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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM


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Builds Higher-Order Thinking & Reading Skills ………….. Higher-Order Thinking & Reading Skills Reading Levels 3–8 •

• •

Designed to help students build higher-order thinking skills. - Summarizing - Analyzing - Interpreting - Predicting - Evaluating Part 1: Guided Practice Part 2: Independent Practice

Level C D E F G H

Reading Level 3 4 5 6 7 8

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Higher-Order Thinking and Reading Skills • Level G

Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Part 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Part 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Questions and Directions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Common Core Standards Correlated to RALLY!’s Reading Comprehension Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Test-Taking Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part 1: Guided Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Part 2: Independent Practice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S ACKNOWLEDGMENTS IS PERM Executive Editor: Amy Collins Design Director: Jean-Paul Vest Editor: Shelley Wake The New York State Education Department has neither endorsed nor authorized this practice test booklet. ISBN 978-1-4204-5946-3 R 5946-3 Copyright ©2011 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. 1010.MAQ RALLY! EDUCATION • 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545 • (888) 99-RALLY

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Higher-Order Thinking and Reading Skills • Level G

Introduction Test Success Series: Higher-Order Thinking & Reading Skills prepares students to answer higher-order thinking questions on tests. Higher-order thinking skills include: Summarizing, Analyzing, Inferring, Interpreting, Predicting, and Evaluating. Each of the Higher-Order Thinking Skills are made up of different reading comprehension skills. Summarizing: Main Idea, Cause/Effect, Compare/Contrast Analyzing: Cause/Effect, Compare/Contrast, Fact/Opinion Inferring: Conclusions, Inferences, Predictions Interpreting: Conclusions, Inferences, Predictions, Character-Plot-Setting (fiction) Predicting: Cause/Effect, Predictions Evaluating: Author’s Point of View/Purpose, Fact/Opinion, Compare/Contrast

Part 1

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part 1 provides instruction and practice in answering questions using higher-order thinking skills. Students read one literary passage and one informational passage and answer the multiple-choice questions that follow each passage. Each question has a hint that provides guidance on how to answer the question.

STER. . A M E Y WAY ACKLIN INthinking N L A B Part 2 provides additional practice in answering questions using higher-order A CED follow each Uthat S NOTquestions I D skills. Students read passages and answer the multiple-choice O T I R . P E REinformational passages. GHTEDpassages Band I passage on their own. Part 2 includes bothPYliterary R O T K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B Questions and Directions N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T O only includes multiple-choice questions. Each TH & Reading Higher-Order Thinking IS NSkills N O I S IS question offers four PERMpossible answer choices. Students should review the questions and Part 2

four choices carefully and select the answer they think is best.

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Higher-Order Thinking and Reading Skills • Level G

Common Core Standards Correlated to RALLY!’s Reading Comprehension Skills College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading The standards on the following pages define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate. Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Skill 1: Facts and Details Skill 10: Draw Conclusions Skill 11: Make Inferences

2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

Skill Skill Skill Skill

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

1: 2: 4: 5:

Facts and Details Main Idea Language and Vocabulary Character, Plot, and Setting

.

ER Skill 5: Character, Plot, and STSetting A M E IN Skill 6: Cause and WAY. KLEffect C Y A N L A B A Skill 7: and Contrast OTCompare ED IN N C U S I D Skill 9: Prediction O T I R

REP TED. H E G B I R O COPY IS BOOK T Craft and Structure S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M 4. Skill 4: Language and Vocabulary GIVE HIS SA Ias OT are N S Interpret words T and phrases they used in a text, Skill 14 Prior Knowledge N O I S S I including determining technical, connotative, and PERM and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. figurative meanings,

5. Skill 3: Sequence Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

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Skill 12: Point of View and Purpose Skill 13: Literary Forms and Sources

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Higher-Order Thinking and Reading Skills • Level G

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Not Applicable Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.* 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Skill Skill Skill Skill Skill

9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Skill 7: Compare and Contrast Skill 12: Point of View and Purpose

1: 2: 6: 7: 8:

Facts and Details Main Idea Cause and Effect Compare and Contrast Fact and Opinion

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

Not Applicable

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Test -Taking Strategies There are six steps that you can follow to become a better test taker.

1. Relax: Everyone gets nervous about tests. It is normal. Try to relax and not worry! 2. Listen: Listen to and read all the directions carefully! Ask your teacher to explain any directions you do not understand.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

3. Read: Read each question and answer very carefully! 4. Think: If you are not sure how to answer a question right away, STER. . A M E relax and give yourself some time to think Kabout it. Y N C LIincorrect NY WA A BLAare Eliminate answer choices that youOTknow A N I UCED SN I D O T I and choose from those Ethat remain. R . P GHT Dto do.TOMake BE REsure you understand I R • Do what you are asked Y P K CO BOO S K ISquestion I O what the is asking. H O T B LE sureVEyour N FORanswer makes sense. Think it through. M•PMake A S I G S I T TH NO than one answer seems right, pick the answer • IIfS more N O I S IS that sounds best or most correct. PERM 5. Plan Your Time: Do not spend too much time on any one question! If a question seems to take too long, skip it and go back to it later (if possible). Answer the questions you are sure of first. 6. Be Positive: Some questions will be hard to answer and others will be easy. Don’t be concerned with other students. Just concentrate and try your best!

RALLY! EDUCATION We’re All About Student Success!

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Part 1: Guided Practice Part 1 is made up of two passages with questions. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response. Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it. Use the “Hint” after each question to help you choose the right answer.

The Science Fair Project

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

1

Terry was just about to take a bite out of his tuna sandwich when his friend Alicia appeared out of nowhere, startling him so badly that he spilled his water all over the lunch table.

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“Ahhh!” he cried, while quickly grabbing some napkins to mop up the mess.

3 4 5

6

Alicia cringed. “Oh, sorry.”

