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April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 1


POLLED, Practical and Productive LMC POLLED AUTHORITY is our Senior Herd Sire and is our kind of sire. He offers lots of mass, volume, bone, breed character, has a great dam with a super pedigree tracing back to JDH Madison, JDH Karu and V8 189/3. He is sired by LMC LF Ambassador who is one of the most consistent Polled bulls ever. Ambassador was sired by a JD Hudgins bull and is out of a POLLED V8 cow. After evaluating Authority’s dam’s consistent production and his first calves, we feel confident that he will follow in his parents footsteps. Co-owned with La Muñeca. Spring is here and even though we are dry, we are very excited about what we feel is the best calf crop we have ever had THANKS to Polled Authority. His first calves are soggy, big boned, big footed, big muzzled, strong calves with lots of breed character and go. We encourage you to come to the Valley and visit the POLLED CAPITAL of the BRAHMAN WORLD. We have a great selection of POLLED show heifer, show steer, replacement heifers or herd bull prospects that will be POLLED, Practical and Productive.

We are excited to show off our latest addition to our Elite Polled Brahman herd – LMC Polled Madonna who is a LMC WFF Pistolero daughter out of a JDH Datapack cow whose dam was the 2000 National Champion. We coown this future donor female with our good friends Kelly Barnard and the Guerras. We all look forward to sharing her future production with the Brahman World.

VISITORS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT ENGLAND CATTLE CO.

We are very proud of the positive impact that LMC Polled Authority has made on our breeding program. As you can see, his calves are the right kind emphasizing We always have some top quality Simbrah, Brangus and conformation, breed character, bone, function and F-1 tiger stripes replacement females for sale. These are pedigree. We are in the business to sell. Come get you one of his first babies and add AUTHORITY to your program. the MONEY MAKING KIND. We would like to THANK all of our previous buyers of commercial replacement and Brahman cattle. You can buy one or a truckload all year around. We also do custom dehorning and AI.

England Cattle Co. Reg. Polled, Horned Brahmans & F1’s

Be on the LOOK OUT for calves from our new smooth double polled JS Polled Patron bull from Smith Brahmans from Louisana. We own him with SRS Land & Cattle and La Muñeca. We are excited about what he offers and look forward to sharing his goodness with the industry. 2 | Thenow American Semen available Brahman for Australia.Review® | April 2013

Mike & Crickett England englandfarms@aol.com

13228 Mile 2 E • Mercedes, TX • 78570

956-330-0916

I am very proud to have helped organize and to be elected the first President of the Rio Grande Valley Brahman & F-1 Association. We have big plans and are off to a great start. Call or email for more details. You are personally invited to our first RGV Brahman & F-1 Association Field Day to be held at England Farms on May 4th 2013.


A & y a d $ y a P 0 0 0 , 0 A 1

! e l i m S r a l l o D N O I MILL

CONGRATS to Winston Walters on a great career with LMC Polled Spice who has won 29 championships for him in both open and junior Brahman shows under many different judges. These wins include the San Antonio Open, Houston Junior and two reserves at the San Antonio Junior show behind our ole buddy Austin Gonzales. By virtue of Austin having won the $10,000 scholarship last year, Winston was awarded the 10 g’s this year and thus the MILLION dollar smile.

A BIG HEARTY THANKS goes out to our repeat customers and good friends Kelly Barnard and Mike England for investing in the future great LMC +S Polled Madonna at the prestigious Houston ABBA Sale. She is a ONE OF A KIND heifer that will help raise the bar in both of their elite POLLED programs.

MIL GRACIAS to our ole buddy Victor Moreno for investing in LMC VJ’s Polled Angel, a double polled, super gentle, good looking baby doll that will be his next show heifer. She is out of LMC Victoria’s Secret, one of our favorites and Ambassador. She has the look and pedigree to help this young man build a great herd.

LMC Polled Paulette won a tough class in Houston and like her paternal sister LMC Polled Spice are going to make a positive impact on the future of the Brahman breed as both are double polled and double good. They are both popular champions that have created a lot of SYNERGY for POLLED Brahmans.

vISItOrS Are ALwAyS weLcOMe At LA MuñecA rANch LMC Apollo

photo at 7 mos. of age.

LMC Baby Doll

We have just weaned our first set of LMC Apollo babies and are very happy with them. LMC Polled Doble is sired by LMC Apollo and LMC Baby Doll – a full sister x full brother mating. Doble is a genetic model designed to make a positive difference in the Brahman world. He is double polled, super clean and very correct.

Simbrahs, Simbraviehs & POLLED Brahmans CARLOS & SISTER GUERRA FAMILY PO Box 81 • Linn, TX 78563 956-383-7566 (Office) Carlos 802-1641 • Victor 607-5515 Carlos Jr. 330-1963 • email: LaMuñecaCattle@aol.com Please visit ourAprilwebsite atAmerican www.LaMuñecaCattle.com 2013 | The Brahman Review® | 3


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Upcoming Events Deep South Brahman Association Sale April 6, 2013 Hattiesburg, MS Miami International Show April 13, 2013 Miami, FL CLC Spring Replacement Female and Premium Bull Sale April 20, 2013 Caldwell, TX Dyess Farms Internet Sale April 20, 2013 Cattle in Motion Heritage Cattle Brahman Production Sale April 27, 2013 Hungerford, TX Pattaya International Brahman Show April 25-28, 2013 Pattaya, Thailand

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Looking for Brahman events? >> Visit www.brahman.org for the latest Brahman information. Florida Brahman Association Field Day April 27, 2013 Wauchula, FL RGV Brahman & F1 Assoc. Field Day May 4, 2013 England Cattle Co., Mercedes, Texas CLC Last Chance Replacement Female Sale May 18, 2013 Caldwell, TX ABBA Select Brahman Sale May 27, 2013 Wichita Ranch; Brenham, TX Okie Extravaganza June 2, 2013 Idabel, OK

Hunt County Fair June 8, 2013 Greenville, TX Carolinas Brahman Assoc. Sale June 8, 2013 Clemson, SC All American National Junior Brahman Show June 24-30, 2013 Lufkin, TX


“The Brahman Breed’s Magazine”

Contents April 2013 • Cattle Handling and Facilities Issue

Photos by Temple Grandin

>>Cover photo by Coleman Locke

FeAtures 25 48 56 58 63 70

International Brahman show; Houston, texas A Guide to successful Cattle Handling Cattle Handling 101 ABBA National F1 and tBA sale report temperament Plays Key role in Cattle Health Incoming ABBA President spotlight: Dr. ricky Hughes

25

63

70 April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 7


Happy Spring!

Contents

national F1 sale candids 75 sHoW & eVent ResULts 27 75 78 80 83 84 86

HLsR International Brahman show ABBA national F1 and tBA sale Candids HLsR Candids Dixie national Dixie national Candids Kissimmee Valley open s.A.L.e. Jr.

35

86 87 88 89 91 92 92

Kissimmee Valley Jr. Miami-Dade HLsR Jr. RGVLs open RGVLs Candids RGVLs Jr. RGVLs steer show

DePARtMents 6 10

Upcoming events From the editor

12 24 34 36 38 42 44 76 104 105

83

ABBA news Page 24 Lunch with Chris shivers Commercial World Doctor’s orders The Run Down Workin’ overtime Affiliate Updates Inspirational Corner Looking Back

Meet our new intern, Brooke Prather!

We are excited to announce the hire of Brooke Prather from Louisiana as the newest staff member for TABR! Brooke comes to us from a strong Brahman background, and is studying Agriculural Leadership and Communications at Louisiana State University. You’ll see Brooke at lots of events this spring and summer. Read more about Brooke on page 35.

Connect with tABR!

facebook.com/brahmanreview Twitter and Instagram: @ambrahmanreview 8 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

dixie national candids


April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 9


From the Editor By Ashley Patterson As I write this column, the 26th Annual ABBA National F1 and Brahman Female Sale is wrapping up. This prestigious sale did not disappoint yet again. It was a great day to sell and purchase Brahman F1 and Brahman females! With a turn out of more than 200 registered buyers, the sale was a great success and it just illustrates more the demand for our Brahman and commercial genetics. Read more about the sale, champion pens, high selling lots, and more on page 58. Taking a few steps back to the 2013 international show in Houston, all I can say is thank you to our friends, customers, and supporters for making it such a great success. We enjoyed visiting with each of you. This breed is truly our livelihood as well, and we feel honored to be able to connect with you on that level. During Houston, we had many visitors stop by our booth to pick up copies of the January/February and March TABR issues, and some great TABR marketing goodies. The response to our March issue was overwhelming. You probably saw us passing out magazines during the entire week of Houston. We worked hard to get this issue out to everyone present. After the open show, our next stop with the March issue was the HLSR Junior Breeding Beef Heifer show where we covered our amazing juniors. These young junior breeders are simply the best around! TABR congratulates each of you on your success at Houston. We handed out more copies of the March issue during that show and enjoyed talking with parents. It wasn’t too long ago that I myself was exhibiting in the junior shows. I remember those days fondly, so it is especially exciting for me to cover our juniors. Then, we headed south to Mercedes, Texas, for the Rio Grande Valley Livestock Show for the open and junior Brahman shows, as well as the first ever Brahman steer show. Our TABR representative, Cassie Saunders Martinez, did a great job taking pictures, recording results, and handing out more March issues. I would also like to thank Jana Acevedo for helping out with the show results. Even more copies were handed out by our southesast representatives, the Bishop family, at the Miami-Dade County Fair. Of course, we covered the Louisiana Brahman Association F1 and Brahman Female Sale in Carencro, La. Look for us at the Deep South Brahman Association

10 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

Sale and the Heritage Cattle Production Sale this month, as we will be distributing our April issues at those events. I guess you could say we’ve covered the Brahman world! Our main focus for TABR is to put this magazine into the hands of the cattleman and cattlewoman, those people who are making a living in the industry, just as we are. I am especially excited about this issue. It is packed with educational and helpful tips on cattle handling and facilities. It is of utmost importance that we continue to breed for docility in our Brahmans, for performance, profitability, and safety reasons. By far the most exciting times I had while working on this issue was the chance to speak with Dr. Temple Grandin, the leader in the field of cattle handling, facilities and animal behavior. I would like to thank Dr. Grandin and Colorado State University for their willingness to help by providing information and pictures. With that said, enjoy the April issue. We’re already working hard on our May issue, which will feature polled genetics, so reserve your ads now! We’ll see you again soon! ©TABR


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April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 11


ABBA News ABBA MeMBers Meet in houston, AwArd MeMBers And friends of the Breed

Houston, Texas—The American Brahman Breeders Association (ABBA) would like to congratulate all past and current board members, international guests, and other individual breeders for their accomplishments and thank those who helped make this year’s events a success. This year’s 2013 International Brahman Show was held in conjunction with the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. The 2013 activities included the presentation of many awards and recognition of several deserving groups and individuals. This year’s international show was dedicated in memory of past President Billy Dan Lindley of Sulphur Springs, Texas. For 18 years Lindley served on the ABBA board of directors, on the executive committee for 11 continuous years, and as president from 2009-2011. He also served on the board and as president of the Texas Brahman Association. During his tenure with ABBA he initiated many of the things that you still see today in both ABBA and AJBA. This presentation was made during the international show in the main arena of Reliant Center on Thursday to his family by Executive Vice President Chris Shivers, President Ricky Hughes, and Vice President Bubba Sartwelle. The HK Trophy was presented to J.D. Hudgins, Inc. of Hungerford, Texas at the 89th Annual ABBA Membership Meeting. The HK Memorial Trophy is presented each year in memory of Henry Clay Koontz. This award was first presented in 1986 after the death of Koontz, a long-time breeder and promoter of the Brahman breed. The trophy is a bronze casting of the national champion bull, HK Mr. America 61/9, known as “Millionaire” who had one of the biggest impacts on the breed of any bull in history. Each year this award is presented to the owner who accumulated the most points at the previous year’s International Brahman Show. Inducted into the hall of fame were Leslie “Bubba” Hudgins and the late Harry P. Gayden. These hall of fame inductees were recognized at this year’s membership meeting on Wednesday morning. 12 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

Leslie “Bubba” Hudgins, of Hungerford, Texas, was present, along with his family, to accept recognition into the hall of fame. Hudgins was introduced by Dinah Weil, who told the membership about his strong character and dedication to Brahman cattle through purebred and commercial production. Through Hudgins’ time at J. D. Hudgins Inc., he has been able to serve as an advocate to the breed to promote the Brahman cattle all over the world. His induction into the hall of fame was gladly presented. The late Harry P. Gayden, of Houston, Texas, served as executive vice president from 1948 to 1974. Introduced by Coleman Locke, Gayden, was remembered for his strong focus in international promotion of the American Brahman and for the beginnings of the F1 female recognition as we know her today. Gayden’s time with the ABBA significantly increased the popularity of the breed and his place in the hall of fame is well deserved. The 2013 Brahman Friend of the Year was awarded to the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo (HLSR). HLSR has been an outstanding partner to the Brahman breed for many years. For more than 30 years, the ABBA International Show has been held in Houston at the livestock show. HLSR’s service to ABBA and the Brahman breed was awarded with a plaque and recognition to Executive Director of Agricultural Exhibits Joel Cowley, Executive Director of Livestock Competitions Allyson Tjoelker, Show Chairman of the Board Steve Stevens, and President & Chief Executive Officer Skip Wagner by Executive Vice President Chris Shivers, President Ricky Hughes, and Vice President Bubba Sartwelle. The 2013 International Brahman Friend of the year was presented to Jose Albertazzi of San Jose, Costa Rica. Albertazzi, who owns Desarollo magazine, a Central American publication, has been one of the greatest promoters of the Brahman breed throughout his lifetime. His efforts have been successful in bringing other cattle breeders to the Brahman world. Brushy Creek Custom Sires of Taylor, Texas, received


April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 13


ABBA News recognition as the 2012 Sponsor of the Year. Owner Ava Barker was presented the award at Wednesday night’s International Sale in recognition of their service to the ABBA. Brushy Creek Custom Sires has served in the promotion of American Brahman genetics since its start in 1977, and stands today as a leader in the semen export business to breeders all over the world. Full reports were given by the ABBA President, ABBA Executive Vice President, ABBA Secretary and acting committee chairmen to update the membership of the association’s happenings. All reports provided detailed and positive information in reference to the efforts that work to improve the breed. Members were recognized for their accomplishments over the past year receiving awards for the association’s

coveted Register of Renown, Maternal Merit Dam, and Maternal Performance Sire recognitions. Ending the membership meeting, the new Board of Directors and Executive Committee were elected and introduced. These officers include President Ricky Hughes of Donaldson, Arkansas, Vice President J. D. “Bubba” Sartwelle, Jr. of Sealy, Texas, and Secretary/ Treasurer George Kempfer of St. Cloud, Florida. Newly elected executive committee members include John Locke of Hungerford, Texas; Rachel Cutrer of Wharton, Texas; Dean Burkhardt of Schulenburg, Texas; Loren Pratt of Maricopa, Arizona; Bob Hudgins of Hungerford, Texas; Jim Bob Trant of Anderson, Texas; and Arnold Saunders of Devine, Texas.

