Page 1

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT Green Market Study 2017 the Nordics

WWW.RAMBOLL.COM


2

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

CONTENT

INTRODUCTION 3 DRIVERS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

4

SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS

6

TRENDS AND TECHNOLOGIES

8

HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

10

GREEN BUILDING TOOLS AND CERTIFICATIONS

12

SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT AND DISCLOSURE

14

HOW THE STUDY WAS CONDUCTED

18

OUR APPROACH

20

GLOSSARY 22 GMS TEAM

Front page photo: Navitas, Denmark © Adam Mørk

23


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

INTRODUCTION This Green Market Study (GMS) report is the fifth of its kind providing an overview of real estate business trends and developments related to sustainability and green building*. This survey is a result of collaboration between Ramboll experts working in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, making it a Nordic study. The topics were selected in co-operation with specialists from various fields of expertise within Ramboll. You can read more about how the study was conducted on page 18. The reason for this study is that we strongly believe in sustainability. Our mission is to create sustainable societies where people and nature flourish. We want to create value for our clients and we believe that sustainability is essential to solutions that maintain their value in this ever-changing world. Urbanisation, social inequality and climate change represent three global megatrends that will put humankind to the test over the next decades. Under these increasingly challenging conditions, sustainability will be the key to finding solutions that enable humans to thrive, while respecting and cherishing our planet. We highly appreciate any feedback and comments to greenmarketstudy@ramboll.fi

Green Market Study team Ramboll

* The previous studies conducted in 2008, 2010 and 2012 were known as Pöyry Green Market Studies. Since 2014, the study has been conducted by Ramboll. In 2014 Ramboll became one of Finland’s largest consulting companies through acquisition of a substantial part of Pöyry’s building services including engineering, real estate consulting, project management and urban and regional planning operations.

This year’s study shows more clearly than ever that the Real Estate and Construction industry now see sustainability as a key business driver. It is understood that sustainability is not just a marketing issue but a fundamental enabler of profit and revenue growth. It is not just about protecting the environment; it is also about the economic and the social aspects. Sustainability translates into more cost efficient operations, higher staff satisfaction and productivity, lower vacancy rates and lower investment risk. In short sustainable buildings mean better business. In Ramboll we are encouraged by the development and we are hoping to see even more progress in the coming years. We have not yet reached the point where buildings have a net positive impact on the environment but this would be the ultimate goal.

Lars Ostenfeld Riemann Group Director for Buildings

3


4

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

DRIVERS FOR SUSTAINABILITY Within the Real Estate and Construction (REC) industry in the Nordics, sustainability is considered an important factor for successful business operations. According to the survey, the most important reasons to prioritise sustainability in organisations working within the REC industry are (with share of all answers in %): 1. Sustainability is a fundamental prerequisite for all business operations (21%)

When compared to answers from previous Green Market Studies, the importance of legislation and regulation, rising energy and other resource costs, as well as company brand and image, have decreased as drivers for sustainability. It seems that sustainability has slowly but surely taken its place at the core of business operations within the industry.

2. Stakeholder requirements (investors, clients, suppliers, business partners) (14%) 3. Sustainability provides the means to develop the company’s brand and image (14%) There are some differences between the Nordic countries. While the Finnish answers resemble the overall results pretty much, the Danish respondents emphasise business development and opportunities related to sustainability. The Swedes consider stakeholder requirements and the intentions of organisation’s senior decision makers as most important, while the Norwegians find image and brand questions as most relevant.

90 %

CONSIDER SUSTAINABILITY IMPORTANT FOR SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS OPERATIONS.


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

Ramboll Head Office in Denmark. © Morten Larsen

5


6

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS Sustainability within the REC industry is connected of course to building performance. How well do the buildings we construct and manage perform in relation to people and the planet, and how profitable are they for their owners? When asked about most important qualities of sustainable buildings, the respondents valued:

1. REDUCED OPERATING COSTS

2. HEALTHIER AND MORE

COMFORTABLE SPACES

3. HIGHER OVERALL QUALITY

4. INCREASED EMPLOYEE/ TENANT PRODUCTIVITY


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

According to experiences of GMS respondents, sustainable buildings have*: * 3-5 % higher property value * 3-5 % higher rent level * 3-5 % lower vacancy rate * 5-10 % lower operational costs compared with ‘traditional’ buildings. On the other hand, investment costs related to sustainable buildings vs. traditional one are 3-5% higher.