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A T that Utheir Alicia smiled and told him that she had just CED school S NOheard I D O T I R . P was going to sponsor a science fairIGnext HTEDmonth. E RE didn’t seem very BTerry R O Y T P K O interested until Alicia mentioned BOOstudent with the best project Sthe K IS C Rthat I O H O T B E would win a new FO Nbike. MPLmountain E A V S I G S I T TH IS Na Olittle after hearing this. He and Alicia liked to take Terry perked up N O I S ERMISeverywhere. The friends had a pair of respectable bikes, but theirPbikes “Don’t worry about it.”

both of them were starting to look a little worn. Terry was saving money by doing odd jobs for his parents and Alicia babysat for her neighbors, but it would still be a while before either of them had enough money for a new bike. 7

If Terry could win the science fair, he wouldn’t have to worry about mowing the lawn anymore. He asked Alicia if she knew what her project would be, and before he knew it, she pulled out a list of possible ideas. Alicia was always making lists. She liked to plan things ahead of time, whereas Terry preferred to take a more relaxed approach. All of Alicia’s ideas seemed interesting, but Terry knew that all of them would take a long time to finish. There had to be an easier project that could win first place.

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GUIDED PRACTICE 8

Alicia finally picked a topic and asked Terry if he wanted to go to the library after school. Terry knew that he should probably get to work if he wanted to win that bike, but he had a whole month. He told Alicia that he’d join her some other time. Terry figured he would go home, relax, and think about his project. There would be plenty of time to start tomorrow.

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But the next day came and went, and Terry still had no idea what he wanted to do. Alicia tried to help by suggesting ideas, but Terry thought that they all seemed too difficult. Besides, the sun was shining and it was a great day to head over to the community pool. Terry asked Alicia to join him, but she declined in favor of getting to work on her model of an aquifer system.

10

For the next two weeks, Alicia was especially attentive to the needs of her project. She refused offers to go to the movies, play video games, or even enjoy a game of catch. Meanwhile, Terry participated in all of these activities, but still had not started his project. About two weeks before the science fair, Terry began to feel nervous. He needed to hand in a project proposal to the science teacher, Mr. Hill, and he still had no idea what he was going to do.

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He asked his older brother, Tony, for some assistance. Tony suggested R. MASTEand AY. that he build a model of a volcano because they were easyLIN toE make W LACKa greatINidea ANY to Blike the judges loved when they erupted. This sounded A T D O N next day, CE handed ODUTerry Terry, especially the part about it being easy. IT ISThe R . P D E E R T E if he was sure that IGH O BTerry in his proposal to Mr. Hill. OThe asked YRteacher T P K O C O IS IS B Terry assured Mr. Hill that he this was the project he toTH submit. OKwanted O B R E O L F MP was already on GIVit.EN IS SAworking

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

TH NOT S I N SSIOnext two weeks, Terry slowly started working on his project. ERMIthe POver

Despite his brother’s reassurance, Terry found that building a volcano was a little more complicated than he had originally thought. The papier mâché proved to be difficult to work with and took an eternity to dry. Although he had started the project two weeks before it was due, Terry still found himself working late on the volcano the night before the fair. Now he realized that maybe he should have sacrificed a couple of trips to the park and spent a little more time on his project. 13

8

On the day of the fair, Terry was completely exhausted. When Tony helped him bring the lopsided mound of wire and paper into the gym that morning, Terry was greeted by a terrible sight. The gym was positively brimming with volcanoes! Terry’s mouth hung wide open and his eyes scanned the various volcanoes as Mr. Hill greeted him.

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GUIDED PRACTICE

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“This is why I asked you if you were sure about the volcano. It’s like this every year. Students think that this is an easy, yet impressive project, so there are always at least a dozen volcanoes submitted.”

15

As his teacher walked away to talk with the judges, Terry spotted Alicia next to her project. It was amazing. It had several tiny wells that actually pumped water from the aquifer. He was positive that Alicia would be the winner. Terry congratulated her on her project, but was too ashamed to show her his volcano.

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R. When the fair was finally over, Alicia emerged the winner. As STEhe A M E watched his friend examine her new bike, Terry couldn’tCK help LIN feelingNYa WAY. A L B A had,CEmaybe IN A he T little remorseful. If he had put in as much effortNas Alicia D O U IT IS deserved . Alicia PROitD for all of the would have won the bike. Terry knewHTthat D E E R E G I OB hard work she had done. S COPYR OOK T

17 18

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

OK I HIS B O T B R E O L F P are you?” EN Alicia asked. AMmad, “You’re not THIS S IS NOT GIV N ISSIOnot. “OfERcourse You did an incredible job. I’m the one who waited M P

until the last minute, but be prepared, because next time, I’m going to have an amazing project.” 19

“I’ll be ready. Until then, you want to go for a ride?”

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GUIDED PRACTICE

1

Skill: Character, Plot, and Setting Terry doesn’t start his project right away because— A he wants to find a topic that he will enjoy B he needs to complete all his chores first C he thinks he has plenty of time to finish D he wants his project to be very original

HINT This question asks you to identify the reason for a certain aspect of the passage. What do you think the reason is that Terry does not start his project right away?

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Skill: Draw Conclusions

Which of these is the best summary of this story?

A Terry and Alicia enter the science fair in hopes of winning a new bike. Alicia asks Terry to come to the library with her, but he decides to go home instead. Terry’s brother helps him with an idea for the science fair. ER. B

C

D

MAST E N I L WAY. Terry and Alicia enter the science fair in hopes of winning aKnew bike. Alicia C Y A N L A B IN like everyone T A that EDjust works hard while Terry wastes time. Terry enters a Oproject is N C U S I D O T TED. I O BE REPR else’s, and Alicia wins the bike. H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K Terry wants to enter the science fair O BO R TsoH he can win a new bike. His friend Alicia E O L F P N M A project. works on her VE doesn’t want to go out or spend time with Terry T GIAlicia HIS Sown O T N S I while she is working SION on her project. Terry can’t come up with an idea on his own. S I M R E Alicia P wants to enter the science fair so she can win a new bike. She tries to help

Terry come up with an idea for a project, but he doesn’t seem to care. Alicia gives up a lot of fun activities to work on her project.

HINT Remember, a summary gives you all of the most important information about the story in a few sentences. Carefully read each answer choice and choose the one that mentions all of the major events that took place in the story. Choose the summary that best sums up the entire story.

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GUIDED PRACTICE

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Skill: Character, Plot, and Setting

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Skill: Character, Plot, and Setting

Why does Mr. Hill ask Terry if he’s sure about entering a volcano?

Why are paragraphs 8 and 9 important to this story?

A He wants Terry to lose at the science fair.

A They introduce the story’s main problem.