2013-2014 ABBA Officers and Executive Committee. Bottom, left to right: Secretary/Treasurer, George Kempfer; President, Ricky Hughes; Committee member, Bob Hudgins; Top, left to right: Recording Secretary, Armelinda Ibarra; Executive Vice President, Chris Shivers; Committee members, John Locke; Rachel Cutrer; Dean Burkhardt; Loren Pratt. Not pictured: Vice President, Bubba Sartwelle; Committee members, Jim Bob Trant and Arnold Saunders. 14 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013


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ABBA News AnimAls Recognized by AbbA foR PeRfoRmAnce And showRing AccomPlishment

Houston, Texas—Each year, the American Brahman Breeders Association (ABBA) recognizes top performing animals in the areas of performance and showring accomplishment. This year’s presentation of the 2012 Maternal Merit, Register of Renown, and Maternal Performance Sire awards were presented at the 89th ABBA Annual Membership Meeting on February 27, 2013, at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. To be considered a Maternal Merit Award Cow a cow must have calved before her 36th month of age. In addition she must have had three calves with performance records and these calves must have been raised with five or more contemporaries. As a third criteria the Maternal Merit Cow must maintain a regular calving interval. The Maternal Merit Cow must maintain a Most Probable Producing Ability of 101 or better. There are two levels of excellence for the Maternal Merit Award. A cow meeting all of the previously stated criteria is termed an Elite Maternal Merit Cow. A cow reaching all previously stated criteria, yet weaning four calves and attaining a 105 MPPA is termed a Supreme Maternal Merit Cow. Maternal Merit awards are as follows: • J. D. Hudgins- Hudgins Division: Supreme with =JDH LADY KAYLAN MANSO • Elite with =JDH LADY LEONA MANSO, =JDH LADY GAIL MANSO, =JDH LADY CAROL MANSO, =JDH CAREN MANSO 517, and =JDH MS LAWFORD MANSO 572 • J. D. Hudgins- Locke Division: Supreme with =JDH LADY ROLLY MANSO • Steve Wilkins: Supreme with =SRW MISS FLYING W 353 • Elite with =SRW MISS FLYING W 452/6, =SRW MISS FLYING W 488/06, =SRW MISS FLYING W 572/7, =SRW MISS FLYING W 518/7 • Detering Brothers Cattle Co.: Elite with =DB SOUTHERN STYLE 260/5 • Steve E. Hudgins: Elite with =JDH LADY CORTEZ MANSO

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• Mike S. and Janet Partin: Elite with =MSP MISS HOLLY HOLIDAY • Texas A&M University: Elite with = MISS TAMU 7217 and =MISS TAMU 7609 Register of Renown awards were presented at the membership meeting as well. The Register of Renown Program was designed to recognize the sires and dams of showring winners at ABBA approved shows. To obtain the status of Register of Renown a cow must gain a minimum of 40 points earned by two or more of her produce. Bulls must gain 150 points earned by 5 or more of his get. Register of Renown awards are as follows: • Barney Joe Allen with +BNA MISS DEACON’S DREAM • Brandalyn C. Bishop with +LS MS HOLLY PARET CRATA • Box R Cattle Co. with +JDH LADY SANDY MANSO • Bull’s Eye Ranch with +MISS BER 218 • Cannon Creek Ranch with +MS CC FAITH 193/6 • Samantha Cone with +MISS B-F 42/7 • Samuel C. Duplantis with +S BAR MISS 598/8 and +S BAR MISS 599/8 • Dyess Farms with +JDH MR CONSTANCE MANSO and +JDH LADY MIRANDA MANSO • Frontline Cattle Co. with +FCC CASH IN THE STING • Clint James Galiano with +MISS BSF SIERRA 05 • Heritage Cattle Company with +LADY HERITAGE MANSO 91, +JDH MISS AIDA MANSO, and +LADY H LANEL MANSO 911/6 • J. D. Hudgins- Forgason Cattle Co. with +JDH LADY MANSO 367/3, +JDH LADY MANSO 85/4, and +JDH LADY MANSO 953/3 • J. D. Hudgins- Forgason Division with +JDH CHARLEY’S JAZZ 946/1 and +JDH ATLAS MANSO 328/3


• J. D. Hudgins- Hudgins Division with +JDH MR WOODMAN MANSO 578/6 and +JDH WOODSON DE MANSO 206/7 • Leslie W. Hudgins with +JDH MR WOODMAN MANSO 206/7 • J. D. Hudgins- Locke Division with +JDH SANDY MANSO • K-C Ranch with +JDH MISS AIDA MANSO and +MS CC MISTI 192/6 • Savannah Kiser with +FCC CASH IN THE STING 411/3 • Adrian I. Land, II with +MISS LADY V8 262 • Locke Brothers with +JDH MR ELMO MANSO • Ron and Linda Salo with +-GS EMPRESS DIDOR 319 • Santa Tereza Agropecuaria with +JDH ATLAS MANSO 328/3 • Satterfield Ranch with +JDH WOODSON DE MANSO 206/7 • Southern Cattle Company with +-GS SUGAR DIAMOND 328 • Steve Swaner, Jr. with +JDH SIR SHANK MANSO 51/7 • Tic Tac Toe Ranch with +TTT MS SUVETTE MARTI 390 • Underwood Ranch with +LADY HERITAGE MANSO 91 and +LADY H LANEL MANSO 911/6 • Valley B Enterprises with +-GS MS SUGAR DIAMOND 328 • Jim S. Williams with +MISS V8 410/6

2013 ABBA InternAtIonAl BrAhmAn SAle BreAkS recordS

Houston, Texas—The 2013 ABBA International Brahman Sale brought record setting prices for the association and breed this week. Eighteen outstanding lots were consigned Wednesday, February 27, 2013, including the 2013 American Junior Brahman Association Foundation Female, one pregnant recipient, one flush, and 15 top heifers. Fourteen semen lots from top herd sires were also consigned in the 2013 International Semen Sale directly following. The sale was preceded by an International Sale Cocktail Hour sponsored by Trans Ova Genetics and Brushy Creek Custom Sires. At 5:30 buyers, consigners, and guests arrived at Reliant Sales Pavilion to socialize and meet international visitors. Leading the sale was the purchase of the 2013 AJBA Foundation Female donated by Brad & Rachel Gonce of Centerville, Texas. She was purchased by an organized buyers group for $14,000. The group’s generous donation of the heifer back into the sale allowed for reauction. Walters Cattle Enterprises of Brenham, Texas purchased the heifer for $10,000. All the money raised from the consignment will be used to support AJBA activities in the upcoming year. The high selling female of the sale was consigned by V8 Ranch, Brandon and Rachel Cutrer, bringing $25,000, and the second high selling female was consigned by J. D. Hudgins-Hudgins Division, bringing $24,000. Both top selling lots were purchased by Hernando Guerra of Mexico. The flush consignment Maternal Performance Sire awards were also presented by RB Ranch brought $6,500. The pregnant recipient at Wednesday morning’s membership meeting. The consignment by Circle T Cattle Company brought Maternal Performance Sire program recognizes the bulls $15,000. Sale average for all 18 lots amounted to that produce Maternal Merit Dams. $14,125, and the night’s sales totaled at $254,250. The bulls that received honors produced between This year’s 2013 International Semen Sale consisted of three and five Maternal Merit Dams, gaining them 14 lots of rare and exclusive genetics. Bull semen offered silver recognition under the ABBA program. Bulls included past show winners and proven performance that produce more than six Maternal Merit Dams are sires. The high selling lot of five straws sold for $3,500, awarded gold recognition. purchased by Sexing Technologies. This portion of the Recipients of this award include: sale grossed $23,750 with the proceeds benefiting the research and breed improvement committee. • Steve Wilkins, who received the Silver Maternal The ABBA International Sale takes place annually Performance Sire award with (=) SRW MR. in conjunction with the International Brahman Show FLYING W 154 and (=) SRW MR. FLYING W at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Each year, 225. ABBA welcomes International visitors from all over the world. The sale is held at Reliant Sales Pavilion in Houston, Texas. April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 19


ABBA News

Brahman SteerS Perform, Yield, and Grade with the BeSt

Houston, Texas—At Graham Land and Cattle Co. and Sam Kane Beef Processor Brahman breeders and the American Brahman Breeders Association have done some extraordinary things for their breed. Breeders and the ABBA have collected carcass data that will appeal to all segments, from the consumer all the way down to commercial producers. Results from the 2012-2013 ABBA Carcass Evaluation Program are now available. This evaluation is certainly one of the most extensive carcass programs in the US, collecting data on factors affecting profitability, carcass merit and consumer acceptance: Average Daily Gain, Ribeye Area, Carcass Weight, Marbling Score, and Tenderness. A total of 105 straightbred Brahman steers from the following breeders were represented in the project: Loren and Edward Pratt, Arizona, Sam Duplantis and Louisiana State University, Louisiana, J.D. Hudgins – Forgason Cattle Co., J.D. Hudgins – Locke Division, Daniel Kutac, Todd Smith, V8 Ranch, St. Cyr Brahman Farm, Inc., Steve Wilkins, and Sunnyside Ranch, Texas. Spring born steers in this project were put on feed the first week of December 2011 at Graham Land and Cattle Co. in Gonzales, Texas. Calves were re-implanted on March 28, 2012, and sorted into two groups. Group 1 included calves weighing above 750 lbs. and Group 2 included calves weighing below 750 lbs. Group 1 was harvested on July 30, 2012, while Group 2 was harvested November 1, 2012 at Sam Kane Beef Processors, Inc. in Corpus Christi, Texas. The carcass data was collected by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension personnel for ABBA. The average of the steers in the project for specific traits was: • In Weight: 497 lbs. • Out Weight: 1,231 lbs. • Days on Feed: 281 days • Average Daily Gain: 2.6 lbs./day • Hot Carcass Weight: 760 lbs. 20 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

• • • • • • • •

Dressing Percentage: 64.3% Backfat: .37 inches Ribeye Area: 13.0 square inches Ribeye Area/Carcass Weight: 1.7 square inches Kidney, Pelvic and Heart Fat: 2.3% USDA Quality Grade: Select USDA Yield Grade: 2 Warner – Bratzler Shear Force for Tenderness: 8.8 lbs. A total of 79 percent of the carcasses graded Choice or Select. The average WBSF of 8.8 lbs was very near the 8.6 pounds that is considered “Very Tender” by industry standard. V8 Ranch of Hungerford, Texas was the breeder of both the High Indexing Steer and the High Indexing Sire Group. These awards will be presented during the International Brahman Show on March 1, 2013, in Houston, Texas. The data obtained though the carcass evaluation program will be included in the calculation of EPD for hot carcass weight, ribeye area, marbling score, retail yield, backfat, and tenderness. Upcoming analyses will provide feeding costs, marketing and feeding margins and overall profitability of the program. Below are the lists of the winning steers and sire groups: HIGH INDEXING STEERS 1. V8 Ranch –sired by +JDH Karu Manso 800 2. V8 Ranch –sired by JDH Mr. Matt Manso 142/4 3. V8 Ranch – sired by JDH Sir Vanicek Manso 340/4 4. V8 Ranch – sired by JDH Fredrick De Manso 393/7 5. V8 Ranch – sired by +Mr. V8 380/6 6. V8 Ranch – sired by Mr. V8 463/6 7. V8 Ranch – sired by #JADL Rey Te 110 8. Loren and Edward Pratt – sired by (=)Mr. 6X Sunland 995 9. V8 Ranch – sired by +JDH Sir Avery Manso 159/7 10. V8 Ranch – sired by Mr. V8 736/5


April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 21


ABBA News OVERALL HIGH INDEXING SIRE GROUPS 1. Mr. V8 463/6 owned by V8 Ranch 2. +JDH Karu Manso 800 owned by Leslie Hudgins, Lazy D Farms, Satterfield Ranch, Juan Moreno, Byron Vassberg, San Rafael Ranch, Watson Land & Cattle and M.M.MAR Ranch 3. +Mr. V8 380/6 owned by Jim S. Williams 4. JDH Fredrick De Manso 393/7 owned by J.D. Hudgins-Hudgins Division and V8 Ranch 5. +JDH Sir Avery Manso 159/7 owned by Jim S. Williams HIGH INDEXING SIRE GROUPS FOR AVERAGE DAILY GAIN 1. +Mr. V8 380/6 owned by Jim S. Williams 2. Mr. V8 463/6 owned by V8 Ranch 3. JDH Mr. Elmo Manso 309/4 owned by J.D. Hudgins – Locke Brothers 4. JDH Fredrick De Manso 393/7 owned by J.D. Hudgins –Hudgins Division and V8 Ranch 5. +SCD Didor Esto 302/1 owned by Samuel C. Duplantis HIGH INDEXING SIRE GROUPS FOR RIBEYE AREA/CARCASS WEIGHT 1. St. Cyr Mr. Imperator 255 – owned by St. Cyr Brahman Farm, Inc., Chris “Chip” Beeker, Jr., Todd Smith 2. +JDH Sir Avery Manso 159/7 owned by Jim S. Williams 3. (Tie) St. Cyr Mr. Imperator 260 owned by St. Cyr Brahman Farm, Inc. 4. (Tie) Mr. V8 463/6 owned by V8 Ranch 5. (=)Mr. 6X Sunland 995 owned by Loren and Edward Pratt HIGH INDEXING SIRE GROUPS FOR MARBLING SCORE 1. St. Cyr Mr. Imperator 255 – owned by St. Cyr Brahman Farm, Inc., Chris “Chip” Beeker, Jr., Todd Smith 2. +JDH Karu Manso 800 owned by Leslie Hudgins, Lazy D Farms, Satterfield Ranch, Juan Moreno, Byron Vassberg, San Rafael Ranch, Watson Land & Cattle and M.M.MAR Ranch 3. +JDH Sir Avery Manso 159/7 owned by Jim S. Williams

22 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

4. NMSU 6X Cloiverdale 5129 owned by Louisiana State University, Loren & Edward Pratt, New Mexico State University 5. (=)Mr. 6X Sunland 995 owned by Loren and Edward Pratt HIGH INDEXING SIRE GROUPS FOR WARNERBRATZLER SHEAR (TENDERNESS) 1. SCD Didor Esto 302/1 owned by Samuel C. Duplantis 2. JDH Sir Vanicek Manso 340/4 owned by J.D. Hudgins – Locke Division 3. St. Cyr Mr. Imperator 255 – owned by St. Cyr Brahman Farm, Inc., Chris “Chip” Beeker, Jr., Todd Smith 4. JDH Fredrick De Manso 393/7 owned by J.D. Hudgins-Hudgins Division and V8 Ranch 5. +JDH Karu Manso 800 owned by Leslie Hudgins, Lazy D Farms, Satterfield Ranch, Juan Moreno, Byron Vassberg, San Rafael Ranch, Watson Land & Cattle and M.M.MAR Ranch

HOUSTON COMMERCIAL SALES BRING HIGH PRICES FOR BRAHMANS AND F1s

Houston, Texas—Consignment of commercial females and bulls took place at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo’s All Breed Registered Range Bull Sale on Wednesday, February 27, 2013, and All Breed Commercial Female Sale on Saturday, March 2, 2013. Among the cattle sold were 40 registered Brahman and 111 Certified/Golden Certified F1 females and 3 registered Brahman bulls. Tic Tac Toe Ranch of Frost, Texas, consigned the high grading Brahman bull for $5,500 to Robert Paret of Brenham, Texas. In the All Breed Commercial Female Sale, Bradley Hodde of Diamond H Cattle Co. of Brenham, Texas, consigned the overall champion females. The pen of five Golden Certified F1 HXB females sold for $3,100 and were purchased by Tom Johnson of Wortham, Texas. This pen was also awarded champion F1 pairs and champion overall F1s. The averages for pairs were: ABBA Golden Certified/ Certified: $3,300; non-certified: $2,600 and other crossbreds: $2,524.


The champion Brahman females were consigned by Martin/Schwartz Partnership of Brenham, Texas, for $3,600 to Diamond H Cattle Co. also of Brenham, Texas. The average of the Brahman consignments which were all open heifers was $2,706 while the other purebred consignments was $1,646 per head. Champion open F1 Females were awarded to John Malazzo Farms of Caldwell, Texas, with a pen of ABBA Certified B X H females bringing $2,700. Jim Watts of Houston, Texas, purchased these females. The average prices for the categories of open heifers were: ABBA Golden Certified/Certified: $1,734; noncertified F1’s: $1,550 and other crossbreeds: $1,710. The Brahman and F1 consignments at the 46th Annual Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Commercial Female Sale followed suit of previous sales demanding top prices and further confirming that the registration and certification of these females adds value. J. D. Sartwelle, manager of Port City Stockyards Company said, “These females were the best group of females overall than the past few years. We are indebted to our 2013 consignors for holding top notch females for our 2013 sale.” The commercial female sale sold a total of 463 head, of all breeds, which grossed $974,200.00. Both sales were managed by Port City Stockyards Company.

ALL-AMERICAN SHOW DATES CHANGED TO JUNE 24-30, 2013

Due to scheduling conflicts with another event, the AJBA show dates have been changed to June 24-30, 2013, in Lufkin, Texas. A selection of hotels are secured at a group rate. Please call to make your reservations, and mention the code, AJBA rate. To receive the group rate, you must book your hotel room by May 30, 2013. These discounted rates are based upon availability. Hotels secured at AJBA rate: La Quinta; Please ask for La Quinta Inn Lufkin and Group# 102 2119 S. First/Lufkin, Texas 75901 $85/night, 1-4 persons, Dbl. Queen Call Group Reservations Department at 936-634-3351.

Comfort Suites; Please mention AJBA when booking 4402 S. First/Lufkin, Texas 75901 936-632-4949 $79.00/night, 1-4 persons, King or Dbl. Queen Std. Quality Inn; Please mention AJBA when booking 4306 S. First/Lufkin, Texas 75901 936-639-3333 $59.00/night, 1-4 persons, King or Queen Dbl. Std. Hampton Inn and Suites; Please mention AJBA when booking 4400 S. First/Lufkin, Texas 75901 936-699-2500 $95.00/night, 1-4 persons, King or Dbl. Queen Std. $105.00/night, King Suite (King bed + Queen Size Sleeper Sofa) Holiday Inn Express; Please mention AJBA when booking 4404 S. First/Lufkin, Texas 75901 936-699-3000 $105.00/night (Mon. - Fri.), 1-4 persons, Dbl. Queen

J.D. SARTWELLE, IV FEATURED IN HOUSTON CHRONICLE

Houston, Texas— Great-great-grandson of J.D. Sartwelle, a pioneer of the American Brahman breed and founder of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, was featured in the Houston Chronicle on March 9, 2013. J.D. Sartwelle, IV, 8, stepped into the ring of his first ever Houston Junior Breeding Beef Heifer show on March 9. The Houston Chronicle captured this moment and the moments of preparation before the show, resulting in an in-depth, heartfelt story. It was a touching moment for the Sartwelle family and the Brahman breed. To read the full story and to view pictures, visit www.houstonchronicle.com to purchase a digital subscription.