*median values

91 % 79 % 63 % 54 % 7%

According to GMS responses about new construction and major renovation projects executed in the Nordics, the most commonly incorporated sustainability features are energy efficiency, material efficiency and indoor environmental quality. As many as 97 % of respondents implement energy efficiency features in their projects. Investments in site ecology enhancement are rarely implemented. This is in line with the findings presented above as the GMS respondents value lower operational costs related to sustainable buildings. Energy and material efficiency result also in economic savings, while site plantings are usually seen to cause rising maintenance costs in addition to investment costs. Water efficiency is not considered as important in the Nordics where water does not currently present an issue environmentally or economically. The responses are presented below in figure 1.

6%

FIGURE 1 SUSTAINABILITY FEATURES

What sustainability features do you usually strive for to implement when doing major renovation or new construction projects? Energy efficiency Indoor environmental quality

Site selection (public transport and pedestrian/cyclist accessibility, adjacent services)

Material efficiency, waste prevention and recycling Water efficiency Enhancement of site ecology

7


8

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

TRENDS AND TECHNOLOGIES

Sunhouse, Denmark.

As part of the ever-changing world and business environment, the construction and real estate industry is facing many changes as well. Climate change, urbanisation, population growth and decreasing natural resources are a few examples of changes taking place around us. While population is globally increasing, we in the Nordics face the consequences of an ageing population. In order to construct sustainable buildings and cities, we need to understand local conditions and to address the most important issues within this context.

In the Nordic countries and in the real estate and construction industry, the most important current trends are considered to be (with share of answers in %): 1. Life cycle thinking and management (22%) 2. Multi-functioning and adaptability of premises (14%) 3. Urbanisation and rural depopulation (14%) 4. New ways of working (12%) 5. Carbon neutrality and climate change mitigation (12%) ‘Life cycle thinking and management’ is considered the most important trend among respondents in each country except Norway where ‘new ways of working’ is seen as most important for the REC industry with 16% of responses. ‘New ways of working’ was also seen important especially by tenants and property owners. Also the ‘circular economy’ ranked as the third most important trend for the Danish market with a share of 13% of responses.


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

DIGITAL SOLUTIONS The REC industry is argued to be one of least digitalised industries1. The GMS participants were also asked to identify the most important technologies for the REC sector. In the Nordics, there seems to be rather strong trust in Building Information Modelling (BIM) and expanding its use to other building life cycle stages than design, i.e. building use and end-of-life stages. This technology supports the aim to strengthen ‘life cycle thinking and management‘ within the sector.

In addition to the top three most important technologies, the respondents value industrialisation of the construction process (such as deliveries of larger assemblies to the site) (with 11% of responses), use of a building certification system to assess and communicate building sustainability qualities (10%), and increased focus on Nearly Zero Energy Buildings due to national implementation of the EU’s Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (9%).

In addition to BIM, the respondents trust in the development of on-site renewable energy, decentralised energy production technologies and demand response, as well as broader use of sensors and automation in energy and indoor environmental quality management.

GMS respondents put least importance on Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), 3D printing and utilisation of open data in building design and maintenance. This might be because these terms and their possible applications for the industry are not yet clear nor well known.

The most important technologies for real estate and construction industry in the Nordic countries (with share of answers in %): 1. Wider application of Building Information Models (BIM) in use and end-of-life stage of building life cycle (18 %) 2. On-site renewable energy production, decentralized energy production and demand response (15 %)

When asked how well the REC sector has succeeded in offering solutions and new services concerning the trends and technologies presented above, only 16 % answered “very well” or “well”, while 33% said “not that well” or “not well at all”. Half of the respondents are neutral on the issue.