B He does not think volcanoes are scientific.

B They establish the setting of the story.

C He is not sure that Terry can build a volcano.

C They introduce the story’s characters.

D He knows many students will choose volcanoes.

D They explain how the problem is solved.

HINT

HINT E L P M SA N O I T A C U D E ! Y RALL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

If you’re having trouble with this question, reread the story. What is Mr. Hill trying to tell Terry when he hands in his proposal?

You should reread paragraphs 8 and 9 and the paragraphs around them to answer this question. Think about why this paragraph is important to the plot of the story. Carefully read all of the choices before choosing the one R. that E T S A fits best. Eliminate answer . INE M choices AYthat Wthe Y ACKLcorrect. N L you know Aare not From A B T D IN the one Othat Echoose N C U S I D choices remain, O T I PR BE REthe most sense. thatTO makes

TED. H G I R COPY IS BOOK S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV SION S I M R PE

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GUIDED PRACTICE

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Skill: Draw Conclusions Why does the author describe Terry’s volcano as a “lopsided mound of wire and paper”? A To explain that Terry’s project shows he didn’t put enough time into it B To show that Terry must have dropped his project on the way to the fair C To describe what a real volcano looks like compared to Terry’s project D To show that all of the other volcanoes look the same as Terry’s

HINT Think about what the author is trying to tell the reader by using this description. Carefully read all of the answer choices and pick the one that fits best.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

Go On 12

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GUIDED PRACTICE

Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it. Use the “Hint” after each question to help you choose the right answer.

Transported by Trolleys 1

2

3

It is hard to imagine how people got around before the invention of the automobile. Many of us rely on cars to take us to school, work, or anywhere else we need to go. Cars were not widely available until the middle of the 20th century. Before then, other forms of transportation were used. When you think about older methods of travel, images of horse-drawn carriages or powerful locomotives probably spring to mind. However, another transportation system of the past is making a comeback in many cities across the United States.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Trolleys, or streetcars, were developed in the late 19th century. They were popular in many areas throughout the United States during the early 1900s. The first trolleys were pulled along a track by a team of horses. This system was plagued by a series of problems. The horses could only pull so many passengers at a time and couldn’t work for more STER. . A than a few hours. Also, the animals could travel only short distances. M E IN CKLthe Y WAY Aas N L This forced companies to purchase more horses as Awell supplies A B N I UCED other S NOT Pconsidered I D needed to care for them. Because of this, companies O T I R . RE HTED forms of energy to power trolleys. TO BE PYRIG

CO OOK S B I S K I O H The first Acompletely FOR T trolleys were operated by steam PLE BO Imechanical N M E V S S to limited THIDue engines. NOT G engine space, these trolleys were usually S I N underpowered ISSIOand not practical in cities with steep hills. This led to the PERM

invention of the cable car. Cable cars were pulled along a grooved track in the road by a moving cable that hung above the street. The cable car proved to be an extremely popular mode of transportation. Cities like San Francisco became famous for their cable cars. These vehicles were far more reliable and could carry more passengers than the steam-powered trolleys. Still, cable cars came with their own set of unique problems. The number of cables, pulleys, and tracks involved in a cable car system cost trolley companies large sums of money. These expenses caused the price of passengers’ fares to rise, which led to a decline in ticket sales. Even so, cable cars continue to be used in cities across the country. They often attract tourists looking for a window into our country’s past.

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GUIDED PRACTICE

14

4

Electric trolleys, or trams, were developed around the turn of the century. Many of these trams drew energy from power lines that ran above the street. Officials in some areas noticed that these wires spoiled the beauty of their cities. They began looking for alternative ways of supplying trams with the power that they needed. Several tram systems were designed so that the electrical current ran through the tracks on the road instead of overhead wires. The first functional electric tram lines in the United States were introduced in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. Electric trams soon became the most widely used form of trolleys in the country.

5

From the early 20th century until the end of World War II, trolleys were the preferred method of transportation for city dwellers around the world. Cities like New York and London spent millions of dollars building intricate trolley systems. Trolleys accommodated residents in areas in and around these cities. Trams of all shapes and sizes were used to carry passengers to their destinations. Some trams were even modified to ship small loads of cargo between towns.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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After World War II, trolleys began disappearing from cities. Mass production made automobiles more affordable for the average person. STER. . A M E Cars also had the advantage of being able to go anywhere. were Y WAY ACKLINTrams N L A B A N I T neighboring normally run within the confines of a cityISorNO its UCED suburbs. D O T I R . P E ED a more Technical improvements also made option for GHTbuses BE Rappealing I R O Y T P K CO to travel many people. Buses were BOOlonger distances and were less S K IS able I O H O T B expensive toMoperate FOR The cheaper bus fares began attracting PLE than Ntrams. E A V S I G S I T H more Tcustomers NO the high-priced trams. Many cities around the IS than N O I world closed down their trolley systems to make way for gas-powered S MIS R E P motor vehicles.

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Though trolleys are no longer as popular as they once were, they are still considered an important part of transportation history. New Orleans, Louisiana is still noted for its continued use of trolleys. Other cities, like Dallas, Texas, have set up new streetcar systems to celebrate this transportation of the past. Trolleys have an intriguing history and are a great way to get where you’re going.

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GUIDED PRACTICE

6

Skill: Cause and Effect

7

Skill: Compare and Contrast

Why did many companies stop using horses to pull trolleys?

One similarity between horse-pulled trolleys and cable cars is that both—

A The trolley companies could not control the horses.

A were very inexpensive to build

B The trolley companies worried about the horses’ health. C The horses cost the trolley companies a lot of extra money. D The trolley companies received customer complaints about the horses.

HINT

B could carry a lot of passengers C had a unique series of problems D could be used off their tracks

HINT This question asks you to find how horse-pulled trolleys and cable cars were alike. Carefully read each of the answer choices and pick the one that fits best.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

This question asks you to determine why many companies stopped using horses to pull trolleys. If you’re having trouble, reread paragraph 2 about horse-pulled trolleys. This will help you understand what caused trolley companies to look for alternative power supplies.