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 23


page

24

According to 24 of our Facebook fans,

1

2 3 4 5

jana acevedo

The possibiliTy of some good rain!!!

7 8 9 10 11 12

13

melissa laurent

our m-Js graduaTion from Texas Tech!

lindsay garrett

looking forward To (hopefully) rain!

jason kimball

rain and green grass!

14 15

shari hobgood barner

arkansas and area 13 field day and Junior show aT my house

16

helping cody build his calf crop & making all The new babies inTo show heifers & bulls

17

peggy sue pilant

6

What are you looking forward to most this spring?

jennifer Collins parker

end of maJor show season. To geT rid of The lasT brahman sTeer so we can sTarT playing wiTh new babies!

18

gretchen kurtz dixon

19

amy lynne tipp

20

candace mccartney

21

warmer weaTher and loTs of new babies. rain!!!

swimming pool. noThing beTTer Than Taking a dip in The pool afTer working caTTle all day!

ricky booth

22

florida brahman associaTion field day and heifer sale...and rain!!!

23

seTTling some cows via ai To +gaT meTz manso riggs

24

drew tucker

24 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

jeremiah jones

i’m looking forward To purchasing our new herd sire so our liTTle herd can begin producing black and whiTe brahman calves

matt warren

noT feeding or spending money on hay!

rachel cutrer

exTra hours of daylighT so me, brandon and mollie Jo can geT To work on genTling calves in The evenings.

jose vega

rain and anoTher calf crop as good or beTTer Than lasT year’s

troy thibodeaux

anTicipaTing eT calves ouT of 8/9

robbie hamilton

plenTy of rain – no repeaT of 2011.

manuel amparan

opening of inTernaTional markeT in souTh american for live caTTle.

leo casas

conTinued improvemenT in caTTle markeT.

angela hebert

our spring calf crop

john allen

warm weaTher and green grass

buddy bailey

exciTed abouT a calf crop by a new bull

milton charanza, jr.

conTinuing a sTrong sale season


Houston, Texas–As the spring show season continued, the metropolitan city of Houston, Texas, was the center stage for Brahman breeders and fitters. Exhibtors rose to the occasion and showcased their best. The ultimate crown, International Grand Champion, was on everyone’s minds as breeders throughout the United States made their way to Houston to compete in front of the entire Brahman world. The week started off in a race to get all the cattle stalled and ready for the tough competition. After all these chores were accomplished, out came the good food and drinks from families that have worked so hard to get here. Everything from, tacos, donuts, beans and rice, jambalaya, crawfish ettouffe, and fajitas would be served to anyone passing by. This always adds to the hospitality that can only be found at this grand show. As thousands of people passed through Reliant Center, this year’s judge Jary Douglas sorted through 588 entries

at a steady pace. Douglas did an excellent job for two days choosing the cattle that he thought were the best of the day, giving reasons to back up his choice. A great crowd was on hand and we were privileged to have many international guests. After a long day on Thursday, February 28, 2013, the champion drive for the red females consisted of calf champion HRW Miss Gabby 52/1 owned by Clay Espey; intermediate champion RCC MS Bombshell 192/1, shown by Legacy Cattle Services; junior champion 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1, owned by Quad M Cattle and exhibited by Legacy Cattle Services; and senior champion female Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0 owned by Amie Ferguson. Only one of these gorgeous females would be crowned 2013 International Grand Champion Red Female. Douglas discussed the females one last time and then walked to 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1 and slapped April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 25


her as champion. She was not a stranger to this arena; last year she was named 2012 International Reserve Grand Champion Red Female. Next, the reserve grand champion red female was chosen and the honor went to the young calf champion HRW Miss Gabby 52/1. The competition did not get easier as the grey champions entered the arena. In this drive was, calf champion Lady H Alexis Manso 296/2, owned by Heritage Cattle; intermediate champion Ms SS 230, owned by Canik Farms; junior champion Lady H Whitney 101/31, owned by Heritage Cattle; and senior champion Miss V8 382/7, owned by V8 Ranch. As Douglas made his last comments on the quality of these females, he chose the cow/calf pair owned by V8 Ranch from the senior division as the 2013 International Grand Champion Grey Female, followed by MS SS 230, owned by Canik Farms, as the 2013 International Reserve Grand Champion Grey Female. As Friday rolled around and the final day of the 2013 International Brahman Show began, all in attendance anxiously awaited the bull judging. The red division champions were paraded into the ring with calf champion SRS Bernardo 100 owned by Steamer Swaner first. He was followed by the intermediate champion MR TC Royal AG owned by Ken Ramsey. The junior champion, KR Mr Rojo Grande 341, was also owned by Ken Ramsey. The senior champion, Mr TO Ferris 10/4, owned by Heritage Cattle and Oden Ranch rounded out the championship drive. The crowd was silent as Douglas made his final comments. The moment all had been waiting for had finally arrived as he slapped the senior champion, Mr TO Ferris 10/4 as the 2013 International Grand Champion Red Bull. After, Douglas eased over to the calf champion SRS Bernardo 100 and selected him as the 2013 International Reserve Grand Champion Red Bull.

26 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

It was now time for the grey division champion bulls to enter the show ring, and after two days of the fierce competition, only four would compete for the most coveted title of the year. From the calf division was JDH Ripstyk Manso 422/6, owned by J.D. Hudgins, Inc., from the intermediate division was Mr H Barrett 221/1 owned by Heritage Cattle; and the junior division champion was JDH Clanton Manso 313/8, another entry from J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Ending the group was senior champion JDH Gene Manso 177/8, owned by J.D. Hudgins, Inc. who was last year’s international reserve grand champion grey bull. These impressive bulls stood poised to win as Douglas made his way to the senior champion bull, JDH Gene Manso 177/8 and selected him as the 2013 International Grand Champion Grey Bull. For the 2013 International Reserve Grand Champion Grey Bull, he chose the reserve senior champion bull, Mr H Drew Manso 131/1 owned by Heritage Cattle. The animals chosen to lead the way this year were all deserving winners and examples of the dedication to quality that our breeders have become known for worldwide. We as a breed can be proud of each one for their hard work, timeless hours spent working with the cattle, and the excellent care and condition they are presented in at this show. Congratulations to all the winners at the 2013 International Brahman Show. ©TABR


2013 HLSR International Show Class and Division Winners

Red Summer Heifer Calf...........................................HRW Miss Gigi 62/1, Clay Espey Red Late Spring Heifer Calf...................................HRW Miss Gabby 52/1, Clay Espey Red Spring Heifer Calf….............Hootie’s Infinity Marie La Vau 430/12, Emilie Green Red Late Jr. Heifer Calf……..............……......…….Miss Fontenot 217, Taylor Trahan Red Early Jr. Heifer Calf…....................Lady H Starr Rojo 274/2, Rayford McCracken RED CALF CHAMPION HEIFER……..…..................HRW Miss Gabby 52/1, Clay Espey RED RES. CALF CHAMPION HEIFER........Lady H Starr Rojo 274/2, Rayford McCracken Grey Summer Heifer Calf......................................…Miss B-F 310/2, Moreno Ranches Grey Late Spring Heifer Calf...….........…Lady H Emma Manso 288/2, Heritage Cattle Grey Spring Heifer Calf……................…Lady H Alexis Manso 296/2, Heritage Cattle Grey Late Jr. Heifer Calf……......…………..............……....Miss V8 709/7, V8 Ranch Grey Early Jr. Heifer Calf…....LMC Polled Paulette 24/2, Walters Livestock Enterprises GREY CALF CHAMPION HEIFER…............Lady H Alexis Manso 296/2, Heritage Cattle GREY RES. CALF CHAMPION HEIFER…..............…………....Miss V8 709/7, V8 Ranch Red Late Sr. Heifer Calf...…..........…KR Ms Lotto Nancy 361, Ken Ramsey Brahmans Red Early Sr. Calf……...………….RCC Ms Bombshell 192/1, Legacy Cattle Services Red Late Summer Yearling Heifer…................……ASL Raquel 569/1, Steamer Swaner Red Early Summer Yearling Heifer..KR Ms Red Sugarland 334, Ken Ramsey Brahmans RED INT. CHAMPION HEIFER…........RCC Ms Bombshell 192/1, Legacy Cattle Services RED RES. INT. CHAMPION HEIFER………...............ASL Raquel 569/1, Steamer Swaner Grey Late Sr. Heifer Calf…......………….Lady H Holly Manso 256/1, Heritage Cattle Grey Early Sr. Calf………...…..………..Miss Dubina Rose 81/1, Dubina Rose Ranch Grey Late Summer Yearling Heifer….…………..............….Miss RB 551/1, RB Ranch Grey Early Summer Yearling Heifer………..……...................MS SS 230, Canik Farms GREY INT. CHAMPION FEMALE………���….................……..MS SS 230, Canik Farms GREY RES. INT. CHAMPION FEMALE..........Lady H Holly Manso 256/1, Heritage Cattle Red Late Jr. Yearling Heifer……………..….Lady H Hootie’s Rose 205/1, Emilie Green Red Late Jr. Yearling Heifer…………KF Ms IM Irresistable 340, Legacy Cattle Services Red Early Jr. Yearling Heifer………..…...5M Ms Roja Valentine 214/1, Quad M Cattle RED JUNIOR CHAMPION HEIFER…..5M Ms Roja Valentine 214/1, Quad M Cattle RED RES. JUNIOR CHAMPION HEIFER...Lady Hootie’s Rose 205/1, Emilie Green Grey Late Jr. Yearling Heifer……………………..B-F Miss 246/1, Adam Barrilleaux Grey Late Jr. Yearling Heifer………..Lady H Whitney Manso 101/31, Heritage Cattle Grey Early Jr. Yearling Heifer………JDH Lady Emma Manso 471/4, Brandy Barnes GREY JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE.…Lady H Whitney Manso 101/31, Heritage Cattle GREY RES. JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE..JDH Lady Emma Manso 471/4, Brandy Barnes Red Late Sr. Yearling Heifer……………...Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0, Amie Ferguson Red Aged Summer Heifer……………………………TO Ms Daisy 5/10, Oden Ranch Red Aged Spring Heifer………………………..Miss Rosario 116, Ganaderia El Rosario RED SENIOR CHAMPION HEIFER….Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0, Amie Ferguson RED RES. SENIOR CHAMPION HEIFER…….….TO Ms Daisy 5/10, Oden Ranch Grey Late Sr. Yearling Heifer…………………….Miss V8 463/7, V8 Ranch Grey Aged Summer Heifer………………..Lady H Macy Manso 165/0, Heritage Cattle Grey Aged Spring Heifer…………………..................………Miss V8 382/7, V8 Ranch GREY SENIOR CHAMPION FEMALE………………..........…...Miss V8 382/7, V8 Ranch GERY RES. SENIOR CHAMPION FEMALE……...................……Miss V8 463/7, V8 Ranch RED GRAND CHAMPION HEIFER.…5M Ms Roja Valentine 214/1,Quad M Cattle RED RES. GRAND CHAMPION HEIFER.……...HRW Miss Gabby 52/1, Clay Espey GREY GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE………..............................Miss V8 382/7, V8 Ranch GREY RES. GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE…..............................Miss SS 230, Canik Farms GREY NATURAL PRODUCE-OF-DAM…..LD Miss Edie Leblanc 38, Louis Dooley GREY EMBRYO PRODUCE-OF-DAM……….......................…+Miss V8 410/6, V8 Ranch GREY GET-OF-SIRE...............…...+JDH Woodson de Manso 206/7, J.D. Hudgins, Inc.

Red Summer Bull Calf……………...KR Mr Royal Flush 376, Ken Ramsey Brahmans Red Late Spring Bull Calf………..Mr CT Rojeaux Rhineaux 1/12, Circle T Cattle Co. Red Spring Bull Calf……………………………..Infinity’s Ragin Cajin, Emilie Green Red Late JR Bull Calf…………..……....KR Mr Red Bolt 818, Ken Ramsey Brahmans Red Early JR Bull Calf……………….....………..SRS Bernardo 100, Steamer Swaner RED CALF CHAMPION…………………………....SRS Bernardo 100, Steamer Swaner RED RES. CALF CHAMPION...........Mr CT Rojeaux Rhineaux 1/12, Circle T Cattle Co. Grey Summer Bull Calf……………....……………..Mr Silverbelly 79/2, Tic, Tac, Toe Grey Late Spring Bull Calf….………...….Mr H Aldean Manso 304/2, Heritage Cattle Grey Spring Bull Calf…………………...........………….Mr CF 111, Taylor Clement Grey Late Jr. Bull Calf…………………….................………Mr V8 306/7, V8 Ranch Grey Early Jr. Bull Calf………………..……..JDH Ripstyk Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. GREY CALF CHAMPION……...……………...JDH Ripstyk Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. GREY RES. CALF CHAMPION…….......….Mr H Aldean Manso 304/2, Heritage Cattle Red Late SR Bull Calf…………... Mr K-Bar Magnum Cash 10, Legacy Cattle Service Red Early SR Bull Calf………………………...............….Mr TO 18/11, Oden Ranch Red Late Summer Yearling Bull Calf........JH Millionaire By Male 128/1, Harry Johnson Red Early Summer Yearling Bull Calf….........Mr TC Royal AG, Ken Ramsey Brahmans RED INT. CHAMPION…………….....……………..….Mr TC Royal AG, Ken Ramsey RED RES. INT. CHAMPION..................................................Mr TO 18/11, Oden Ranch Grey Late Sr. Bull Calf………….................…………………Mr V8 259/7, V8 Ranch Grey Early Sr. Bull Calf…………….........JDH Sir Antonio Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Grey Late Summer Yr. Bull Calf...JDH Mr Goudeau Manso 240/0, JDH Goudeau Div. Grey Early Summer Yearling Bull Calf...…..Mr H Barrett Manso 221/1, Heritage Cattle GREY INT. CHAMPION………............…..Mr H Barrett Manso 221/1, Heritage Cattle GREY RES. INT. CHAMPION.................................................... Mr V8 259/7, V8 Ranch Red Late Jr. Yearling Bull Calf……………..........DF Mr Corbyn Lotto, Morgan Sharp Red Late Jr. Yearling Bull Calf….......KR Ms Rojo Grande 341, Ken Ramsey Brahmans Red Early Jr. Yearling Bull Calf..............…….Mr Hampton Rojo 201/1, Brandy Barnes RED JUNIOR CHAMPION…..............KR Ms Rojo Grande 341, Ken Ramsey Brahmans RED RES. JUNIOR CHAMPION..................DF Mr Corbyn Lotto, Legacy Cattle Services Grey Late Jr. Yearling Bull Calf……………....................…….Mr V8 191/7, V8 Ranch Grey Late Jr. Yearling Bull Calf………….JDH Clanton De Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Grey Early Jr. Yearling Bull Calf…….……Mr H Bogota Manso 253/1, Heritage Cattle GREY JUNIOR CHAMPION……....………JDH Clanton De Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. GREY RES. JUNIOR CHAMPION…….......…........................….Mr V8 191/7, V8 Ranch Red Late Sr. Yearling Bull Calf...........................5M King Tut 697/0, Matthew Madden Red Aged Summer Bull Calf…...……Mr TO Ferris 10/4, Heritage Cattle/Oden Ranch Red Aged Spring Bull Calf………................…...Mr HVR 0/865, Happy Valley Ranch RED SENIOR CHAMPION…...............Mr TO Ferris 10/4, Heritage Cattle/Oden Ranch RED RES. SENIOR CHAMPION.….......................5M King Tut 697/0, Matthew Madden Grey Late Sr. Yearling Bull Calf………...........JDH Domino Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Grey Aged Summer Bull Calf……..…….JDH Sir Bradford Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Grey Aged Spring Bull Calf…………….………JDH Gene Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. GREY SENIOR CHAMPION……………..………JDH Gene Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. GREY RES. SENIOR CHAMPION………........Mr H Drew Manso 131/1, Heritage Cattle RED GRAND CHAMPION BULL……................……Mr TO Ferris 10/4, Heritage Cattle RED RES. GRAND CHAMPION BULL............................SRS Bernardo 100, Steamer Swaner GREY GRAND CHAMPION BULL……………..JDH Gene Manso, J.D. Hudgins, Inc. GREY RES. GRAND CHAMPION BULL………Mr H Drew Manso 131/1, Heritage Cattle RED NATURAL PRODUCE-OF-DAM….........................+ Miss HVR 6/860, Oden Ranch RED EMBRYO-PRODUCE-OF-DAM............Miss JL Fontenot 240, Ken Ramsey Brahmans RED GET- OF- SIRE…………...............……………Mr CC Sultan 411/8, Oden Ranch

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 27


Grand Champion Red Female 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1 Exhibited by Quad M Cattle/Legacy Cattle Services

Grand Champion Red Bull Mr TO Ferris 10/4 Exhibited by Heritage Cattle/Oden Ranch

Grand Champion Grey Female Miss V8 382/7 Exhibited by V8 Ranch

Grand Champion Grey Bull 28 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013

JDH Gene Manso 177/8 Exhibited by J.D. Hudgins, Inc.


