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A DRIP OF NEW BLOOD

I did not have the privilege of knowing Mr. Cy Yoakum but have a lot of respect for the impact that his Cherokee Ranch Red Brahmans had on the Brahman industry. One of his theories on breeding excellent Brahman cattle was to always try a drip of new blood every year. If it works, you turn into a drop next year and if it does not, try another new drip the next year. We believe in this theory big time and practice it every year with more than one drip. Sometimes we buy a junior’s show heifer, some semen at a charity auction but we always go after the genetics that we know will add some power to our program. This past year we have added some fabulous horned and polled females and a very promising young bull featured here with State of the Art pedigrees. JS POLLED PATRON is a smooth polled, deep bodied, big boned, heavy muscled herd bull prospect sired by the POLLED Register of Renown Bull, + Mr. V8 212/3 and a straight bred Hudgins Double A cow. Polled Patron is rich in breed character, pigment, correctness and is destined to make a big impact on the Brahman World as more and more progressive breeders are using POLLED GENETICS. He was bred by Smith Brahmans. In visiting with our good friends, Jason and Tammy Smith, we asked them what everybody around their home area called Jeff and they said Boss Man. Patron is Boss Man in Spanish. When asked about the name, they both loved it so in Jeff’s honor for his many contributions to his family, his community, the Brahman World and society, we have named this great young bull JS POLLED PATRON. Semen will be available this fall. He is co-owned with England Farms and SRS Land & Cattle.

JDH CECILIA MANSO 816 is a phenomenal heifer bred by our ole buddy Dr. Richard Forgason that NEARS PERFECTON IN THE FLESH. We bought her for our grand daughter Cecilia and look forward to her making a big impact on our breeding program. She goes back to Charley’s Jazz and V8 Super Stroke, two major league herd bulls. A BIG HEARTY THANKS goes out to Mary Kate Walters for investing in this great young female.

JDH RACHEL ANN MANSO 870/1 is a big boned, growthy, super feminine future donor that has a great pedigree stacked with some of the breed’s all time greats – JDH Liberty, Madison, Woodman, Datapack and Dakota. We look for her to add some POWER to our POLLED program. She has a great disposition and was easy to halter break. She is a paternal sister to the great JDH Woodson bull who is our all time favorite JDH sire.

A BIG HEARTY THANKS goes out to our ole buddy Jody Youngblood for allowing us to select eight fancy POLLED females from the HEART of his herd. We look for these females to add some POLLED POWER to our program. 514/6 is a future donor whose sire has at least five generations of POLLED breeding plus the great Suva and the Polled Sugarlands Esto 225 bull in his pedigree.

MIL GRACIAS goes out to our ole compadre Beto Salinas on his generosity in giving me this gorgeous LMC Polled Aussie x V8 901/4 x JDH Liberty heifer for my 60 th birthday. We will always treasure her and the impact she will have on our program. She adds pedigree clout to our program. We appreciate his friendship and all of the good things he has done for Mission and South Texas as Mayor of Mission.

This is a very fancy JDH Winchester daughter that heads up a fancy set of JDH heifers we just bought to add some more cow power plus NEW BLOOD to create new POLLED bloodlines to strengthen the POLLED GENE POOL with their progeny. So far we have been able to raise a herd bull out of every JDH female we have bought. A BIG HEARTY THANKS to John Coleman Locke for all of his assistance.

This Heritage BABY DOLL is a super long and feminine Maddox and Karu grand daughter sired by the champion V8 442/6 bull who is a grand son of the great V8 188/5 donor. She is a full sib to Mr. H Barrett Manso. Add the major league studs - Dakota, Charley, 360/1 and Double Take (All Register of Renown) in the next generation and you have a star studded pedigree whose progeny will enrich the POLLED GENE POOL ONE DRIP OF NEW BLOOD AT A TIME.


If you are interested in introducing A DRIP OF NEW BLOOD to your herd that can make a major impact, please consider buying our 2013 ABBA Houston sale lot who is awesome !! LMC +S Polled Madonna will be a herd bull producer and is the kind to build a herd around. She is sired by our Senior Herd Sire, LMC WFF Pistolero and an outstanding JDH Datapack donor of the Schneiders. Polled Madonna is the real deal and is one of the very best we have ever produced. We are keeping her full brother as a herd bull – LMC Polled Datapack (see below). Four units of semen from any of the ten POLLED LMC or Schneider bulls sell with her. We are proud to be SHARING OUR BEST with the BRAHMAN WORLD at Houston 2013. Come see us.

CONGRATULATIONS to the Val Walters family and staff for all of their recent championships with LMC Polled Spice and LMC Polled Paulette. We do not show many of our Polled Brahmans and when we do they are mostly bulls. We are extremely proud of how successful some of our clients like the Walters have been with our LMC Polled Brahmans. LMC Polled Paulette (photo) is double polled and is an Ambassador daughter out of a grand daughter of =JDH Sir Alexo Manso. It is females like Polled Spice and Paulette that are going to keep the POLLED NATION growing as they win over the hearts of more and more Brahman breeders.

LMC POLLED BOSS is a LMC LF Ambassador son of our JDH 446/5 cow that is destined for greatness. When you study bulls like LMC Polled Boss, Polled Madison and Apollo you can appreciate why we like breeding our bulls to JDH females. We also have a great set of yearling bulls for sale right now that will be two this fall and early next spring. They are polled and sired by four different polled sires. The demand for good POLLED Brahman cattle is growing daily so help us help you by getting one of these good bulls working in your herd.

We purchased JDH LADY MICHELE MANSO for two reasons – her tremendous capacious body style and her fantastic pedigree. She is a grand daughter of two breed greats – JDH Liberty and Madison. If you study the JDH Semen Catalog you will find these two bulls to be the most common denominators in the pedigrees of their very best bulls, many of which have been major champions. They are in 53 of the 70 pedigrees.

Se Habla Español

Simbrahs, Simbraviehs & POLLED Brahmans CARLOS & SISTER GUERRA FAMILY

LMC POLLED DATAPACK is a full brother to Polled Madonna and is going to make a powerful polled herd bull supported by a great pedigree. We are going to sell ½ interest in him so if you have been thinking how to add some polled genes to your program, here is a great opportunity.

PO Box 81 • Linn, TX 78563 (Office) 956-383-7566 • Carlos 802-1641 Victor 607-5515 • Carlos Jr. 330-1963 email: LaMuñecaCattle@aol.com Please visit our website at www.LaMuñecaCattle.com

LMC GUIDO MUNECA 256/1 is one of 4 fancy heifers we bought from the good folks at Schneider Brahmans. She is a JDH Guido Manso x JDH Sir Marri. We also bought 3 littermate sisters sired by JDH Carlos Manso (Madison son) and a JDH Sir Marri x Bross Manso daughter. By incorporating these proven and popular JDH bloodlines with our proven POLLED sires, we are insuring the future success of POLLED American Brahmans.

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Looking for Brahman events?

>> Visit www.brahman.org for the latest Brahman information.

National Brahman Show

October 15, 2012 8:00 a.m. - Cattle start arriving 2:00 p.m. - International Committee (Salon E) - Youth Activities Committee (Riata Room) - Marketing Committee (Latigo Room) 4:00 p.m. - Communications Committee (Riata Room) - Research & Breed Improvement Committee (Latigo Room) - Membership Committee (Salon E) 6:30 p.m. - Executive Committee (Salon E) October 16, 2012 9:00 a.m. - BOD Meeting (Salon C) 9:00 a.m. - Cattle must be in place 11:00 a.m. - Deadline to Check In 12:00 p.m. - Lunch (Salon D) 2:00 p.m. - Weigh & Measure (Main Arena) October 17, 2012 10:00 a.m. - Open Brahman Show Heifers & Group Classes 6:30 p.m. - Exhibitor Dinner October 18, 2012 8:00 a.m. - Open Brahman Show Bulls

October 11, 2012 Alabama National State Fair Montgomery, AL Judge: Clyde Goudeau

November 6, 2012 National Peanut Festival Dothan, AL Judge: Gene McCarter

October 11, 2012 Heart of Texas Fair Waco, TX Judge: Mark McClintock

November 9, 2012 Greater Jacksonville Fair Jacksonville, FL Judge: Steve Hudgins

October 17-18, 2012 National Brahman Show at the State Fair of Texas Dallas, TX Judge: Blake Nelson

November 10-11, 2012 Jambalaya Classic Gonzales, LA Judge: Mitch Thomas

October 18, 2012 Arkansas State Fair Little Rock, AR Judge: Dr. Ron Gill November 1-2, 2012 Louisiana State Fair Shreveport, LA Judge: Billie Farris

AMERICAN BRAHMAN BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 3003 South Loop West, Suite 520 Houston, TX 77954 Phone: 713-349-0854 Fax: 713-349-9795 Email: abba@brahman.org For Registrations and Transfer Questions: PO Box 14100 Kansas City, MO 64101-4100 Phone: 816-595-2442 Fax: 816-842-6931 Email: abba@abraonline.org

Livestock Grooming Supplies SULLIVAN SUPPLY, INC.

Order Line: 1-800-475-5902 • Dunlap, Iowa sales@sullivansupply.com

SULLIVAN SUPPLY SOUTH

Order Line: 1-800-588-7096 • Hillsboro, Texas sullivan@hillsboro.net

SULLIVAN SUPPLY WEST

Order Line: 1-888-914-5972 • Lodi, California lee@sullivansupply.com

www.sullivansupply.com 6 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

November 16-17, 2012 ABBA Membership Convention Galveston, TX

Call for a free catalog.

Executive Vice President: Chris Shivers - cshivers@brahman.org Recording Secretary/Office Manager: Armelinda Ibarra - armelinda@brahman.org Director of Communications/Youth Activites: Libby Williams - lwilliams@brahman.org Membership/Promotional Items: Teresa Dominguez - tdominguez@brahman.org

2012 ABBA OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Bob Hudgins, President George Kempfer robertehudgins@yahoo.com kempfercattleco@yahoo.com Dr. Richard Hughes, Vice President John Coleman Locke hughesdr@sbcglobal.net johnclocke@hotmail.com Tommy Stadler, Secretary/Treasurer Billy Dan Lindley tstadler@stadlercompany.com billydan@lindleybrahmans.com Danny Acevedo Arnold Saunders dannydoublea@aol.com dotsaunders@yahoo.com Rachel Cutrer Jim-Bob Trant rachelv8@yahoo.com jtbrahmans@mscc.net


The premier magazine for American Brahman and Brahman F1 cattle

CONTENTS

16 shirley watts will be honored in dallas

Fall 2012 | Summer Show Coverage

NATIONAL BRAHMAN SHOW DEDICATION 16

A Lifelong Commitment t’s more than a dedication. It’s an honor for a woman who has truly devoted her life to the Brahman breed. The American Brahman Review talks with Shirley Watts of Tic Tac Toe Ranch, this year’s honoree of the 2012 National Brahman Show.

24

Texas A&M’s TALL Program How can you put farmers, ranchers, horticulturists, regulatory agencies, scientists, bankers and attorneys in one room and expect peace and harmony?

38

It’s How We Play the Game that Really Counts A 4-H or FFA project can teach responsibility, how to win and lose, work as a team and more.

44

Impact of Bos indicus Genetics on the Global Beef Industry - Part 2

FEATURES

A continuation into the science behind the role of Bos inducus in beef today.

24

38

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brahman in demand

CONTENTS Support your state associations

horse in the city 52

SHOW & SALE RESULTS 28 31 42 50 54 58

MJBA State Show & Deep South Association Meetings All American National Junior Show Bluebonnet Kickoff Classic Brazos Vally Fair & Expo Sugar Classic Tennessee State Fair WANT MORE BRAHMAN? Go to www.facebook.com/ brahmanreview to view thousands of photos from Brahman events!

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DEPARTMENTS 6 10 12 20 26 52 53 56

Upcoming Events From Our Staff News from ABBA Brahman Happenings Industry Updates Horse in the City

Answers on pg 59

Nutritionist Corner Letters from Kodi

Next Issue: Winter 2013

Our next issue will be available in January. It will feature the F1 female and get you prepared for Houston, along with results from the Fall shows and Brahman events.


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From the Staff

Wrapping up Summer As we are wrapping up the Summer and heading into Fall, we would like to say ‘Thank You’ to everyone that we have met along the way for welcoming us into the Brahman breed. As always, the ‘All American’ was a GREAT event and we had an awesome time meeting the Junior members and seeing first-hand how well represented the Brahman breed will be in the future. Over the Summer we were fortunate enough to have the Bishop family agree to help us out by representing the Brahman Review at shows and other events. Mark is also a contact person for us if you are interested in advertising with us. His contact information is listed on page 11. They are an amazing family with a true passion for the Brahman breed. See you down the road! Sincerely, Crystal Devoll

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Thank you to the Bishop Family of IS Ranch for representing us at Brahman events in the Southeast! WANT MORE BRAHMAN? Go to www.facebook.com/ brahmanreview to view thousands of photos from Brahman events!


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The American Brahman Review™ promotes the attributes of American Brahman cattle and Brahman F1s. By providing accurate, positive coverage of Brahman, we add value for Brahman breeders and inform the public of the necessity of the Brahman breed and the Brahman F-1 in the global beef industry.

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WANT TO BE IN THE BRAHMAN REVIEW? We accept photo submissions, article ideas, show results, and more. If you have an idea, or request coverage of your event, email crystal@brahmanreview.com.

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News from ABBA ABBA ANNOUNCES MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY The American Brahman Breeders Association is excited to announce the production of the premier membership directory of the Brahman breed. The ABBA will be compiling information on each of its active members to use in this 2013 reference guide that will be distributed at industry events, to individuals who contact the office with an interest in Brahman cattle, and will be mailed out to all ABBA members. The ABBA Membership Directory will be an all inclusive guide to ABBA members, their contact information, ABBA events, and all other important association information. To be included in the ABBA membership directory, members must pay their activity fees by November 1. The ABBA would also like to invite members, breeders

and association affiliates to advertise in the new membership directory. This is an opportunity to provide your operation with year round exposure in the breed’s foremost reference guide! The ABBA is accepting full and half page, camera ready ads. Please contact Libby Williams at lwilliams@brahman.org or 713349-0854, with ad commitments by OCTOBER 18. Ads must be received no later thanNOVEMBER 15. We look forward to representing you in this one-of-a-kind, ABBA Membership Directory! Ad Prices: 1 Page, 4 color - $400 1/2 Page, 4 color - $200

LAUNCH OF THE MEMBER CENTER AT brahman.org The ABBA recently launched the “Member Center” section onbrahman.org. This section works to provide information to its members on the association and its functions. The new “Member Center,” where brahman.org’s “Join” section used to be, will replace “New Member” binders that had been mailed out in the past. Now all pertinant information,

including questions about membership, registrations, transfers, special recognition, and BHIR and performance programs can be found on this page. It also highlights the ABBA’s new video libarary. Check out the new “Member Center” on brahman.org. It is your reference tool for everything ABBA.

UTILIZE THE ABBA’S FREE CATTLE LISTING SERVICE The ABBA provides a free cattle listing service on brahman. org for members wishing to sell registered bulls and females, commercial cattle, stocker and feeder cattle, and genetics. Any member has the opportunity to utilize this service. To do so, find the listing forms under the “Cattle for Sale” link on

brahman.org, and submit them to the ABBA office via mail, email or fax. Your cattle will be listed within one day of receipt by the ABBA office. Don’t pass up this additional marketing opportunity.