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GUIDED PRACTICE

8

9

Skill: Draw Conclusions Read this chart of information from the article. Spoiled the beauty of cities

Widely used across the country

Skill: Point of View and Purpose The main purpose of this article is to— A persuade readers to ride a trolley instead of an automobile B show readers how trolleys changed over many years C explain why trolleys are much safer to use than cars

Wires hung above the street

Developed at the turn of the century

D give readers information about different kinds of transportation

HINT E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Which idea belongs in the empty circle?

A Characteristics of electric trolleys B Advantages of using steam engines

This question asks you to determine the main purpose for writing this article. What did you learn from the article? What effect did it have on you? Read over the answer choices carefully ER. and decide which one A fits STbest.

M WAY. KLINE C Y A N L A B OT A ED IN N C U S I D O T TED. I O BE REPR H G I R D Improvements made to cable Ccars OPY OOK T S B I S K I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S HINT THIS ON IS NOT G MISSI above asks you The graphic PERorganizer C Problems with horse-pulled trolleys

to fill in a circle with some missing information. Read the information already provided in the organizer. Refer to paragraph 4 to find the answer. Read your answer choices and decide which one is the correct answer.

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GUIDED PRACTICE

10

11

Skill: Prediction

Skill: Draw Conclusions

With which statement would the author probably agree?

The reader can conclude that trolleys—

A Trolleys were too expensive to run.

A are now being used more than buses

B Trolleys were too difficult to build. C Trolleys are still widespread today. D Trolleys have an interesting history.

HINT When you read an article, you can learn about the author who wrote it. You can learn from the author’s ideas and knowledge as well as the words he or she uses. Read over each of these statements. Knowing what you do about the author of this article, with which statement would he or she most likely agree? After reading the article, you should have a good idea. Now read the answer choices and decide which best fits with your impression of the author.

B allow people a glimpse into the past C are now much less expensive to ride D are no longer used in other countries

HINT E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Think about what the author says about trolleys today. Use this information to help you answer the question.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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GUIDED PRACTICE

12

Skill: Draw Conclusions Which sentence from the article supports the idea that ticket costs contributed to the decline in the use of trolleys? A They began looking for alternative ways of supplying trams with the power that they needed. B Mass production made automobiles more affordable for the average person. C The cheaper bus fares began attracting more customers than the high-priced trams.

Skill: Compare and Contrast According to the article, which of the following made cars more appealing than trolleys? A Cars were more attractive. B Cars could go anywhere. C Cars caused less traffic. D Cars needed less energy.

HINT If you don’t remember the answer, look back to paragraph 6. The author discusses the decline of trolleys. This will help you understand why cars became more popular than trolleys.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

D Cities like New York and London spent millions of dollars building intricate trolley systems.

HINT

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STER. . A M E Think about which statement supports ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A the idea that ticket costs are one S NOT PRODUCED I T I . reason trolleys are not as widely used GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O as they once were. Reread paragraph K IS C R THIS BOO O O B 6. Read all of the choices N FO MPLE carefully E A V S I G S I T before choosing the best response. TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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GUIDED PRACTICE

14

Skill: Literary Forms and Sources How does the author organize paragraphs 3 through 5? A The author compares trolleys to other forms of mass transportation. B The author explains why trolleys are still being used in some cities. C The author relates several events that helped change transportation. D The author describes the various types of trolleys that were created.

HINT

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Every author must decide how to organize or present ideas in his or her work. This organization can have a great effect on readers. How did this author approach his or her writing? How did he or she present the information to be conveyed to readers?

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Part 2: Independent Practice Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it.

The Girl on the Moon 1

At one time, I felt fortunate to be the first kid to travel to the moon. After my family’s two-day flight, all I wanted was to put on my sweats and hike in the fresh air; however, the first thing I discovered about the moon is that there is no air! To go outside, I have to wear a bulky jumpsuit, an aggravating helmet, and chunky boots. After changing into that weighty attire, I’m in no disposition to embark on a soothing stroll.

2

We moved into a moonhouse near the site where Neil Armstrong positioned the American flag more than a hundred years ago. In fact, directly in the middle of our moon-colony, Mr. Armstrong’s flag continues to fly, and there’s also a roped-off area where his footprints are still impressed into the ground. When my mom showed me, I was rendered speechless, but now I’m aware that no wind exists onER . ST the A M E moon to blow the moondust around, so a footprint can Klinger forever. LIN WAY.

3

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

ANY BLAC A N I T D O N of theOfirst My parents always remind me that being DUCEkids on the IT ISone R . P D E E R T moon is quite an advantage because opportunities. BE Oastonishing YRIGH I Ohave T P K O O C S B I For example, when Omoondust first drizzled down outside my window, I OK HIS T B R E O L F P threw on my VEN hurried outside to build the first moondust SAMmoonsuit GIand S I T H O T N man. Although S good to be first, my parents don’t always understand N Iit’s O I S S I that Eit’s P RM not so great being the only first. I love how my moonbuggy rambles roughly over craters, but I become lonely by myself. I like catching moon-berries effortlessly as they slowly descend after I fling them into space; I just wish I had someone else taking pleasure in these activities with me.

4

20

Instead of a classroom full of kids, every day I walk to my kitchen and activate the blue-board on the wall. A blue-board is just like a blackboard, only all I have to do is think of something and the thought appears on the blue-board. When my teacher, Mr. Leon, wanted to discuss the Grand Canyon, a live video of the landmark appeared instantaneously on the blue-board. What was happening at the Grand Canyon on Earth at that very moment could be observed on my blueboard on the moon. © RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


5

Mr. Leon is not a person, but an android that has been programmed to recognize exactly what I know and what I don’t know. He’s tremendous because he always remembers what baffles me and has no problem slowing down; however, nothing beats having a best friend, or a study buddy, or even a human teacher, just another person who can share experiences with me.

6

I like to reflect on the time when I left home, and my classmates had a going-away party for me. They decorated the classroom with stars and comets and a giant banner that said, “Good Luck, Gracie!” Everyone congratulated me on being one of the first kids to visit the moon. When my friends write me letters they still ask questions: What’s it like to live with 260°F days and -280°F nights? The first few times I answered excitedly, but now I simply yearn for regular days and regular nights. In fact, sometimes when I really miss Earthly things, like the feel of wet grass between my toes, or wind blowing through my hair, or my bare feet propelling a bike to a friend’s house, I go into the kitchen, turn on my blue-board, and concentrate on my old neighborhood, my bygone friends, and even my classroom.

