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A year or two after ‘Kissed By Lightning’ was released at the ImagiNative Film Festival in Toronto (and again to great accolades in both the Santa Fe and San Francisco festivals), ElizaBeth found this need to create something new on the basis that her personal life and challenges were mastering huge changes. She had worked closely with the director of the film who advised her on what type of sound she was looking for. And not only was she given the creative freedom to source the sounds, but also to compose new, and collaborate with other Native American artists on the singing pieces required to complete the project. For this, ElizaBeth was also asked to draw from her own repertoire pieces that fit the film effectively. She called the process the “grass-roots version of film scoring”. “I sang the parts that I wanted to create if I couldn’t play the instruments, and I used banjo and guitar where I could. I hired musicians who would listen to what I recorded and the back and forth commenced from there. I worked with Grant Avenue Studio in Hamilton, who are always very supportive of anything I do, and this made the entire project very easy on me.” From there, all recordings were then sent to the film editor for scoring. But it wasn’t until after all of this was completed that she found her family and personal needs as well as her health in particular were converging into a type of “perfect storm”. Subsequently, she took a break from the business, focused on herself and her home, and took her doctor’s medical advice to heart.

the commercial writing industry for ten years before moving back to Canada for family reasons. By the time she did, there was a burgeoning Aboriginal music scene in the country that had hit high-gear in the late 90’s. As a part of that, she found herself working with a genre she called “trad- mix”, which involved the composition of new pieces that included traditional Native American sounds. Invited by traditional and contemporary Haudenosaunee singer Sadie Buck, she began with a ’97 project entitled ‘Aboriginal Women’s Voices’.

Photo Credit: Reverbnation.com

In a convergence at Sleeping Buffalo Mountain in Banff, AB, many Aboriginal women artists from various nations, cultures and languages brought with them their musical traditions in the form of one song representing the place they came from. Together, they created, rehearsed and recorded eight new songs through the ‘Aboriginal Women’s Voices’ project, which were incorporated onto the ‘Hearts of the

When asked how she found her path in the artistic world she explained that she left upstate New York in 1986 and moved to Nashville, TN with the goal of living in the song-writing mecca to learn. She worked in

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Profile for Ranch & Reserve Magazine

Ranch & Reserve Magazine Vol 1 Issue 8  

Catch the 'Top 5 Reasons a Guest Ranch is a HOT Destination' for your summer reading! Also includes features on Texas wines, The Green Door...

Ranch & Reserve Magazine Vol 1 Issue 8  

Catch the 'Top 5 Reasons a Guest Ranch is a HOT Destination' for your summer reading! Also includes features on Texas wines, The Green Door...

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