to be high energy the whole time, but I’ve found there are certain moments you need to take the audience through and that pick-me-up is something everybody in the room feels.” Hundley experiments with bringing that energy into the music, and COME WORSHIP WITH US strives to grow Sunday School and challenge 9:45 am herself. In her arrangements. Morning Worship Service For instance, Del Haynes, pastor 11:00 am she will explore uncommon 310-831-5446 combinations 888 Hamilton Avenue, San Pedro

Calendar from page 14.

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

eginning with a rich background in musical education, Lindsey Hundley has succeeded in becoming a dynamic musician, piano soloist, instructor, jazz ensemble leader, vocalist and arranger. She performs a broad range of music including, familiar jazz standards and blues, Brazilian and Latin jazz, and classical. Trained in classical and jazz piano between the ages of 14 to 18, Hundley quickly mastered piano skills, which could normally take up to 10 years. She was accepted on a half-scholarship to Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan. She is a graduate of the University of Southern California’s Thornton School of Music. As if Hundley knew her destiny, when she was a young 10 years she asked for piano lessons. Coming from a small town in Colorado, she had to be put on a waiting list for three years before she began instruction. If waiting wasn’t enough commitment for a child, once she started her father had to drive her five hours, round trip, every other week to her classes. During this time, Lindsey sustained an injury, which kept her from playing piano for about six months. So, instead, her teacher made her study scores like Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, and Mozart. “She would drop the needle on any point on a record and I would have to tell her what movement it was, what composer, what key it was in,” Hundley described. “It was great. It expanded my mind and I was fortunate to have that. She wanted to keep my mind active so I wouldn’t stop playing.” She started singing while waiting on piano lessons and then began playing classical music first. Her favorite classical composers are Chopin and Bach. Many times she would say to her teacher that she wished the composer wrote the score in a different way and would then go on to describe what she was thinking. That is how she came to improvising before she even understood jazz or what improvisation was. Her first exposure to jazz came when her parents played CDs in their gift shop by Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald and Glenn Miller Orchestra. Hundley’s jazz influences are Chic Corea, Keith Jarret and Herbie Hancock. Lately, Hundley has been greatly influenced by multi-reed instrumentalist Bennie Maupin and has had unique opportunities with him. Hundley says he has given her an even broader perspective on what a jazz composer and improviser can do. She has always opened herself up to different genres, even while in school, taking as many music classes as she could.

of instruments, using the flute and the flugelhorn instead of the saxophone and the trumpet. Her approach to composing is very structured. In her charts and books of her tunes, she usually has multiple parts for each instrument, rather than having the typical one part. “Sometimes with the bass player I like to double the left hand of the piano, so we play a line together,” Hundley said. “It gives a really interesting tone when the piano and bass are played simultaneously. I like to have these very composed elements in my music juxtaposed with improvisation. I think that might be where my classical and jazz worlds collide.” Hundley said her next steps lie in exploring non-traditional ways of doing things with her compositions. “I like to balance training and structure with improvisation and experimentation but I always want it to be accessible and to connect to the audience,” she said. That’s why she loves the jazz standards. “These songs have to be protected because jazz is still fairly new,” Hundley said. “It’s important to bring the history along with us.” She is hoping to be able to participate in a tour that is in the planning stages on the West Coast up to Oregon. Earlier this year, she performed at a place called The Jazz Station in Eugene, Ore., after the screening of the documentary, The Girls in the Band. Her hope is to build that tour from California to Oregon or a Central Coast tour with Lady Jazz. Bennie Maupin encouraged Hundley to go forward and create the Lady Jazz ensemble. She always wanted to play with other female musicians, but says she did not want to single herself out; it was hard for her to blend in. In school, she was one of two female instrumentalists out of 75. Feeling like she always had to prove herself, be better, work harder, be stronger and don’t expect someone to help. All she wanted was to be one of the guys. “There is a stigma that women don’t play instruments as well as men,” she said, “I think it’s getting better, but there is definitely this female energy when I perform with Lady Jazz. It was created to celebrate the contributions and talents of female jazz musicians. It’s about supporting and working together, women still need that in this world.” Through performing with women, Hundley says she keeps meeting more and more talented female musicians, hearing their stories and learning what they have to bring to the music. “I want whoever I play with to be themselves and play their way,” she said “I’ve found that if you do, you will play so much better”. A proud accomplishment of Hundley’s was playing in a fusion ensemble of Korean music and jazz called, Yerak. The name means to blend traditional Korean instruments with Western instruments, such as cello, flute and drum, creating an innovative style of fusion music. She described it as an international ensemble. “We got to perform for the South Korean president when she came to Los Angeles,” Hundley said. “That was remarkable to be a part of. It’s an interesting ensemble and a meaningful project.” Hundley’s short-term vision is to get her album out, continue to explore traditional and nontraditional composition, and to support other female jazz musicians. Giving women a platform or voice to express themselves has become a passion for her. You can see Hundley performing with Lady Jazz next at Seabird Jazz Lounge March 28. Details: www.SeabirdJazzLounge.com