7

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

R.

E Tonight, I reactivate the blue-board and concentrate onE M my ASTold N I L WAY. K All of Amy C Y classroom, which immediately appears on the screen. A N L B T A have D IN my NOwould CEbeen classmates pay attention to Mr. Brown, ITwho U S I D O PR Earth and the D. has drawn REthe TEHe H E seventh-grade teacher if I had stayed. G B I R O OPYsmileSbroadens Cmy OOK T at the idea that they are S moon on the blackboard, so B I K I O H T expect on the moon “when we get BO LE explains FOR to thinking of me. what PHe N M E A V S I G class will be visiting my moon-colony. All of HISclarifies there.” THe that NOT the S I N SIO the wonders ERMIS of the moon are about to get more wonderful now that I P can share them!

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1

Why does Gracie feel so lonely?

4

A She traveled to the moon all alone. B She does not like her teacher much.

In paragraph 1, which words does the author use to create a mood of awkwardness? A I felt fortunate to be

C She is one of few kids on the moon.

B hike in the fresh air

D She thinks her class forgot about her.

C a bulky jumpsuit D a soothing stroll

2

A theme throughout this story is— A a fear of the unknown B forgiving a good friend C sharing good times

5

This story is mostly about— A a person who just wants to stay home B the way people get to travel to the moon

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

D the beauty of family

C the relationship between a girl and her mom

3

Why does Gracie turn on the blueboard at night?

D how it feels to be one of the first kids on the moon

A She wants to look around her kitchen. B C D

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B She misses her seventh-grade A S NOT PRODUCED I T teacher. I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K She cannot sleep and wantsIStoCO BOO S K I O H O T B do work. N FOR MPLE E A V S I G S I T O with TH she could IS Nbe She wishes N O I S IS her friends. PERM

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6

From the narrator’s reaction to her blue-board, the reader can conclude that— A Gracie will complain about the moon to her friends B Gracie will want to talk about Mars with her friends

8

In paragraph 7, the author’s tone is— A hopeful B awkward C lonesome D urgent

C Gracie will visit the Grand Canyon with her friends D Gracie will show the moon to all of her friends

7

Why is paragraph 3 important to this story?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A It introduces the main problem. B It establishes the setting.

C It introduces the characters. D It explains the solution.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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23


Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it.

Discovery 1

When Ms. Trilby announced that the International Scholars would embark on a field trip to Mexico, all 12 members erupted with enthusiasm. Although most of the scholars had visited at least one foreign country, I had never left my hometown. I had always dreamed about being an explorer. I devoured books about explorers, and my favorite was about the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. America was named after him, and I always dreamed that I would find new worlds like Amerigo did, and people might name those places after me. The other scholars often reminded me that all of the new worlds had already been discovered, and I would have to be happy reading about explorers and not actually being one.

2

International Scholars is a group of students who love to learn about different cultures. Ms. Trilby, our director, explained to the scholars that she had written to the group’s headquarters boasting about how we had organized a Mexican Day at our school and had created our own Mexican artwork. My mom and I had also cooked a big pot of rice and beans, which everyone said they enjoyed. Ms. Trilby sent pictures of R. Mexican Day with the letter. The headquarters wrote back andMsaid STEthey A E WAY. KLIN firsthand would like to send us on a field trip to Mexico to experience C Y A N L A B A IN the culture of which we had learned. IS NOT DUCED

3

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

. IT PRO D E E R T H E G I met atKschool, TO B 20 of us in all: the 12 On the morning of our trip, OPYRwe O C O S B I International Scholars, BOOK Ms. FTrilby, R THISand seven parents. We rode in a E O L P N M E A the airport school IS Sto OT GIVand then boarded the plane that would take us THbus N S I to Mexico. SIONEven though the Mexican S I M R PE is only about 150 miles away, we border

didn’t drive because the International Scholars committee didn’t want us to have to wait in line at the border. They thought we should spend all of our time appreciating Mexico.

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4

Our first splendid stop in Mexico City was at the Palace of Fine Arts to see the Ballet Folklorico, a dance show that celebrates Mexican culture. What immediately jumped out at me were all of the bright colors that decorate Mexico and make everything seem festive. While waiting in the theater for the show to begin, I was fascinated by the vivid murals. I searched for the right vocabulary in my Spanish phrasebook and then asked a worker about the murals. She said that most of the works were by a famous Mexican artist named Diego Rivera.

5

She explained that the Palace of Fine Arts was the best place in the world to see Rivera’s artwork. Rivera was a well-loved artist in Mexico because his art represented the Mexican spirit so well. There was artwork by many other artists in the Palace, but I especially admired Rivera’s work. The Ballet Folklorico was the only thing that affected me as much as Rivera’s work. The dancing was unbelievably lively, and the costumes exhibited the same dazzling colors that appeared in Rivera’s artwork. The Ballet Folklorico was like a Rivera mural came to life!

6

After the show, we visited Alameda Central, the largest park in Mexico City. Beautiful buildings surrounded us on all sides. Ms. Trilby had ordered us all tortas, which were sort of like tacos, but much better. We also bought tamals in the park, which were like nothing I had ever tasted.

7

After lunch we visited Xochimilco (pronounced so-chee-MEEL-ko), a gorgeous area of Mexico City that features countless colorful flowers and TER. Sago, canals in which people travel in brightly colored boats. Long A M E N a tourist WAY. KLIof C Xochimilco was a thriving place to live, but now it isBmore Y A N L A A driftedCEdown D IN the OTand N attraction. Our whole group piled into oneT Iboat U S D O ED. I REPRthe magnificent Tarchitecture waterway, observing the impressive and H E G B I R O Y K T Many people on these COPXochimilco OOfamous. collection of flowers that Kmakes S B I S I O H R T as us, but not every boat contained LE BO theVsame other boats were FOtours Ptaking N M E A S I G art and souvenirs right from their boats! Some IS tourists.TH Merchants sold NOTtheir S I N SIOof bands that played amazing Mexican music as they sailed boats were RMISfull E P down the waterways.