3. Sensors and automation (in for example energy, indoor environmental quality and waste management) (14 %)

1

McKinsey&Company (2016) Imagining construction’s digital future

Energy transition enables new kind of possibilities for buildings to increase renewable energy and energy storage systems. The Finnish national main grid offers special possibility to participate to demand response markets and to control and operate buildings proactively according to grid frequency and market price. New service models can minimize or eliminate the owners’ need for equity. Service agreement models can even generate investment projects with positive cash flow. Anssi Laaksonen Unit Manager, Building performance Siemens, Building Technologies Division

Our energy system is undergoing significant shifts from centralised one- to-one networks to complex many-to-many networks with multiple inputs, users and providers with flexible two-way energy flows. This generates many possibilities for the building sector, but also the need to evaluate the building’s performance not only on an annual or monthly basis but also on a minute-to-minute and hour-to-hour basis. Our projects in Finland have shown that optimisation of building technical systems on a minute basis and participating to demand response market generates significant potential for cost savings and revenue for building owners that should be evaluated as part of the design or consulting process. Smart buildings that are able to meet the requirements of both users and energy infrastructure achieve win-win scenarios for both parties.* Mika Kovanen Department Manager Ramboll Finland

* Ramboll has collaborated with Siemens on several projects in Finland in finding the most profitable solutions for clients concerning on-site renewable energy production, decentralised energy production and demand response.

9


10

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

30%

30%

67%

1. EMISSIONS OF HAZARDOUS

2. DAYLIGHT AND

CHEMICALS FROM CONSTRUCTION

MATERIALS INTO INDOOR AIR

3. THERMAL COMFORT

LIGHTING QUALITY

19 %

19 %

11 %

4. ACOUSTIC COMFORT

5. SPACES ENABLING AND

6. SPACES PROMOTING PHYSICAL

PROMOTING HUMAN

ACTIVITY AND ERGONOMICS

INTERACTION

11 %

9% 2%

7. VIEWS OUT AND VISUAL

8. ACCESSIBILITY (UNIVERSAL/

9. AVAILABILITY OF RECREATIONAL

STIMULUS

INCLUSIVE DESIGN)

INDOOR AND OUTDOOR SPACES


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

HEALTH AND WELL-BEING As building users, we spend approximately 90% of our time indoors2. Salaries and other staff related costs account for approximately 90% of companies’ operating costs3. The REC sector thus has a great responsibility as well as opportunities to influence and improve the well-being of people and societies in general.

Recently an increased focus on health and well-being issues can be seen within the industry. World Green Building Council published their report Health, Wellbeing & Productivity in Offices – The Next Chapter for Green Building already in 20143. Consequently, there are an increasing number of tools and certification systems to help incorporate well-being aspects into building design and management. Examples are the International WELL standard* and the Health and Well-being module of GRESB Real Estate assessment. The Green Market Study participants were asked which building related health and wellbeing effects they consider most important for the health and productivity of building users. The results are listed on the left (with share of answers in %). Of the range of possible choices, one stood out as the most popular. Two of three respondents designated ’Emissions of hazardous chemicals from construction

* WELL is still little used in the Nordics as 71% of GMS respondents are not familiar with it and only 2% have used it so far. In Sweden, however, 10% of respondents stated that they are going to use the WELL building standard in future projects.

materials into indoor air’ to be the most important. This result bears witness to the increased interest on materials and chemicals and their possible effects on our health. There is an increased demand for research and documentation of these effects. The effects ‘Daylight and lighting quality’ and ‘Thermal comfort’ both get one third of the respondents’ votes. They are both rather directly perceivable and the main contributors to the experienced indoor environment. On the other hand, ‘Availability of recreational indoor and outdoor spaces’, ‘Accessibility (universal/inclusive design)’ or ‘Physical activity and ergonomics’ are considered less important compared to those mentioned above. This does not mean these are not important, but simply that other effects have been indicated as more important in this relation.

2

Klepeis et al. (2001) The National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS) A Resource for Assessing Exposure to Environmental Pollutants. the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

3

World Green Building Council (2014) Health, Wellbeing & Productivity in Offices - The next chapter for green building

11


12

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

GREEN BUILDING TOOLS AND CERTIFICATIONS There are many tools that help the industry to incorporate sustainability into construction projects and management of existing buildings. Environmental building certifications are also handy in communicating these efforts to stakeholders. Most tools are used internationally to serve the global real estate market. To find out how these tools are used in the Nordic construction and real estate sector, questions were asked about what systems the respondents use and why, and how they foresee the future of these tools.