15


Calendar from page 15. ambassador and philanthropist, at 6 p.m. April 5, at the Manhattan Beach Marriott. The annual gala is a major source of support for the community center. Tickets cost $300. Details: (310) 832-1145 ext. 119; www.toberman. org Venue: Manhattan Beach Marriott Location: 1400 Parkview Ave., Manhattan Beach

Theater/Film March 21

The Melville Boys at Little Fish When two brothers take to the woods to escape from reality and reminisce in the family cabin, their plans to fish the weekend away are interrupted by a pair of attractive sisters. In a charming mix of human aspiration and romantic diversion, the four discover more than they bargained for. Melville Boys will run Fridays and Saturdays through April 5 at 8 p.m., with a Sunday matinee scheduled for 2 p.m. on March 23, after which the creative team will be available for 10 to 15 minutes for a post-show discussion with the audience. Venue: Little Fish Theatre Location: 777 Centre St., San Pedro

Art Shine The Collaborative presents the works of local Long Beach artists. Works span a broad variety of media, including video, photography, painting, mixed media, dance and wood cutting. Exhibition emphasis the diversity for which Long Beach is known. Margie Darrow, Jeff Foye, Jessica Kondrath, Annie Stromquist and Kurt Simonson are the artists. The show runs through April 5. Details: www.artslb.org/collaborative Venue: The Collaborative Location: 421 W. Broadway Ave., Long Beach

Independent And Free.

Big Spaces, Little Gems Stone Rose Gallery presents paintings by Margaret Lazzari. Abstractions addressing density, emptiness, movement and light. Based on patterns in landforms, water and sky. Details: http://stonerosegallery.com Venue: Stone Rose Gallery Location: 342 E. 4th St., Long Beach Papered Over Papered Over, brings six accomplished artists, whose works in this show share a theme of the many layers of life that humans experience throughout the society. Curator Robin Hinchliffe states the title refers not only to the collage process used by several of the artists, but also that the term “papered over” refers to hiding the real essence of an object. Joyce Dallal, Terry Braunstein, Angie Bray, Susanna Meiers, Christine Nguyen and Pam Posey are the artists. The show is on display through April 25. Details: (310) 541-4354 Venue: Angel’s Ink Gallery Location: 366 W. 7th St., San Pedro Frida Kahlo, Her Photos The Museum of Latin American Art presents more than 200 images from Frida Kahlo’s personal Casa Azul archive in Mexico City. The photos offer insight into Frida’s daily life, showing her with family, friends and at work, painting. They provide a stark contrast to the collective image of Kahlo that has been largely generated by her self-portraits. The show runs through June 8. Details: www.molaa.org Venue: Museum of Latin American Art Location: 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach

March 21 – April 3, 2014

San Pedro Treasures The Loft Studios and Galleries presents San Pedro Treasures featuring the work of Eugene Daub and Muriel Olguin.Eugene Daub, contemporary figure sculptor, won the design competition to create a Rosa Parks statue for the U.S. Capitol. Muriel Olguin was a founding board a member of Angels Gate Cultural Center. The Olguin High School was named after Muriel Olguin and her husband John. She has exhibited her fantasy work in Europe and Asia, as well as with numerous galleries and museums in Southern California. An artist’s reception will take place, from 4 to 7 p.m. April 12. Daub will conduct a PowerPoint presentation at 5 p.m. San Pedro Treasures will open on First Thursday, April 3 and run through May 30. Details: (310) 851-5757 Venue: Loft Galleries 16 Location: 401 S. Mesa St., San Pedro

The exhibit Papered Over at Angels’ Ink Gallery. Photo by Andrea Serna.