8

On the way home, I thought I’d be bouncing all over the plane with excitement, but instead I was too tired to even keep my eyes open, just like all of the other International Scholars who napped around me. One thing I did realize from this trip is that the people who say there are no more new worlds to explore are mistaken. There are still new places to discover!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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9

This passage is mainly about—

12

A a famous Mexican artist who painted murals

The reader can conclude Xochimilco is— A often filled with many visitors B not open to most foreign tourists

B a park in Mexico where tourists often visit

C home to many types of animals

C a person who learns something in Mexico

D in an area that is hard to reach

D a show that honors the Mexican culture 13

10

Why does the author compare the Ballet Folklorico to a Diego Rivera painting?

Why does the narrator look in the Spanish phrasebook? A The narrator wants to ask a question about the theater. B The narrator is studying the paintings of Diego Rivera.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A To explain to readers that the dancers were painted

B To show readers that the show was about a painting

C To explain to readers that color is part of Mexican culture

11

C The narrator is bored because the show has not begun.

D The narrator does not understand the people in the show.

STER. . A M E D To give readers an example of LIN WAY Y Amerigo ACKnarrator N L A B 14 WhyOdoes the like A N how the people danced I S N T PRODUCED I T I Vespucci? . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO A Italian explorers are the most O O B legendary. PLE N FO Mreaction E A From the narrator’s to Mexico V S I G S I T TH IS NO that— B America was named after Vespucci City, the reader can conclude N O I S S I M R and he wants to be like him. PE will give up the A the narrator dream of being an explorer B the narrator wants to come back to Mexico City some day

C the narrator begins to appreciate her home country more

C He was the first explorer to be an International Scholar. D He loves any and all information about explorers.

D the narrator is considering permanently moving to Mexico City

Go On 26

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Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it.

Rachel Carson: Working for a Better World 1

2

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The youngest of three children, Rachel Carson grew up on a small farm in Springdale, Pennsylvania. When Rachel was a child, her mother encouraged her to learn about the rivers, ponds, and streams surrounding their home. This early education helped inspire a lifelong love of nature in Rachel. The young girl’s other passion was writing. She originally went to school to study writing, but then decided to switch STER. . A M E her focus to marine biology. After graduation, Rachel Kgot LIN a second Y WAY AC years. N L A B A N degree in zoology and then taught that subject Nfor several I OT ED

ODUC IT IS R . P D E E R T IGH Rachel later took a job asPaYRscience writer O BatE the U.S. Bureau of T K O O C O B Fisheries. She becameOonly in history to be hired by OK ISthe Osecond HIS woman T B R E L F P N M the bureau Sas a full-time employee. She worked as a writer on radio GIVE S A I T H O T N scripts. After Rachel N IS had worked at the bureau for a while, one of her O I S S I M bosses that Rachel submit some of her work to a science PERsuggested magazine. Rachel wrote several articles for magazines and newspapers before being contacted by a publishing company. They encouraged Rachel to turn her work into a book. Rachel’s first book about life in the ocean received praise from other scientists, but failed to sell many copies.

3

Despite this setback, Rachel continued writing and eventually became the chief editor of publications for the Fish and Wildlife Service. She continued working on more books in her spare time. Her second and third books became bestsellers and won Rachel several awards. With this success, Rachel was able to quit her job and concentrate on her own writing.

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4

Rachel’s next publication would become the work for which she would forever be remembered. In the 1940s, Rachel became concerned with pesticides, harmful chemicals that were used to keep insects from eating farmers’ crops. Rachel felt that these chemicals, specifically one called DDT, were damaging the environment and the food chain. Her book, Silent Spring, shed light on this problem and sent people around the world into a frenzy. Though many scientists criticized her work, Rachel stood by her claims and continued to fight for tougher restrictions on the chemicals used in pesticides.

5

Her hard work eventually paid off. President John F. Kennedy formed a committee to examine the effect that pesticides had on the environment. DDT was finally found unsafe by this investigation. Rachel’s book helped the public become aware of a major environmental issue. She will always be remembered as a brave scientist who wished to protect our beautiful world.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

28

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15

What is paragraph 1 mainly about? A The popularity of Rachel’s work B Rachel’s job as a science writer C Rachel’s early life and education D The criticism of Rachel’s ideas

16

By using the word frenzy in paragraph 4, the author helps the reader understand that people were— A disinterested B worried C accepting D cheerless

17

18

Which sentence from the article supports the idea that Rachel’s work changed how people thought about the environment? A Her second and third books became bestsellers and won Rachel several awards. B Rachel felt that these chemicals, specifically one called DDT, were damaging the environment and the food chain. C President John F. Kennedy formed a committee to examine the effect that pesticides had on the environment. D Rachel’s next publication would become the work for which she would forever be remembered.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Why did Rachel decide to write Silent Spring? A B C

STER. . A M E She wanted to make money so ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A she could travel the world. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O She wanted to damage the Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO company that produced DDT. O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T She wanted O THto proveIStoNother N O I scientists that she was right. S IS PERM

D She wanted to show people that pesticides were harmful.

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Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it.

A Life Under the Sea: Jacques Cousteau 1

2

30

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Can you imagine spending your days exploring the mysteries of the vast oceans? This was the reality of Jacques Cousteau’s life. As a young child growing up in France, Jacques enjoyed swimming, making home movies, and learning about how machines worked. These early interests would help to shape the young man’s future in a big way. In his late . teens, Jacques enrolled in the French naval academy, where he began STERhis A M E underwater explorations. WAY. KLIN

ANY BLAC A N I T D O CE time to IS N II, Jacques While fighting for the French in World ODUfound IT War R . P D E E R T H develop a machine that allowed to Tstay O BE underwater for longer YRIGdivers P K O O C O IS periods of time. This the OKinvention, HIS Baqualung, is a portable breathing O T B R E O L F apparatus S AMPsupplies IVEN with the air that they need. After the war Gdivers S that I T H O T N ended, JacquesN continued his career as an officer exploring shipwrecks and IS O I S S I developing PERM new techniques to help the navy discover underwater mines.

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3

Though he did well serving his country, Jacques wished to expand his underwater explorations. In 1950, he purchased a ship called the Calypso and traveled to some of the most fascinating waters in the world to study the creatures of the oceans. Jacques documented his travels in books and on film in the hopes of increasing the public’s knowledge about what lies under the sea. His work was extremely popular all over the world. Jacques won several awards for his work and was later asked to make a television series. For eight years, The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau could be seen on television screens in dozens of countries. The show provided millions of viewers with an underwater look at our planet.