JDH Mr. Kenny Manso +JDH SIR LIBERTY MANSO (847/5) B 747549

JDH MR. ECHO MANSO (237/1) B 830355 =JDH MADDIE REM MANSO 28 (28/1) C 776603 JDH SINBAD MANSO (173/3) B 726806

JDH HENRIETTA MANSO (58/1) C 785536 JDH BHAGNARI MANSO (827) C 717889

ble ic ila st va e A om en & D em n S g rei Fo

El Salinas Ranch Mission, TX

Home to some of the world’s finest Red & Grey American Brahman cattle. Whether looking for bulls to fill your registered needs or produce F1 females, we always have a great selection available. Give us a call or visit our website at:

www.elsalinasranch.com

Beto Salinas - Owner Cell: (956)240-5656 Office: (956)584-5555 Email: info@elsalinasranch.com

Raul Benavides - Ranch Manager Cell: (956)467-9724 Email: Raul@elsalinasranch.com April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 29


Reserve Grand Champion Red Bull SRS Bernardo 100 Exhibited by Swaner Brahmans

Reserve Grand Champion Red Female HRW Miss Gabby 52/1 Exhibited by Clay Espey

Reserve Grand Champion Grey Bull Mr H Drew Manso 131/0 Exhibited by Heritage Cattle

Reserve Grand Champion Grey Female MS SS 230 Exhibited by Canik Farms 30 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013


April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 31


32 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013


April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 33


Lunch with Chris Shivers

Executive Vice President Report

Chris Shivers discusses the recent HLSR events and F1 Sales.

Ashley: What are your thoughts on the recent HLSR International Brahman Show?

Chris: If you missed this year’s event you missed a

great one. We had one of the highest quality shows ever and this was noticed by most in attendance. You as breeders are to be complimented for the great strides you have made in improving the cattle. To conclude this event report I cannot fail to mention the great Annual Membership Meeting that we had. This was one of the most well attended meetings we’ve had in several years and we appreciate each of you who attended and congratulate those who were recognized for your achievements. In summary, the 2013 International Brahman Show & Sale was a huge success and set a positive tone for the upcoming year.

Ashley: What can you report about the

International Brahman Sale? Chris: In addition to the great show we had another record setting sale with an average of $14,100. Each year it seems that we are able to break the previous year’s record and this is due to the outstanding consignments and the continued demand for these cattle. We greatly appreciate both the consignors and buyers for making this a record-breaking sale. Not only was the sale great, but this enthusiasm carried over to the stalls where a number of cattle were sold both domestically and foreign. From all accounts there was a lot of enthusiasm and transaction of business during the week’s activities. 34 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

Ashley: How have the high selling Brahman F1s at recent stock show sales impacted the industry?

Chris: Not only has the past month been positive

for the registered cattle but also for the F1 & F1 Plus cattle. I reported last month that during the month of February these cattle had topped several sales bringing over $200 more per head to non-program cattle and other breed crosses and this trend has continued. This further shows that producers are willing to pay more for known genetics due to them knowing the superiority of these animals. We have done an outstanding job of promoting our F1 program and should see it continue to grow and gain popularity. We have been discussing for the past year that this would come to fruition and with the recent rains providing forage, producers looking to restock, and them demanding the attributes that the Brahman cattle provide the time is now.


TABR is excited to announce our hire of Brooke Prather as our new intern. We couldn’t be more excited! With our new and expanded issues, we discussed hiring an intern to help out behind the scenes. But Brooke has not been behind the scenes exactly; you may have seen her at the ABBA National F1 and Brahman female sale on March 16. Brooke was there taking pictures, updating Facebook, and reporting on the day’s events. We were thrilled to have her debut as our intern at the greatest F1 sale in the country. In the few weeks that Brooke has been working with us, she has shown initiative, drive, and enthusiasm. We are excited to work with her over the next six months. Look for her at future events and this summer as we travel around the Brahman world! Now, here’s a few words from Brooke:

It is pretty safe to say that I was born with a show stick in my hand; since I was three months old, I have been in or around the show ring. Growing up, I was very involved in the Louisiana Junior Brahman Association and the American Junior Brahman Association. I participated in every event possible from photography to the public speaking contest even having the opportunity to spend the summer of 2011 in Australia representing the ABBA. The experiences I have Words cannot express my excitement to represent The gained throughout my years in the junior associations American Brahman Review®. First of all, I would like made me the person that I am today. to thank Ashley Patterson, Mr. Milton and Mrs. Yvonne Currently, I am a junior at Louisiana State University Charanza, as well as the rest of The American Brahman studying Agricultural Leadership and Communications. Review team for giving me this great opportunity. Upon graduation from LSU, I plan to attend Oklahoma For those of you who may not know me, I was raised State University to obtain a Master’s Degree in on a cattle and forage operation in south Louisiana. My Agriculture Communications. I have a passion for parents, Burton and Cindy Prather, started our operation photography and have never met a stranger. With that in 1990 with registered Grey Brahmans they purchased being said, I look forward to meeting and working with from Dr. LeBlanc. TCB Ranch is where my brother each and every one of you! James and I call home and the reason I developed a love -Brooke Prather for those long eared, hump-backed cattle. April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 35


Commercial World

News from the commercial world By J.D. “Bubba” Sartwelle, Jr.

In the last issue we visited about obligations that we have as producers and being knowledgeable of the market for which we produce. Obviously we must produce for the folks that use our seed-stock genetics and they in turn must produce for the ultimate consumers of beef. We are all part of the cattle “supply chain”. In this dynamic world of food production, the consumer demands “wholesome and safe” foods and wants to know where it comes from. The beef complex does not escape the scrutiny of consumers and those in the supply chain. Coupled with the demands of “wholesome and safe” by consumers is the “added demands” that production animal agriculture is humane in the treatment of animals. Demands by some for humane treatment of animals has given rise to the “animal rights” movement which is not to be confused with what most of us in animal production believe as “animal welfare”. We all believe that humane treatment of animals is in the best interest of the animal and those who produce them. The goal of radical groups in the animal rights category is the elimination of animals in the food chain. Most of us realize that in some cases there is mistreatment of animals in our production schemes and abhor the fact that there are some among us who do such things. There seems to be no shortage of those who want to expose such treatment and will until WE quit becoming an easy target; we must change our ways if we haven’t already. Right or wrong there are suppliers, as well as retailers and consumers, who are demanding certain production criteria in our meat animals. In order to maintain the confidence of consumers, the industry has begun to address these issues. Years ago, the Beef Quality Audits pushed by the industry led us in the right direction as there were

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J.D. “Bubba” Sartwelle, Jr. of Sealy, Texas, is a long-time Brahman breeder, marketman, and commercial cattleman

several practices that we as producers were doing that affected beef product quality and value. Injection site lesions, bruises, and even lead shot in animals were detracting from product profitability. This early work led to industry interventions that have become common place for some and need to be for the rest of us. The early work of Dr. Temple Grandin, The Beef Quality Assurance programs that have spread to every state, the Beef Cattle Institute at KSU, have all made us aware of the need for the entire industry to do a better job. Proper training of animal handling practices has spread to our livestock auction markets and the trucking industry and needs to be in our minds also. We must examine even the smallest, most mundane things that we do. When we work our cattle, when we haul down the road, we need to do it as if a camera is at our back. Quite literally there is with every one packing a cell phone. Examine your handling practices, it might even lead to the production of gentler, quieter Brahman cattle. ©TABR


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Doctor’s Orders

Advice from a veterinarian By Dr. Don Goodman

A Herd Health Vaccination Protocol: Part I “Hey Doc! I want to start a herd health protocol. What do I use to vaccinate my herd?” As a bovine practitioner this question is asked most frequently from beef cattle producers. The conversation then continues, “Doc just give me what I need. My helpers, little Johnny and his roommates, are out on spring break from Texas A&M and want to help.” Before I can give this secret recipe for optimal herd health, there are a few boring but important issues we (beef producers and local veterinarians) must address before you reach for the vaccine. We must all agree that it is more profitable to prevent problems than to correct problems. First we must not treat vaccinating as shooting silver bullets into the herd and expecting complete immunization or disease protection without taking into consideration other factors. I define vaccination as the physical act of injecting a vaccine, an antigen, such as Clostridium Chauvoei, commonly known as blackleg, into the subcutaneous tissue of a calf ’s neck.

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A good analogy of vaccination is for you to draw 5 mls (milliliters) of blackleg into a syringe and inject this into a watermelon. Yes, the watermelon is vaccinated but is the watermelon immunized? Does it have protection against blackleg disease? Of course NOT! The following are some important factors you MUST know before you reach for the vaccine. Considerations for optimal immunization: 1) Vaccine Handling: Contrary to belief, a dashboard is not a refrigerator for your vaccine. Only purchase and receive vaccine that is cooled at the proper label temperature and maintained at that temperature. Know that a MLV (modified live vaccine) is useless after one hour post mixture. Disinfectant in your syringe will inactivate a MLV (modified live vaccine). Try to minimize UV light in these fragile MLV products. Another tip is to never vigorously shake your vaccine as this dissolves the particles and causes acute inflammation and swelling at the injection site. 2) Please read the label: On most USDA approved vaccines, the first sentence will inform you “Approved for the immunization of healthy cattle”. The next line typically informs of the proper dosage and route, usually SQ (subcutaneous) in the neck. Remember to include BQA (Beef Quality Assurances) practices in your vaccination practices. 3) Placement of vaccine: In addition to the proper route SQ or IM (intramuscular), vaccines should be placed at least a hands width apart. If you are using an injectable dewormer try to place it on the opposite side of the calf. The dewormer can cause inflammation and render your vaccine useless if placed too close to the vaccination site. 4) Proper vaccine: There are basically two types of vaccines, MLV (modified live vaccine) and killed. Each having both pros and cons, there is a place for each in optimal immunization. I will attempt to address this subject, MLV versus Killed and what is best for your


unique herd situation in future articles. 5) Timing of vaccine: Studies show that optimal protection occurs approximately one month after vaccination. For example, Trichomonas vaccine needs to be given at least one month prior to bull turnout with cows. 6) Nutrition: A cow with a poor BSE (body score condition) will not confer immunity from a vaccine. Make sure you have adequate trace mineral supplementation: zinc, copper, iron, etc. in addition to the major minerals: calcium, phosphorus and salt. 7) Biosecurity: This involves the use of contained management practices designed to prevent the introduction of disease to a premise. No disease limiting vaccination program will work without a good biosecurity program in place. Yes Sir, most diseases are bought and paid for before you realize you have a problem in your herd. A minimal biosecurity program should include a. Quarantine new purchases at least 30 days from purchase to the mother herd. No nose to nose contact. b. An identification system should be in place to track new purchases.

c. Do not purchase or transfer bulls from other farms without a trich test. d. Limit purchases to open heifers. e. Screen by testing for BVD-PI animals by means of skin ear notch or serum test, a simple procedure that can be performed on any age animal. f. Screen by testing for Johne’s disease-a serum test that is less reliable in younger animals versus older cows because of its long incubation period. So before you have the expense of vaccines and labor costs, ask yourself are you just vaccinating watermelons or properly immunizing your herd against the pathogens of importance in your unique operation. Unfortunately, the second most frequently asked question is “Why do I have this disease, I vaccinated against it?” Now you know the answer. Part II of this article in the next issue will address the diseases or pathogens that are included in a herd health program. Until next time, Doc Dr. Don Goodman is a large animal practitioner in Navasota, Texas, serving Grimes and surrounding counties for more than 30 years. He is co-owner of Beard-Navasota Veterinary Hospital.

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The Run Down

An excerpt on agricultural issues By Jimmy Sartwelle

Be an ambassador for YOUR breed

The day before we headed to Houston for our eight-year old son JD’s first time participating in the junior breeding beef show, we received a call from a reporter at the Houston Chronicle. The reporter had been tipped off by Allyson Tjoelker with HLSR that JD would be showing a heifer, and as the great-great grandson of the show’s founder, it might be a good subject of a feature article. Long story short, after two days of “embedding” with us, Chronicle reporter Anita Hassan and photographer Johnny Hanson produced an amazing article that was printed on the front page of the Saturday, March 9, newspaper. After the initial thrill of opening the paper and seeing a photo of JD sprawled out on top of his resting Brahman heifer subsided, I got to wondering what this experience really meant to the breed and to our industry. First off, all of us who breed these great cattle explain on a regular basis to the uninfomed that they are not wild, rodeo stock. We can explain over and over that they are alert, respond well to good, quiet treatment, and are no less docile than most other breeds. But a photograph is truly worth a thousand words, and the front-page photo that day communicated more than words can convey. There’s no small amount of trepidation in turning an eight-year old loose with a reporter for hours on end, wondering exactly what he’s communicating. You question what he knows, then you remember he is only eight--he doesn’t know much that his family hasn’t taught to him. We read the article and were extremely proud that he could not only relate the story of him and his heifer, but he understands the role of heat-tolerant, insect- and disease-resistant cattle on the Gulf Coast and beyond. He knows his family history and came across well in print. I’ve preached to cattlemen across the country for years about the importance of good handling practices, 42 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

Jimmy Sartwelle, III, of Robinson, Texas, is a public policy specialist for Texas Farm Bureau

using a line about “working your cattle like 60 Minutes was filming you.” That got brought soundly home when Johnny arrived to photograph JD’s preparation of his heifer for show. Certainly we weren’t branding, dehorning, castrating, or any other of our essential beef production practices that look far more stressful on the animals than they actually are. But as an object lesson, presenting what we do as both a wholesome family activity and responsible animal husbandry was a once-ina-blue-moon opportunity that was capitalized upon. In grassroots public policy work, we talk about the “elevator speech.” Often when relating your side of an issue to an elected official, you get no more time than the minute it takes to walk with them from their office to the elevator. You have to know your stuff and be sufficiently thought out ahead of time to make the most of your brief opportunity. It is a great skill for cattlemen to possess, too. Learn more about your breed, learn more about your industry and how your cattle fit, and be ready to make the most of your opportunity to be an ambassador for your fellow breeders. ©TABR


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Workin’ Overtime

From the desk of... Milton E. Charanza, Jr.

WOW! What a month. The Houston International Brahman Show has come and gone – but like always it was a fabulous event. The excitement for this great breed of cattle was at a fevered pitch. As usual the best of the best is at Houston and this was validated at the International Brahman Sale with a record sale average of $14,375.00. The prices were consistently high and the crowd was awesome. Prices for Brahman F1’s have been phenomenal this spring but at Houston the factory ruled supreme. Our Brahman cattle are second to none in the world and that was proven at the International Sale. The cattle judging was in the capable hands of Jary Douglas and he commented on numerous occasions on the outstanding quality of the cattle. The huge crowd on hand must have appreciated the manner in which he sorted through the cattle and his excellent reasons on the placings. The Rio Grande Valley had the spotlight for a few days and did they put on a show! The show in Mercedes has really been growing in the past few years and 2013 was no exception. The Brahman show was excellent like always and in the capable hands of Judge Jim Sanders of Texas A&M University. However, this year the eyes were on the Valley with their first ever Brahman steer show. It was a huge success. Look further in this issue to find complete coverage of the show. The sales are rolling on and the Brahman is regaining its rightful place as the dominate breed in the commercial cattle industry. A huge crowd always helps the success and the enthusiasm of an event. This issue focuses on cattle handling and facilities and I cannot think of a more appropriate topic for the spring. Our team has put together a really nice feature about this topic. I must mention the unbelievable help we received from Dr. Temple Grandin from Colorado State University. Dr. Grandin is a renowned expert in this field and we really appreciate how accessible she was and the tons of material she made available for this issue. 44 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

On a side note how could you address this topic without discussing temperament? For years this has been a negative connotation when anyone talked about Brahman and Brahman cross cattle. This is not necessarily true anymore. Breeders who are serious about their program are addressing the issue. The research committee is planning to emphasize this through collection of data for the ABBA BHIR program. As a sales manager dealing with mostly Brahman cattle for the past 12 years I can tell you that a calm temperament can add hundreds if not thousands of dollars to your animal. A docility EPD will be one of the most progressive and valuable tool this breed an embrace. Remember our May issue will focus on polled genetics and our combined June/July feature will be on Juniors and the importance of this segment of the industry. The American Brahman Review will be there. Will you? Gig ‘em. Milton


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E

veryday millions of head of cattle in the United States alone are gathered, moved, sorted, placed in pens, put through working chutes and transported. This has been done since the big cattle drives of the 1800s. While many aspects of these daily chores remain somewhat the same, there has been a strong movement recently in the beef industry to move toward low-stress handling and using facilities designed from a cow’s point of view.