The most used certification tools in each country are (with share of respondents who use or have used the system): Denmark 1. DGNB (62 %) 2. Passive house standard (14 %) 3. Nordic Swan Ecolabel (14%) 4. BREEAM (10 %) Finland 1. LEED (63 %) 2. BREEAM (51 %) 3. Green Office (30 %) 4. Nordic Swan Ecolabel (23 %) Norway 1. BREEAM (78 %) 2. Passive house standard (69 %) 3. Nordic Swan Ecolabel (46 %) 4. LEED (13 %) Sweden 1. Miljöbyggnad (67 %) 2. GreenBuilding (61 %)* 3. BREEAM (46 %) 4. LEED (39 %) In conclusion, the established international systems, LEED and BREEAM, are well-known and used throughout the Nordics, and national systems such as Miljöbyggnad in Sweden and DGNB in Denmark are widely known within their respective countries.

50%

40%

30%

20%

FIGURE 2 SHARE OF CERTIFIED BUILDINGS

What percentage of your company’s portfolio (or construction projects) has gone or is going through green building certification now and in the future? The graphs show the median value of responses.

10%

0% Currently

In 5-10 years

New construction

Existing buildings


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

Top drivers to use certification tools are:

From other building-related tools, both Life Cycle Costing and Life Cycle Assessment-calculations are used by roughly half of the respondents throughout the Nordics. This supports the fact that the respondents consider ‘Life cycle thinking and management’ to be the most important trend within the industry. See the comments below by Ramboll’s experts about these tools. In Finland and Norway, energy performance ratings are also widely used; 85% of respondents have used them in Finland and 77% in Norway.

1. Better quality 2. Enhanced building performance 3. Competitive advantage There still remain constraints for the use of building certifications. For example, the documentation process required for certification application is seen as too extensive and time-consuming and therefore expensive. There are also difficulties in understanding the assessment criteria among GMS respondents. Regardless of the constraints, respondents of GMS view building certifications as a growing market for both new construction and existing buildings within the Nordics (figure 2). According to responses, half of property owners are going to certify 90-100 % of their new construction projects in 5-10 years. The share is considerably lower when it comes to existing building stock where there remains a lot more work to be done.

Panorama Tower © Varma

Responsibility is part of Varma’s core task and strategy. We have already certified 12 office properties with BREEAM In-Use and are also using BREEAM rating system in our biggest construction projects. We aim to certify our most important buildings by 2025. We also control environmental impacts of our own operations by using WWF’s Green Office system. Using these third party accredited environmental rating schemes is a part of the work we are conducting for mitigating climate change and ensuring the well-being of Varma employees and tenants. Johanna Haikala Real Estate Analyst Varma Mutual Pension Insurance Company, Finland

At Ramboll, Life Cycle Costing (LCC) analysis is used to investigate which options are the most beneficial from an economic point of view for our clients. The clients attain a large value from this because with help of LCC we can calculate a product’s or system’s total revenue and cost during its life cycle. Sadly there are still many suboptimal and incorrect usages of this tool in the construction industry regarding what’s possible to calculate and how, but since I started working with LCC in 2008 the interest has been growing steadily – which is very exciting! Erik Sörbring LCC Specialist Ramboll Sweden

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) can enable a quick screening of any systems potential environmental impact. LCA can also provide a very detailed model of any production system, product life cycle or building with information on environmental performance for process or product development, environmental marketing and often cost savings. David Palm LCA Specialist Ramboll Sweden

* The respondents answered Green Office, but most likely there was confusion between WWF’s Green Office and Sweden Green Building Council’s GreenBuilding which is widely used in Sweden, while WWF’ Green Office is mainly used in Finland where it was developed. GreenBuilding was missing from the list of options presented in the survey.

13


14

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT AND DISCLOSURE Monitoring key performance indicators as a basis for effective sustainability management is in wide use throughout the Nordics within real estate and construction sector. As many as 86% of all respondents state that sustainability indicators are being monitored within their organisation.

97 % 79 % 67 %

The primary focus is on monitoring energy performance related Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), such as absolute energy consumption and energy consumption intensity. 97% of respondents say that they follow energy-related KPIs. Water consumption and waste management data are the second-most monitored KPIs. Also the space efficiency and tenant satisfaction are considered important indicators, while greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are monitored only by a minority of the respondents. The share of monitored KPIs of all responses is presented in figure 3 below.