LOOKING AHEAD Keep the following ABBA events and future opportunities in mind! • INTERNATIONAL SALE Start selecting your consignments for the International Sale, which will be held in February in conjunction with the International Show in Houston. Members should have received nomination forms in a recent membership mail out. The consignment nomination deadline is November 15. • ABBA CARCASS PROGRAM The ABBA will be

taking nominations for the spring group of carcass evaluation program steers no later than November 15. Start considering which calves you would like to have fed out for this unique data collection program. • ABBA MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY The ABBA will be publishing its own all inclusive Membership Directory. This is an opportunity to advertise in this reference guide and be seen year round. Look for the Membership Directory to hit mailboxes in January 2013

TWO-YEAR-OLDS OFFERED REDUCED REGISTRATION FEE Between August 1 and October 31, 2012, the ABBA will be offering a registration moratorium for animals over 24 months of age. This moratorium will offer a half price registration fee ($50) for individuals over two years old. If you are interested in this moratorium, feel free to contact the ABBA office for further details. 12 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

3003 South Loop West, Suite 520 l Houston, TX 77954 Phone: 713-349-0854 l Fax: 713-349-9795 Email: abba@brahman.org


BRAHMAN PERCENTAGE FEMALES OFFER MAXIMUM HYBRID VIGOR, PROFIT HOUSTON - The American Brahman Breeders Association (ABBA) is not only the organization that registers and promotes the country’s purebred Brahman herd, it also boasts two percentage female programs that may be the solution to many cattlemen’s droughtcentered issues. The ABBA F-1 Certification program is the industry’s leading commercial female program. It recognizes the Brahman’s heat tolerance and efficiency, and takes advantage of its ability to harness maximum hybrid vigor when crossed with traditional European breeds. The American Brahman generates the kind of first-cross (F-1) offspring the nation’s cattlemen need: versatile, functional, practical. Many commercial cattlemen are using the F-1 cow as their base female. This is due to her hybrid vigor, or heterosis, that is second to none. Heterosis is the increased performance a crossbred calf exhibits over its purebred parent and is achieved when animals of two nonrelated strains are crossed. Maximum heterosis is achieved by crossing two different species. Because one-half of her pedigree is Bos indicus, and the other half is Bos taurus, the Brahman F-1 female garners maximum hybrid vigor. As a result, she outperforms both her straightbred parents in different traits. Not only does she have increased milk production, higher fertility, and wean heavier calves, but because her parentage is one-half Brahman, she’s bred to adapt to harsh environmental conditions, resist diseases and parasites and last up to 50 percent longer. Cattlemen across the country can utilize this package of practical traits to add value to their herds. The Brahman F-1 Female is a profit driver that will enhance returns in almost any environment. Her profitability is proven. Her percentage offspring only add to her value. They exhibit the same heat resistance and efficiencyas their F-1 dams, while still qualifying for traditional marketing

programs. Brahman percentage females have the versatility to thrive in all climates. She’s equipped to sustain cooler northern weather while still maintaining drought tolerance, which ensures efficient productivity in hot, dry conditions. Plus, ranchers can improve their bottom line by injecting Brahman genetics into cattle they send to the feedlot. Percentage steer calves are more efficient in the feedyard than their straightbred counterparts and still qualify for many branded beef programs that make them eligible to receive premiums. Brahman percentage steers are the most efficient and profitable in all feeding situations. Golden Certified (progeny of two registered parents) and Certified (progeny of a registered sire and purebred/nonregistered dam) F-1 females guarantee maximum heterosis and improve upon the positive traits gained from both parents, making her the most versatile female in the beef industry. To expand on the versatility of the Golden Certified/ Certified F-1 cow, the ABBA recently launched the F-1 PLUS program to offer these sought-after genetics to a broader region of the country. The F-1 PLUS female is the progeny of a Golden Certified/Certified F-1 cow and any registered breed sire. Depending upon the desired amount of Brahman influence, the F-1 PLUS female can fill the bill. “With the improved genetics of both parent breeds of the F-1 cow, as well as her noted versatility, it only makes sense that producers utilize her,” said ABBA Executive Vice President Chris Shivers, “She has truly earned the title “Queen of Cow Country.’” The American Brahman Breeders Association is the world registry for Brahman cattle, the #1 beef breed for efficiency, hybrid vigor and environmental adaptability. For more information on the ABBA and its annual convention, visit www.brahman.org.

PRE-REGISTRATION FOR 2ND ANNUAL ABBA MEMBERSHIP CONVENTION NOW AVAILABLE The American Brahman Breeders Association will be holding its second annual convention November 16-17, 2012. The convention will bring families, breeders, vendors and livestock professionals together to learn more about the Brahman breed, best practices in ranching and other updates for ABBA members. In addition to the workshops and seminars, time will be set aside for family activities. This year, workshops will also be provided for kids, giving you the opportunity to make this a family event! The first session planned will spotlight the Ranching for Profit School that will be sponsored by Dubina Rose Ranch. This business school of the livestock industry will serve as the general session on Saturday morning, November 17. Dave Pratt, a nationally recognized lecturer, will help you find the breakthroughs you’ve been looking for to increase profit, improve the health of the land, improve the relationships in your business and increase your satisfaction with your ranch. Make plans now to attend this year’s Membership Convention. Pre-registration for the convention is now

available for $50. This price will be guaranteed until October 18. If you choose to preregister for the event, you will also be entered for a chance to win a free two night stay at the Moody Gardens Hotel and Spa. The drawing will be held at the 2012 National Show in Dallas on October 18. After the drawing, registration will increase to $100. To preregister for the 2012 ABBA Membership Convention, use the link below. If you are interested in attending or sponsoring the ABBA Membership Convention, you can obtain the required forms by contacting the ABBA office at 713-349-0854. Hotel Information: Moody Gardens Hotel & Spa Seven Hope Boulevard Galveston, Texas 77554 For Reservations: 888-388-8484 Rate: $129 plus tax Deadline for Reservations: October 25, 2012 FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 13


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A Lifel ong

Commitment

By Ashley Patterson

Shirley Watts is humbled as the 2012 National Brahman Show is dedicated in her name. It’s more than a dedication. It’s an honor for a woman who has truly devoted her life to the Brahman breed. The American Brahman Review talks with Shirley Watts of Tic Tac Toe Ranch, this year’s honoree of the 2012 National Brahman Show. A FAMILY TRADITION Shirley has known nothing else but cattle. Raised on a Hereford ranch with her family in Navarro County, she worked hard to sustain their livelihood, just like she does today. Her mother’s Hereford ranch, Jesse Engle & Sons, started the Beau Blanchard Hereford bloodline, one of the main bloodlines in the Hereford industry. The roots run deep, and Shirley has certainly planted that same passion and dedication in her family. Shirley and her late husband Max Watts, raised their three daughters, Stephanie Ebeling, Debra Barnes, and Tammie Watts, with the same determination and passion as they were raised. The 16 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

girls started their show careers in 4H with Limousin and Hereford heifers, and Brahman and Hereford cross steers. In 1971, each girl bought their first Brahman show heifer from Bob and Diana Massey of Koontz Ranch. To distinguish between the sisters’ animals, their cattle were branded with “WR,” which stands for Watts Ranch, and a unique numbering system. Stephanie’s herd number began with number 1, Debra’s with number 2, and Tammie’s with number 3. All three daughters had successful show careers, winning multiple breed champions at the San Antonio and Houston Livestock shows and champions at many Brahman shows. Stephanie, Debra, and Tammie were taught many lessons in the showring through the strong direction of their parents. Their support made them into champions in the showring, and inspired them beyond the show arena; they are still involved in the industry and have passed on the tradition to their children as well, something that can be credited to their mother and father.


SHIRLEY WATTS & STUART WATKINS WATCHING A CLASS AT THE 2011 NATIONAL SHOW “Both of them would teach, but yet guide you to do it on your own and let you learn from your mistakes,” said Tammie. In 1975, the Watts’ started their Brahman operation, and began showing Brahman cattle in the 1980s. After more than 30 years in the Brahman showring, and a lifetime in the cattle business, Tic Tac Toe Ranch have earned their place at the top. TIC TAC TOE RANCH As a small operation, Tic Tac Toe produced and raised some of the most influential bulls of the breed. One such bull was (+) WR Mr. Suva 203, who was bred by Debra as a result of Koontz Ranch bloodlines. Suva 203 sired cattle with length and extra frame, and bred some of the most feminine females at that time, said Jim Williams of V8 Ranch, who purchased an interest in Suva 203 along with Charlie Thomas Ranch. The bull had a successful show career, winning Grand Champion bull at the 1979 Houston Show. His progeny were no different—his first calf crop produced 63 champions and 91 class winners. Today, Suva 203 holds the number one spot in the Register of Renown. “He was the bull that put the Watts family on the map,” said Williams. When Charlie Thomas Ranch dispersed, Thomas sold a quarter of Suva 203 for $198,000, which made him one of the first syndicated Brahman bulls. At the 1990 International Brahman Show in Houston, Texas, +TTT Mr. Suva Crata 163 won Grand Champion Bull as a calf. Suva Crata 163 was sired by +JJ Didor Crata 500, a bull owned by Clyde Goudeau. Other influential cattle produced and/or raised by the Watts’ were +TTT Mr. Mayro Suva 845 “Rambo” and +TTT Mr. Suva Crata 450, who was purchased by J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Suva Crata 450 was known for his thickness and muscling and impacted the breed through his most famous son, (+)JDH Datapack Manso 563/5. The ranch’s main herd sire for the past seven years has been +JDH Martin Manso 879/3. The progeny of Martin Manso 879/3 has certainly been successful in the showring and on the ranch. His first calf crop qualified him for Register of Renown, making him the youngest herd sire to date holding the coveted title. Shirley has high hopes for a young Martin Manso 879/3 son, TTT Mr. Suva Martin 363 “Big Boy,” who looks to be

another great Tic Tac Toe herd sire, she said. The family ranch has been in operation for more than 50 years. In 1963 when Max and Shirley married, Max owned Tic Tac Toe Ranch. Today the ranch runs approximately 70 head of Brahmans and 50 head of commercial cattle, including Brahman X Hereford F1s. Ranching is Shirley’s and her family’s way of life. “You love the cattle and you love the people,” said Shirley. “I was raised in this industry and have enjoyed carrying it on.” Shirley’s reputation is most favorable in the Brahman breed; she’s a person who makes a great example for everyone. “She’s a hard working person and has respect for accomplishments that she’s made and that other people have made,” said Debra. “She knows it’s hard to make those accomplishments.” As a friend and fellow breeder for 42 years, Williams also described Shirley as a person with a strong and determined work ethic. When the Watts’ raised Brahmans and Brahman cross steers in predominant Hereford country in North Texas, a decision that was not the most popular at the time, they proved then to be strong proponents of the breed, said Williams. From those beginnings, she’s “been a lifelong supporter of the Brahman breed and has shown many champions,” said Williams. TIC TAC TOE IN THE SHOWRING Throughout the years, Shirley and her family proved

PAST NATIONAL SHOW DEDICATIONS 1985

A.J. Marceau

1989

Dr. James P. Wood

1990

Tom Dean

1991

Herman & Margie Rojillo

1997

Ike Hamilton

1998

Les Brandes

2005

Charles Greenwood

2007

Max Watts

2008

Dr. Earl Hubert

2009

Gordon Guilot

2010

Dave Sagebiel & Jerry Simon

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 17


themselves in the Brahman THE NATIONAL SHOW showring. The show scene is DEDICATION a definite family effort at Tic The National Show has Tac Toe ranch. Daughters been dedicated to 11 Brahman Debra and Tammie, with producers over the past 27 granddaughter Brandy Barnes, years. The honor goes to those all pitch in to make the shows individuals who contributed a success. Traveling to various to the American Brahman shows across the state and Breeder’s Association (ABBA) country, the family spends and to the Brahman breed, said their time in both business and ABBA Executive Vice President pleasure. Chris Shivers. These individuals “You enjoy the competition have built their lives around the and it helps you see where you Brahman industry. are in the Brahman program,” “Shirley Watts is most said Shirley. “The showring deserving of this honor due SHIRLEY WATTS MAKING BEDS AT WACO IN 2011 really helps you get your to her longtime service and name out to that commercial promotion of the Brahman cattleman.” breed,” said Shivers. “Not Through the long hours only has she excelled in the and hard work poured into showring, but she understands preparing for every show, the commercial industry.” the family still cherishes the Now, Shirley takes her experiences as ones they will place among those breeders, never forget. The showring including her late husband. is where they love to be, said Max had this same honor Shirley. bestowed upon him at the Granddaughter Brandy 2007 National Brahman Show. recalled the memories made For Brandy, it was difficult to on the road, at the ranch, and express the gratitude she felt in the showring, and how her for both of her grandparents to grandmother is an ever constant hold this honor. presence in her life. Brandy “They both have made such traveled to many domestic an impact on so many people and international shows with and have earned so much Shirley. They were special trips, respect from cattlemen around HOUSTON 2012 - SHIRLEY WATTS HELPING SHOW said Brandy, because it was just the world with their knowledge THE JDH ELMO GET-OF-SIRE her and Shirley. and experience in the cattle “She is one of a kind....” business,” said Brandy. “I am said Brandy. “Her strength and very proud that the Brahman toughness will never stop amazing me.” breed and the ABBA have chosen to recognize both of them for their contributions to the breed and selfless time spent teaching THE OTHER SHOWRING anyone that showed an interest in learning, never expecting any Along with her many accomplishments as an exhibitor in acknowledgement in return.” the showring, Shirley has become a well-known and respected It is certainly an honor to be recognized along with the other cattle judge. In 1998, she was the first woman to judge the National Show honorees as an individual who has devoted their International Brahman Show in Houston, and has judged many time, energy, and ultimately their life to the Brahman breed. major cattle shows across the southern United States and in South Debra recalls being with her mother when she received the news and Central America. For Shirley, she enjoys the chance to see of the dedication, and watched as tears came to her mother’s eyes. other people’s cattle and is always honored for the opportunity to “It is a great honor to me,” said Shirley. “I feel very happy and evaluate those cattle, she said. honored.” In an ideal show animal, Shirley first looks for good muscling Through her service on the ABBA Board of Directors, Shirley and sound feet and legs, the most important qualities. The right has impacted the industry in more ways than one, making her an hump placement, clean underlines, and extension of the neck asset at all levels in the organization, said Shivers. are among the other qualities. With a lifetime spent evaluating Shirley will be recognized at the National Brahman Show cattle, it’s no surprise that Shirley has become a successful and in Dallas, Texas, Oct. 15-18, 2012, which will be held in recognized judge. conjunction with the State Fair of Texas. © TABR

18 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012


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Brahman Happenings TEXAS BRAHMAN ASSOCIATION MEETINGS AND FIELD DAYS AT SUNNYSIDE RANCH It was a beautiful day, at least by cattlemen’s standards, at the Sunnyside Ranch field day. Even though it was September 15th on the calendar you certainly could tell that fall was in the air. It was an overcast sky with temperatures in the low 80’s. It had rained the night before and felt like it could shower at any moment throughout the day. As stated before, a beautiful day for anyone in the cattle business. Tommy and Shirley Stadler and their whole family opened their South Texas ranch up to everyone for a day of just good oldfashioned fellowship. It was extremely well attended with people coming from across the state. It was a time for old friends to catch up and new people to get acquainted with fellow Brahman breeders. What would one of these events be without good ole Texas BBQ? No one left hungry as the Stadler family served a traditional BBQ lunch with all of the fixings. After lunch the South Texas Brahman Association and the Texas Brahman Association (TBA) each had their annual meetings. During each of these meetings it was discussed that funding should at least remain at current levels to support shows

across the state and to make sure that scholarships are continued as well. There was a resounding theme among both meetings that the youth are what will continue the Brahman breed far into the future and everything must be done to help them get a college education. The TBA also made a special presentation during their meeting. They recognized the Livestock Marketing Association (LMA) and Livestock Marketing Association of Texas (LMAT) as TBA Beef Booster of the Year. This is their 62nd year for giving out this recognition. The award was presented by J.D. Sartwelle, Jr., and received by Carl Herrmann and Jesse Carver on behalf of

20 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

the LMA and LMAT. The final portion of the day was a live auction. Brahman Breeders donated items and Col. Terry Reagan was the presiding auctioneer of this great event. All proceeds from this auction went directly to the scholarship fund. Believe me there were a lot of items to choose from. Some people donated coolers full of beef, while others donated home cooked sweets, there was pretty much something for everyone. All the breeders that participated

should be very proud as several thousand dollars was generated that afternoon to help the youth. Thanks go out to the Stadler family for their hospitality, and if you were not able to attend this year, be sure to mark your calendar for the next field day that these organizations put together.


FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review速 | 21


LIVESTOCK MARKETING ASSOCIATIONS NAMED AS TBA BEEF BOOSTER OF THE YEAR FOR 2012 The Livestock Marketing Association headquartered in Kansas City Missouri and the Livestock Marketing Association of Texas in Austin, TX were jointly recognized as the Texas Brahman Association’s 2012 Beef Booster of the Year. Since 1962, the Texas Brahman Association has recognized a deserving person or entity for outstanding contributions to the beef industry and counts a distinguished list of industry leaders, doers, and thinkers among its recipients. TBA President Al Herring of Houston, said “recognition of the livestock marketing sector of our industry is only fitting as they performed yeoman work on behalf of all livestock producers of Texas and the Southwest at the onset of our nations’ current devastating drought and they have continued that good work throughout other areas as the drought area has expanded.” “Our livestock markets who regularly provide marketing services six days each week, stepped to the plate last year and this year as they have worked tirelessly and diligently with expanded and innovative services to livestock producers who were/are forced to reduce or liquidate their cowherds. At no time in our recent history have so many still useful cattle been relocated to so many areas at relatively high prices. Recognition of these extraordinary efforts and dedication to livestock producers is most appropriate.” said Herring. J. D. Sartwelle, Jr., a past TBA President, Brahman breeder, and Chairman of the Selection Committee from Sealy, Texas made the actual presentation of the award on Saturday, September 15th, during the TBA’s annual meeting at Tommy Stadler’s Sunnyside Ranch near Floresville, Texas. Jesse Carver of Conroe, Texas, Region Executive Officer of LMA and Executive Director of the TLMA and Carl Herrmann, owner of the Caldwell Livestock Commission of Caldwell, Texas, received the award on behalf of the two associations. The LMA, composed of some 800 livestock markets across the nation, provides industry leadership not only to the nations livestock

(L-R) Jesse Carver, LMA Region Executive Officer & Executive Director of LMAT; Carl Herrmann, Caldwell Livestock Commission, Calwell, TX; TBA President Al Herring of Houston, TX markets but to producers everywhere and to all who believe in true price discovery through competitive auction selling. LMA is another voice of practical livestock producers on Capitol Hill as well as in state houses across the nation. In addition, they provide LMA members with a valuable package of services designed to assist them in their daily business and all members adhere to stringent guidelines relative humane animal handling. The Livestock Marketing Association of Texas represents livestock market operators, order buyers, trucking companies, and those who serve livestock producers in the State of Texas. The Texas Brahman Association was organized in 1961 to promote the use of Brahman cattle in general and Texas Brahman cattle in particular. Brahman cattle are crossbreeding’s Common Denominator and #1 in heat tolerance, hybrid vigor and efficiency. The Brahman F1 Hybrid is known as the “Queen of Cow Country” and is considered by practical cowmen everywhere as the most trouble free cow in use today.

LET US KNOW WHAT IS GOING ON IN YOUR PART OF THE BRAHMAN WORLD, WE WILL BE HAPPY TO SHARE IT!

22 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012


FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review速 | 23


Texas A&M ’s

TAL L Program

By Kelly Sullivan

Here is your question of the day: How can you put farmers, ranchers, horticulturists, regulatory agencies, scientists, bankers and attorneys in one room and expect peace and harmony? This may seem impossible but Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service offers such a forum in TALL - Texas Agricultural Lifetime Leadership - and I am a proud member of the 13th class being held over the next two years. My name is Kelley Sullivan and my family has been in beef cattle production for over 100 years, primarily along the Coastal Bend of Texas. I am a sixth-generation Galvestonian and grew up “down the island”, where cattle grazed in the salt grass during the winter months. My PawPaw, John R.A. Sullivan, ran the backgrounding yards for Lykes Bros., the Hutchings and other wealthy families on the island. He would drive the cattle along the beachfront into town and turn them north through the heavy residential areas of the city. They eventually arrived at the Galveston Wharves and loaded onto cattle boats, bound for Haiti and Cuba. My father, Gerald Sullivan and Uncle John still tell stories about their father but, as the oldest grandchild, I was lucky enough to spend my earliest years with PawPaw and Nana and develop my love for the cattle business. Like most little girls, I also love horses and still find my greatest peace in the saddle. 24 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

Our family now owns Santa Rosa Ranch, a seedstock and cow/ calf producer of Brangus, Angus and Ultrablack Cattle. We are based in Navasota and Crockett, Texas and, under the expert oversight of General Manager Kent Smith, have developed a breeding program where we feel we are “Making the Best Breed Better”! Considering that I spent my youth with PawPaw before he passed away, I am honored to continue the proud legacy that our family has developed over so many years. I was introduced to TALL several years ago through Dr. Charles Looney, a graduate of TALL X and came to admire the initiatives of the program. During the early 1980’s, the Texas Agricultural Extension Service had pondered the need for a new kind of adult leadership program, similar to those underway in a number of states. Through years of development and garnering support from industry leaders, TALL welcomed the first class in


1987. The TALL Mission Statement reads “TALL will create a cadre of Texas leaders to help ensure effective understanding and encourage positive action on key issues, theories, policy and economics that will advance the agriculture industry.” For Agriculture to remain dynamic, well informed leaders must emerge. The Texas Agricultural Lifetime Leadership (TALL) program prepares men and women, dedicated to agriculture, for the leadership challenges ahead. Following my graduation from Texas A&M University, I enjoyed a career in marketing and real estate development in the Houston/Galveston area but I was drawn to my agricultural roots. I decided to become a student once again and entered the TCU Ranch Management Program in Fall 2011 because I wanted to dedicate myself to an industry that had given my family such great opportunities. This intensive nine-month program at TCU teaches our future producers how to assign a dollar figure to every production decision that is made - I compare it to an MBA in Resource Management and Production. Through the program, I developed some wonderful friendships and was honored and humbled to be nominated to TALL by Amanda Dyer (Texas A&M Class of ‘03, TCU Ranch Management Class of ‘09 and TALL XII graduate). Additionally, I received letters of support from the Director of the TCU Ranch Management Program, Kerry Cornelius (TALL VIII) and Missy Bonds (TCU Ranch Management Class of ‘03 and TALL XI graduate). TALL gives producers the opportunity to understand all segments of this industry and the impact that the global climate has on our ability to feed the world. Through my experiences thus far, I

VISITING ELLISON’S GREENHOUSE Courtesy of Lindsay Kennedy

can say that the future for Agriculture is very bright – I have met some wonderful young producers and their dedication and commitment to this industry will ensure great success in the future.

VISITING BLUE BELL CREAMERIES Courtesy of Lindsay Kennedy

TALL – AT A GLANCE Following an application and interview process, TALL features 25-30 men and women who make a two-year commitment to participate in the program. Participants come from all segments of the industry and include farmers, ranchers, bankers, regulatory agents, attorneys, horticulturists and association executives. The “curriculum” is designed with the intent to make each participant have a greater awareness of the complex economic, political and social systems that affect Agriculture and develop an appreciation for how Agriculture must interact with society as a whole. Eight seminars are held during the two year program which enhances the participants’ knowledge and understanding of key subjects that affect our current agricultural leaders. These seminars are held in different areas around Texas as well as destinations in California, Washington DC and New York. However, the goal of the program is to emphasize the impact that Agriculture has on the global economy; therefore, the second year of the program focuses upon a certain foreign country or region and the opportunities that exist for producers. Our class is excited to have Brazil as our international focus, particularly during a time when this country will have a significant impact on domestic production. FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 25


TALL – SESSION 1 Our introductory seminar was held in College Station and, as an Aggie, it is always good to return to the Motherland! I am excited about our group because everyone offers a different perspective –we even have a vegetarian! However, when you consider production agriculture as a whole, we must consider the cultures and habits of all global populations so I am excited to learn more from this gentleman…except I already explained that a vegetarian diet is not in my future! During each seminar, we enjoy on-site tours and studies of agriculturally-related businesses and industries while discovering the procedures and problems in production, marketing and financing. Session 1 featured visits to places such as the Texas Forest Service, Blue Bell Creameries, Brazos Valley Recycling, ABC Equipment Company, Wiggins Watermelons, Ellison’s Greenhouse and the George Bush Library. We also had speakers from the Texas Department on Criminal Justice – Agriculture Division, Texas Veterinary Diagnostic Medical Laboratory and two retired military officers who spoke of the global challenges we all face as the world population increases to 9 Billion by 2050. Each presentation was fascinating and showed the global reach and effect that Agriculture has on the world. The most interesting experience was a mock press conference that we did with the Agricultural Communications Program at Texas A&M. We were divided into groups and given a topic with

2 minutes to prepare an opening statement and talking points to use with these members of the “press” (actually, they were Ag Communication students who should get an acting award for their performances!). These topics covered current issues in Agriculture and some participants were not familiar with some of the issues because they were “outside of their industry segment”. But, what it exemplified was that, as agriculturalists, we are obligated to stay aware of what is happening in our industry, regardless of whether or not it affects our area of interest. We are all in this together and we need to be Advocates for Agriculture! So, it brought home the point that we need to stay constantly aware of everything that can potentially affect our ability to feed our neighbors. WHAT’S NEXT FOR SESSION 2? The Brahman Review has asked for me to chronicle my TALL experience over the next two years so stay tuned for more experiences! Our next stop will be the Texas Panhandle in October. We will be starting in Lubbock and end up in Amarillo as we visit various farming and feedlot operations. To learn more about TALL, log on to http://tall.tamu.edu/ or contact the program at (979)845-1554. If you would like to ask questions about my participation in TALL or as a student at TCU Ranch Management, please feel free to contact me at Kelley@ srrtexas.com. © TABR

Industry Updates LACK OF AWARENESS & PLANNING FOR SWEEPING TAX CHANGES PUT THE FARM AT RISK Milwaukee, WI – August 7, 2012 (AgNewsWire) – If the combination of extreme drought and historically hot temperatures isn’t giving farmers enough to worry about this summer, sweeping changes to the federal wealth transfer tax system are looming large. Yet, many family farmers are not aware of the full implications of these possible changes – including losing their farms. “Few farmers fully understand there is a limit to the amount of wealth that can be transferred from generation to generation, and those who don’t take advantage of the current tax environment could be forced to sell their land to pay the estate taxes on that very land,” says Milwaukee-based estate planning attorney Eido Walny. “Since the IRS does not differentiate between wealth held in the form of cash versus land, equipment, or other forms, a farmer with a $2 million farm is treated the same as a Wall Street banker with $2 million cash in the bank.” According to the USDA, about 98 percent of all farms in the United States are family farms and about 70 percent of the nation’s farmland will change hands in the next two decades. Yet, 89 percent of farmers don’t have a farm succession plan. Of immediate concern, Walny says, is the possibility that the federal wealth transfer tax system may reset to 2001 levels ending a historic opportunity for family farmers to do appropriate succession planning. Under current law, each individual has a $5.12 million federal estate tax exemption, meaning that up to $5.12 million worth of assets can be passed to heirs free of estate tax. Anything in excess of 26 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

that value will be taxed at a rate of 35 percent. Unless Congress acts, that estate tax exemption will fall from $5.12 million to $1 million effective January 1, 2013, and the tax will rise from 35 percent to 55 percent. That means, for example, a $5.12 million transfer would incur no taxes in 2012, but $2,266,000 in taxes in 2013 and beyond. Because estate taxes must be paid within nine months of a person’s death, often survivors are forced to sell assets or property for significantly less than full market value in a scramble to pay those taxes. The solution, says Walny, is to take advantage of the window of opportunity between now and the end of the year to develop a solid succession plan regardless of what federal changes might be at hand. “A great option for many family farmers is to implement a trust – or series of trusts – to which the farm can be transferred,” Walny says. “A trust can address issues of income and land control, as well as offer asset protection benefits that are not available when people simply make outright gifts of their land. And, perhaps most importantly, a well-drafted trust can protect the farm from exposure to estate taxes for many generations to come.” Because of the complex nature and number of documents and transactions necessary to establish an appropriate trust – and with possible sweeping changes coming to the federal wealth transfer tax system – Walny urges family farmers to act now to begin the succession planning process.


FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review速 | 27


MJBA State Show

& Deep South Association Field Day

June 30, 2012 Judge: Brandi Barnes

SHOWMANSHIP CHAMPIONS Junior Champion: Katelyn Warren Intermediate Champion: Reagan Batson Senior Champion: Carey Haley Collegiate Champion: Christine Latner

MJBA OFFICERS

GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE & CHAMPION JUNIOR FEMALE RBC Miss Madre J 593 Exhibited by Reagan Batson

28 | The American Brahman Review速 | FALL 2012

GRAND CHAMPION BULL &

CHAMPION SENIOR BULL Mr Bar LLL Renegade 159/0 Exhibited by Christine Ladner


RES. GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE &

RES. GRAND CHAMPION BULL &

CHAMPION SENIOR FEMALE RLB Miss 292 Exhibited by Morgan Pounds

Carson, MS – Official results for the day were as follows: OWNED FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

Mitchell’s Katie 6B

Harvey Mitchell

Reserve Calf Champion

Miss DF/AR 68

Katelyn & Madison Warren

Junior Champion

RBC Miss Madie J 593

Reagan Batson

Reserve Junior Champion

Miss Red V8 575/7

Morgan Pounds

Senior Champion

RLB Miss 292

Morgan Pounds

Reserve Senior Champion

Lady H 148/0

M’Lee Ivy

Calf Champion

Mr Bar LLL 175/1

Christine Ladner

Reserve Calf Champion

GS Mr Doc’s Didor 382

Harvey Mitchell

JUDGING CONTEST ADULT 1st Clyde Goudeau; 2nd (tie) Glenn Howe & Don Banks; 3rd Tim Ladner

Junior Champion

RLB Mr 281

Morgan Pounds

Reserve Junior Champion

Mitchell’s Myro 61

Natalie McCormick

Senior Champion

Mr Bar LLL Renegade 159/0

Christine Ladner

BRED & OWNED FEMALE RESULTS Grand Champion

Ms Bar LLL Annie Oakley 170/1

Christine Ladner

Reserve Grand Champion

Ms HF 6/10

Leigh Anne Howe

BRED & OWNED BULL RESULTS

OWNED BULL RESULTS

JUDGING CONTEST JUNIOR 1st Hadley Batson; 2nd Harvey Mitchell; 3rd Madison Warren