A New Perspective

This new way of thinking has evolved largely because of research and the work of Temple Grandin, Ph.D, a professor of animal science at Colorado State University. Grandin’s handling methods and facility designs are now in use in over half the meat plants in North America and on ranches across the country. Her life and work were also documented in a very successful movie in 2010. Numerous studies, including National Beef Quality Audits, have proven time after time that stress compromises an animal’s health, can lead to injury for the animal and sometimes the cowman and that cattle that remain calm during handling have improved weight gain and are less likely to have dark cutting meat. John Coleman Locke with the Locke Division of J. D. Hudgins, Hungerford, Texas, said, “Animal friendly facilities can benefit Brahman-influenced cattle in feedlots by reducing the stress on them during processing or doctoring. As stress goes up, gains, efficiency and good animal health go down.” In addition, low-stress handling and cattle friendly facilities offer advantages to purebred breeders as they work their cattle.

around me when I am not asking for movement,” explained Detering. He went on to say that “low-stress handling is being cultivated by more and more ranchers for one basic reason: reduced stress on cattle translates into more profit” and he offers the following principles when it comes to working cattle: 1. Work with the fearful and social nature of cattle, not against it. 2. Set things up to make what you want easy and other choices difficult. 3. Break down teaching into as many “baby steps” as required. 4. Use “pressure and release” for movement in a way that slowly increases pressure on cattle and releases it quickly once they comply. 5. Work calmly back and forth across the line of their flight zone, so cattle pay attention to you and start a search for a way out of your pressure. Detering realizes that these principles ask the handler to reject the natural instinct to chase and subdue the animal. The cowman is challenged to take on a patient and sympathetic role that has the ability to discipline, but not punish the cattle. “In trying to convince cattle that they can be relaxed and cooperative in our presence. We should always remember they are fundamentally migratory, herd-

Handling Advice

Herman Detering, Detering Piney Creek Farm, in Bellville, Texas, has taken the skill sets he learned from training horses and courses from Bud Williams stockmanship classes to become quite an expert on cattle handling methods. Williams, who is now deceased, was widely recognized for decades as a trailblazer in the methods used for livestock handling. “The handling goal I pursue with my cattle is for them to have essentially no flight zone in my presence. I want them to view me in a positive way and look to me for direction. I want them to respect my requests for movement, but not fear me. I would like them to be able to move calmly away from me, as well as to be relaxed

The flight zone, an important principal for working livestock, is the area within an animal’s flight distance that will cause alarm and escape behavior when entered. If a person enters the flight zone of an animal, the animal will move away.


oriented, prey animals. This means that they are not desired results using as little pressure as possible. Locke territorial and become aggressive only as a matter of advised to be educated on flight zones and pressure and defense or reproduction. They are naturally afraid of us, release. search for a leader, and rely on freedom of movement to “The most common mistakes I see with cattle insure their survival,” said Detering. handling are too much pressure, applied too quickly, “The gentling program I use relies heavily on control for too long, and putting as many cattle as will fit in a of movement. By this crowding pen-instead I do not mean control of putting only as through confining many animals as will cattle in a small pen fit in the alley and or by tying them up,” chute in the crowding said Detering. “What pen,” he explained. I do is work with them in an area where Facilities they are free to move The primary set of in any direction and pens at the Hudginsthen position myself Locke Division to influence their operation are arranged choice with my body in a rectangular language.” fashion that take When using these advantage of an tactics, Detering animal’s willingness to Herman Detering uses a gentling technique that relies on essentially gives return to the general controlling movement of the animals. the cattle time to direction they came make choices free of originally. pressure. “At every “The general idea of stage of gentling, our pens is that after they are encouraged cattle enter a trap or to make choices and pen, the entrance to are given time, free of the next pen is near pressure, to process the where the cattle just consequences of their entered. That way, decisions,”he said. cattle enter, then Locke said, “My turn and move back advice for cattlemen towards where they in regards to cattle came from, which is a handling is first and natural reaction.” foremost, pay attention. He went on to Always pay attention say that, “The most to what reactions the Working pens at J.D. Hudgins integral part of our animals seem to have to working pens is the what you are doing. Be prepared to change what you are lead-up to the race (or alley) that leads to the chute. This doing, if you aren’t seeing the desired result. If almost area is often called a crowding pen. It is very simple, every animal is balking in the pens and not wanting to but I think it makes the difference between being able to go in the chute, you have a problem. Change something. effectively move cattle through the pens and constantly Good handling doesn’t start when the cattle get to the being frustrated by cattle balking. Our entrance to the pens, good handling starts in the pasture when the cattle race is rectangular, and not a funnel shape like most. are being gathered. In my experience, funnel shaped crowding pens often He continued to explain that too many people think intensify the pressure on cattle and cause them to balk about the act of herding cattle rather than getting the 50 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013


The New Way To Market

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and circle in the entrance to the race. The rectangular should be highly desired by cattlemen. Good facilities crowding pen in my opinion allows cattle to more make our job of caring for the welfare of our animals comfortably move into the race. My favorite style easier. Also, not only do the animals benefit, but the of “crowding” pen is the Bud Box, designed by Bud people benefit from a lower level of stress.” Williams,” said Locke. Detering suggests that no matter what type of pen Grandin Facilities set-up is being used, to always use it in a way that Sexing Technologies, Navasota, Texas, turned to Dr. accommodates the natural inclinations of cattle. Cattle Temple Grandin, who is recognized world wide as prefer to follow other members of the herd and feel an expert in cattle behavior and handling, for advice comfortable when they are able to move and keep an eye in designing their on the handler. processing facilities Cattle will “line for their Genetic out” when they are Developing Center. relaxed, but “bunch These facilities were up” for safety when unveiled in July 2012. under stress. Pay Sexing attention to the Technologies’ actions of your herd Gustavo Toro to know how your explained, “Our presence is being facilities are designed interpreted. to have the animal Working with constantly moving in cattle requires a the natural direction. “teaching” frame of The circular pens we mind according to use keep the flow of Detering. the animals going in Locke suggests that an efficient manner. even though handling This lowers the stress practices shouldn’t levels, which has been differ between proven to increase different breeds of results and efficiency cattle, the fact that in cattle. Brahman cattle are The transfer and more intelligent, ET labs at Sexing use presents advantages. a lot of the principles “The difference recommended by Dr. is, Brahman Grandin, explained influenced cattle are Toro. One of those more “sensitive” to recommendations is improper handling the use of a silencer and poor corral chute and most of design. Brahman The facilities at Sexing Technologies in Navasota, Texas, were designed the equipment runs cattle are more by Temple Grandin, Ph.D., the leading scientist in the field of animal on hydraulics and intelligent than other behavior and livestock handling. remote controls. breeds. The Brahman This decreases the intelligence can also amount of yelling in be used to your advantage, as they are easy to train and the facility, which again reduces the stress levels on the respond to good handling practices,” Locke said adding, cattle. “A well designed set of working pens, and in my opinion “We receive a lot of positive comments from one that utilizes the principles of the Bud Box design, 52 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013


customers about their animals’ behavior once they have been here. Many comment that they find their animals more calm and tamer after being here in our facilities and handled according to Dr. Grandin’s research,” said Toro. “It is the use of our improved facilities that help with the flow of the animal and results in easier handling animals, because they have been handled in an appropriate way. Like in any other company, safety is first for us and all our equipment is safe for animals and for the people that work with the animals. We are always looking out for each animal’s comfort and well-being.”

Keep Calm

Less or none is better when it comes to yelling and whistling, according to animal behavior experts. Also cattlemen are urged to change their approach as poking, hitting or prodding cattle is counter productive to an animal’s health and has become a very huge target of animal rights groups. Consumers remain interested in safety and taste, but have become very concerned that animals are not mistreated or abused in the processes. Dr. Ron Gill, with Texas AgriLife Extension regularly holds clinics on cattle handling and proper facilities. He was a speaker on this topic at the 2012 Beef Improvement Federation Conference, hosted by the ABBA and at the 2013 Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course. In his presentation at Texas A&M, Gill noted that cattle are not mind readers. You have to teach, condition and prepare them. Unfortunately, today’s cattle owners are short on time and experienced labor, and consequently, don’t spend time with their cattle, as did the stockmen of days gone by. Perhaps there’s not time to educate the entire existing herd, but quality time spent with replacement heifers will pay dividends for years to come, according to Gill. In closing, it’s important to remember that facilities and low stress handling methods are all about improving animal performance and increasing profits on each operation, while maintaining high quality care of each animal. See more information and illustrations on pages 56-57. ©TABR

We’ve just scratched the surface of this topic and there are a number of sources available on handling techniques, facilities and related subjects. Following is a short reference list; many of these sites contain multiple articles, videos and DVDs. www.grandin.com Animal behavior, restraining systems, facility designs, and animal welfare and rights information. http://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/ Search “cattle handling” to find a number of articles covering a broad range of stockmanship topics. http://vimeo.com/60566063 A 40 minute video of Herman Detering explaining more in depth the practices he uses to handle his cattle. As Dr. Grandin said, “This video is essential for all people who work with Brahman, Zebu or Nelore cattle.” www.stockmanship.com Bud Williams site www.ranchtv.org AgriLife Extension site that is a virtual video library, designed to teach beef cattle producers the best management practices for beef quality. Many videos on effective stockmanship are included. http://www.bifconference.com/bif2012/summaries/ RonGillonStressFeeCattleHandling.htm Summary of Ron Gill’s presentation at the 2012 Beef Improvement Federation Conference April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 53


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Handling Facility Layout Rules

Curved cattle chutes are more efficient for handling cattle because they take advantage of the natural behavior of cattle. Cattle move through curved races more easily because they have a natural tendency to go back to where they came from.

The Basics

• The most important thing you should always remember when handling cattle in any way, is to start with the absolute minimum amount of pressure that may be required and work up from there until the desired result is achieved. • When approaching an animal or a group of cattle, Curved cattle pens facilitate efficient handling. observe their reactions to your movements very early Photo by Temple Grandin. on. An animal’s movement and direction can usually 1. The crowd pen must always be level. be influenced from much further away than people 2. If the system includes a ramp, it should be located think. within the single file chute. An animal standing in the • If animals are not cooperative, stop and assess crowd pen must be able to see 2 to 3 body lengths up the situation. Try to determine what can be done the single file chute before it curves. This will facilitate differently. entry into the chute. • Be mindful of angles when moving groups of animals in the open. Most people that have been around cattle their whole lives don’t know that the most effective way to stop a herd is to angle away from the lead and not towards it. • If a hotshot is needed as a last resort to move an animal forward, a small shock directly on top of the tailhead is the most effective way to encourage forward movement with less chance of kicking or backing up. If a hotshot is needed to back an animal up, a light shock on the tip of the nose is effective. If you have to use a hotshot more than 5% of the Entrance to chute from crowd pen. Photo by Temple Grandin. time, you are doing something wrong. 56 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013


Quiet handling of cattle is impossible if animals slip or chute is to show the animal there is a place to go but conceal the people who are standing around the squeeze fall during handling. Animals tend to panic if they slip chute. even a little bit. The photo below shows a non-slip metal floor grating for use in high traffic areas for beef cattle. It is recommended for cattle scales, stunning boxes, crowd pens and the area in front of a squeeze chute. To prevent damage to the hooves, the bars must be welded so that the grid lies flat. Do not cross the bars on top of each other. Use heavy steel rods.

Figure 1. Illustration by Temple Grandin.

Example of non-slip floor. Photo by Temple Grandin

3 Basic Problems with crowd pens and chutes:

Fixing crowded, poorly designed systems isn’t impossible. In fact, there are usually three basic causes of problems in crowd pens and chutes: 1. Distractions, such as a chain hanging down in the chute entrance, that cause balking, 2. Poor handling methods, like overloading the crowd pen with too many cattle, and 3. Layout mistakes in the crowd pen and chute. A curved chute works more efficiently than a straight one because it prevents cattle from seeing people and other activities at the end of the chute. A round crowd pen will work better than a straight crowd pen because, as cattle go around a 180° turn, they think they are going back to where they came from (see Figures 1). The most common mistake is the straight-through layout shown in Figure 2. The advantage of a round crowd pen is lost when cattle move straight through it. When cattle go around the bend as shown in Figure 1, it takes advantage of their natural behavior. Cattle want to go back to where they came from. The principle of a well-designed curved single file

Figure 2. Illustration by Temple Grandin.

Layout Mistakes and Tips:

The most common design mistake is dead-ending the curved single file chute. This occurs when the chute is bent too sharply where it joins the crowd pen. An animal standing in the crowd pen must be able to see a minimum of two body lengths up the chute before it turns. When cattle enter the crowd pen, they should move easily into the single file chute. If the animals balk, either eliminate distractions (such as a closed one-way antibackup gate) or change where people stand. The number one rule is never overload the crowd pen. Cattle need room to turn. Fill the crowd pen less than half full. Another common mistake is building facilities that are too small and cramped. This is done to make them fit inside a building. Unfortunately, many of these facilities work poorly. A system that is designed perfectly will not work if the chute entrance is too dark.

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C

attleman from across the southern United States traveled to the small town of Caldwell, Texas, on March 16, 2013, for a chance to purchase the queens of cow country and top quality Brahman females. The 26th Annual ABBA National F1 and TBA Brahman Female Sale was again a success for buyers and consignors, with the Brahman breed showcasing one of its strengths in the F1 female. A standing room only crowd was on hand to see Colonel Leo Casas sell one of the most impressive sets of F1 and Brahman cattle ever offered. The F1 females were judged this year by three 58 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013

H&M Cattle: Champion Pairs

John Malazzo Farms: Champion Exposed

well respected cattlemen, Drew Hubert, Murphy Moriarty, and Jacob Tipp. The three cattlemen are well versed in the strengths and attributes of this great female; this expertise was evident in their picks. The set of champion pairs were consigned by H&M Cattle from Wharton, Texas. These 6 impressive 34-38 month old Golden Certified BxH females with Angus sired calves at side were all bred back. They sold for $3,450 each. Other pairs receiving blue ribbon recognition were a set of Golden Certified BxH females with Gelvbeih calves at side consigned by Pratt Farms of Maricopa, Arizona. Continued on page 62


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Continued from page 58

Champion exposed F1 Champion and blue females, a set of 5 Certified ribbon winners received BxH 15-16 month-olds, were more than $5,000 in consigned by John Malazzo prize money in addition Farms of Caldwell, Texas. to the premium prices This fancy set of females sold they received for their for $3,250 each. Blue ribbon consignments. The top three awards were also given for 2 volume buyers received more pens of John Malazzo prizes from Elanco. John Malazzo Farms: Champion Open Farms consignments. The TBA Brahman In the open F1 division, portion of the sale was well the champion pen of 12-13 month-old females was also represented. A premium set of Brahman females were consigned by John Malazzo Farms and commanded a offered, and considering the prices, the buyers must have bid of $2,200 each. been impressed. This was without question the best set Blue ribbons in the open division were also awarded to of Brahmans offered in a few years. a set of BxG females from Pratt Farms along with Bruce Some of the top sellers were four head, all selling for Alford Cattle Company and Alford Cattle Company $4,000. Two of these females were a pair of 5-6 yearwho won a blue ribbon for their consignments of old bred cows consigned by Bailey Brahmans, and a set Golden Certified BxA pen of heifers. of full sisters from Dubina Rose Ranch Ltd. These 19 This year the F1 Plus month-old females were a division was exciting because crowd favorite. of the excellent quality of A 5 year-old cow the progeny out of Golden from Frazier Brahmans Certified or Certified F1 commanded an awarding females and sired by a bid of $3,700. Baileys registered beef bull. The Brahmans sold a set of 3 competition was tough year-old half sisters that were and champion honors heavy bred for $3,700 each. were awarded to Alford The volume Brahman Cattle Company with a set female buyer was James Alford Cattle Company: Champion F1 Plus of ¼ Brahman ¾ Angus Bozeman from ETTA Cattle females that rang up a price of $1,500 each. Another Company of Malvern, Arkansas. He will receive a pair consignment from Alford Cattle Company was awarded of Anderson Bean stock boots that can be redeemed at a blue ribbon. South Texas Tack in Brenham, Texas. The high selling female was a single entry consigned The sale was managed by Broken Triangle Cattle and by H&M Cattle Company in Wharton, Texas. This Caldwell Livestock Commission and was sponsored by Golden Certified BxH pair sold for $5,000 as the gavel the ABBA and the TBA. The major gold sponsors were pounded the counter. Diamond H Cattle of Brenham, Capital Farm Credit and Producers Cooperative. The Texas, consigned the high selling group of 5 pairs, a set sale also had 18 silver sponsors and 30 ranch sponsors. of 26 month-old BxH cows This was a great event with Angus calves at side for the breed and without that sold for $3,500 each. question further emphasizes The high selling exposed the importance of Brahman heifers were consigned by genetics in the beef industry. John Malazzo Farms. This A sincere thank you goes out pen of five 16-17 monthto the buyers, consignors, old Certified BxH females bidders, workers, and exposed to an Angus bull everyone else who made the since February 1, 2013, sale a success. This year’s sale was dedicated to the late Gary Hartman. Above, brought $3,450. ©TABR

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his wife, Dianne, and family receiving the honor.