Angels’ Ink Gets Papered Over By: Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Writer

Perhaps you have noticed that large fluffy

cloud floating through the window of Angels’ Ink Gallery on 6th Street in San Pedro. With each exhibit, gallery owner Robin Hinchliffe is building the reputation of her gallery, along with the 7th Street gallery row. Her objective is to communicate with visitors to her gallery and the district. The point of the First Thursday Art Walk in San Pedro is to connect artists with the public. The exhibit Papered Over, brings six accomplished artists whose works in this show share a theme of the many layers of life that humans experience throughout the society. Hinchliffe states the title refers not only to the collage process used by several of the artists, but also that the term “papered over” refers to hiding the real essence of an object. “It is the joy of bringing ideas to people visually,” Hinchliffe said. “I could be seeing something that makes you feel wonderful or joyful, and you can’t even figure out why. When that works, it is wonderful. “People can go by on their sidewalk; they own it. They own that sidewalk. It is their space. But they can walk past this space, look in the window and say ‘Is that art? I didn’t know I liked art!’” Hinchliffe has accomplished a superb task of presenting her curatorial vision of the layered existence in our society as a whole. “You come in here [and] it can change your life, ” said a recent visitor to gallery. The artist who created “The Cloud” is El Camino educator Joyce Dallal. Dallal is known to many local visitors to Crafted Art Market for her 10-foot tall sculpture titled “Receptacle.” The giant baby doll is filled with discarded toys manufactured from toxic plastics.

Dallal contributed two pieces for the Papered Over show, “The Cloud” and “Landscape With Approaching Storm.” The concept for “The Cloud” came from visualizing the virtual cloud on the internet that stores all our data. In the new millennium we send our information to an anonymous cloud that has no substance and form, but refers to a familiar object we see every day in the sky. “I had this vision of the cloud as a network of information, thought and human manufactured thinking that is kind of up there floating above us like a storm cloud,” Dallal said. “It is an invisible thing, like the way you know that the stars are out there, even though you can’t always see them.” She wanted to create a physical representation of the virtual cloud and played with several iterations before arriving at this version. “I walked into the office at school and they had just completed a shredding [of documents],” Dallal said. “They had a huge bag of shredded paper and I asked if I could take it.” Shredded NCR forms, flyers, documents and applications from the art department at El Camino College came together to form a beautiful rain cloud of bureaucratic waste. She commissioned a metal platform to layer the mounds of shredded paper. As she began to build the large piece, it suddenly occurred to her that the result resembled a three-dimensional version of a painting by surrealist artist René Magritte. Ironically, Magritte stated a desire to ‘make everyday objects shriek aloud,’ and Dallal has also accomplished this with her cloud. A subtler, but more dramatic result, was achieved in her piece “Landscape With Approaching Storm.” Resolutions and United Nations peace initiatives were downloaded, photographed and

touched with charcoal. The powerful result of the framed collage is the Palestinian landscape laid out in broken promises. The artist’s family is from Iraq, although she is Jewish, which makes her highly aware of the Middle East conflict. “I got involved in a group called, the Peace Process, a group of Arab and Jewish artists who exhibit together around issues of the Middle East,” she said. “Because of that, I decided I want to go back and look at the partition plan.” She printed out the documents and somehow landscapes began to emerge from the political process that was created to divide the land. Twenty framed images are laid out 48 by 90 inches and the observer views the desert landscape, while a closer look reveals the words and text on paper. In addition to Dallal, other artist’s also come together in this meaningful exhibition. Terry Braunstein, Angie Bray, Susanna Meiers, Christine Nguyen and Pam Posey. The exhibit will be on display through April 25. In the meantime, Dallal’s baby doll sculpture is no longer at Crafted. It has been shipped for an exhibit in Charlotte, N.C. It is part of a two-person show called Sustain Me Baby, an exhibit focusing on the problematic issue of plastics disposal. Details: (310) 541-4354 Venue: Angel’s Ink Gallery Location: 366 W. 7th St., San Pedro Continued from page 12.