62 % 51 % 50 % 38 % 29 %

FIGURE 3 MONITORED KPI’s

Which of the following key performance indicators do you monitor? Energy (total consumption, intensity) Water (total consumption, intensity) Waste (amount, recycling rate, etc.) Tenant satisfaction Share of renewable energy Space efficiency (m2/person) GHG emissions (total, intensity) Employee absenteeism


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

Sustainability becomes more and more important in the commercial real estate sector, and institutional investors require more thorough integration of ESG-aspects in all our business operations. GRESB real estate assessment is a tool we use for benchmarking and continuous development of our sustainability performance. Heidi Launo Associate and Head of ESG Genesta Property Nordic

One-third of global GHG emissions are caused by buildings4. The Paris Agreement (COP21) underlines the role of the buildings in achieving the global CO2 reduction objectives. It is hence likely that GHG emissions reduction and monitoring will become a more important KPI in the near future. So far the focus has been on energy efficiency and increased share of renewable energy (that lead to fewer emissions) than directly targeting GHG emissions within the REC industry.

4

European Commission (2012) Roadmap - Communication on Sustainable buildings BI Norwegian School of Management.

15


16

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

The industry shows a keen interest in disclosing and communicating its sustainability performance.

REPORTING AND DECISION MAKING In three out of four cases, the monitored sustainabilityKPIs influence decision making in organisations. 27% of the respondents state that the monitored KPIs are also integrated into company strategy; there is a named person in charge of sustainability performance; and there are procedures on how to address non-conformities. This illustrates that sustainability management and KPI’s are an important part of running and developing businesses within the industry. The industry shows a keen interest in disclosing and communicating its sustainability performance (figure 4). The majority of respondents still communicate their sustainability performance only internally. Of all the respondents, 57% disclose and communicate sustainability performance and progress related to monitored KPIs internally, 34% do it externally and 9% don’t do it at all. It could be stated that the stakeholder requests and the pressure for external sustainability disclosure through regulation, like the recently implemented EC directive on non-financial reporting, will increase the external sustainability disclosure and communication within the whole industry. Institutional investors and financiers are among the most significant and active stakeholders striving for sustainability performance disclosure.

9%

33 %

58 %

FIGURE 4 COMMUNICATING AND REPORTING

Do you communicate and report the performance and progress related to the KPIs being monitored?

Yes, internally Yes, externally No

The most used reporting schemes are: 1. GRI G4 with its Construction & Real Estate Supplement (CRESS) (30 %) 2. Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark (GRESB) (30 %) 3. EPRA Sustainability Best Practise Recommendations (12 %) External disclosure on sustainability performance is expected to grow, and even smaller private companies, funds and actors will face this challenge. GRESB Real Estate assessment has increased its significance within the industry in past few years and it is expected to become an even more widely adopted sustainability assessment and benchmark tool among the real

estate and construction industry actors. Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) is traditionally widely applied sustainability reporting framework in different businesses. GRI has recently launched GRI Sustainability Reporting Standards (GRI Standards), replacing GRI G4 and CRESS guidelines in 2018.


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

FIGURE 5 USE OF

Yes

GREEN LEASE AGREEMENTS

No

Are you using green lease agreements?

I don’t know

16 %

64 %

20 %

Oslosolar, Norway

CO-OPERATION REQUIRED

In 2010 the leading Swedish commercial property company, Vasakronan, launched the country’s first version of a green lease. The green lease agreements soon became very popular and, in just a few years, more than a thousand green lease agreements had been signed. Today they are so sought after that the company has decided to make them standard practice and the reason is simple: Vasakronan has a very rational way of looking at this and there simply is no logic in providing the market anything else than green leases. Anna Denell Sustainability Director Vasakronan, Sweden

According to the survey results, tenants wish to have more guidance on how to improve sustainability performance of the premises they operate in and owners trust in sharing sustainability performance -related costs with tenants. This was already visible in Green Market Study 2014, but apparently there has not been much improvement in co-operation in this area between building tenants and owners. While tenants find guidance on indoor environmental quality (23%) and occupant controls related to lighting, temperature and ventilation (30%) especially important, they would also like more information about energy and

water efficiency (21%) and waste management (19%). Only 5% prefer not to have more guidance or incentives. Owners, on the other hand, would like to share responsibility and/ or costs relating to energy and water consumption (65%) and waste management (30%) with their tenants. Only 3% believe that sharing responsibility would not be feasible. Green lease agreements are still rather rarely used as can be seen in figure 5. Only about one out of five respondents has green lease agreement(s) in use. Of all the respondents, the percentage of green lease agreements is highest in Norway – 29%.