Do you know someone who’s temperamental? What about an animal? Amazingly, cattle can be temperamental too, which influences how they should be handled, how they perform, and even how they react to viruses that cause diseases. April 2013 | The American Brahman ReviewŽ | 63


F

or cattle, temperament is defined as the reactivity or fear response to humans or handling. Terms used to describe temperamental animals include “flighty,” “excitable,” and “high strung.” These animals can potentially injure themselves or their handlers. Beef cattle experience stressful events during routine management practices—weaning, transportation, social mixing, and vaccination. These practices have been shown to induce secretion of the stress-related hormones cortisol and epinephrine. Stress can negatively affect growth, reproduction, welfare, and immune function—predisposing cattle to infectious intestinal and respiratory diseases that cost U.S. cattle producers an estimated $500 million per year. Reducing adverse consequences of stressful incidents and identifying animals that may react differently to stressors may benefit cattle’s growth and health. A team of scientists in the Agricultural Research Service’s Livestock Issues Research Unit (LIRU) in Lubbock, Texas, Mississippi State University (MSU), and

Testing Temperament

Most studies were done shortly after weaning to emulate what happens in the industry, says Ron Randel, animal physiologist at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Overton, Texas. One of the most stressful times for an animal is after it is weaned. The team was among the first in the United States to adopt and use the exit velocity system developed in Australia, Randel says. The system measures the rate at which an animal exits a squeeze chute or scale box where it’s been restrained or held after transport. A fast exit indicates the animal is showing fear and is stressed by handling and human activity. Scientists also used pen scoring, a subjective measurement in which small groups of cattle are scored based on their reactions to a human observer. Scores range from 1—calm, docile, and approachable, to 5— aggressive and volatile. The exit velocity and pen score for each animal were

ARS animal scientist Jeff Carroll (left) and animal physiologist Ron Randel from Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center measure cattle temperament by scoring their reactions to human observers. This Brahman calf is quite calm, showing virtually no fear of or aggression towards humans and would receive a score of 1, whereas a more aggressive and volatile calf would be scored 4 or 5.

Texas AgriLife Research—a member of the Texas A&M University System—are studying interrelationships of stress and cattle temperament with transportation, immune challenges, and production traits. They have found that, depending on temperament, cattle respond differently.

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then averaged together to come up with a temperament score, says Jeffery Carroll, LIRU research leader. Calves were chosen for studies based on their temperament scores, which categorized them as most calm, intermediate, and most temperamental.


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Challenging Behaviors

“Depending on whether an animal is classified as being really calm or really high strung, we’re seeing differences in the way it deals with illness,” Carroll says. In the study, Brahman calves were classified by temperament and transported 478 miles from Overton to Lubbock. After the trip, blood samples and body temperatures were taken before, during, and after Brahman calves just before transport to Lubbock, Texas. Each calf ’s stress response will be administration of an monitored before, during, and after transport to determine whether temperament is linked to endotoxin to simulate illness. the amount of stress experienced in transport. Sickness behavior was scored on a 1-to-5 scale that measured the Previous studies indicate that human-animal severity of calves’ behavioral responses to the challenge. interactions are probably the most stressful events that A score of 1 indicated normal maintenance behaviors, the majority of cattle encounter. and 5 indicated the greatest amount of sickness “The duration of transportation is not the problem,” behaviors, such as head distension, increased respiration, Randel says. “It’s the action of being handled and and labored breathing. loaded into the trailer that is producing the stress.” If “You could immediately tell that the calm animals had cattle are handled in an appropriate manner and given been given an immune challenge, because they showed water and feed at no more than 12-hour intervals, then visual signs and became ill,” Carroll says. getting on and off the trailer is the major stressor, he The more temperamental animals continued to act says. high-strung and flighty after the endotoxin challenge. If a temperamental animal doesn’t show signs of illness, managers might not realize that the animal is sick and Making the Grade needs treatment. While the handling process is more stressful for animals, “We’re not talking about one breed compared to transportation duration and conditions can have another breed,” Carroll says. “We’re talking about negative effects on intramuscular fat, says Rhonda Vann, animals within the same breed type, and the only MSU associate research professor. difference is their temperament.” “When animals are transported, they will use or Results showed that the endotoxin increased body mobilize intramuscular fat very quickly for fast sources temperature and induced secretion of epinephrine of energy,” Vann says. “The degree of intramuscular fat, and cortisol, hormones associated with coping with or marbling, determines the quality grade of beef. High stress, says Tom Welsh, Texas AgriLife Research levels of marbling improve quality grade, whereas lower endocrinologist in College Station, Texas. levels reduce it.” When animals are transported, they become stressed, Vann and her colleagues looked at the combined contributing to the incidence of disease, Randel says. effects of transportation and animal temperament on Therefore, identifying cattle that are more susceptible body composition traits. They took ultrasound images of to stressors and subsequently have altered immune muscle ribeye area, rib fat, intramuscular fat, and rump responses may help to reduce the impact of sickness after transport. 66 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013


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Temperament is important in all areas of production to ensure safety and maximum performace. fat to evaluate and measure fat mobilization. Temperamental cattle appeared to use more fat stores when stressed, Vann says. Also, as the hauling distance increased, the percentage of intramuscular fat decreased. “From a production standpoint, temperament of animals does make a difference in the ultimate quality grade—for example, choice versus select,” Vann says. “As stressors and transportation times increase, temperamental animals could potentially have lower quality grades, and that could mean lower profits.”

Tactics for Taming

Results show that temperamental cattle require special management practices to reduce stress before, during, and after transportation. Also, because temperament and resistance to bovine respiratory disease are both heritable traits, future research will include developing gene-based methods to select calm, stress-tolerant, and diseaseresistant cattle. “Information derived from our studies will enhance gene-based approaches to improving animal health and performance,” Welsh says. In the meantime, cattle producers can use 68 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

temperament scoring to select calmer bulls for breeding less temperamental cattle and use pen scoring for replacement females to eliminate the more temperamental cows, Randel says. “I’m not suggesting selecting for the calmest cattle,” he says. “I’m suggesting that producers eliminate animals that are most temperamental to improve herd health and productivity, ensure animal welfare, and to protect animal and worker safety.” This research was partly supported by a cooperative research and development agreement between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Texas AgriLife Research and was part of a project by Texas A&M graduate student Nicole Burdick, who is now with LIRU. This research is part of Food Animal Production, an ARS national program (#101) described at www.nps.ars.usda. gov. To reach scientists mentioned in this article, contact Sandra Avant, USDA-ARS Information Staff, 5601 Sunnyside Ave., Beltsville, MD 20705-5129; (301) 5041627. “Temperament Plays Key Role in Cattle Health” was published in the February 2013 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.


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Cattleman, veterinarian, husband, father, and friend are just a few words to describe incoming American Brahman Breeders Association (ABBA) President, Dr. Ricky Hughes. Hughes brings his love and knowledge of the Brahman breed to the table and is sure to honorably represent the Brahman breed and the ABBA. 70 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013


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B

orn and raised near the small town of Donaldson, Ark., Hughes’ love for Brahman cattle began in 1968 when he was only eight-years-old. With the help of his father, he was introduced to Mr. Tommy Stiles who owned Brahman cattle he purchased from the Paret Ranch in Lake Charles, La. and from Hamp Williams in Hot Springs, Ark. Hughes was surrounded by these gentle cattle weekly and knew that he wanted his own Brahmans one day. Hughes continued to surround himself with Brahman cattle while assisting Charles Keeney from his hometown of Malvern, Ark., with his cattle at the county and state fairs. At 16, Hughes purchased his first two registered Brahman females from K.O. Sites in Sheridan, Ark. Over time, Hughes’ herd consisted of five cows and a herd bull. Preparing to start a family and continuing his education, Hughes sold his herd in 1981 with the intention to purchase Brahman cattle again one day. That same year, Hughes married his high school sweetheart, Myra. Graduating from Southern Arkansas University in 1983 with a Bachelor of Science in Biology, Hughes attended Louisiana State University (LSU) to complete his degree in veterinary medicine. Upon graduation from LSU, Hughes and Myra moved back home to Malvern. In the fall of 1989, Hughes opened a mixed animal practice, Hughes Animal Hospital, where Myra now works as the office manager. Together, they have two children, Janna and Bradley. In 1991, Hughes began purchasing Brahman cattle again, starting his own ranch, Circle H Ranch. Hughes describes his ranch as a family affair; both children were involved with the cattle growing up and now Bradley works full-time on the ranch. In the beginning, Myra assisted Hughes with herd health and they have all

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Hughes performing a surgery at Hughes Animal Hospital

enjoyed traveling to Brahman events such as the World Brahman Congress in Brazil and Panama. As a Brahman breeder, Hughes understands the importance of the breed to the commercial cattle industry. The primary Circle H Farms customers are, in fact, commercial cattlemen who want to purchase Brahman bulls to produce F1s. For these reasons, Hughes strives to produce low birth weight calves, which are moderate in frame size and heavy muscled. Circle H Ranch uses predominately J.D. Hudgins herd sires to achieve the above criteria. Their current herd sire is Capital Gains 77/7, a Hudgins pedigreed bull imported from Mexico. Hughes explains, “This bull fits our herd plan as he is moderately framed, heavy muscled and has a gentle disposition. We are expecting our first calves from him in the fall of 2013.” The Hughes family plans to continue to produce bulls that commercial cattlemen can use to produce quality F1s. Hughes’ involvement with the ABBA began in 1995 when he and Myra first started attending the ABBA membership meeting and the International Show in Houston. During this time, they made friends with fellow Brahman breeders across the world and have come together to share their own philosophies to help advance


“The Brahman breed is a unique breed of cattle. They have an important place in all aspects of the beef industry. Their outstanding traits of longevity, heat resistance, milk production, and hybrid vigor make them a necessity in today’s cattle market.” their cattle program. ABBA is not dictated solely by the president and officers; “Brahman breeders are like family,” said Hughes. “We by having strong committee chairpersons and active may not always agree but are a close knit group who are members working toward a common goal, the ABBA passionate about our cattle.” will only become stronger. Hughes is no stranger to leadership within the A few of Hughes’ goals as ABBA president is to ABBA. He has served on the ABBA Communications encourage the continued acceptance of the Brahman Committee, holding the position of chairman for breed in the cattle industry. He also plans to educate the past four years. While serving as chairman, the others on the performance aspects of Brahman cattle committee has produced two videos, television ads, and such as tenderness and feed efficiency. One of the continued to promote the breed with print ads in the most commendable goals Hughes plans to achieve is to top industry advocate the publications, example ABBA as well as members set increasing the for the junior ABBA website members. and social “It is media presence. imperative that Hughes has we are good also served as role models to the chairman teach the next for the finance generation how committee to be good while serving breeders and on the ABBA responsible Board of leaders. We Directors as can do this the secretary/ by acting treasurer. responsibly, Hughes feeding cattle at Circle H Ranch. ABBA Executive showing Vice-President Chris Shivers explains, “During this time respect to each other, and by being ethical and honest ABBA had some of the most successful years financially in our dealings with others inside and outside of our making a profit each year.” association,” said Hughes. As he begins his term as ABBA President, Hughes With everything that is happening in the cattle plans to establish strong committees first and foremost. industry, Hughes believes that pure economics of He understands that committees are essential to raising cattle is one of the most crucial issues facing the the success of the ABBA. There are seven different industry today. Environmental aspects such as drought, committees throughout the ABBA, each one playing hurricanes, and floods have hurt cattle producers in a vital role in establishing policies and procedures, recent years; in turn, decreasing grain production along with producing results for the betterment of the causing feed costs to escalate. We will never forget the association. Hughes understands that the business of the horrible drought that struck Texas and surrounding areas

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Hughes speaking at the annual membership meeting during the 2013 HLSR International Brahman show.

during the summer of 2011. During that time, producers lost a number of cattle and some were even forced to sell cattle. Those producers are now beginning to buy cattle back to replenish their herd. Hughes is adamant when he states, “We have to educate cattlemen about the hardiness of the Brahman cow. She can withstand the heat, live a long time and is a good milk producer,” he said. “Now is the time for the Brahman breed to take control of the cattle industry. Brahman is the only breed that can continue to be productive in these harsh environments and perform efficiently in the feed lot as well.” As a spokesperson for the ABBA, Hughes hopes to be a positive influence among the members of the association and the Brahman breed. He plans to travel and attend as many events as possible across the country, making connections that will benefit ABBA. With a dedication to educating cattlemen about the positive influence the Brahman breed can have on the cattle industry and continually learning about Brahman genetics and marketing strategies, Hughes has what it takes to make a positive impact on our association. He is certainly qualified for the position, serving on numerous ABBA committees as mentioned earlier, as well as serving as an elected director for Area 13 for the

past twelve years. “I have a deep respect for the members of the American Brahman Breeders Association and hope together we can work to spread the positive aspects of our breed to unreached markets in our great country,” he said. When asked what major goal he hopes to achieve as ABBA President, his answer was clear: to see an increase in membership in the organization. He would like to see members all across the country take an interest in ABBA. Throughout his term as president, Hughes hopes to encourage members to attend the membership convention and to continue to learn everything they can about the breed. Furthermore, breeders need to know how great the annual membership meeting is during the International Brahman Show in Houston and hopes to increase attendance at the meeting. Finally, Hughes plans to educate members to register their cattle, which is important to our breed association. He goes on to say, “Registrations and transfers are the most important factors for the continued economic success of the American Brahman Breeders Association.” Shivers believes that Hughes will be an important asset to the ABBA, bringing his very practical background as he is a veterinarian and a cattle producer. While understanding the importance of the breed and the necessity of cattle to make a profit, Hughes will be a fair president and one that will have the best interest of the Brahman breed in mind when making decisions. I had the pleasure of meeting Hughes at the National F1 Sale in Caldwell, Texas, and can confidently say he will do a great job representing and leading the ABBA. His knowledge of the industry and passion for promoting the breed, not only on the purebred level but also to commercial markets, will only advance the Brahman industry. ©TABR

“Brahman breeders are like family. We may not always agree but are a close knit group who are passionate about our cattle.”

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26th Annual national abba f1 and tba brahman female sale

Caldwell, Texas

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Affiliate Updates

FELIX WIns 2013 AJBA HErd BuILdEr AWArd

Houston, Texas—Brennan Felix of Erath, La., was selected as the winner of the 2013 AJBA Junior Herd Builder Program. The program was initiated in 2011 by Steve & Amy Good of Grandview, Texas. In an effort to assist AJBA members in growing and improving their breeding programs, the Good family donated a yearling bull to the winner of the program. The presentation of the bull was made to Felix Friday in the main arena of Reliant Center during the 2013 International Bull Show. Felix has participated in AJBA activities for three years. He plans to attend college after graduating from high school. His plans also to include using the bull to improve and expand his existing herd. Funds from this enterprise will fund his college expenses. Felix says, “It doesn’t matter what I do, raising cows will be part of my life.” Felix is the grandson of Sam and Nan Duplantis of Erath, La., who have helped teach him about cattle production and the Brahman breed. Requirements for the AJBA Herd Builder Program include: • Each applicant must complete the Official AJBA Junior Herd Builder Application and submit an essay on the specified topic. • The winner of the animal must agree to exhibit the bull for at least one year from the time they take possession and at one All American National Junior Brahman Show. • For a full twelve months following the presentation of the bull, the winner should provide monthly reports to the ABBA Office updating the status and accomplishments of the bull. • After the recipient has met the show and report requirements the bull then becomes the sole property of the recipient with no further obligations. 76 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

Brennan Felix, winner of the AJBA Herd Builder Award, pictured with AJBA President Andrew Simon, ABBA Executive Vice President, Chris Shivers; Michael Joyce; Amy Good; Steve Good; and Brandon Shanks holding bull.

2013 AJBA ALL-AMErICAn PuBLIC sPEAKInG COnTEsT TOPICs AnnOunCEd Junior Division: 8-11 years old

• Discuss the traits that make the Brahman breed useful to the commercial beef industry and why these are important. • Discuss what you as an AJBA member can do to positively promote the beef industry.

Intermediate Division: 12-15 years old

• Identify and discuss each segment of the beef industry. • Discuss the importance of Brahman genetics in the restocking of the cow herd.