CHAMPION JUNIOR BULL RLB Mr 281 Exhibited by Morgan Pounds

Grand Champion

Mr Bar LLL Renegade 159/0

Christine Ladner

Reserve Grand Champion

Mr Bar LLL 175/1

Christine Ladner

©TABR

JUDGING CONTEST INTERMEDIATE 1st Morgan Pounds; 2nd Leah Anne Howe; 3rd Zach Coulter

JUDGING CONTEST SENIOR 1st Natalie McCormick; 2nd Carey Haley; 3rd Christine Ladner

DEEP SOUTH ASSOCIATION OFFICERS President Mike Mitchell; Vice President Chance Hinton; Treasurer Glenn Howe; Secretary Kathy Pounds; Director at Large Bill Nettles; Youth Advisors Melanie Sojourner, Shep Batson, Cory Ladner FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 29


NMSU Garrett Manso 7057

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Mr. V8 442/6

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July 23 - 28, 2012 Judge: Gerald Young, Brett Barber, Paul Maulsby SHOWMANSHIP CHAMPIONS Grand Champion & Senior Champion: Amie Ferguson Res. Grand Champion & Res. Senior Champion: Evan Acevedo Intermediate Champion: Katelin Cooper Res. Intermediate Champion: Jordan Storey Junior Champion: Emilie Green Res. Junior Champion: Payton Herzog

GRAND CHAMPION GREY FEMALE & CHAMPION SENIOR GREY FEMALE Miss V8 474/7 Exhibited by Austin Gonzalez

GRAND CHAMPION RED FEMALE & CHAMPION SENIOR RED FEMALE Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0 Exhibited by Amie Ferguson

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review速 | 31


GRAND CHAMPION RED BULL &

GRAND CHAMPION B&O GREY FEMALE &

GRAND CHAMPION B&O RED FEMALE &

GRAND CHAMPION B&O GREY BULL &

CHAMPION JUNIOR RED BULL Mr H Hampton Rojo 201/1 Exhibited by M’Lee Ivy

CHAMPION B&O SENIOR RED FEMALE Miss Double A 695/0 Exhibited by Evan Acevedo

CHAMPION B&O SENIOR GREY FEMALE Miss CBR Viva 491/0 Exhibited by Haley Herzog

CALF CHAMPION B&O GREY BULL JMV Leroy Manso 52/1 Exhibited by Jacob Valenta

Shawnee, OK – Official results for the day were as follows: GREY FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

DR Miss Candy’s Roxy 207

Logan Peterson

Reserve Calf Champion

Miss V8 639/7

McKenzie Moreland

Junior Champion

Lady H Whitney Manso

Erin Cullers

Reserve Junior Champion

Miss CBR Wicked Witch 497/1

Haley Herzog

Senior Champion

Miss V8 474/7

Austin Gonzalez

Reserve Senior Champion

Miss CBR Viva 491/0

Haley Herzog

GRAND CHAMPION B&O RED BULL &

RED FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

KR Ms Red Sugarland

Kelli Doucet

Reserve Calf Champion

RCC Ms Bombshell 192/1

Candice Kiser

Junior Champion

Lady H Hootie’s Rose 205/1

Emilie Green

Reserve Junior Champion

Miss CBR 499/1

Payton Herzog

Senior Champion

Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0

Amie Ferguson

Reserve Senior Champion

Miss B-F 221/0

Fallon Plaisance

32 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

CALF CHAMPION B&O RED BULL Bar L Red Solo 70 Exhibited by Allie Carriere GREY BULL RESULTS Calf Champion

JMV Leroy Manso 52/1

Jacob Valenta

Reserve Calf Champion

Mr BER 296

Cole Smith

Junior Champion

Bar L Rex Didor 213

Erin Carriere

Reserve Junior Champion

Mr JMV Buttercup Manso 39/1

Jacob Valenta

Senior Champion

JDH Manso 638

Adrian Land II


RES. GRAND CHAMPION GREY FEMALE & CALF CHAMPION GREY FEMALE DR Miss Candy’s Roxy 207 Exhibited by Logan Peterson

RES. GRAND CHAMPION RED BULL & SENIOR CHAMPION RED BULL KR Mr Red Diablo 112 Exhibited by Dalton Wickham

RES GRAND CHAMPION RED FEMALE

Miss GRT Molly Manso 750 Exhibited by Garrison Tullos

& CHAMPION B&O SENIOR GREY BULL Bar L Stetson 52 Exhibited by Hannah Carriere

Mr Double A 707/0

& RES. CHAMPION SENIOR GREY BULL Mr Double A 707/0 Exhibited by Evan Acevedo

RES. GRAND CHAMPION B&O GREY FEMALE RES. GRAND CHAMPION B&O RED FEMALE & RES. CHAMPION B&O SENIOR GREY FEMALE & RES. CALF CHAMPION B&O RED FEMALE

RES. GRAND CHAMPION B&O GREY BULL

Reserve Senior Champion

RES GRAND CHAMPION GREY BULL

& CALF CHAMPION B&O RED FEMALE KR Ms Red Sugarland Exhibited by Kelli Doucet

Evan Acevedo

RED BULL RESULTS

Ferg’s Elizabeth Exhibited by Amie Ferguson

RES. GRAND CHAMPION B&O RED BULL & RES. CHAMPION B&O JUNIOR RED BULL Mr JS Rouge Peterbuilt Exhibited by Jessica Smith

BRED & OWNED GREY FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

CBR Miss True 516/1

Haley Herzog

Reserve Calf Champion

DR Miss Candy’s Roxy 207

Logan Peterson

Junior Champion

Miss GRT Grace Manso 775

Garrison Tullos

Calf Champion

Bar L Red Solo 70

Allie Carriere

Reserve Calf Champion

Mr JS Rouge Peterbuilt

Jessica Smith

Junior Champion

Mr H Hampton Rojo 201/1

M’Lee Ivy

Reserve Junior Champion

Ms CJV Maria Del Ray Manso 41/1

Jacob Valenta

Reserve Junior Champion

5M Sancho 414/1

Candice Kiser

Senior Champion

Miss CBR Viva 491/0

Haley Herzog

Senior Champion

KR Mr Red Diablo 112

Evan Acevedo

Reserve Senior Champion

Miss GRT Molly Manso 750

Garrison Tullos

Reserve Senior Champion

MR MC Enix 607

Kelli Doucet

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 33


BRED & OWNED RED FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

Ferg’s Elizabeth

Amie Ferguson

Reserve Calf Champion

Lady R Peaches N Cream 112

Justin Robertson

Junior Champion

SRS Miss Sassie 973

Laci Leathers

Reserve Junior Champion

SL Miss Sahara

Bailee McDonald

Senior Champion

Miss Double A 695/0

Evan Acevedo

Reserve Senior Champion

TO Ms Daisy 5/10

Darby Oden

Senior Champion

Bar L Stetson 52

Hannah Carriere

Reserve Senior Champion

Mr 3P Play’s Manso

Fallon Plaisance

BRED & OWNED RED BULL RESULTS Calf Champion

Bar L Red Solo 70

Allie Carriere

Reserve Calf Champion

Mr JS Rouge Peterbuilt

Jessica Smith

Junior Champion

DF Mr Corbyn Lotto 27

Morgan Sharp

Reserve Junior Champion

Mr JS Rouge Elvin 190/1

Jessica Smith

BRED & OWNED GREY BULL RESULTS Calf Champion

JMV Leroy Manso 52/1

Jacob Valenta

Senior Champion

Mr Bar LLL Renegade 159

Christine Ladner

Reserve Calf Champion

Mr 4C Cain Morton 33/1

Sarah Caffey

Reserve Senior Champion

Mr TO Ferris 10/4

Darby Oden

Junior Champion

Bar L Rex Didor 213

Erin Carriere

Reserve Junior Champion

Mr JMV Buttercup Manso 39/1

Jacob Valenta

©TABR

PUBLIC SPEAKING JUNIOR PUBLIC SPEAKING INTERMEDIATE 1st Bethalan Bishop; 2nd Hadley Batson; 1st Katelin Cooper; 2nd Briley Richard; 3rd Savannah Allen; 4th J.D. Sartwelle, 3rd Hannah McCracken; 4th Megan IV; 5th Alyson Fontenot; 6th Collin Lavergne; 5th Morgan Pounds; 6th Parker; 7th Darcy Lavergne Hannah Barrilleaux; 7th Jordan Storey; 8th Ty Hebert; 9th Blaine Spencer; 10th 8th Arica Land; 9th Victoria Frederick; Kelsey Spencer 10th Jess Cook

PUBLIC SPEAKING COLLEGIATE 1st Sarah Caffey; 2nd Sarah Cook

34 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

PUBLIC SPEAKING SENIOR 1st Haley Herzog; 2nd Brandalyn Bishop; 3rd Bailee Jo McDonald; 4th Adam Barrilleaux; 5th Amy Ferguson; 6th Jacob Valenta; 7th Kelli Lucas

HERDSMAN QUIZ JUNIOR HERDSMAN QUIZ INTERMEDIATE 1st Savannah Allen; 2nd Blaine Spencer; 1st Briley Richard; 2nd Rhealee Spies; 3rd Emilie Green; 4th Bethalan Bishop; 3rd Alysse Hebert; 4th Erin Carriere; 5th Kelsey Spencer; 6th Alyson 5th Madison Bonsall; 6th Jess Cook; 7th Fontenot; 7th Madison Plaisance; 8th Ronni Dell Hull; 8th Hannah Barrilleaux; Ty Hebert; 9th Gabrielle Marceaux; 10th 9th Gage Marceaux; 10th Arica Land Darcy Lavergne


HERDSMAN QUIZ SENIOR HERDSMAN QUIZ COLLEGIATE HERDSMAN QUIZ ADULT 1st Adam Barrilleaux; 2nd Jacob 1st Sarah Cook; 2nd Eli Graham; 3rd 1st Brandon Cutrer; 2nd David Miller; Valenta; 3rd Amie Ferguson; 4th Kelli Briana Bishop; 4th Erin Forgason; 5th 3rd Matthew Pounds; 4th Craig Lucas; 5th Brandalyn Bishop; 6th Evan Randy Rogers; 6th Hannah Carriere; 7th Fontenot; 5th Ron Dell Hull; 6th Sarah Acevedo; 7th Bailee Jo McDonald; 8th Travis Trent Allen; 7th Kathy Pounds; 8th Neil Kristen Cullers; 9th Morgan Howe; 10th Bullion; 9th Suzanne Lindley; 10th R.L. Kylie Sharp Barlow

SPONSORSHIP CONTEST Austin Gonzalez; Kelsey Fontenot

HERDSMAN AWARD 1st L2 Ranch - Adrian & Arica Land; 2nd IS Ranch - Bishop Girls; 3rd Triple C - Carriere/Doucet Kids; 4th Jordan Storey; 5th Savannah Allen

PHOTOGRAPHY JUNIOR 1st Kelsey Spencer; 2nd Savannah Allen; 3rd Alyson Fontenot; 4th Kaleb Hull; 5th Collin Parker; 6th Ty Hbert; 7th Bethalyn Bishop; 8th Gabrielle Marceaux; 9th Darcy Lavergne; 10th Hunter Owens

PHOTOGRAPHY INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY SENIOR/COLLEGIATE QUIZ BOWL JUNIOR/INTERMEDIATE 1st McKenzie Brightwell; 2nd Victoria 1st Christine Ladner; 2nd Morgan 1st Cowboy & Indians - Fallon Plaisance, Frederick; 3rd April Nettles; 4th Katelin Graham; 3rd Sarah Cook; 4th Bailee Hannah Barilleaux, Jared Barrilleaux, Cooper; 5th Briley Richard; 6th Morgan Jo McDonald; 5th Brandalyn Bishop; Madison Bonsall; 2nd Cajun Kickapoos Pounds; 7th Kaston Gore; 8th Megan 6th Briana Bishop; 7th Kelli Lucas; 8th Alyson Fontenot, Blaine Spencer, Kelsey Lavergne; 9th Morgan Sharp; 10th Adam Barrilleaux; 9th Kelsey Fontenot; Spencer, Ty Hebert Jordan Storey 10th Amie Ferguson

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review速 | 35


QUIZ BOWL SENIOR/ADULT 1st My Team - Kelsey Fontenot, Sarah Cook, Kaston Gore, Kelli Lucas; 2nd Sharps & Adam - Kylie Sharp, Morgan Sharp, Adam Barrilleaux

SHAWNEE BAILEY AWARD RECIPIENT Jacob Valenta

OUTSTANDING JUNIOR BREEDER Haley Herzog

ALL AROUND TOP 5 1st Savannah Allen; 2nd Bailee Jo McDonald; 3rd Collin Parker; 4th Katelin Cooper; 5th Amie Ferguson

AJBA SCHOLARSHIP Kylie Sharp; Adam Barrilleaux; Lakyn M’Lee Ivy

ABBA SCHOLARSHIP Cody Morgan; Rennie Rogers; Jessica Smith; Amie Ferguson; Desire’ Boyd

LADIES OF THE ABBA SCHOLARSHIP Andrew Simon; Kensey Smith; Austin Fontenot

MARGRET WATKINS SCHOLARSHIP Rennie Rogers

AMANDA POUNDS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Travis Trent

36 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012


JEFF SMITH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP Andrew Simon

BRAHMA MAMAS SCHOLARSHIP Kylie Sharp

SHERRY HENSLEY SCHOLARSHIP Desire’ Boyd; Jessica Smith

LBA SCHOLARSHIP Kylie Sharp

2012-2013 AJBA BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS President Andrew Simon - Baton Rouge, LA; Vice President Haley Herzog - Robinson, TX; Secretary Arica Land - Branford, FL; Treasurer Jessica Smith Maringouin, LA; Reporter Jacob Valenta - Alleyton, TX; Ex-Officio Sarah Cook Alexandria, LA; Director at Large Morgan Pounds - Mathews, AL; Director Becka Richard - Grand Chenier, LA; Director Morgan Howe - Lumberton, MS; Director Christine Ladner - Poplarville, MS; Director Kyle Fanning - Anadarko OK; Director Evan Acevedo - Mission, TX; Director Kristen Cullers - Hungerford, TX; Director Travis Trent - Austin, AR