17


18

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

HOW THE STUDY WAS CONDUCTED The data for GMS 2016 was collected through an online survey among REC industry professionals: property owners, investors, contractors and tenants as well as industry peers and service providers. The aim of the survey was to gather experiences and opinions relating to sustainable business operations, green building and construction. The survey was conducted between December 2016 and January 2017 with SurveyXact online survey tool. The questionnaire was sent as an e-mail link to REC industry operators in the Nordic countries. It was also possible to participate in the survey through social media, as the survey was promoted on Ramboll’s homepage, LinkedIn and Facebook pages as well as on Twitter. The survey received a total of 387 responses. The figures 6-8 on the adjacent page illustrate the distribution of the respondent groups. In most cases, a country-specific comparison is not representative, as the number of respondents in different countries varies and is often too small for proper statistics. For example the amount of responses from Denmark is too low to be able to fairly compare the results. This is why most of the statistics in this publication are based on answers from all the respondents.


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

FIGURE 6 SHARE OF RESPONDENTS

74%

BASED ON SECTOR Private Sector Public Sector

FIGURE 7 NUMBER OF RESPONDENTS WITH DIFFERENT ROLES

Other includes representatives of for example construction material production, NGOs and education services. Contractor or developer Other operator* Property owner or investor Other Service provider** Property user/tenant Institutional investor

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

FIGURE 8 NUMBER OF RESPONDENTS REPRESENTING DIFFERENT COUNTRIES

Other countries include for example Russia and the Baltics. Other Sweden Norway Finland Denmark

0

* design, urban development, research, consulting ** such as asset management and facility management, maintence

50

100

150

200

19


20

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

‘NO BUILDING IS AN ISLAND’


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

OUR APPROACH Ramboll’s approach to sustainable building design is best described by our motto: ‘No building is an island’. At Ramboll we believe that;

Buildings should be designed to be attractive to individual users. People should feel good in the buildings they live and work in. © Søren Peter Kristensen

Buildings should stimulate people and encourage people to interact with each other Buildings should adapt to the local environment and to their surroundings. The concept of planetary boundaries* presents the framework for development of human society on our planet. Hence, a building should make a net positive contribution to our planet.

* Planetary boundaries present a so called safe operating space for humanity. If these boundaries are crossed due to human actions, the functioning of earth’s natural systems is threatened and the risk of irreversible and abrupt environmental change increases. (Rockström et al. (2009) A safe operating space for humanity. Nature, 461/24)

21


22

SUSTAINABILITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

GLOSSARY In this survey ‘Green/Sustainable Building’ refers to a building where sustainability issues are emphasised throughout the building life cycle. THESE ISSUES INCLUDE 1. Environmental (such as energy, water and material efficiency, alternative transportation and site ecology enhancement) 2. Economic (such as life cycle costing) 3. Social aspects (such as safety, accessibility and health and well-being related issues like indoor environmental quality).

OTHER TERMS Green lease is a model of lease agreement which brings incentives to operations in accordance with sustainable development. The benefits are divided between the contracting parties. The idea is to generate a higher return on investment for the owner and efficient business premises for the occupant. GreenBuilding was an EU initiative in 2004-2014 to promote energy efficiency within the REC industry. In Sweden, the local Green Building Council SGBC has since continued to administrate and develop the certification system. www.sgbc.se/om-greenbuilding Green Office is an environmental management system for offices developed by World Wildlife Fund. wwf.fi/en/green-office GRESB (Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark) is an investor-driven organization committed to assessing the Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) performance of real assets globally. www.gresb.com GRI (Global Reporting Initiative) is an international independent organisation that has developed sustainability reporting standards for communicating the impact of business on climate change, human rights, corruption and others. www.globalreporting.org/Pages/ default.aspx