4

Jacques later decided to use his popularity to educate the public on environmental issues. In 1960, a company sent a train full of radioactive waste toward the ocean, where it was to dump a large amount of the harmful materials into the water. Just before the train reached its destination, the train had to make an unexpected stop. Jacques and a group of volunteers were blocking the train’s path. They refused to move, and the company was forced to send the train back.

5

The oceanographer’s interest in protecting the environment from man-made dangers also led to the founding of the Cousteau Society. The group still exists and now has more than 300,000 members.

6

Jacques love of the ocean led to several important inventions that are still used today. His explorations provided the scientific community STER. . with critical knowledge about the world below the waves. Jacques’ A M E CKLINthe many amazing work is continued today by his two sons Y WAY Aand N L A B A N I D OT scientists he helped to inspire. ODUCE T IS N

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

TED. I O BE REPR H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV SION S I M R PE

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19

Why does the author start this article by asking a question?

21

A To capture the reader’s attention immediately

Why does the author include additional information about Jacques at the end of the article? A To inform readers that Jacques will be remembered as a brave man

B To show the reader that sea exploration is fun

B To let readers know that more scientists are studying oceans today

C To warn readers about the dangers of the sea

C To explain to readers how scientists have improved Jacques’ ideas

D To explain why Jacques is still remembered

D To show readers that Jacques’ work continues to be important today 20

How does the author organize paragraphs 1 through 3?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A The author explains the problems Jacques faced in exploring the oceans.

B The author compares the study of oceans before and after Jacques’ work.

C The author relates important events in Jacques’ life in chronological order. D

22

Why did Jacques choose to film a television show? A He wanted to be able to finally quit his job as an officer of the navy.

B He wanted to be able to make . own enough money to buy STERhis A M E ship. WAY. CKLIN

ANY BLA A N I T D O E N wantedODtoUCshow people how ITCIS He R . P D E E R T wastes harm the BE YRIGH OOK TOradioactive The author describes the lasting P O C ocean. K IS on R THIS B Ohad effect that Jacques’Lwork O B E O F P the world.HIS SAM D He wanted to bring the beauty of GIVEN T O T N S I the oceans into peoples’ homes. SION S I M R PE

Go On 32

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Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it.

Here To Help 1

“Helping is such a hassle,” I sullenly explain to my mother, but she doesn’t understand. I had planned to start my summer reading on our four-hour flight, but Mom has alternate plans for me.

2

“I’m depending on you to lend a hand on vacation,” Mom declares seriously.

3

“I want to help, but I need to finish my reading and summer’s almost finished!”

4

“Your brother and sister admire you, Maria,” Mom continues. “You’re an example of how they should behave, so just attempt to be considerate of them, okay? Let them have the window seat so that you can read, and be a responsible big sister!”

5

When I was my sister’s age, Mom showed me the curve of the earth and the ripple of billowy clouds from an airplane window. I still love to stare out the window whenever I fly. Sure, I would apply myself to ER. reading more if I didn’t sit by the window, but Adam and Maggie STwill A M E probably bother me with a million questions and almost certainly WAY. KLIN climb C Y A N L A B IN over my lap repeatedly to use the bathroom.IS NOT A UCED

6

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

. IT PROD D E E R T H E G B my first book, but When I awoke this morning, KtoTObegin OPYRI Iintended O C O S B I K me as Rsoon Adam attached himself THISas I stepped out of my room with BOOto E O L F P N M A IVE help packing his luggage. He insisted he the explanation OheT Gneeded THIS S that N S I didn’t haveSanything to occupy him on the flight, and he needed a ION S I M R variety PE of activities.

7

Mom frowned at me and told me to understand his viewpoint, so I shoved an assortment of coloring books and playthings into his backpack. When Maggie witnessed what we were doing, she wanted an activity bag too. Aside from reading, I still needed to get my own bags ready, so I crammed two dolls into a backpack for her, stomped into my bedroom, and shut the door because I was irritated.

8

Now, Mom is requesting my help because she doesn’t seem to understand that I’m willing to baby-sit occasionally, but I want to be by myself sometimes too.

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9

10

11

12

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Dad informs Mom we have an hour before boarding the plane so we should proceed to the gate; therefore, Adam and Maggie each eagerly grab one of my hands, and I sigh, slouch, and shuffle them along.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

There’s a clump of people outside the restaurants and magazine shops, where people idly stare at merchandise and sift lazily through newspapers. While watching a man browse through the bookshop, I imagine being able to get lost in a book and decide that I just can’t spend my vacation babysitting. People wander dazedly in and out of shops, a family pushes past me, and my brother and sister yank me in different R. directions. I turn toward my parents to advise them that I won’t be STEable A M E AY. to help them with babysitting this week after all. BLACKLIN A NY W

OT A ED IN N C U S I D O T . I sisterEloyally Where are my parents? My brother REPR follow me, but TEDand H G B I R O when they see me swinging for our parents, they OK T COPYaround, Ohunting S B I S K I O H O appear frightened. thinking, FOR T I calmly explain that we’ll have no PLE BWithout N M E A V S I G problem our and I make a goofy expression to lighten THISlocating NOT parents, S I N their moods. ISSIO PERM Adam and Maggie realize something is wrong: their eyes search the crowds for our parents and their hands slip from my grip. I remember what Mom told me— that my brother and sister respect me— and I reassure them that everything will be all right.

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13

People cluster around the television screens that display information about the flights, and I realize I can probably use the screens to discover where my parents are headed. Tightening my grip around my brother’s and sister’s hands, I push through the crowd, and we approach the screens and search the flight information.

14

We’re flying to New York, so I look for that destination and see three listings: one is currently boarding, one leaves in an hour, and the third departs tonight. We would have arrived earlier if our flight was currently boarding, and we wouldn’t be here yet if we didn’t need to leave for eight more hours, I reason.

15

The middle flight departs from gate B13, according to the screen. The letter “B” is everywhere in this corridor, so we must be in the correct area, and we are standing directly in front of a sign that says “Gates 23 through 27.” Still holding my brother’s and sister’s hands, I fearlessly begin to walk toward Gate 23 and watch the signs display lower numbers as we move. In the distance, I see Gate 13 and my parents speaking frantically to a policeman. The sight of them relieves me, and I beam as we approach. “Mommy,” my brother exclaims as he breaks away from me and sprints to her side.