Hungry?

and his wife Carly are bringing the popular menu from Think to the new Sonny’s Café. On my most recent visit to Think, I ordered the Sonny’s special, a rack of pork, a double thick cut of pork chops, which was served over potatoes and spinach with a delicious sauce. My companion had sand dabs, which were served with wonderfully prepared mixed vegetables. “We want to bring [this location on Western], back to the glory days of Think Bistro, when people used to come and have fun at the bar and crowd around” Carly Ramirez said. “We will do our specials every night. We will have great dishes in [the tradition] of American cuisine. A soft opening is planned for the beginning of April. Lunch and dinner will be served from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mondays through Saturdays. Sundays will be dinner only. Sonny’s Café is at 1420 W. 25th St., San Pedro. Lastly, Art Luna has brought new management and a change to the menu to the San Pedro Taco Company on 5th and Gaffey streets. The restaurant serves the traditional Mexican fare of tacos and burritos. New on his menu is a tasty marinade for his pollo asada, or grilled chicken, which is made outside on a giant grill. Luna said that his special is two whole chickens, 32 ounces of rice, 32 ounces of refried beans and fresh tortillas for $24.95. His menu also lists an after school student special of only $1.95 for hungry kids craving burritos, quesadillas or taquitos. The Taco Company has a drive through window (which is not always apparent when you drive by, so look for it.). Luna has plans for a buffet and a sunny banquet room for large groups. San Pedro Taco Company is at 441 S. Gaffey St. in San Pedro. Call (310) 514-2808 for take-out orders.


from p. 5

Deeper Problems at Rancho LPG

City Controller to “subpoena the insurance policy or policies held by Rancho LPG Holdings Ltd.,” in order to evaluate the costs to the city in case of an explosion at Rancho, and (3) the convening of a task force, with subpoena power, to evaluate the “full range of all public policy alternatives” to protect the public from the threats posed by Rancho. If it seems like a round-about approach, getting Rancho Palos Verdes to get Los Angeles to act, you’re not grasping the big picture as

from p. 7

Looking forward, there was still a lot of work to do with port staff, Anderson said. He anticipates port staff may object to public involvement early in the environmental review process. He also plans to take the motion to joint committee of the Harbor Area Neighborhood Councils next month. “If it’s a slow movement forward; that’s fine,” Anderson said. “I just hope to see progress so we do get something in place that’s more functional, that’s stronger than PCAC [Port Community Advisory Committee], where we actually are in at the beginning stages and can make the difference, so that there doesn’t have to be any China Shipping-type litigation for the port to do what it’s supposed to do.”

Command to Change for LAPD Harbor Division Capt. Nancy Lauer recently announced her retirement. Her last day on the job was March 20. The new Los Angeles Police Department Harbor Division commander is Gerald Woodyard, Captain III. The new patrol commander, Jennifer Thomas, Captain I, and Woodyard will likely be introduced at the police commission meeting April 1, at Peck Park in San Pedro. The new captain’s adjutant is Sgt. Brad Hearn. Venue: Peck Park Location: 560 N. Western Ave., San Pedro