AUTOGRAPH CONTEST Zachary Collins

2012 - 2013 QUEEN AND PRINCESS Queen Jordan Store; Princess Katelin Cooper

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 37


It’s How We Play the Game that

Really Counts

By Carlos X. Guerra

A properly managed show heifer project can be the most productive extra curricular activity that a 4-H or FFA member can have if they are the ones that want the project, do the work and invest the necessary time to optimize the benefits. It can unite a family and create lots of travel and fun opportunities. It is amazing the number of hours that a family will spend together both at home working as a team on the project and on the road. Many priceless memories will be created. It will also teach a junior all about responsibility, how to win, how to lose, how to work as a team, how important we are to animals and they to us. We sell an average of 50 show heifer prospects per year at La Muneca. The first questions I ask the parents are if the child is the one wanting the project and are they ready for a large animal project. When a parent is trying to relive their childhood through their children or when a child is not quite ready for a heifer, it may not work out as expected for the family. A bad experience will take time to get over. I have talked several families that came to buy a heifer into buying a goat or hog project so that their child can gain experience and confidence because without confidence, a person 38 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

will always find a way not to win. I also encourage parents to visit several ranches and several breeds before investing in their first heifer. These visits are both fun and educational. You will know when you are comfortable with the people selling you a calf. There is no grey area in the marketing of a junior heifer, the breeder either knows their stuff or they do not. They are interested in juniors or they are not. You can tell by asking them what they do for their junior clients. As a potential client, you must ask all of the right questions – 1. Is her DOB accurate, 2. Is she guaranteed to DNA to her recorded parentage, 3. What happens if our heifer never breaks, 4. Has she had all of her shots, 5. Has she been OCV’d, 6. Will you help us get her bred, 7. Will you give us semen from your best bulls to breed her to when the time comes, 8. Do you have any junior benefits that your competitors do not offer, and 9. Do you have any way of helping us sell her when she is no longer eligible to show? It is important to know how much you are willing to invest in a top quality show heifer before you set out to shop for one. You should inform the breeder you are to visit next what your budget is in case he or she does not have any show quality heifers


in that range so that you do not waste your time and theirs. I recommend that you buy the best heifer you can afford because in essence you are buying a factory that will produce for you for ten years or more depending on how much Brahman blood she has in her as that breed is known for it’s longevity. It costs the same to feed an average one as it does a great one. Always remember that The Bitterness of Poor Quality Is Remembered Long After the Sweetness of Low Price is Forgotten. At La Muneca we green break every one of our show prospects that we sell. We walk 75% or more on the trailer for our juniors. We feel that it is important to do the tough work to keep the heifer from getting hurt by someone with no experience and to keep someone with no experience from getting hurt. We normally will process calves the day we wean them. We will put rope halters with a ring where the rope can have some slack and not tighten on the calf ’s throat. We let them walk around for at least two days so that they can break themselves as compared to tying a calf to a fence right out of the chute. This is when they can easily get hurt because they have not learned that the rope is stronger than they are and might break a leg or their neck jerking on the rope. Our calves are guaranteed to break if they are not broke when you pick them up. I do not recommend that you buy a calf from a breeder that will load it on your trailer without it never having been processed, haltered, de-horned or worked with. Even though many breeders think that a junior should do it all, some simply cannot do it due to their age, size or lack of experience. The more of the above that a breeder can do for his junior clients, the better chance they have of getting referrals or repeat business from this family. It is very easy for a heifer to create bad habits from a new family that has no experience in halter breaking. A breeder should do all they can to insure a successful transition period of a calf from mama to weaning to it’s new owner. Try and buy your show heifers from breeders who have a good reputation of having honest birthdates and pedigrees. It is sad but true what some people will do to try and win a buckle or championship. Some birthdates are altered as much as six months or more. They may start out making December heifers January’s and before they know it are making summer heifers January’s. A lie is a lie whether it is one day, one week, or six months. What a cheater may think he won by cheating is worthless when our day comes and we are judged on how we played the game of life. If you cheat on birthdays and pedigrees, you will cheat on everything else from your relationships to your business to yourself. It is not worth it. Many think that everyone else does it so it is ok to do it our selves. But not everyone does it plus the best definition of integrity is to always do the right thing even when one is looking. This is why my ole buddy Jim Theeck who I had a lot of respect for would tell me that he would not show his cattle until they were two years old. At that age all of those FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 39


PICTURE TAKEN AT $ELLEBRATION 2012 AT LA MUÑECA out of age cattle did not look so out of place and did not have that size advantage. To support this, take photos of those young heifers that look so much bigger when they are lined up in class early on in their careers and then do it again one year later. You will find that there will not be near the difference, with those bigger heifers that were so much bigger as weanlings sometimes not even being the biggest at two years of age. What is really sad is when an honest kid and family buy an out of age heifer not knowing any better and then get accused of being part of the problem. When anyone teaches a child how to cheat whether we are talking about birthdates, pedigrees, showing a calf in a breed that it is not, painting, pumping, injecting, surgically altering their animals - you name it – all you have done is teach that child how to cheat in everything else they will do. When they get caught, who is to blame ? When that kid starts lying to the person that taught him how to lie is when it hits home because what do they do next to correct that kid. Be careful of your thoughts for your thoughts become your words. Be careful of your words for your words become your actions. Be careful of your actions for your actions become your habits. Be careful of your habits for your habits become your character. Be careful of your character for your character becomes your destiny. This is a lot bigger problem than what we may think and it needs to stop or our industry is going to lose the integrity that our forefathers worked so hard to establish. It is good to buy a heifer 40 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

from a breeder that will guarantee her to DNA to her pedigree. I predict that there will be more and more of the big money shows having proof of parentage as a requirement for their champions. You should also try and buy your show heifers from breeders who have good cattle with well known pedigrees as the pedigree is the only constant in the cow business that only you can change. The rules, the people, the fads, the markets, the frame scores will always be changing. Start with a solid foundation (pedigree) and work on making it the best it can be. It takes a long time to breed consumer demand into a cold blooded pedigree. It is also good to invest in cattle from breeders that promote their product whether it be through their field days, advertising, websites, the show ring or their experience and leadership in that breed. Their investment in promotion will always make it easier for you to market your cattle. One of the major advantages of a breeding heifer over a steer project is that she can be a two year project so make sure to buy a heifer that fits the window where she can be shown for two years. If you breed her to calve at two, she might produce your next show calf. If you are lucky, bred her to the right bull, you just might have produced your next show heifer which will turn that initial investment into a four year project. Another reason to buy the best you can afford. If it is a bull calf, and you do not want to sell it as a bull, you can sell it as a steer project if born at the right time to a fellow FFA member or 4-H’er. Always try and have your heifer either 60 days away from calving or have at least a 60 day old calf at the show that means the most to you as this is when they will look their best. One never knows what the cow’s disposition will be right after birth, how her udder will look, how much swelling she will have, how good the calf will look and how strong the baby will be. Prior to all of this it is important to document when the heifer is cycling as this can determine how she will act at a show if it is that time of month prior to her being bred. Try and buy your heifers from a breeder that will help you to get her bred at least the first time around. Also prior to buying find out what kind of semen they will offer to you to AI her to and if there are any restrictions if you want to ET her with it. We offer to breed our juniors heifers the first time and then give them free semen from any of our bulls that are available for free until they sell her or graduate from high school. Many of our juniors have been very successful with this. As a matter of fact, one of our top bulls right now, LMC ATZ Dr. Feel Good was bred by one of our juniors, Jacob Atzenhoffer. Her next calf won two big SYNERGY shows for his little sister. This cow is indeed helping this family to build a solid college fund. Always ask what kind of benefits every breeder or breed offer their junior clients. I have always been impressed with the fact that the junior Santa Gertrudis kiddos compete for a show quality heifer at every class at their National Junior Show every summer. The Simbrah breed is one of the more creative and supportive when it comes to offering junior benefits to their juniors. I know for a fact because my family has either created or been a co-sponsor of most of them. Our LMC Juniors compete every year for over $100,000 in extra premiums offered at both LMC shows (LMC Futurity & LMC Jackpot) and LMC co-sponsored shows like the Simmental-Simbrah Super Bowl, MAS, SYNERGY, Heart of Simbrah and the LMC $ellabration.


Any group of breeders from any breed can do the same and I encourage you to do so. We are big believers in showmanship because everyone has the same opportunity to win plus the kids will learn more about life as they will use these skills all of their life. At all of our shows, 50% of the premiums are awarded in our showmanship shows. We all need to encourage more shows, especially the majors to make time in their schedules and offer good premiums for showmanship. They should be held on a separate day with a different judge so as to give the kids a new outlook, a new chance to dress up, get excited, compete, show off their skills supported by their work ethic on a level playing field. Showmanship shows are won at home with the many hours that a junior will invest in teaching their heifers how to show off and stand correctly as quickly as possible. As the saying goes no one ever drowned in sweat. Always remember that the only place that SUCCESS comes before WORK is in the dictionary. Another great saying are the ten most important two letter words – IF IT IS TO BE – IT IS UP TO ME. We have two major LMC events at our ranch every year. We will be celebrating our 25th Annual LMC Jr. Round Up and Futurity which is an all day, family oriented, fun filled, educational field day open to the public for free. Every kid learns and every kid wins a door prize thanks to our many donors. We always have some women as speakers and judges because so many our daughters go through school being taught ag and judged mostly my men. We need to help identify some new Role Models for these girls. We have our LMC Futurity after the awards ceremony which is followed by our Customer Appreciation Dinner where we award our annual awards for LMC Volunteer, Booster and Supporter of the Year. This event is always held the first Saturday of October. I encourage all breeders to put on a field day as this will make you clean up your ranch plus people from all over that have wanted to visit you will attend. Remember the saying – NO SEE, NO TELL = NO SELL. Two thirds of the word promotion is motion. Our other main event is our annual production sale, the LMC $ellabration Sale and $20,000 Junior Show. We also host our LMC Jackpot on this weekend which is always the fourth Saturday in March unless Easter falls on that date. This we awarded over $43,000 to our junior clients on that weekend. Many of our clients are members of the LMC $ellabration with each putting up an annual $1,000 sponsorship fee. It is a team effort that creates lots of enthusiasm and consumer demand for the Simbrah, Simbrah and Brahman breeds. Once again, I encourage all breeders to try and work with your fellow breeders to put on more co-op type events that will create interest in your cattle and

show the juniors how much we appreciate their business. One of the biggest problems juniors have is what to do when it is time to retire their show heifers as many do not have a farm or ranch to turn them out on. I guess this is why there are loaner programs which can be good when done for the right reasons. Some breeders take heifers in on trade with a little extra cash to boot on a new heifer and others like us offer our juniors a place to sell them in our annual sale. This is important to discuss with the breeder prior to you making the purchase. LMC Juniors can sell their LMC heifers in our production sale if they show them in our LMC $ellabration show that year. This helps them cash in and either invest in another one or put some money into their college fund. In summary, I encourage all of you to do your home work and have fun in the process before you invest your hard earned dollars. If you are going to keep the heifer after her show career, make sure that she will function in your environment. Buy the best heifer you can afford from a breeder that you feel confident will always be there to make a problem right and one that supports their breed and it’s juniors. Get involved in your breed’s junior organizations. Make sure to get into a breed that offers educational contests and scholarships. I just got back from interviewing this year’s crop of TJSSA and American Junior Simbrah Round Up scholarship applicants which is always so inspiring. These juniors are so polished and confident. Why - because of years of involvement with sales talks, public speaking and giving oral reasons. When we set up our scholarship program, we made it possible for juniors in high school through juniors in college to apply so that the young ones could have the practice going into their senior year interviews. Being able to do it for four years just about insures that everyone will win a scholarship. If you treat every day as show day, you will enjoy success with your heifers. There is always going to be someone better, luckier, smarter or faster but if you do not let them outwork you and you give the best you have every day, our Lord will see to it that you earn your share of goodness and success. And when it is all said and done, it is not as important how many ribbons, rosettes, buckles, banners and trophies you won but what is the most important IS HOW YOU PLAYED THE GAME !! © TABR

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 41


Bluebonnet Brahman Breeders

Kickoff Classic

August 3-4, 2012

Judge: Jimmy Linthicum

Brenham, TX – It was hot in Brenham, Texas as the Bluebonnet Brahman Breeders hosted another highly attended Kickoff Classic. Judge Jimmy Linthicum selected Lady H Mystic Manso 151/0 as the Grand Champion Grey Female. This daughter of +Mr H Maddox Manso 684 and Lady H Fanci Manso 652 was exhibited by Heritage Cattle Co. Miss V8 274/7 took home the Reserve Champion Grey Female honors. She was exhibited by V8 Ranch GRAND CHAMPION GREY FEMALE GRAND CHAMPION RED FEMALE & CHAMPION SENIOR GREY FEMALE & CHAMPION JUNIOR RED FEMALE and is a daughter of +Mr V8 380/6 and Lady H Mystic Manso 151/0 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1 +Miss V8 797/6. Exhibited by Heritage Cattle Co. Exhibited by Wyatt Manuel JDH Troy Manso was selected as the Grand Champion Grey Bull. He is sired by JDH Mr Woodman Manso by +JDH Lady Charla Manso, and was exhibited by J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Judge Linthicum gave Reserve Grand Champion Greay Bull honors to Mr V8 243/7. Exhibited by V8 Ranch, Mr V8 243/7 is sired by +Mr V8 380/6 and JDH Ms Water Manso. The title of Grand Champion Red Female was won by 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1. This daughter of FCC Cash in the Sting and 5M Miss Red GRAND CHAMPION GREY BULL GRAND CHAMPION RED BULL Infaturation 521/8 was exhibited by & CHAMPION JUNIOR GREY BULL & JUNIOR CHAMPION RED BULL Wyatt Manuel. #Miss Rosario 111 was JDH Troy Manso Mr H Hampton Rojo 201/1 Exhibited by J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Exhibited by Dyess Farms/Heritage Cattle Co. selected as the Reserve Grand Champion Red Female. She is a daughter of Mr 3X Maxmillion 100 and +5M Miss Magnum Molly and was Reserve Calf Champion Miss V8 626.7 V8 Ranch exhibited by Ganaderia El Rosario. Intermediate Champion JDH Lady Babette J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Dyess Farms and Heritage Cattle Co. exhibited the Grand Manso Champion Red Bull, Mr H Hampton Rojo 201/1. He is a son of Res. Intermediate Champion TTT Suva Echo Lady Tic Tac Toe Ranch Mr H Gold Rush 478 and +Miss JS Rouge 494/5. The Reserve Junior Champion Miss V8 488/7 V8 Ranch Grand Champion Red Bull was Mr MK 127. This son of HVR Reserve Junior Champion Miss V8 507/7 V8 Ranch 2/717 and Miss MK 565/6 was exhibited by Dr. Carl McKenney. Senior Champion Lady H Mystic Manso Heritage Cattle Co. Official results for the day were as follows: 151/0

GREY FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

JDH Lady Manso 848

42 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Reserve Senior Champion

Miss V8 274/7

V8 Ranch


GREY BULL RESULTS

RED BULL RESULTS

Calf Champion

Mr V8 243/7

V8 Ranch

Calf Champion

Mr SG 111/1

SG Cattle Co.

Reserve Calf Champion

JDH Mr Manso 380/6

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Reserve Calf Champion

Mr Red V8 241/7

Michaela Burford

Intermediate Champion

Mr V8 191/7

V8 Ranch

Intermediate Champion

5M Sancho 414/1

5M Farms

Res. Intermediate Champion 21st Mr Max HR

Res. Intermediate Champion

JDH Clanton De Manso

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Junior Champion

JDH Troy Manso

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Reserve Junior Champion

Mr V8 123/7

V8 Ranch

JDH Gene Manso 177/8

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Mr V8 948/6

V8 Ranch

Senior Champion Reserve Senior Champion

Florida Genetic Center

Junior Champion

Mr H Hampton Rojo 201/1

Dyess Farms/Heritage Cattle Co.

Reserve Junior Champion

Mr El Rosario 102

Ganaderia El Rosario

Senior Champion

Mr MK 127

Dr Carl McKenney

Reserve Senior Champion

Mr HVR 0/865

Happy Valley Ranch

©TABR

RED FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

RCC Ms Bombshell

Ripple C Cattle

Reserve Calf Champion

KR Mr Lotto “Nancy”

Ken Ramsey Brahmans

Intermediate Champion

Ms Chaparral 102

Chaparral Ranch

Res. Intermediate Champion DB Southern Style 853/1

Detering Red Brahmans

Junior Champion

5M Miss Rojo Valentine

Wyatt Manuel

Reserve Junior Champion

Miss SG 142/0

Paden Allen

Senior Champion

Miss Rosario 111

Ganaderia El Rosario

Reserve Senior Champion

JEH Senora Nora

Meg Rodriguez

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 43


Impact

of Bos indicus Genetics on the Global Beef Industry Part 2

By Larry V. Cundiff, R. M. Thallman and L. A. Kuehn

More than half of the cattle in the world are maintained in tropical environments between the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn. The tropic of Cancer is located just south of the tip of Texas and Florida. About 40% of the beef cows in the United States are located in relatively hot and humid subtropics of the Southeast or more arid subtropics of the Southwest. Bos indicus germplasm plays a critical role in providing for adaptation of cattle used for beef production in these regions.