16

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

My parents smile at the officer. “Looks like you were able to find us,” Mom says and politely thanks the policeman. “My daughter already saved the day,” she tells him, and I feel pretty good about myself STER. . suddenly. Maybe it’s not such a hassle to help, I realize as my Mparents A E AY LIN grin proudly. ANY W BLACK

OT A ED IN N C U S I D O T TED. I O BE REPR H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV SION S I M R PE

23

A theme throughout this story is—

24

The reader can infer that Maria—

A the memories of childhood

A is the oldest child in her family

B relaxing on vacation

B has the lead role in a play this year

C being responsible D the enjoyment of reading

C is afraid of flying by herself D has read many books this summer

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35


25

26

Maria’s flashback to the morning helps the reader understand—

27

From Maria’s reaction to her siblings, the reader can infer that—

A that Maria’s required reading is incredibly difficult

A the siblings are disrespectful to Maria

B that Maria’s siblings regularly rely on her for help

B the siblings do not want to be with Maria

C that Maria’s parents don’t trust her with her siblings

C Maria worries the siblings will receive a lot of attention

D that Maria’s excited about the vacation

D Maria wishes she had more time by herself

Which of these is the best summary of the story?

28

Why is paragraph 13 important to this story?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

A Maria browses a bookshop for a magazine to read. Her brother and sister hold her hand. They get lost and a policeman finds them.

A It introduces the main problem. B It establishes the setting.

C It introduces new characters. D It explains a solution.

B Dad tells Mom that there is one hour before the plane leaves. STER. . A M E Mom sits in the window seat of AY Y Wmind ACKLINchange N L A B 29 WhyOdoes Maria her A the plane and watches the clouds. N I D UCEparents? S N Thelping I D O T I about her Mom and Dad are relieved to see R . P GHTED BE RE I R O Y the children. T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO A Maria realizes that it is not such O O B E theirEN FO a hassle. C Adam and Maggie MPLpack A V S I G S I T bags. When TH they get IS NtoO the B Maria’s parents give her a reward. N O I S airport they color in their S I M R PE books. They find their C Maria’s parents force her to babysit. coloring parents talking to a policeman. D Maria decides that her siblings D Maria’s mom needs her help on vacation. Maria feels that she never gets any time to herself. She loses sight of her parents while at the airport and she takes good care of her brother and sister. She finds her parents at the gate.

36

dislike traveling.

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30

In paragraphs 1 through 3, the narrator’s tone is— A satisfied B confident C nervous D grouchy

31

Look at the diagram of information from the story.

Cause

Effect

Adam asks for help packing a bag.

Maria helps Adam to pack his bag.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Adam and Maggie grab Maria’s hands.

Maria pays attention to the people in the store.

Maria loses sight of her parents.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . What belongs in the empty box? GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O BOO S K IS C toys. I O H A Maria’s sister asks for Ehelp packing O T B N FOR MPL E A V S I G S I T B Maria’s mom TH says the NO admire her. IS kids N O I S IS to go to the right gate. C Maria’s P dad ERMsays D Maria’s parents talk to a police officer.

32

The reader can conclude that during vacation Maria’s parents— A watched Adam and Maggie the whole time B told Maria she couldn’t go to theater camp C made sure Maria had time for reading D read Maria’s required reading for her

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Go On 37


Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it.

James McNeill Whistler: Portrait of an Artist 1

When he was nine years old, James McNeill Whistler developed a life-long love of travel. His family moved to Russia, where his father worked on the railroad. Whistler studied drawing. Years later, the family moved back to the United States, where Whistler drew maps for a living.

2

In 1855, Whistler moved to Paris hoping to become an artist. He visited museums and gazed for long hours at famous paintings. He also became friends with many well-known artists.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8 3

When his painting At the Piano received bad reviews, Whistler moved to London. There, Whistler made a name for himself not only because of his work but also because of his colorful personality. He A NOTwas S I T I outspoken and funny. Unlike his outgoing D. HTEsubdued. G I R behavior, his art was more Many Y COP S I . K R art reviewers E BOO criticized MASTEWhistler because L E P N M I L A his work. S did notLAunderstand CK ISthey

TH 4

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A self-portrait of James McNeill Whistler

B

Whistler often used musical terms to name his paintings. Many of his titles include words such as arrangement and notes. This represented the artist’s belief that painting was very much like music in that paintings should not be expected to teach morals. To Whistler, art should be observed and enjoyed, not learned from.

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5

Instead of signing his name on his paintings, Whistler created a symbol that looked like a butterfly. He signed his works with this symbol. The symbol changed over the course of his career. For example, he added a flower to the symbol when he got married. The butterfly signature was another demonstration of Whistler’s beliefs about art. Changing his signature from written words to a symbol demonstrated the idea that art was about pictures, not words. Sometimes Whistler applied his signature to the frame instead of the painting. Whistler often designed and built frames for his paintings to show that the entire presentation was important to how people viewed his paintings.

6

In 1888, Whistler married Beatrix Godwin. Art critics finally began to respect Whistler’s talent. He became famous. After his wife’s death, the painter’s personality changed. He was no longer social and friendly. From that time until his own death, he spent most of his time in his studio.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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39


33

Look at the outline of information from the selection.

34

What is this selection mainly about? A How Whistler became an artist B How Whistler’s art was recognized

I. Whistler’s background in art

C How Whistler met his new wife

A. Studied art in Russia

D How Whistler’s art was like music

B. Observed famous paintings C. Met famous artists

35

II. Whistler’s beliefs about art A. Art is like music

In paragraph 3, the word colorful gives the reader the idea that Whistler — A wore bright clothing

B. Artworks do not have to teach a lesson

B created attractive paintings

C. ______________________

C was a lively and vibrant person D liked to keep to himself

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

What information belongs on the blank line?

36

A Travel is important to art

To Whistler, the butterfly is a symbol representing—

B Artist’s style should match art

A how fragile art is

C Art is about pictures, not words

B the importance of art

C how art is about pictures

STER. . A M E D the link between and W AY Y nature ACKLIN art N L A B A N I S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

D Frames have to be handmade

STOP 40

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

42

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

ISBN 978-1-4204-5946-3

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