March 21 - April 3, 2014

away an agency that comes to inspect them. How crazy is that? That doesn’t sound good.” The intensification of threats and costs to surrounding communities seems to be growing by leaps and bounds. Recently, even the CEO of Exxon, Rex Tillerson, has joined a lawsuit against construction of a water tower needed for fracking near his home in Bartonville, Texas. His lawyer tried to downplay the fracking connection after national media picked up the story, but the facts are simple: without fracking, the tower would not have been needed. Tillerson is worried about his property values, according to the suit. But folks have to wonder, “What’s a water tower, compared to a potentially explosive facility like Rancho?” as the contradictions and class-based double-standards continue to mount. “People shouldn’t feel unsafe in their homes because of fossil fuel industry,” Martinez said. Everyone seems to agree in principle. But actions are another matter entirely. Rutter has something to say about that as well. “The EPA in any case hardly does any enforcing,” she told Random Lengths. “They hand it off to local agencies and don’t require a report from a local agencies. But the state does essentially the same thing.” There are more than half a dozen programs dealing with hazard material of one kind or another, and Rutter participated in the workshops where the regulations were developed. “They would say, ‘So, were going to have the fire department be enforcement agencies,’” Rutter recalled. “And the fire department people would be there in those meetings and say, ‘We can’t do it. We don’t have the manpower. We don’t have the expertise. We don’t have the money. We don’t have the time to run those programs.’ Didn’t matter.” The result has been a total regulatory failure. But you can’t blame the fire departments, Rutter says. “They’re not really the bad guys, fire departments,” Rutter said. “They were handed in impossible job.” One way to get things moving politically would be to focus on insurance issues—putting a monetary cost on the dangers involved. It could also generate the funds needed to make the inspection system actually function. “Nobody talks about the need for insurance,” Weiss said. “The last time it was a significant debate on this was back in the 50s, when they wanted to build nuclear power plants.” Congress had a debate, and passed a law assuming government liability, because private insurers were not willing to assume the risk. It wasn’t ideal, perhaps. “But you know what?” Weiss said. “You had a public debate on it and you had a vote.” And that’s what’s needed now with respect to fossil fuel facilities whose dangers have never been properly insured against. Rancho is a prime example, but hardly unique, as seen in a whole string of life-threatening incidents across the continent since the 2010 San Bruno fire. Weiss has crafted a multi-pronged resolution for consideration by the Rancho Palos Verdes City Council, seeking to bring pressure to bear on Los Angeles, which bears primary responsibility. Among other things, the resolution calls for (1) enacting “a robust and vigorous ‘Risk Management Ordinance’ fashioned and modeled off of the Risk Management Ordinance enacted by Contra Costa County, which was praised by Sen. Barbara Boxer,” (2) for the Los Angeles

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to begin with. The RMP [risk management plan] apparently is not something it [the EPA] requires to be filed with them. Only something that’s required to be on-site, if in fact the EPA happens to show up… So that’s pretty pathetic.” “But, the bottom line is to rely on the EPA to do anything until after the fact is a little unrealistic. That’s what I kind of glean from that.” In his assessment, the regulations are “intended by industry to be as ineffectual as possible, except to the extent necessary to pander and patronize the public into thinking that maybe there’s protection when there is none.” “You see it with the pipelines; you see it with railroads; and it just needs to be a public discussion, on how to balance the public safety needs against the economic needs.” Weiss said. But it’s nearly impossible to have such a discussion absent basic information. “Conflicting interests, at some level, need to be reconciled,” Weiss continued. “What else is new? That’s what these people are elected to do.” Putting things in context, Martinez sees the Rancho controversy as typical of a conflicted national process, which is particularly concentrated here in Los Angeles. “Increasingly people are trying to figure out how we can get off fossil fuels as we’re trying to move to cleaner air technology,” Martinez said, referring to Clean Air Act standards local regulators are aiming to meet. “The goal is to try to get to zero [emissions] but then you have these legacy facilities and people want to keep them running for a long time, and this one seems particularly old.” “LA is kind of the epicenter for a lot of fossil fuels,” he added, pointing to natural gas and oil in particular. “There’s been a debate about fossil fuels and the need to move away from them that’s playing out really prominently in LA. And this is just one example of many of the tensions that the industry has when you put very heavy industrial facilities right next to homes.” Rancho’s entanglement in these broader issues was further underscored by retired oil industry consultant Connie Rutter. She has repeatedly tried to make people aware of how dangerously explosive LPG gases are. That’s why she initially paid attention when tar sands crude oil trains started exploding recently. “There have been four or five, with loss of life in one of them,” Rutter noted. “I was hoping to have that be clear enough in the reporting so that we could say, ‘Now you see how explosive butane is,’ because it’s relatively a small volume of butane that would be in anyone tank.” But now Rutter sees other connections with the tar sands explosion. “It gives another market for butane, which changes the economics to make it even more sure that Rancho will stay there,” she explained. Another connection this creates is with Valero’s request for a tar-sands processing permit from the AQMD, which is now on hold. “Butane is going to be even more prevalent in our neighborhoods and so even more of a threat,” she said. Another company involved with LPG locally is Tesoro, which recently made news by refusing to allow inspections by the Chemical Safety Board following an incident at its Northern California facility. Rutter has a friend working for Tesoro. He told her, “Even though they are a huge company, they think like a small company. In other words they think they can do stuff like turning

Weiss sees it. “I’m telling them to basically spark a national debate,” he said. It’s an argument that makes more and more sense over time. With every new incident across the country, the need for that debate becomes increasingly clear. So why shouldn’t we be the ones to start it? It’s certainly better than just waiting to be the next victims.