Experimental results documenting the importance of using both Bos indicus and Bos taurus breeds in crossbreeding programs or composite populations to exploit heterosis and match genetic potential of cow herds to the climatic environment will be reviewed based primarily on results from the cattle germplasm evaluation (GPE) program at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC), Clay Center, Nebraska conducted in cooperation with experiment stations in the Southern U.S.

MATCHING GENETIC POTENTIAL TO THE CLIMATIC ENVIRONMENT Matching Genetic Potential to the Climatic Environment In choosing breeds to cross for a specific production system it is very important to consider climatic adaptation. In Cycle III of the GPE Program, genotype-environment interaction for reproduction and maternal performance of Bos indicus X Bos taurus F1 cross (Brahman X Hereford, Brahman X Angus, Sahiwal X Hereford, Sahiwal X Angus) and Bos taurus X Bos taurus F1 cross (Hereford X Angus, Angus X Hereford, Pinzgauer X Hereford, and Pinzgauer X Angus) females in a temperate (Nebraska) and subtropical (Florida) environment. About 1/3 of the F1 females of each breed group produced at the USMARC were transferred at about 8 months of age to the Subtropical Agricultural Research Station (STARS, ARS-USDA) at Brooksville, Florida. The other 2/3 of the females remained at the USMARC. The females were maintained under standard management practices at each location. Females at both locations were pasture mated to Red Poll bulls produced at the USMARC for their first calving and to Simmental bulls

produced at the USMARC calves for subsequent calvings through 6 years of age. Key results from this experiment for birth weight of calves, unassisted calving rate and weaning weight per cow exposed to breeding are summarized in Figure 2. The genotypeenvironment interaction was highly significant for both calving ease and birth weight. Calving ease (unassisted calving rate) was significantly greater in Florida than in Nebraska, especially for Bos taurus X Bos taurus cross females. The

44 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

DR LARRY CUNDIFF IS THE FARMER DIRECTOR OF THE U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER’S (USMARC) GERMPLASM EVALUATION PROJECT. BEGINNING IN THE 1970’S, THESE LONGRUNNING SERIES OF EXPERIMENTS HAVE EVALUATED 37 BREEDS OF CATTLE


increased assistance in Nebraska was primarily associated with heavier birth weight (17.5 lb over all breed groups) of calves produced in Nebraska. Most of the advantage in calving ease was observed in first calvings. Birth weight of calves produced by Bos indicus X Bos taurus cross females were significantly lighter than those produced by Bos taurus X Bos taurus cross females, especially in Nebraska. This result comparing Brahman and Sahiwal as sires of dams to

FIGURE 2

TABLE 2

Hereford, Angus, or other Bos taurus sire breeds (Figure 2), is just the opposite to those comparing Brahman and Sahiwal as sires of calves to Bos taurus breeds (Tables 2 and 3). Brahman and Sahiwal sired calves out of Hereford and Angus dams were significantly heavier at birth than Hereford-Angus reciprocal crosses (Table 2), but maternal birth weights of calves produced by Bos indicus X Bos taurus dams were significantly lighter than Bos taurus X Bos taurus cross dams (Table 5). Bos indicus X Bos taurus cross females have a remarkable ability to limit prenatal growth of their offspring (Figure 2) and to excel in calving ease. This favorable maternal effect was especially pronounced in Nebraska. The genotype-environment interaction was highly significant for weaning weight per cow exposed (Figure 2). Weaning weight per cow exposed combines the most important output components of cow herd production efficiency (reproduction rate, survival rate, and progeny growth rate) into one trait. Weaning weight per cow exposed was significantly greater for Bos indicus X Bos taurus cross dams than for Bos taurus X Bos taurus cross dams, especially in Florida (28%), but also in Nebraska (5.8%). COLD TOLERANCE AND BEEEF TENDERNESS The calves produced by Bos indicus X Bos taurus females by Red Poll or Simmental sires had 75% Bos taurus and 25% Bos indicus, while those produced by the Bos taurus X Bos taurus dams by the same Red Poll and Simmental sires had 100% Bos taurus inheritance. These results favoring Bos indicus X Bos taurus cross cows, even in Nebraska, prompted us to ask, what is the optimum proportion Bos indicus inheritance in the temperate region of Nebraska? To address this question, the Bos indicus X Bos taurus F1 cross (Brahman X Hereford, Brahman X Angus, Sahiwal X Hereford, Sahiwal X Angus) and Bos taurus X Bos taurus F1 cross (Hereford X Angus, Angus X Hereford, Pinzgauer X Hereford, and Pinzgauer X FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review速 | 45


Angus) females were mated to produce reciprocal backcross (purebred Angus, Hereford, Brahman, and Pinzgauer sires used to produce F1 cross females) and F2 (F1 bulls mated to F1 females) progeny to evaluate alternative ratios of Bos indicus to Bos taurus inheritance. These matings were made only in Nebraska, because similar breed groups had been evaluated at other experiment stations in Florida and the Southern region of the U.S. Results from this experiment for mortality of calves born in the spring (late February to early May) are summarized in Table 4. Mortality increased significantly as the proportion Bos indicus inheritance increased and as average temperature (around the clock mean 24 hr temperature) on the day of birth decreased. Mortality of 100% Bos taurus (0:100) was not different from that for 25% Bos indicus (25:75) calves, even on the coldest days. These results for mortality were observed under our standard management protocol in which any calves showing signs of cold stress (increased shivering, glazed eyes, huddling, and decreased activity) were revived by placing them in a heat chamber (100 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit) for a span of time (30 minutes to 3 hours). Results from this study revealed that calves with 50% or more Bos indicus inheritance were not as well adapted as calves with 25% or less Bos indicus inheritance to calving conditions which can be characterized as cold (mean 24 hr temperature 0F or less), cold and wet (460F or less combined with 0.1 inch precipitation or more), or cold and windy (when a measure of heat loss, Ko > 800 Kcal/m2/hour; Sipple and Passel, 1945). Results for heat chamber usage and for the combination of heat chamber usage and mortality (assuming many if not all calves would have died had they not been revived in the heat chamber) indicated losses would have been severe for calves with 50% Bos indicus inheritance and especially severe for calves with 75% Bos indicus inheritance without the use of the chamber. We also studied effects of season and proportion Bos indicus 46 | The American Brahman ReviewÂŽ | FALL 2012

inheritance on average daily gains of steer (males castrated within 24 hr of birth) calves from birth to slaughter at about 15 months of age (Sousa et al, 1993). Breed effects for average daily gain, analyzed separately for different seasons classified by month (03-07 denotes March - July, 08-09 denotes August – September, etc,) are shown in Table 6. Breed effects shown in Figure 3, estimated by regressing average daily gain on breed composition expressed

TABLE 3

TABLE 5


as a proportion (i.e., 0. .25, .5, or .75), shown in Figure 6 represent the deviation of each breed from Angus, (e.g., 100% Brahman versus 100% Angus). Estimates show higher average daily gain for Brahman than Angus sired steers during spring and summer months for both pre-weaning (March – July) and post-weaning (June -August) periods, but significantly lower post-weaning average daily gains during winter periods (November - December, January – February,

TABLE 4

FIGURE 6

March – April). In general, Bos indicus breeds performed relatively well in summer months but poorly in winter months. Effects of 0, 25, 50 and 75% Bos indicus inheritance on shear force estimates of tenderness are shown in Figure 4. Shear force required to slice through half inch cores of cooked rib steaks increased 1.6 lb for each 25% increase in Brahman inheritance and 2.9 lb for each 25% increase in Sahiwal inheritance (Crouse et al., 1989). Similar results were observed in sensory panel estimates of tenderness. COW EFFICIENCY Biological efficiency differences in Bos indicus X Bos taurus and Bos taurus X Bos taurus cross cows were evaluated using the Hereford-Angus reciprocal cross and F1 Pinzgauer, Brahman, Sahiwal cross cows produced in Cycle III of the program. The cows were 11 and 12 years of age raising Charolais sired calves born during late March of early April. Cows and calves were moved to the feed lot approximately 40 days after calving and were assigned to replicate pens (3 pens per breed group) with 12 pairs per pen. Cows were fed to maintain their initial weight commencing at about 50 days postpartum. Cow and calves were weighed bi-weekly. If average pen cow weight was reduced below initial weight, feed was increased to bring average pen cow weight up to the initial weight (or vice versa, if average weight was increased above initial weight, feed was decreased to bring average weight down to initial weight) bi-weekly for the 126 day test. Output/input differences among the breed groups are shown in Table 5. Performance of each breed cross group is presented as a ratio relative to the overall mean. Weight gains, recorded during summer months, were significantly greater than those for any other breed group. Calf creep consumption was inversely related to levels of milk production, with the exception of Pinzgauer crosses. Differences among F1 cross groups were highly significant (P<.01) for cow size, milk yield, and level of FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 47


fatness. Brahman cross cows were the largest and produced the highest daily milk yield. Sahiwal cross females were similar to Brahman cross females in milk yield and level of fatness but were significantly smaller in mature weight. Pinzgauer cross cows were intermediate in milk yield and mature weight and were similar to Hereford-Angus crosses in level of fatness. Hereford-Angus crosses were the lightest in mature weight and produced the lowest amount of milk per day. When outputs and inputs were combined into an estimate of efficiency, progeny gain, lb / Mcal metabolizable energy intake by cow and calf, Brahman and Sahiwal cross cows were approximately 10% more efficient than HerefordAngus or Pinzgauer crosses. At the conclusion of this experiment, the condition of teeth in the cows remaining in the experiment was examined. Frequency of normal, broken, loose, and missing incisors were assessed. Frequency of normal teeth was much greater in Brahman and Sahiwal crosses than in Hereford-Angus and Pinzgauer cross cows. Frequency of missing incisors was greater in Bos taurus X Bos taurus crosses than in the Bos indicus X Bos indicus crosses. Superior longevity of Bos indicus X Bos taurus crosses has been well documented (e.g., Thrift and Thrift, 2003). These results favoring efficiency of Bos indicus cross cows are similar to those from a subsequent experiment involving mature F1 cross Hereford, Angus, Brahman, Boran, and Tuli cows sampled from Cycle V of the GPE Program (Jenkins and Ferrell, 2004). These cows were individually fed during lactation while nursing Charolais sired calves (Jenkins and Ferrell, 2004). Efficiency was defined as the ratio of age adjusted preweaning weight gain per unit total dry matter intake of the cow during the preweaning period. Bos indicus Brahman (88.6 g/kg DMI; i.e., g 212-day calf wt/kg DMI of dam from birth to weaning) and Boran (85.0 g/kg DMI) sired cows did not differ in efficiency but were significantly more efficient than Bos taurus tropically adapted Tuli (74.2 g/kg DMI) and HerefordAngus (72.6 g/kg DMI) crosses. 48 | The American Brahman ReviewÂŽ | FALL 2012

Results from these trials contrast to results from another trial in which Hereford-Angus cross cows were about equal in cow efficiency to Red Poll, and Maine Anjou crosses and significantly more efficient than higher milking Braunvieh or Gelbvieh crosses or larger size Chianina crosses (Jenkins et al., 1991). Š TABR Watch for Part 3 in our Winter issue.

FIGURE 3

FIGURE 4


FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review速 | 49


Brazos Valley Fair & Expo

September 6, 2012 Judge: Doug Pierce Bryan, TX – Breeders from across the U.S. descended on Bryan/College Station for the first annual Brazos Valley Fair and Expo. Doug Pierce of Brenham, Texas was on hand to sift through entries and make the hard decesions as the quality was deep. The Grand Champion Grey Female honors went to DR Miss Candy’s Roxy 207. She was exhibited by Logan Peterson and is a daughter of TTT Mr Suva Martin 363 and DR Miss Candy 202. The Reserve Grand Champion Grey Female GRAND CHAMPION GREY FEMALE GRAND CHAMPION RED FEMALE & CHAMPION INTERMEDIATE GREY FEMALE & CHAMPION SENIOR RED FEMALE title was awarded to JDH Lady Manso DR Miss Candy’s Roxy 207 CT Lady Rhineaux Ray 730. This daughter of JDH Mr Manso Exhibited by Logan Peterson Exhibited by Wesley Thibodeaux 105 and JDH Lady Manso 367/3 was exhibited by J.D. Hudgins, Inc. J.D. Hudgins, Inc. took home the title of Grand Champion Grey Bull with JDH Domino Manso. He is a son of JDH Woodson De Manso and JDH Lady rosaura Manso. Reserve Grand Champion Grey Bull honors also went home with J.D. Hudgins, Inc. for JDH Roma Manso, a JDH Mr Echo Manso son by JDH Lady Fisk Manso. Judge Pierce selected CT Lady Rhineaux Ray as the Grand Champion GRAND CHAMPION GREY BULL GRAND CHAMPION RED BULL Red Female for the day. Exhibited by & CHAMPION JUNIOR GREY BULL & CHAMPION JUNIOR RED BULL Wesley Thibodeaux, she is a daughter of JDH Domino Manso JDH Mr Saxon Manso 824/4 Exhibited by J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Exhibited by J.D. Hudgins, Inc/Dyess Farms Mr H Red Rhino 765 and 5M Ms Marcia. Wyatt Manuel’s entry, 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1 was named the Reserve Grand Champion Red GREY FEMALE RESULTS Female. She is sired by FCC Cash in the Sting and 5M Miss Red Calf Champion JDH Lady Manso 848 J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Enfatuation 521. Reserve Calf Champion WR Ms Tinkerbell Brandy Barnes J.D. Hudgins, Inc. and Dyess Farms’ entry, JDH Mr Saxon Manso 091 Manso 824/4, was named the Grand Champion Red Bull. He Intermediate Champion DR Miss Candy’s Roxy Logan Peterson is a son of JDH Mr Elmo Manso 309/4 and JDH Lady Sandy 207 Manso 301. The Reserve Grand Champion Red Bull title was Res. Intermediate Champion Miss La Preciosa 207/1 La Preciosa Ranch awarded to Mr HVR 0/865. He is a son of FCC Freedom Sting Junior Champion JDH Lady Manso 730 J.D. Hudgins, Inc. 546/2 and JDH Lady Dora Manso and was exhibited by Happy Reserve Junior Champion JDH Lady Emma J.D. Hudgins, Inc/ Vally Ranch. Manso 471 Dyess Farms Official results for the day were as follows: 50 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012


Senior Champion

Lady H Bailey Manso 87/9

Heritage Cattle Co.

Res. Intermediate Champion BB Bronson’s Hurricane

Reserve Senior Champion

Lady H Mystic Manso 151/0

Heritage Cattle Co.

Junior Champion

5M Miss Rojo Valentine 214/1

Wyatt Manuel

Reserve Junior Champion

Ms TO’s Red Hot Slugger 31/1

Logan Peterson

Senior Champion

CT Lady Rhineaux Ray Wesley Thibodeaux

Reserve Senior Champion

5M Miss Rojo Barb 307/0

Matthew Madden/ Adrian Land II

GREY BULL RESULTS

Wesley Thibodeaux

Calf Champion

Mr HOBO 60/1

Emily Jernigan

Reserve Calf Champion

JDH Mr Manso 380/6

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Intermediate Champion

Mr H Barrett Manso 221/1

Heritage Cattle Co.