Affiliate Updates

Senior Division: 16-18 years old

• Discuss the different existing marketing options for Brahman and Brahman influenced cattle and alternative marketing ideas that you have. • Explain how the use of available tools (epds, ultrasound data, DNA tests, etc.) will lead to the improvement of the beef industry.

Collegiate Division: 19-21 years old

• Discuss the effects of the recent droughts on the price of retail product and the factors that affect this. • Discuss current (last 10 years) issues that have directly impacted the cattle industry.

FLORIDA BRAHMAN ASSOCIATION FIELD DAY SCHEDULED FOR APRIL 27

The Florida Brahman Association will hold a Brahman field day and sale on April 27, 2013, in Wauchula, Florida, at Marcus Shackelford’s Rocking S Ranch. The event will be fun for the whole family, offering speakers, a complimentary lunch, a junior meeting and heifer sale. The sale will consist of replacement heifers and show prospects from top Florida herds. All show heifers are gentle and halter broken. This will be the last sale before the AJBA possession date. For more information visit floridabrahman.org or contact Marcus Shackleford at 863-773-4616.

REPORT OF LOUISIANA BRAHMAN ASSOCIATION F1 SALE

Louisiana Brahman Association (LBA) President Dr. Clay Espey, along with sale chairman Carolyn Falgout, hosted the 15th annual LBA Brahman/F1 Invitational Sale at Dominique’s Livestock Market in Carencro, La., on March 23, 2013. Auctioneer Mike Dominique started the sale off with 192 F1s followed

by 32 registered Brahmans. The 47 F1 pairs sold for an average of $2,300 per pair. Champion pen of pairs consigned by Triple Son Farms, Paul Dufrene, consisted of three Golden Certified Brahman x Angus (BXA) pairs, and sold for $3,250. Fifty-eight F1 open heifers averaged $1,483 per head. Champion pen of open heifers, also consigned by Triple Son Farms, included three head of Golden Certified BXA heifers and sold for $1,700 per head. A total of 87 F1 bred heifers averaged $2,208 per head. Champion pen of bred heifers consigned by Seven L Cattle, Chris Kreilow, consisted of three head of certified Hereford x Brahman heifers and sold for $3,100. To close out the sale, 32 head of registered Brahmans sold for an average of $2,314 per head. Overall, the sale was a success and the LBA Board of Directors look forward to next year.

RGVLS HOLDS FIRST BRAHMAN STEER SHOW

Nine registered Brahman steers competed in the first ever Brahman steer show in Mercedes, Texas, on March 15, 2013, at the Rio Grande Valley Livestock Show. The show was a huge success and garnered interest from many Brahman breeders. With the success of this show, the Rio Grande Valley Brahman and F1 Association will most certainly have more than nine entries next year. The champion steer sold for $5,500 and the reserve sold for $8,300. In addition $2,000 of premium money went to the champion and $1,500 to the reserve champion. The 3rd place steer received $500 in premium money and each steer thereafter received $50 less so the 9th place steer still received $200 extra prize money. Carlos Guerra, long-time Brahman breeder and Association member said that the benefits of selling a Brahman male and getting more people involved in the cattle benefits everyone. If we can get information on the steers, it could be helpful to the entire breed.

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2013 International Brahman Show Houston, Texas

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Show Results

Dixie National Livestock Show February 11, 2013 Judge: Dr. Craig Fontenot

Jackson, Mississippi—On February 11, 2013, the Dixie National Livestock Show and Rodeo held its annual open Brahman show. Dr. Craig Fontenot of Ville Platte, La., served as the judge for the day. The show featured Brahman cattle from seven different states from around the country, including Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. In the red show, Fontenot selected the junior champion, 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1 of Quad M Cattle/Legacy Cattle Services as the grand champion red female. Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0, exhibited by Amie Ferguson, was selected as the reserve champion red female. She received the senior champion title. Later in the bull show, Fontenot chose 5M King Tut 697/0 of 5M Farms/Legacy Cattle Services as the grand champion red bull. He also won the title of senior champion. Fontenot then selected the junior champion, DF Corbyn Lotto of Dogwood Farms, as the reserve champion red bull. In the grey show, Fontenot picked the calf champion 5M Krater 248 of Legacy Cattle Services as the grand champion grey female and the junior champion Lady H Kelly Manso 209/1, exhibited by Megan Lavergne, as the reserve champion grey female. Concluding the day with the grey bulls, Fontenot chose the junior champion KF Majestic Crossfire 147 of K-Bar Farms, Ripple C Cattle Company, Vogue Farms, Wood, and Legacy Cattle Services as the grand champion grey bull. The calf champion, Mr B-F 308/2 of Bennett Farms, was then selected as the reserve champion grey bull. Results for the day were as follows: RED FEmaLE RESuLtS Calf Champion

KC Ms Karma 909/2

Carriere Cattle

Reserve Calf Champion

Moreno Ms Lady Reba

Bennett Farms

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Intermediate Champion

RCC Bombshell 192/1

Ripple C Cattle Co/ Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Intermediate Champion

Ferg’s Elizabeth

Amie Ferguson

Junior Champion

5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1

Quad M Cattle Co/ Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Junior Champion

GKM Lady Slugger 108

Quad M Cattle Co/ Legacy Cattle Services

Senior Champion

Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0

Amie Ferguson

Reserve Senior Champion

Miss B-F 218/0

Bennett Farms

Grand Champion Female

5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1

Quad M Cattle/Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Grand Champion Female

Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0

Amie Ferguson

RED BuLL RESuLtS Calf Champion

KC Bucee 201/2 Carriere Cattle

Reserve Calf Champion

KF Mr Charlie’s on Target Mr K Bar Magnum Cash 10

Dogwood Farms K Bar Farms/ Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Intermediate Champion

DF Mr Jesse James

Dogwood Farms

Junior Champion

DF Mr Corbyn Lotto

Dogwood Farms

Reserve Junior Champion

5M Sancho 414/1

5M Farms/ Legacy Cattle Services

Senior Champion

5M King Tut 697/0

5M Farms/ Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Senior Champion

Mr Bar LLL Renegade 159

Bar Triple L Farms

Grand Champion Bull

5M King Tut 697/0

5M Farms/ Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Grand Champion Bull

DF Corbyn Lotto

Dogwood Farms

Intermediate Champion


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GREY FEmaLE REsULts Calf Champion

5M Krater 248

Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Calf Champion

Lady H Taryn Manso 279/2

Legacy Cattle Services

Intermediate Champion

Miss Sugar Reese 501

Logan Choiniere

Reserve Intermediate Champion

Lady H Summer Megan Manso 218/1 Lavergne

Junior Champion

Lady H Kelly Manso 209/1

Megan Lavergne

Reserve Junior Champion

Miss KF Lex’s Diamond 101

Kelsey Fontenot

senior Champion

Miss Amber Reese

Logan Choiniere

Reserve senior Champion

Miss JH 104/0

Quad M Cattle/Legacy Cattle Services

Grand Champion Female

5M Krater 248

Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Grand Champion Female

Lady H Kelly Manso 209/1

Megan Lavergne

Calf Champion

Mr B-F 308/2

Bennett Farms

Reserve Calf Champion

Mr B-F 294/1

Bennett Farms

Intermediate Champion

JR Astroid Manso 401

Rich Cattle Comapny/ Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Intermediate Champion

JDH Mr Manso 837

JD HudginsForgason Cattle

Junior Champion

KF Majestic Crossfire 147

K Bar Farms/ Ripple C cattle Co/Vogue Farms/Wood/ Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Junior Champion

D Bar Mr 780/1 D Bar Ranch/ Valley B Enterprises

senior Champion

Mr 3P Play’s Manso

4N Ranch

Reserve senior Champion

Mr Zero

Tyler Lusco

Grand Champion Bull

KF Majestic Crossfire 147

K-Bar Farms/ Ripple C Cattle Company/ Vogue Farms/ Wood/Legacy Cattle Services

Reserve Grand Champion Bull

Mr B-F 308/2

Bennett Farms

GREY BULL REsULts

Grand Champion Red Female Res. Grand Champion Red Female 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1 Lady H Flavia Manso 179/0 Exhibited by Quad M Cattle/Legacy Exhibited by Amie Ferguson Cattle Services

Grand Champion Red Bull 5M King Tut 697/0 Exhibited by 5M Farms/Legacy Cattle Services

Res. Grand Champion Red Bull DF Corbyn Lotto Exhibited by Dogwood Farms

Grand Champion Grey Female Res. Grand Champion Grey Female 5M Krater 248 Lady H Kelly Manso 209/1 Exhibited by Legacy Cattle Services Exhibited by Megan Lavergne

Grand Champion Grey Bull KF Majestic Crossfire 147 Exhibited by K-Bar Farms/ Ripple C Cattle Company/ Vogue Farms/ Wood/Legacy Cattle Service

Res. Grand Champion Grey Bull Mr B-F 308/2 Exhibited by Bennett Farms

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Dixie National Show

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 83


Show Results

Kissimmee Valley livestock show: Open February 14, 2013 Judge: robbie sands Kissimmee, Florida–On February 14, 2013, in Central Florida, in the heart of Florida Brahman country, the 2013 open Brahman show of the Kissimmee Valley Livestock Show was held. A majority of the Brahman breeders from around the state were in attendance. The show was judged by Robbie Sands of Alachua, Fla. Sands slapped Lady H Holly Manso 256/1 of IS

Ranch as his grand champion female, and then chose JDH Lady Manso 780 of Hidden Creek Genetics/ Valley B Enterprises as his reserve champion female. Then, Sands picked Mr SG 85/1 of Ford Farms/Valley B Enterprises as his grand champion bull and then selected IS Mr A Plus 82 of NuStar Cattle Company/IS Ranch as his reserve champion bull. ©TABR Bull results

Female results Calf Champion

D Bar Miss 875/1

D-Bar Ranch/ Valley B Enterprises

Calf Champion

BB Mr. Emp’s Pride 627

Barthle Brothers Ranch

reserve Calf Champion

Moreno Miss Spanish Olive 116

Moreno Ranches

reserve Calf Champion

VBE Mr. Suva Manso 200

Valley B Enterprises

Intermediate Champion

Lady H Holly Manso 256/1

IS Ranch

Intermediate Champion

GS Mr Sugar Manso 505

Gray Shadow Ranch/Valley B Enterprises

reserve Intermediate Champion

GS Ms Linda Sug Manso 506

Gray Shadow Ranch/Valley B Enterprises

reserve Intermediate Champion

Mr La Preciosa 209/1

Moreno Ranches

Junior Champion

JDH Emily Manso 477

Hidden Creek Genetics/ Valley B Enterprises

Junior Champion

Mr. SG 85/1

Ford Farms/ Valley B Enterprises

reserve Junior Champion

D Bar 780/1

Diamond S/Bailey Simpson

D-Bar Ranch/ Valley B Enterprises

senior Champion

Ms Cheyenne Manso 487/0

Moreno Ranches/IS Ranch

IS Mr. A Plus 82

NuStar Cattle Company/IS Ranch

reserve senior Champion

Grand Champion

Lady H Holly Manso 256/1

IS Ranch

BB Mr Doc’s Davon 609

Barthle Brothers Ranch

reserve Grand Champion

JDH Emily Manso 477

Hidden Creek Genetics/ Valley B Enterprises

Grand Champion

Mr. SG 85/1

Ford Farms/ Valley B Enterprises

reserve Grand Champion

IS Mr A Plus 82

NuStar Cattle Company/IS Ranch

reserve Junior Champion

senior Champion

Grand Champion Female Lady H Holly Manso 256/1 Exhibited by IS Ranch

Honey

res. Grand Champion Female JDH Emily Manso 477 Exhibited by Hidden Creek Genetics/ Valley B Enterprises

84 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

Grand Champion Bull Mr. SG 85/1 Exhibited by Ford Farms/ Valley B Enterprises

res. Grand Champion Bull IS Mr. A Plus 82 Exhibited by NuStar Cattle Company/IS Ranch


April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 85


Show Results

San Antonio Livestock Exposition: Junior

February 14, 2013 Judge: Blake Bloomberg FEmALE rESuLtS Calf Champion

Miss Calamity Jane 37/2

McKenna Schulte

Senior Champion

Miss V8 Legacy 474/7

Austin Gonzalez

reserve Calf Champion

Miss CBR Little T 517/2

Payton Herzog

reserve Senior Champion

LMC Polled Spice 710/1

Winston Walters

Junior Champion

BNA Miss Nel Manso 596/1

Mary Kate Walters

Grand Champion Female

Miss V8 Legacy 474/7

Austin Gonzalez

reserve Junior Champion

Miss V8 639/7

McKenzie Moreland

reserve Grand Champion Female

LMC Polled Spice 710/1

Winston Walters

res. Grand Champion Female LMC Polled Spice Exhibited by Winston Walters

Grand Champion Female Miss V8 Legacy 474/7 Exhibited by Austin Gonzalez

Kissimmee Valley Livestock Show: Junior February 14, 2013 Judge: Brett Wheeler FEmALE rESuLtS

BuLL rESuLtS

Calf Champion

Moreno Ms Bahama Mama

Bobbi Jean Frazier

Calf Champion

Moreno Mr Bourbon Jazz

Bobbi Jean Frazier

reserve Calf Champion

Moreno Ms Ricca Chula

Kylie Perra

reserve Calf Champion

IS Mr Boulet 103

Cole Newman

Intermediate Champion

Lady H Holly Manso 256/1

Brandalyn Bishop

Intermediate Champion

IS Mr Kosciusko Bethalan 100 Bishop

reserve Intermediate Champion

IS Miss Mellie Mae 200

Bethalan Bishop

reserve Intermediate Champion

IS Mr Prime Time 102

Junior Champion

Honey

Bailey Simpson

Junior Champion

Ritz’s Mr Walker Cole Newman

Senior Champion

IS Mr A Plus 82

Brandalyn Bishop

reserve Senior Champion

BB Mr Doc’s Davon 609

Rachel Barthle

Grand Champion

IS Mr Kosciusko Bethalan 100 Bishop

reserve Grand Champion

IS Mr A Plus 82

reserve Junior Champion

JDH Lady Manso 777

Bethalan Bishop

Senior Champion

Ms Cheyenne Manso 487/0

Moreno Ranches/IS Ranch

Grand Champion

Lady H Holly Manso 256/1

Brandalyn Bishop

reserve Grand Champion

Moreno Ms Bahama Mama

Bobbi Jean Frazier

res. Grand Champion Female Grand Champion Female Moreno Ms Bahama Mama Lady H Holly Manso 256/1 Exhibited by Bobbi Jean Frazier Exhibited by Brandalyn Bishop 86 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

©TABR

Grand Champion Bull IS Mr Kosciusko 100 Exhibited by Bethalan Bishop

Brandalyn Bishop

Brandalyn Bishop

res. Grand Champion Bull IS Mr A Plus 82 Exhibited by Brandalyn Bishop


Show Results

Miami-Dade County Fair March 16, 2013 Judge: Pasquale Swaner Miami, Florida—On March 15, 2013, the Miami-Dade County Fair welcomed more than 90 head of Brahman cattle from six different states—Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Tennessee and Florida—to their white sandy beach show ring for the annual open Brahman show. Pasquale Swaner of Waco, Texas, served as the judge for the evening. First, Swaner selected Moreno Ms. Big Momma as the Produce of Dam the winner, along with +GS Ms. Sugar Diamond 328 as the Embryo-Produce-of-Dam winner, and finally Mr. V8 546/6 as the Get-of-Sire winner. Next, Swaner chose Moreno Ms Lady Reba 112 of Moreno Ranches as the grand champion female, and FeMale reSultS

Lady H Holly Manso 256/1 of IS Ranch as the reserve champion female. Later, Swaner chose Mr SG 85/1 of Ford Farms/Valley B Enterprises as the grand champion bull and Mr L2 Triple Threat 33 of L2 Ranch as the reserve champion bull. Results for the day were as follows: Bull reSultS Calf Champion