17


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILINGS Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014020792 The following person is doing business as: Vintage Edge Jewelry, 1621 W. Wycliff Place, San Pedro, CA 90732, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Heather Lynn Hovard, 1621 W. Wycliff Place, San Pedro, CA 90732. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Heather Lynn Hovard. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Jan. 27, 2014. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 02/06/14, 02/20/14, 03/06/14, 03/20/14 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014020795 The following person is doing business as: Los Trucking, 941 Bloomwood Rd., San Pedro, CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Reg-

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istered owners: Rafael Juan Carlos Perez, 941 Bloomwood Rd., San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Rafael Juan Carlos Perez. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Jan. 27, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 02/06/14, 02/20/14, 03/06/14, 03/20/14 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014020793 The following person is doing business as: Otto Trattoria, 301 W. 6th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: San Pedro Group, 555 W. 9th

Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by a corporation. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Gregory J. Wilson, president. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Jan. 27, 2014. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 02/06/14, 02/20/14, 03/06/14, 03/20/14

wood Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by a corporation. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Bridget Contreras. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Jan. 27, 2014. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 02/06/14, 02/20/14, 03/06/14, 03/20/14

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014020791 The following person is doing business as: Violetica De Mil Colores Flowers, 819 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Bridgette Contreras, 956 W. Crest-

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014024899 The following person is doing business as: It’s Showtime Movie Memorabilia & Antiques, 741 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA

continued on following page


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS & LEGAL FILINGS from previous page 90731, Los Angeles County. Articles of Incorporation: C0797011. Registered owners: Kraakevik Corporation, 15915 Ventura, Blvd., Ste 303, Encino, CA 91436. This Business is conducted by a corporation. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. George Woytovich, vice-pres. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Jan. 30, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 02/20/14, 03/06/14, 03/20/14, 04/04/14

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014053951 The following person is doing business as: The Mama’s & The Papa’s Childcare, 864 S. Herbert Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners:Ada Esther Valencia, 864 S. Herbert Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: July 2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Ada Esther Valencia, owner. This statement was filed with the County

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014048047 The following person is doing business as: The Original Las Brisas Mexican Food 2. The Original Las Brisas Restaurant, 1110 N. Gaffey St., Ste D, San Pedro CA 90731. Los Angeles County. Registered owners:Gilberto A DeHaro, 24400 Marine Ave., Carson, CA 90745. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: 1982. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Gilberto A. DeHaro, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Feb. 24, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 03/06/14, 03/20/14, 04/03/14, 04/17/14 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014062923 The following person is doing business as: (1) Red Cat Realty, (2) RC Realty GROUP, (3) CA REALTY PARTNERS, (4) CALIFORNIA REALTY SERVICES,(5) 115 REALTY GROUP, (6) 123 REALTY GROUP, (7) 7404 REALTY GROUP, (8) 109 REALTY GROUP, (9) 7409 REALTY GROUP, (10) RC Realty Partners, (11) RC Realty Services, (12) RC Realty, 28364 S. Western Avenue, Suite 321, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, 90275, Los Angeles County. Registered owners:Susan Wylie Montero, 28364 S. Western Avenue, Suite 321, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, 90275. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Ada Esther Valencia, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 10,, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to

expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 03/20/14, 04/03/14, 04/17/14, 05/01/14 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014063045 The following person is doing business as: Rosy Scenario, 461 W. 6th Street, #106, San Pedro, CA 90731 Los Angeles County. Registered owners:Rose N. McGillivray, 2936 S. Denison Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Rose N. McGillivray, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 10, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 03/20/14, 04/03/14, 04/17/14, 05/01/14 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014055609 The following person is doing business as: Dove Enterprise, 658 W. 7th St., San Pedro, CA 90731. Los Angeles County. Registered owners:Morris Taub, 1265 W. 13th St, San Pedro CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Morris Taub, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 3, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 03/20/14, 04/03/14, 04/17/14, 05/01/14

as: Doorstep DaySpa, 530 W. 37th St., #1, San Pedro, CA 90731. Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Regina Fernandez, 530 W. 37th St., #1, San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Regina Fernandez, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 3,, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new

fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 03/20/14, 04/03/14, 04/17/14, 05/01/14 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014058500 The following person is doing business as: Fenmar Professional Instrument Service, 4034 S. Pacific Ave. #22, San Pedro, CA 90731. Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Rick Sippel, 4034 S. Pacific Ave. #22, San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant

who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Rick Sippel, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on March 5, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 03/20/14, 04/03/14, 04/17/14, 05/01/14

Louise Cecilia Frances Brown, 1961-2014

A Star that will forever burn brightly in our hearts. Louise Brown, a resident of Palos Verdes since 1969, died peacefully in her sleep at home where she lived with her parents, Pat and Frank Brown, on Feb. 28. Anyone whose life she touched was impacted by her darling smile and her loving way of life. Louise was born Aug. 10, 1961 in Verdun, France. She was among the first children in Palos Verdes with an intellectual disability to enroll in the special education program that had been revised to be more inclusive. While Louise learned reading and writing at Silver Spur Elementary and Malaga Cove Intermediate schools, she also interacted with students in mainstream classes such as art and music. A whole generation of understanding, acceptance and love on the part of these school children was nurtured. In 1983, Louise graduated Rolling Hills High School along with her brother, James Brown. Louise worked for Goodwill Industries for 19 years. In her free time she took acting lessons, learned American Sign Language and helped sign for hearing impaired attendees at St. Margaret Mary’s church services for the developmentally disabled. Her acting career peaked when Pat and Frank brought her to auditions for “Life Goes On.” She starred in a poignant episode of “ER” playing the part of Louise Mendoza, a Down Syndrome woman in line for a heart transplant. At one point,

she declared George Clooney “gorgeous” and loved working with Anthony Edwards. Honored by the Palos Verdes Chamber of Commerce, Louise shared the Citizen of the Year award with her parents in April, 2008. For the past 10 years Louise attended Canyon Verde, an interactive program for adults with developmental disabilities. Louise earned many hours as an usher at the Norris Theater and her social calendar was filled with dinners and cultural events she attended on the Peninsula with her parents. She was an advocate for the developmentally disabled and was an invited speaker to programs highlighting their unique qualities and contributions. She would frequently correct people who asked her about Down Syndrome saying she referred to it as “Up Syndrome.” Louise is survived by her parents, Frank and Pat Brown, her siblings Francine Howard (Jeff), Nicole Brown (Pat Shaw), Christine Brown, and James Brown (Dana). Pre-deceasing Louise was her sister Leslie Ferris (Bill). A celebration of Louise’s life will be held in the future. Contributions can be made in her memory to Canyon Verde (2761 190th St., Redondo Beach, CA 90278), and to the Down Syndrome Association (16461 Sherman Way, Suite 180, Van Nuys, CA 91406, Tel: 818786-0001).

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014022161 The following person is doing business as:Spirit Cruises & Yacht Charters, 2. Spirit’s Boardwalk Cafe & Grill,1200 Nagoya ?Way P-21, San Pedro, CA 90731. Los Angeles County. Ports O’Call Berth 77 P-21, San Pedro CA 90731. Registered owners: Jayme Wilson, 43 61st Place, Long Beach, CA 90803. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: 1984. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) S/. Jayme Wilson, owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on Jan. 28, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 02/20/14, 03/06/14, 03/20/14, 04/04/14

Clerk of Los Angeles on Feb. 28, 2014. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 03/06/14, 03/20/14, 04/03/14, 04/17/14

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2014055607 The following person is doing business

March 21 - April 3, 2014

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March 21 - April 3, 2014

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


Rln 03 20 14 edition