EPRA (European Public Real Estate Association) is a non-profit association whose mission is to promote, develop and represent the European public real estate sector. www.epra.com DGNB is a sustainability assessment and certification system for buildings and urban districts. DGNB was developed in Germany and is applicable globally. www.dgnb-system.de/en Miljöbyggnad is an environmental assessment and classification system for buildings, developed by Sweden Green Building Council. www.sgbc.se The Nordic Swan Ecolabel scheme is available for around 60 product groups from detergents to buildings and real estate. www.nordic-ecolabel.org LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is an environmental certification system developed and administrated by the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) and used globally. www.usgbc.org/leed BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) is an environmental assessment method and rating system operated by British BRE (Building Research Establishment) and used globally. www.breeam.com


GREEN MARKET STUDY 2017

GMS TEAM LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) is a tool for evaluation and quantification of environmental impacts generated throughout a product’s life cycle from raw material extraction, production and use to end-of-life LCC (Life Cycle Costing) is, according to International Organization for Standardization, a technique that is used for predicting and assessing the cost performance of constructed assets. It is one form of analysis for determining whether a project meets the client’s performance requirements. BIM (Building Information Model) is a computer-generated 3D model of building geometry which contains relevant data to support the entire construction process from design, procurement and construction activities, to actual delivery of the project. When used correctly, BIM allows efficient knowledge sharing and improved collaboration between stakeholders. AR (Augmented Reality) is a technology that places computergenerated overlays on the physical real-world environment. The reality is thus augmented or supplemented by virtual input. An example of augmented reality is Microsoft’s HoloLens technology. VR (Virtual Reality) is a computergenerated simulation of real life environment. Virtual reality replaces the real world, while augmented reality supplements it.

NZEB (Near Zero Energy Building) by definition have very high energy performance, and the low amount of energy that these buildings require comes mostly from renewable sources. The EU Energy Performance of Buildings Directive requires all new buildings to be nearly zero-energy by the end of 2020. All new public buildings must be nearly zero-energy by 2018.

RAMBOLL DENMARK Gitte Gylling Hammershøj Olesen, Sustainability Specialist Andreas Qvist Secher, Sustainability Engineer RAMBOLL FINLAND Anne Kaiser, Lead Consultant

Demand response means change in normal consumption pattern of electricity by an end-use client in response to changes in the price (or other incentives) of electricity over time. New ways of working reflect a shift in workplace management and operations allowing for more flexibility and hopes to attain better employee satisfaction and retention. Examples of applications of new ways of working include telecommuting, remote working and flexible working hours. WELL building standard is a certification tool that concentrates on human health and well-being aspects of buildings and spaces. It is developed by the International WELL Building Institute (WBI). www.wellcertified.com

Johanna Mero, Consultant Silja Nopanen, Senior Consultant RAMBOLL NORWAY Magnus Killingland, Head of Department Monica Kviljo, Environmental Advisor Reet Pedersen, Assistant RAMBOLL SWEDEN Magnus Heier, Specialist – Energy & Indoor Climate David Lindgren, CSR Manager RAMBOLL MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT SWEDEN (SurveyXact) Camilla Gylfe, Analyst GRAPHIC DESIGN/PUBLICATION Laura Mäkelä, Visual Communications Designer

23


ABOUT RAMBOLL

Ramboll is a leading engineering, design and consultancy company founded in Denmark in 1945. We employ 13,000 experts and have a strong presence in the Nordics, North America, the UK, Continental Europe, Middle East and India, supplemented by a significant representation in Asia, Australia, South America and Sub-Saharan Africa. With almost 300 offices in 35 countries, we emphasise local experience combined with a global knowledgebase. We constantly strive to achieve inspiring and exacting solutions that make a genuine difference to our customers, end-users and society as a whole. Ramboll works across the markets: Buildings, Transport, Planning & Urban Design, Water, Environment & Health, Energy, Oil & Gas and Management Consulting.

WWW.RAMBOLL.COM

Ramboll Green Market Study 2017  

Sustainability in the built environment. Watch video: https://youtu.be/Ufc8TIhl_gs

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you