Res. Intermediate Champion

JDH Clanton De Manso

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Calf Champion

Mr SG 111/1

SG Cattle Co.

Junior Champion

JDH Domino Manso

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Reserve Calf Champion

Mr Red V8 241/7

Michaele Buford

Reserve Junior Champion

JDH Troy Manso

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Intermediate Champion

Senior Champion

JDH Roma Manso

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

21st Mr Max HR 880/1

Florida Genetics Center

Reserve Senior Champion

JDH Gene Manso

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

RED FEMALE RESULTS

RED BULL RESULTS

Res. Intermediate Champion VL Rojo Red 1/11

Santa Elena Ranch, Inc.

Junior Champion

JDH Saxon Manso 824/4

J.D. Hudgins, Inc/ Dyess Farms

Calf Champion

RCC Ms Bombshell192/1

Candice Kiser

Reserve Junior Champion

5M King Tut 697/0

Matthew Madden

Reserve Calf Champion

VL Elena 1/100

Santa Elena Ranch, Inc.

Senior Champion

Mr HVR 0/865

Happy Valley Ranch

Reserve Senior Champion

Mr MK 127

Dr. Carl McKenney

Intermediate Champion

Lady H Hootie’s Rose 205/1

Emilie Green

©TABR

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 51


y t i C e h t Horse in K O , e e n w a Sh

A

Anyone that was at the “All American” in Shawnee, Oklahoma this past July couldn’t help but notice the horse statues along the roads. This project was started in 2007 by the city of Shawnee as part of its Public Arts Projects. These are life-sized fiberglass horses that were sponsored by companies, organizations and individuals in the Shawnee area. We are showing you three of them in this issue, but there are a total of twelve in Shawnee. We thought it would be fun to see if you can identify the horses by using partial pictures of them on this page, and then giving you the full pictures and descriptions later in the magazine. Good luck and enjoy!

Your choices are: 1) Freedom ____ 2) Evening Star ____ 3) 100 Year Horse ____ Answers on page 59

B 52 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

C


Nutrionist Corner

Strategic Feeding for Fall 2012 My hope is that by the time this article reaches you all out there, that we are dealing with lower feed/ingredient prices that we are currently dealing with. In any case, making the right feeding decisions given these osts will be paramount for ranchers. One must evaluate carefully each feeding decision and be confident of his or her choice. When we look at making feeds we evaluate not only prices but nutritional impact as well. In short what is the best value for the dollar that will get the job done right when it comes to nutrition. We also evaluate forage supplies on hand for quality. The ingredients we look at fall into several categories, those being true grain products (corn, milo, wheat, oats, barley) in addition to processed grain by-products such as wheat midds, corn gluten, distillers grains and rice bran. Then we review plant proteins or major proteins like cottonseed meal, peanut meal, soybean meal and canola. Depending on the type of feed needed we may look at roughage products like high energy soy hulls or low energy roughage like cottonseed hulls or peanut hulls. From there we may establish a breeder cube formula or a high protein cake formula for those who simply want to supplement with some type of cube since they have enough grass or hay to make the winter. For those situations where it goes beyond just protein supplementation to, for example, grower rations for heifers or bulls, a higher feeding rate may be needed for higher calorie and higher energy. Then we will develop grower type blends that would be fed at considerably higher rates with less forage or hay being relied on. The challenge this year so far is that all ingredients are very close in terms of price. This leaves ont to question the need for co-products feeding program or at least to evaluate the level used in any feed. Below are a couple of feeding scenarios to consider. 1. Cubes and cake - For those of you who have adequate hay and/or forage, you may want to consider higher protein cake because it will probably be a better buy as opposed to your standard 20% type cube. (i.e. 38% at $482.00 per ton feed at 2 pounds per head per day equals 48.2 cents per head per day to supply 0.76 pounds protein). If 20% cubes were at $366.00 per ton, you would have to feed 3.80 pounds to match the protein level of the 38% feed at 2 pounds per head per day and the cost would be 69.54 cents per head per day on the 20% cube. The higher protein usually figures the best in terms of cost but the cattle have to maintain body condition at the lower level of feed intake to make it work. There may be some situations where you may need to feed a 20% cube due to the need to have a higher caloric intake or higher energy intake in terms of pounds fed to maintain body condition or grow cattle on a forage based diet.

Be sure to evaluate the cubes you purchase in comparison to others. One major factor that may come into play this year is the Cary L. Zipp use of urea or non-protein nitrogen due to high protein Nutritionist prices. So know if you are Gorman Milling Co., Inc. feeding a cube that is “All Gorman, TX Natural” or contains urea. We have made the desision this year as in years past not use use urea. 2. Alternative supplementation - In years past, I have always been an advocate of using things like distillers grains, gluten and canola as long as the feed did not have to be fed on the ground. While it may not be for everyone it does have its place out there and many have had good success with it. Sometimes you can achieve higher energy , fat and carbs that you cannot achieve in a cube formulation at usually a lower cost. 3. Grower rations/stocker rations - These would be feeds that are either textured or loose and would be fed in a selffeeder on pasture or in confinement with hay. Typically these are feeds that are fed to achieve maximum gain or growth in younger cattle. They usually will be self-fed, figuring consumption around 3% of body weight with potential to produce 2 to 3 pounds per head per day in gain. While typically these feeds will be cheaper per ton. The amount fed per animal per day can be an expensive method to feed. For example a 500 pound heifer could be eating 15 pounds per head per day of $280.00 to $300.00 per ton feed. An alternative to consider if one has the time and man power, is to purchase a feed that is “hotter”, more energy, higher in digestibility, higher in carbs and calories and feed 1.5% of their body weight. Then provide hay and/or pasture to make up the remaining 1.5% of intake. You may pay $20.00 to $30.00 more per ton for a “hotter” feed, but you feed half as much and then rely on the hay instead of relying on the feed to accomplish the fiber needs. Even with the current cost of coastal, sudan or wheat hay, it’s still a good buy compared to what the feed mills have to pay for various types of fiber. Thanks for the opportunity to help you with feeding advice. Lets all pray for rain and lower feed prices.

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 53


Sugar Classic September 1-2, 2012

Judge: Charles Crochet

New Iberia, LA – As Hurricane Isaac headed North leaving Louisiana, Brahman breeders and exhibitors blew into Southwest Louisiana for the Annual Sugar Classic Brahman Show, sponsored by the Louisiana Brahman Association. Brahmans came from five different states, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, totaling 190 Brahmans in the open show. The show started Friday night with youth showmanship. The show was judged by Charley Chrochet, of Ultra Black GRAND CHAMPION GREY FEMALE GRAND CHAMPION RED FEMALE & CHAMPION SENIOR GREY FEMALE & CHAMPION SENIOR RED FEMALE Cattle of Lafayette, Louisiana. The winners Lady H Bailey Manso 87/9 CT Lady Rhineaux Ray were Shannon Carriere in the 8-10 year Exhibited by Heritage Cattle Co. Exhibited by Circle T Cattle Co. old division, Blake Spencer in the 11-13 year old division, Isabelle Dominique in the 14-16 year old division and Kelli Doucet in the 17-18 year old division. Mr. Chrochet then named Blaine Spencer as the Overall Showmanship winner. Saturday morning kicked off with the Youth bull show. Mr. Chrochet chose Bar L Red Solo 701, exhibited by Allie Carrierre of Port Barre, Louisiana, as Grand Champion Red Bull and JS Rouge Elvin 190/1, exhibited by Jessica Smith of Maringouin, Louisiana, as Reserve GRAND CHAMPION GREY BULL GRAND CHAMPION RED BULL Champion Red Bull. Then Mr. Chrochet & CHAMPION SENIOR GREY BULL & CHAMPION INTERMEDIATE RED BULL decided on Mr. B-F 242/1, exhibited by JDH Mr Manso 638 Mr JS Rouge Peterbilt Exhibited by Forgason Cattle/L2 Ranch Exhibited by Smith Brahmans Hunter Owens of Robeline, Louisiana, as the Grand Champion Grey Bull and Bar L Rex Didor 213, exhibited by Erin Carriere of Port Barre, Tut 697/0, exhibited by Legacy Cattle Company, was named the Louisiana, as the Reserve Champion Grey Bull. Later on during Reserve Champion Red Bull. In the Grey show, JDH Mr. Manso the morning, the Open Bull Show was held, judged by Mr. Doug 638, exhibited by Joyce Custom fitters and owned by Forgason Husfeld, of Texas, but before the bull show, the group classes were Cattle Company and L2 Ranch, was named Grand Champion held. Fontenot’s Red Brahmans won the Red Embryo Produce of Grey Bull and Mr. H Barrett Manso 221/1, exhibited by Heritage Dam with a group out of JDH Lady Cindy Manso, while Ripple Cattle Company, was named Reserve Champion Grey Bull. Later C Cattle Company won the Red Get of Sire class, sired by +Mr. Saturday night, the Louisiana Brahman Association provided Winchester Magnum 99, and The Grey Produce of Dam went to everyone with a delicious dinner of red beans and rice prepared by Louis Dooley and his group out of LD Miss Edie Leblanc 38. In Chris and Andi Herpin. the Red Show, JS Rouge Peterbilt, exhibited by Smith Brahmans, Sunday morning brought on the Youth Heifer Show, a split was chosen as the Grand Champion Red Bull while 5M King show of Red and Grey Brahmans, with the Red Brahmans 54 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012


showing first. Mr. Chrochet sorted through the red heifers and named KR MS IM Irressistable 340, owned by Joseph Carriere of Church Point, Louisiana as the Grand Champion Red Heifer, followed by Lady H Hootie’s Rose 205/1, owned by Emilie “Hootie” Green of Rosharon, Texas, as the Reserve Champion Red Heifer. Next came the Youth Grey Heifer show, this time Mr. Chrochet selected 4N Miss Susie 85/1, owned by Fallon Palisance of Kentwood, Louisiana, as the Grand Champion Grey Heifer, and MS SS 210, owned by Drake Conner, of Cameron, Louisiana, as the Reserve Champion Grey Heifer. Sunday afternoon, the open Brahman show started with Mr. Husfeld selecting CT Lady Rhineaux Ray 8/9, exhibited by Circle T Cattle, as the Grand Champion Red Heifer and 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1, exhibited by Legacy Cattle Company. The as the finish to a great weekend, Lady H Bailey Manso 87/9, exhibited by Heritage Cattle Company and Lady H Holly Manso 256/1, exhibited by Heritage Cattle Company, was named Reserve Champion Grey Heifer. Official results for the day were as follows:

Reserve Junior Champion

Miss B-F 218/0

Senior Champion

CT Lady Rhineaux Ray Circle T Cattle Co.

Katelin Cooper

Reserve Senior Champion

Miss Fontenot 945

Fontenot Red Brahmans

RED BULL RESULTS Calf Champion

Bar L Red Solo 70

Allie Carriere

Reserve Calf Champion

Mr K-Bar Magnum Cash 10

Legacy Cattle Co.

Intermediate Champion

Mr JS Rouge Peterbilt

Smith Brahmans

Res. Intermediate Champion Mr JS Rouge Elvin 190/1

Smith Brahmans

Junior Champion

5M King Tut 697/0

Legacy Cattle Co.

Reserve Junior Champion

Mr JS Angel Rouge 152/0

Smith Brahmans

©TABR

GREY FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

Lady H Holly Manso 256/1

Heritage Cattle Co.

Reserve Calf Champion

AF Miss Amie 485

Island Brahmans

Intermediate Champion

Lady H Whitney Manso 101

Heritage Cattle Co.

Res. Intermediate Champion JDH Lady Manso 770

Joyce Custom Fitters

Junior Champion

Miss JH 104/0

Legacy Cattle Co.

Reserve Junior Champion

LMC Polled Spice 47/1

Walters Livestock

Senior Champion

Lady H Bailey Manso 87/9

Heritage Cattle Co.

Reserve Senior Champion

Miss B-F 210/0

Kelsey Spencer

Calf Champion

RLB Mr 288

B&P Brahmans

Reserve Calf Champion

LD Chester Malee 92

Louis Dooley

Intermediate Champion

Mr Barrett Manso 221/1

Heritage Cattle Co.

Res. Intermediate Champion

SRW Mr Flying W 828/11

Legacy Cattle Co.

Junior Champion

Mr H Reno Manso 200/0

Heritage Cattle Co.

Reserve Junior Champion

KF Mr Jajestic Crossfire 14

Legacy Cattle Co.

Senior Champion

JDH Mr Manso 638

Forgason Cattle/L2 Ranch

Reserve Senior Champion

Mr CC Challenger 901/0

Legacy Cattle Co.

GREY BULL RESULTS

RED FEMALE RESULTS Calf Champion

RCC Ms Bombshell192/1

Candice Kiser

Reserve Calf Champion

Miss J&R 362

Joyce Custom Fitters

Intermediate Champion

5M Ms B Rosie 801/1

Legacy Cattle Co.

Res. Intermediate Champion BB Bronson’s Hurricane Junior Champion

5M Miss Rojo Valentine 214/1

Circle T Cattle Co. Wyatt Manuel

FALL 2012 | The American Brahman Review® | 55


Letters from Kodi

The Little Cowdog with the Wiggly Butt!

Hi Y’ll,

Yea! Fall is finally here! Now I know that it hasn’t been nearly as hot and miserable a summer as the one last year was, but the thought of cool days and chilly evenings make all four of my paws want to do a little happy dance. Sometimes on cool evenings my daddy will fix a fire in the pit on the deck and we’ll sit there for a spell just enjoying the crackling of the burnings logs. My folks will prop their feet up by the fire and Mr.P and I will get close by and and enjoy the quiet time. You know little things like that sure make for good memories. Another sign it’s Fall is all the squirrels scurring around here and there gathering stuff to get them through the winter that’s coming. I haven’t seen any here at the house and I’m kind of surprised too cause of the big pecan tree in the back yard. That tree is full of those tasty nuts and squirrels love them as much as I do. Actually there are so many this year that I guess it would be alright of Mr. Sq got a few to carry back to his house. There are plenty to go around so sharing some would be the neighborly thing to do. Even though I haven’t seen any of the little furry varmits here at the house there are plenty of them at the golf course. They seem to be extra busy gathering stuff like pine cones. And the other day I got to chase one up a tree. Now don’t worry, he wasn’t gathering anything so I didn’t interrupt his work, but just gave him a good run for his money. He got away from me and said some things from the tree branch he ran up to. From the tone he used I don’t think he appreciated being chased either. It sure was fun though ! I don’t get to chase them very often when we’re on the course cause it’s not good manners, but since there was no one around my folks said ,”What the heck; go for it Kodi” and that I did. It’s been kind of on the noisey side around here since we’ve been weaning calves. I had to help separate them from their mamas and my girls never take that too well either. Then I helped load them into the trailer for their trip to the weaning pens here south of the house. They walked and bawled and walked and bawled for several days, but finally settled down and got ready for the next phase of their lives. Their mamas did the same, but since they were in a pasture a ways from the house I didn’t have to listen to them. Of course when I went with daddy to check on them each day they did give me some dirty looks, since I helped 56 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