Mr L2 Triple Threat 33

L2 Ranch

reserve Calf Champion

VBE Mr Suva Manso 200

Valley B Enterprises

Intermediate Champion

GS Mr Sugar Manso

Gray Shadow Ranch/Valley B Enterprises

reserve Intermediate Champion

IS Mr Prime Time 102

IS Ranch

Junior Champion

Mr SG 85/1

Ford Farms/ Valley B Enterprises

Calf Champion

Moreno Ms Lady Reba 112

Moreno Ranches

reserve Calf Champion

Miss V8 746/7

L2 Ranch

Intermediate Champion

Lady H Holly Manso 256/1

IS Ranch reserve Junior Champion

RLB Mr 281

L2 Ranch

reserve Intermediate Champion

JDH Lady Manso 846

L2 Ranch

Grand Champion Bull

Mr SG 85/1

Junior Champion

JDH Miss Emily Manso 477/4

Valley B Enterprises

Ford Farms/ Valley B Enterprises

reserve Grand Champion Bull

Mr L2 Triple Threat 33

L2 Ranch

reserve Junior Champion

JDH Lady Manso 780

Valley B Enterprises

Senior Champion

Ms Cheyenne Manso 487/0

Moreno Ranches/IS Ranch

reserve Senior Champion

Bar L Magnolia 105

L2 Ranch

Produce-of-Dam

Moreno Ms Big Momma

Moreno Ranches

Grand Champion Female

Moreno Ms Lady Reba 112

Moreno Ranches

embryo-Produce-of-Dam

+GS Ms Sugar Diamond 328

Gray Shadow Ranch/Valley B Enterprises

reserve Grand Champion Female

Lady H Holly Manso 256/1

IS Ranch

Get-of-Sire

Mr V8 546/6

L2 Ranch

Grand Champion Female Moreno Ms Lady Reba 112 Exhibited by Moreno Ranches

res. Grand Champion Female Lady H Holly Manso 256/1 Exhibited by IS Ranch

GrouP ClaSS reSultS

Grand Champion Bull Mr SG 85/1 Exhibited by Ford Farms/Valley B Enterprises

res. Grand Champion Bull Mr L2 Triple Threat 33 Exhibited by L2 Ranch

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 87


Show Results

Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo: Junior Breeding Beef Heifer Show March 8, 2013 Judge: Randy Perry RED FEMaLE RESuLtS

GREY FEMaLE RESuLtS Calf Champion

Miss Calamity McKenna Shulte Jane 37/2

Reserve Calf Champion

JLP Miss Maizy 113

Rexanna Powers

Junior Champion

Miss V8 639/7

McKenzie Moreland

Reserve Junior Champion

Lady H Hootie’s Emilie Green Rose 205/1

Lady H Shae Manso 242/1

Garrett Villemez

Senior Champion

Miss V8 474/7

Reserve Senior Champion

BB Ted Passport 764/1

Austin Gonzalez

Reserve Senior Champion

Grand Champion Red Female

Lady H Hootie’s Emilie Green Rose 205/1

LMC Polled Spice 47/1

Winston Walters

Grand Champion Grey Female

Miss V8 474/7

Reserve Grand Champion Red Female

BB Ted Passport 764/1

Austin Gonzalez

Reserve Grand Champion Grey Female

Miss V8 639/7

McKenzie Moreland

Calf Champion

Miss W 215

Michael Webb

Reserve Calf Champion

Miss Little Ann 5/24

Kali Davis

Junior Champion

KR Ms Red Fancy 359

Alyssa Doucet

Reserve Junior Champion

ASL Ms Raquel 569/1

Laci Leathers

Senior Champion

Grand Champion Red Female Lady H Hootie’s Rose 205/1 Exhibited by Emilie Green

Cody Gollnisch

Cody Gollnisch

Res. Grand Champion Red Female BB Ted Passport Exhibited by Cody Gollnisch

88 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

Grand Champion Grey Female Miss V8 474/7 Exhibited by Austin Gonzalez

Res. Grand Champion Grey Female Miss V8 639/7 Exhibited by McKenzie Moreland


Show Results

rio Grande Valley livestock show: Open march 15, 2013

Judge: Dr. Jim sanders

reD Female results Calf Champion

DB Southern Style 958/2

Detering Red Brahmans

reserve Calf Champion

LMC Polled Paulette 24/2

Mary Kate Walters

reserve Calf Champion

Lady H Starr Rojo 274/2

Heritage Cattle

Intermediate Champion

Miss SS 230

Canik Farms

Intermediate Champion

Miss J&R 362

Joyce Custom Fitters

reserve Intermediate Champion

Miss CJV Rae Manso 55/1

Jacob Valenta

reserve Intermediate Champion

Miss LB Polled La Negra Rayne 191/1

Junior Champion

Miss Double A 281/1

Victor Moreno

Junior Champion

5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1

Quad M Cattle/5M Farms/ Legacy Cattle Servies

reserve Junior Champion

LMC Polled Spice 47/1

Winston Walters

senior Champion

Evan Acevedo

reserve Junior Champion

DB Southern Style 846/1

Detering Red Brahmans

Miss Double A 673/0

reserve senior Champion

Evan Acevedo

senior Champion

DB Southern Style 784/0

Detering Red Brahmans

Miss Double A 728/0

Grand Champion

Victor Moreno

reserve senior Champion

Miss Double A 695/0

Double A Ranch

Miss Double A 281/1

reserve Grand Champion

Miss SS 230

Canik Farms

Grand Champion

DB Southern Style 958/2

Detering Red Brahmans

reserve Grand Champion

5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1

Quad M Cattle/5M Farms/Legacy Cattle Services

Calf Champion

4M Ozona 594/2

Legacy Cattle Services

reserve Calf Champion

LMC Polled Valor 127/2

La Muneca Cattle Co.

Intermediate Champion

Mr B-F 271/1

Joyce Custom Fitters

reserve Intermediate Champion

LMC Polled Boss 341/1

La Muneca Cattle Co.

Junior Champion

KF Mr Majestic Crossfire 147

Legacy Cattle

reserve Junior Champion

RCC Torgson Legacy 426/1

Legacy Cattle Service

senior Champion

Mr J&R 192

Joyce Custom Fitters

reserve senior Champion

El Salinas NBS Mr. Shogun Manso Ranch 88/10

Grand Champion

Mr J&R 192

Joyce Custom Fitters

reserve Grand Champion

Mr B-F 271/1

Joyce Custom Fitters

Natural produce-of-Dam

Ms CC Misti 192/6

Legacy Cattle Services

embryo produce-of-Dame

Ms CC Misti 192/0

Legacy Cattle Services

Get-of-sire

FCC Cash In The Sting

Legacy Cattle Services

reD Bull results Calf Champion

KC Bucee 201/2

Legacy Cattle Services

reserve Calf Champion

Mr CT Rojeaux Rhineaux 1/12

Joyce Custom Fitters

Intermediate Champion

Mr Red V8 241/7

Joyce Custom Fitters

reserve Intermediate Champion

Legacy Cattle Mr. K Bar Magnum Cash Servies 10

Junior Champion

5M Sancho 414/1

Legacy Cattle

reserve Junior Champion

El Indio 148

Roel Villarreal

senior Champion

5M King Tut 697/0

Legacy Cattle Services

Grand Champion

Mr Red V8 241/7

Joyce Custom Fitters

reserve Grand Champion

5M King Tut 697/0

Legacy Cattle Services

Grey Female results Calf Champion

Miss US Louise Polled Manso 270/2

Brandon Salinas

Grey Bull results

GrOup Class results

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 89


Grand Champion Red Female DB Southern Style 958/2 Exhibited by Detering Red Brahmans

Res. Grand Champion Red Female 5M Miss Roja Valentine 214/1 Exhibited by Legacy Cattle Services

Grand Champion Red Bull Mr Red V8 241/7 Exhibited by Joyce Custom Fitters

Res. Grand Champion Red Bull 5M King Tut 697/0 Exhibited by Legacy Cattle Services

Grand Champion Grey Female Miss Double A 281/1 Exhibited by Victor Moreno

Res. Grand Champion Grey Female Miss SS 230 Canik Farms

Grand Champion Grey Bull Mr J&R 192 Exhibited by Joyce Custom Fitters

Res. Grand Champion Grey Bull Mr B-F 271/1 Exhibited by Joyce Custom Fitters

90 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013


Rio grande valley show Mercedes, Texas

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 91


Show Results

Rio Grande Valley Livestock Show: Junior March 13, 2013 Judge: Webb Fields FeMaLe ReSuLtS

Senior Champion

Miss Double A 673/0

Evan Acevedo

Denise Martinez

Reserve Senior Champion

Miss Double A 728/0

Evan Acevedo

Miss V8 688/7 Evan Acevedo

Calf Champion Reserve Calf Champion Junior Champion

Ms CJV Rae Manso 55/1

Jacob Valenta

Grand Champion Female

Miss Double A 637/0

Evan Acevedo

Reserve Junior Champion

Miss To’s 88/11

Jacob Valenta

Reserve Grand Champion Female

Ms CJV Rae Manso 55/1

Jacob Valenta

Res. Grand Champion Female Ms CJV Rae Manso Exhibited by Jacob Valenta

Grand Champion Female Miss Double A 637/0 Exhibited by Evan Acevedo

Rio Grande Valley Livestock Show: Brahman Steers March 15, 2013 Judge: Gary Clayton CLaSS pLaCinGS (1050-1284 LBS.)

5th place

Hannah Wells

1055

Victoria Rae Rickford

Grand Champion

6th place

Emilio J. Flores

1090

Daniel Galvan

1239

Reserve Grand Champion

7th place

Jody Martin

1050

3rd place

Leroy Montemayor

1215

8th place

Kylie Sellman

1050

4th place

Yulisa Santana

1150

9th place

Caleb Kemp

1284

Grand Champion Brahman Steer Exhibited by Hannah Wells 92 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

Res. Grand Champion Brahman Steer Exhibited by Emilio J. Flores

1208


Alabama

Arkansas

Florida

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 93


Florida

Louisiana

94 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013


Louisiana

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 95


Louisiana

Mississippi

96 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013


North Carolina

Tennessee

Texas

Bentke Cattle Company Certified Brahman X Hereford Females Michael Bentke

6156 Quail Run Road • Burton, Texas 77835 979-289-4805

B RUSHY C RE E K CUSTOM SIRES

C u s t o m S e m e n C o l l e c t i o n a n d St o r a g e “The Best Are Here”

18051 FM 1660 • Taylor, TX 76574 512-352-7444 • 512-352-7040 e3bccs@sbcglobal.net • www.brushycreeksires.com April 2013 | The American Brahman Review® | 97


Texas

98 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013


F

Texas

Fat Dog

cattle company Trucking

FD

SCOTT ROGERS 7093 State Highway 59 S Bowie, Texas 76230 940-872-0426 fatdogcattleco@gmail.com

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 99


Texas 2515 FM 2223 • Bryan, TX 77808

The White’s Larry: 979-324-4538 S ally: 979-777-6068 Justin: 979-255-0632 Leiha: 716-485-3989 jwbrahman@hotmail.com

www.JWBrahmans.com

100 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013


Texas Red & Grey Brahmans

Farms

McKENNEY 6429 County Road 125 Terrell, Texas 75161 www.mckenneyfarms.com

214-384-5465 972-524-0088 docmckenney@aol.com

Post Oak Ranch

Golden Certified BXH F1 Cattle C a l dwe l l , Tex a s

Brian & Nancy Aulbaugh Cattle martketed by Milton E. Charanza, Jr. 979-450-8588

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 101


Texas

102 | The American Brahman Review速 | April 2013


Canada

Professional Services

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 103


Looking Back

J.C. Buie on temperament of Brahman Cattle From the “Brahman Breeder Feeder” October 1948 Mr. J.C. Buie, president of the Franklin Parish Cattlemen’s Assocaition, has served on the board of directors of the Louisiana Brahman Breeders Association and is extremely enthusiastic about overcoming the misconception as to the wildness of Brahman cattle. This breeder has been in the business since 1941, at which time he bought 10 cows and two bulls from J.D. Hudgins of Hungerford, Texas. Mr. Buie operates 1,800 acres with 700 being in cotton, and is credited with being the first to bring Brahmans into his particular part of the country. He is very anxious for all readers to know that the Brahman is not a wild animal but that they are extremely easy to train, particularly to halter break. He states that, at about 3 months of age, he halters his calves, ties a rope to the halter, and allows them to drag the rope when not tied up. The next step in his gentling process is to tie the calves for about three months, visit them several times a day, rub them, and convince them of his friendliness. Then these calve are taught to lead, being led back and forth in a small enclosure. Then they are moved from near his

farm repair shop where there is considerable amount of noise, engines, and tractors running. Here they are tied up for about a week or so until they are accustomed to the noise and strange surroundings. Mr. Buie feeds his Brahmans principally on oats with a little cotton seed meal and alfalfa hay and states that his animals are doing extremely well in northern Louisiana and stand the winter temperatures with no ill effects and are extremely good hustlers. His Brahman calves are thrifty, grow off fast, and meet the market demand. The Brahman breed is expanding rapidly throughout Louisiana and this state has been the scene of some of the greatest experiments that have proved the breed’s adaptability, particularly to the Gulf Coast region. Brahman Breeder Feeder October, 1948 E.G. Stone, Editor “This Magazine Has Sold Brahmans To the Beef Producing World”


Insprirational Corner

Fun and memorable quotes to live by.....

April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 105


Advertising Index 3D Cattle Company……………..................……………97 3X-HK……………………………………………………97 4N Ranch………………………………............…………96 ABBA…………………………..……………….......BC Alford Cattle Company…………………………........…..85 Andrews Polled Brahmans………………....………….103 B & P Brahmans……………………………….......…......93 Bailey Brahmans……………………….................………98 Bar Crescent D Ranch…………………........……….…...93 Bar W Ranch……………………......……...……………..97 Barthle Brothers Ranch………………….....…………...93 Beard Navasota Veterinary Clinic……….....…………103 Bentke Cattle Company…………………….....………..97 Big Hat Cattle…………………………………………….97 Bovine Elite……………………………….……………103 Broken Triangle Cattle.......................................31,45,46,47 Brushy Creek Custom Sires……………………...............97 Bryant Red Brahmans…………………………................98 Buck N Hoss Cattle………………………………………94 Bud Cross Ford…………………………………………43 Bulls Eye Ranch…………………………………54,55,98 Butler Polled Brahmans…………………………………98 Caldwell Livestock Commission…………………...........81 Cattle In Motion…………………………………………..51 Charlie Hurston Cattle……………………......………......94 Circle H Ranch………….............…………………….71,93 Circle T Cattle Co………………………………………94 D Bar Ranch……………………………………………94 Diamond A Ranch………………………………………93 Dooley Farms……………………………………………..95 Double A Ranch……………………………………..........98 Double C Bar Ranch………………………………………93 Dubina Rose Ranch……………………………………….98 Dyess Farms…………………...........................................96 Dykes Farms………………………….........…..................96 El Salinas Ranch………………………………………29,98 England Cattle Co…………………………………IFC,99 F&R Brahmans…...………………………………………95 Fat Dog Cattle Company……………………...………....99 Ferguson Cattle………………………………………….95 Five Oaks Cattle…………………………………………96 Fontenot’s Red Brahmans…………………….................95 Graham Land and Cattle Co…………………… ……....21,99 H B Braswell Red Brahman……………………..................99 H.O.B.O. Cattle Company……………………………....99 Heritage Cattle……………….....……………………...9,99 Horse Stomp Ranch…………......………………………..96 HRW Cattle Co…………………………………...............95 IS Ranch………………...………………….................39,93 Island Brahmans……………....………………….………95 106 | The American Brahman Review® | April 2013

JT Brahmans…………………………………................100 JW Brahmans…………………………………. ……..…100 JW Red Brahman Ranch………………………………100 J.D. Hudgins, Inc. Locke Division…………………... ...…4,5 J.D. Hudgins, Inc…………………………………….16,17 J.H. Novak & Sons Ranch……………………………….99 Ja Images………………………………………………..103 Joyce Custom Fitters……………………….......................99 Ka-Wai Ranch…………………………….......................100 Kawasaki of Caldwell…………………………………….37 Key Brahmans…………………………......……………100 Kratzer Brahmans………………………………………...95 L2 Ranch…………………………………………………94 La Muneca Cattle Co………………………………….3,100 Lanny Sullins Brahman Cattle…………………………..100 Lazy D Farms…………………………………………….96 Leo Casas III……………………………………………..98 Lindley Brahmans…………………......………………..100 Longview Ranch………………………..………………101 M. James Brahmans……………………………………...95 McKenney Farms……………………………………...101 Moreno Firms……………………………………............94 Morrison Farms…………………………………………..97 Oden Ranch………………………………………40,41,101 Ova Genix……………………………………... ………..103 Parish Brahmans……………………………….. ……….101 Pharmacy and Livestock Supply, Inc……………………103 Post Oak Ranch……………..…………………………..101 Privi Ranch…………………….....…….…..59,60,61,67,69 Quality Genetics……………......……………………….103 RB Ranch…………......………………………………….13 Reese Ranch…………….....……………………………101 Rocking B Cattle………………………………………..96 Rocking S Ranch………...……………………………….94 Salinas Ranch………......…………………….................101 Satterfield Ranch……………………………………......15 Service Semen Texas………………………………......IBC Southern Cattle Company…………..…………………….94 St. Cyr Imperators………………………………………101 Sunnyside Ranch………………….…………………….102 Tic Tac Toe Ranch…………………………..................102 Tipp Ranch……………………………………...............102 Triton Farms……………………………………..............96 V8 Ranch…………………………..................32,33,65,102 Valenta Cattle Company…………………………………97 Vogue Farms…………………………………................102 Watkins Brahmans………………………………………102 Whitlock Cattle Company……………………... ….…....102 Windy Hill Ranch…………………………….................102 YP Brahmans…………………………………................102


April 2013 | The American Brahman Review速 | 107



Brahman Review - April 2013