in taking their babies away. The weaning process is kind of a sad time actually, but it’s just part of life and before you know it those cows will have new babies to take care of. Actually new babies are being born right now to my girls whose calves were weaned last year. They sure are cute when they’re little. It won’t be long before they’re running and playing and trying to get me to chase them. That’s great fun until their mamas (and my folks) take notice and put a stop to it. Mr.P never likes weaning time cause he says it’s harder for him to sleep with all the racket, but I noticed he managed pretty well. Everytime I saw him, when he wasn’t at his food bowl that is, his eyes were closed, so I don’t think the bawling bothered him too much. You know one reason this past summer was less miserable was that we had ample rainfall here in our neck of the woods. But, the downside to that comes in the form of mounds and mounds of fireants. Have you ever stuck your nose into a fireant mound? I don’t mean on purpose cause that would be just plain stupid, but by accident. I’ve gotten some on my paws before, but the other day I got stung on my nose and “yeouch” isn’t a strong enough word to say how that felt! I was following a grasshopper in the deep grass when all of a sudden he disappeared. So I “nosed” around trying to find him again and that’s when I managed to stick my nose into a fireant mound hidden from view. Those little red devils can sting you instantly and I drew my nose back in a flash. I rubbed and rubbed it with my paw trying to get the stinging to stop and it finally did. I’m sure glad none of those things crawled up into one of my nostirls cause a sting on the outside of my nose was bad enough; I hate to think what one on the inside would have felt like. And what if one of those things crawled all the way up into my sinus cavities and on to my brain. OMG, I hate to think what a brain sting would be like cause you couldn’t get to it to try and rub the sting away. I’ve heard of a “brain freeze” when you drink something cold too fast but a “brain sting” would definitely be worse. Note to self: Fireants are not to be messed with and that’s a fact. By the way have you noticed all the butterflies flying here and there? They seem to be every where you look this time of the year. Mama said they’re called Monarchs cause of their size and they


are lots bigger than the ones that hang around during the spring and summer. They seem to be mostly shades of orange, kind of like the colors of fall. Anyway, they seem to show up about the time the hummingbirds are getting ready to leave for their winter home. Isn’t it great how Mother Nature gives all critters, birds, and bugs just the right instinct to when it time to come or when they should be leaving. Speaking of hummers there are still three hanging around the feeder on the deck. Those little “jet fighters” buzz around so fast that I have to take a second look just to keep up with where they fly to next. They don’t seem to get along very well either and don’t like to share that stuff in the feeder. I keep thinking that as little as they are they shouldn’t be so worried cause there seems to be plenty to go around. Anyway mama keeps it filled up so they shouldn’t get in such a tizzy about it. I forgot to ask if any of you have one ear that sort of has a mind of it’s own? Ever since I was a 5 pound ball of wiggly fur my right ear just pops straight up on occasion and I have no idea why. It’s sort of like a periscope on a submarine the way it goes up and I expect it to start making that “beep-beep-beep” sound. When I was little mama taped a coin to the tip end to help train it to lay down correctly and 99.9% of the time it does. But then all of a sudden, for no apparent reason, it will stand at attention. It doesn’t make any sense so I was wondering if this ever happens to any of you? When it does it’s “stand at attention” thing my folks call me “Radar” which is not my favorite nickname. I like” The Princess Kodi, The Mighty K “ or even “Wiggle Butt” better cause they seem to fit my personality better. What I’m about to tell you I sure hope you’ll keep to yourself cause I was embarrassed to say the least. Since I’m head of security and all I shouldn’t have let this bother me and I sure don’t want my girls to find out or they’d “mooooo” their heads off the next time I have to work with them. The other day mama went outside to do some yard work and I went along, but of course first I had to make a quick dash to the big hay barn to check on that big yellow cat living out there. Well I went through a tunnel between the barn wall and 300 rolls of hay and that’s when things went wrong cause I got trapped. Mama finished what she was doing and headed back to the house and called for me to come with her. She called and called my name but saw no sign of me. About then daddy came out and joined in the search. All this time I was trapped in the tunnel cause the big, evil-eyed yellow monster had jumped down and was between me and freedom. I couldn’t go out the other end cause it’s covered with big mesh panels. That cat was none too happy that I was in his territory and was growling and hissing at me and all I could do was stand there. Now if I were human I would have had a cell phone and could have dialed 911 for help. I didn’t even want to bark cause I didn’t want to make the evil one any more angry than he already was. Finally mama noticed my eyes shining in the dark recesses and called my name. She didn’t see what was trapping me. Daddy called my name too but I didn’t move a muscle. Finally they saw the cat obstacle so daddy went to the back and used a crowbar to pry a panel loose enough for me to squeeze my little wiggly butt through. I crawled out to freedom and felt such a wave of relief. That critter is still living out there and I’m still running out there to check on him but I stay out of that tunnel so as not to get trapped again. I should have let him know who is in charge around here but he let me know that my pretty face might get

rearranged if I messed with him so I decided it was best to let things slide for now. If he and I cross paths again I think I’ll back into him cause I ‘ve got lots of fur on my wiggly behind and his sharp claws wouldn’t hurt so much. So long for now. I think a nap is in order and it’s sure nice outside. The sun is shining and a cool breeze is blowing and I hear the grass under the pecan tree calling my name. Hopefully I won’t dream of fireants or evil cats.

Your friend, Kodi – The Little Cowdog With The Wiggly Butt Ps: Remember to keep this little cat fiasco just between us, ok.

This column is based on a book titled, “Letters From Kodi, The Little Cowdog With The Wiggly Butt”. The book is written by Phyllis Clem through the eyes of Kodi, a miniature Australian Shepherd. Mrs. Clem is a retired teacher who lives near New Summerfield in East Texas along with her husband, Garry, and of course, Kodi. They raise Registered Brangus cattle and when they have free time they enjoy playing golf, watching professional bull riding, traveling and spending time with family and friends. The book is available by contacting Mrs. Clem at 903-726-3463 or ggclem69@aol.com. The cost is $10 plus $2 for shipping and handling.

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Tennessee

Fair State September 6, 2012 Judge: Wes Hudson

Nashville, TN – On September 6, 2012, Music City, Nashville, Tennessee, opened its gates for Brahman cattle from six different states, as the Tennessee State Fair kicked off their 2012 fair. The Brahman show was the very first of the GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE GRAND CHAMPION BULL fair. Judge Wesley Hudson, of Harrison, & CHAMPION JUNIOR FEMALE & CHAMPION INTERMEDIATE BULL Arkansas, started out with the group LMC Polled Spice 47/1 Mr SG 85/1 classes, choosing –GS Ms. Sugar Diamond Exhibited by Walters Livestock Exhibited by Valley B Enterprises 328’s Embryo Produce of Dam as his Class winners included Valley B Enterprises, Walters Livestock, winner, along with JDH Mr. Manso 236/3, as the Get of Sire IS Ranch, B & P Brahmans, Tyler Cattle, and J and H Genetics. winner, both exhibited by Valley B Enterprises of Cleveland, The Brahmans were represented by breeders from six different Tennessee. states, including Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida In the female show, Mr. Hudson started by selecting LMC and the home state Tennessee. Polled Paulette 24/2, exhibited by Walters Livestock of Brenham, Texas as the Calf Champion, followed by GS Ms. Esto 385, Official results for the day were as follows: exhibited by Valley B Enterprises of Cleveland, Tennessee, as the FEMALE RESULTS Reserve Calf Champion. In the Intermediate division BNA Miss Calf Champion LMC Polled Paulette Walters Livestock Nel Manso 896/1, exhibited by Walters Livestock was selected as 24/2 Champion followed by 4N Miss Delta 81/1, exhibited by B & P Reserve Calf Champion GS Ms Exto 385 Valley B Enterprises Brahmans of Mathews, Alabama, for Reserve Champion. Next in Intermediate Champion BNA Miss Nel Manso Walters Livestock The Junior division, LMC Polled Spice 47/1, exhibited by Walters 596/1 Livestock, was selected as Champion and Ms. LF Showtime 340 Res. Intermediate Champion 4N Miss Delta 81/1 B&P Brahmans as Reserve Junior Champion. Finally, in the senior division, Miss Junior Champion LMC Polled Spice 47/1 Walter Livestock Lady Anabella 254/0 was chosen as the Champion and RLB Miss Reserve Junior Champion Ms LF Showtime 340 Tyler Cattle 292 was named Reserve Champion. Ultimately, in the final drive, Senior Champion Miss Lady Anabella Walters Livestock LMC Ms. Polled Spice 47/1 as the Grand Champion and Miss 254/0 Lady Anabella 254/0 as the Reserve Champion Female, both Reserve Senior Champion RLB Miss 292 B&P Brahmans exhibited by Walters Livestock. In the Bull Show, Mr. Hudson selected RLB Mr. 288, exhibited by B & P Brahmans as Calf Champion and IS Mr. BULL RESULTS Kosciusko 100, exhibited by IS Ranch of Trenton, Florida as Calf Champion RLB Mr 288 B&P Brahmans the Reserve Calf. Next, Mr. SG 85/1, exhibited by Valley B Reserve Calf Champion IS Mr Kosciusko 100 IS Ranch Enterprises named Intermediate Champion and RLB Mr. 281, Intermediate Champion Mr SG 85/1 Valley B Enterprises being named Reserve Champion. Then in the Junior division, VBE Mr. Dixie Manso 207, exhibited by Valley B Enterprises was Res. Intermediate Champion RLB Mr 281 B&P Brahmans named Junior Champion. Finally, IS Mr. A Plus 82, exhibited by Junior Champion VBE Mr Dixie Manso Valley B Enterprises IS Ranch was named Senior Champion. To close out the show, Senior Champion IS Mr A Plus 82 IS Ranch Mr. Hudson selected SG 85/1, exhibited by Valley B Enterprises, ©TABR as the Grand Champion Bull and RLB Mr. 281, exhibited by B & P Brahmans as the Reserve Champion Bull. 58 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012


y t i C e h t n i e s r o H A n swe r s to

C

Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the pictures and answers to Horse in the City.

Your choices are: 1) Freedom C 2) Evening Star A 3) 100 Year Horse B Clues on page 52

A

B FALL 2012 | The American Brahman ReviewÂŽ | 59


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Alabama

Florida

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Arkansas


Florida

Louisiana

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Louisiana

To place your ad, call 979-820-8362. Rates are $25/issue or $125/year. 64 | The American Brahman Review速 | FALL 2012


Louisiana

Mississippi

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Oklahoma

Texas

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Tennessee


Texas

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Texas

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Texas

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Texas

Professional Services

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Industry Updates TAHC PROPOSES CHANGES TO CURRENT TEXAS CATTLE TRICHOMONIASIS REGULATIONS AUSTIN - The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) proposed several changes to the current Texas Bovine Trichomoniasis “Trich” regulations at its September 18 meeting. The proposed amendments to Chapter 38, “Trichomoniasis” reflected suggestions by an industry working group of cattle producers, veterinarians, and other stakeholders which meets annually to review the program and make suggestions for improvement. The Trich program helps protect Texas cattle from avenereal disease caused by protozoa that can cause abortions and infertility, resulting in economic losses for the producer. Diagnosis of the disease is made by laboratory testing of samples collected from bulls by veterinarians. The disease does not affect humans. Although the rules have not been officially passed yet, the Commission will put in abeyance its existing rules and allow the following changes to take effect immediately. The TAHC will now accept tests run on samples “pooled” at an official lab, for both change of ownership and quarantine release. The veterinarian will still collect samples from individual bulls for submission to the laboratory, and the maximum acceptable pooled ratio will be 5:1. Upon receipt, the lab may combine up

Professional Services

to 5 samples together if requested prior to testing. “This change in protocol will result in substantial savings for Texas producers testing their bulls for this economically devastating venereal disease,” stated Dr. Dee Ellis, Texas’ State Veterinarian. Recent studies have confirmed that pooled sampling is acceptable to make the diagnosis while saving the producer considerable money. A second significant change was also proposed. Diagnostic samples will now be accepted at the laboratory if submitted up to 120 hours (increased from 96 hours) from collection, if specific guidelines are followed by the submitting veterinarian to ensure the integrity of the sample. This will give veterinarians one more day to submit the samples to the lab, which is helpful to rural veterinarians with long distance shipping concerns. Proposals were also made to amend Chapter 51 “Entry Requirements”. Out-of-state bulls will also now be allowed to enter Texas using the 5:1 lab-pooled sample method described above. Further, the validity of Trich tests on bulls entering the state will be extended to 60 days from 30 days. These changes are intended as cost savings measures, as well as an attempt to help align Texas entry rules with other states requirements. For more detailed information concerning the proposed Trich rules, visit www.tahc.state.tx.us or call1-800-550-8242. Founded in 1893, the Texas Animal Health Commission works to protect the health of all Texas livestock, including: cattle, swine, poultry, sheep, goats, equine animals, and exotic livestock

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Advertiser’s Index 3X-HK Cattle…......................................................66 4N Ranch, Inc….....................................................65 4V Ranch…..............................................................66 B&P Brahmans....….................................................62 Bar Crescent D Ranch..............................................62 Bailey Brahmans.......................................................66 Barthle Brothers Ranch, LLC...................................62 Big Hat Cattle, Honea, Walter..................................66 Bovine Elite.........................................................30,70 Broken Triangle Marketing....................................5,66 Brushy Creek Custom Sires...................................IBC Bryant Red Brahmans..............................................66 Buck N Hoss Cattle..................................................63 Bulls Eye Ranch........................................................66 Butler Polled Brahmans...................................19,66,67 Cattle Solutions........................................................22 Circle H Ranch....................................................15,62 Circle T Cattle Co....................................................63 D Bar Ranch.............................................................63 Dooley Farm............................................................63 Double A Ranch (Acevedo).......................................67 Double C Bar Ranch................................................62 Dubina Rose Ranch.............................................23,67 Dyess Farms..............................................................65 Dykes Farms.............................................................65 El Salinas Ranch..................................................67,70 England Cattle Co....................................................67 F&R Brahmans.........................................................63 Ferguson Cattle Company....................................... 63 Five Oaks Cattle.......................................................65 Fontenot’s Red Brahmans.........................................64 G2 Cattle Company..................................................67 Genex.......................................................................43 H.O.B.O. Cattle Company..................................14,67 HB Braswell Red Brahman Ranch............................67 Heritage Cattle.........................................................68 Horse Stomp Ranch..................................................65 HRW Cattle Company.............................................64 IS Ranch...................................................................62 Island Brahamns.......................................................64 72 | The American Brahman Review® | FALL 2012

J.D. Hudgins, Inc.................................................2,3,9 JaImages...................................................................70 JT Brahmans.............................................................68 JW Brahmans............................................................68 JW Red Brahman Ranch..........................................68 K-Bar Farms..............................................................64 Key Brahmans...........................................................68 Kratzer Brahmans.....................................................64 L2 Ranch..................................................................62 La Muneca Cattle.........................................IFC-1, 68 Lanny Sullins Brahman.............................................68 Lazy D Farms............................................................65 Lindley Brahmans.....................................................68 Longview Ranch.......................................................69 M. James Brahmans..................................................64 McKenny Farms.......................................................69 Moreno Firms...........................................................62 Oden Ranch.............................................................69 OvaGenix.................................................................71 Parish Brahmans.......................................................69 Quality Genetics.......................................................71 Ranch House Designs...............................................27 Rocking B Cattle......................................................65 Rocking S Ranch......................................................63 Sagrera Brahmans......................................................64 Schneider Brahmans.................................................51 Service Semen Texas...............................................IBC Southern Cattle Company........................................63 Stacey Shanks Photography.......................................81 Sullivan Supply...........................................................6 Sunnyside Ranch......................................................69 Tic Tac Toe Ranch....................................................69 Trans Ova Genetics...................................................19 Triton Farms.............................................................64 V8 Ranch.....................................................4,21,49,69 Vogue Farms.............................................................70 Whitlock Cattle........................................................70 Windy Hill Ranch....................................................70 YP Brahmans............................................................70



The American Brahman Review Fall 2012