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Level G

READING STRAND MASTERY

Applying the Common Core State Standards

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Reading Strand Instruction with Assessment

………….. Reading Strand Mastery: Applying the Common Core State Standards Reading Levels 3–8 •

• • •

Reading Strand Mastery is divided into 2 Parts Part 1: Instruction Part 2: Assessment Multiple-choice & open ended questions Modeled instruction, guided and independent practice Nonfiction and fiction passages

Level C D E F G H

Grade Level 3 4 5 6 7 8

25-Pack Item #___ 6057-5 6058-2 6059-9 6060-5 6061-2 6062-9

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Level G

Applying the Common Core State Standards

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Contents

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Modeled Instruction, Guided & Independent Practice Common Core State Standards . . . . . .2

Strand C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Making Reader/Text Connections

Reading Comprehension

Objective 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94

Strands and Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Make Connections (CCSS 7)

Objective 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Write a Personal Response to the Text (CCSS 3)

Strand C: All Together . . . . . . . . . . .114 Strand A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Forming a General Understanding

Strand D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121

Objective 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Main Idea (CCSS 2)

Examining the Content and Structure

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Objective 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122

Objective 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Inference (CCSS 3)

Analyze Author’s Use of Literary Devices (CCSS 6, 8)

Objective 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129

Objective 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Summarize (CCSS 2)

Synthesize Information to Evaluate Texts (CCSS 1)

Objective 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138

Objective 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Make Predictions (CCSS 2, 3)

Analyze Author’s Purpose (CCSS 9)

Strand D: All Together . . . . . . . . . . .147

Objective 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

STER. . A M E AY LIN Assessments A. .B.L.A.CK . . . . . . .N. A. N. Y. .W.157 Strand A: All Together . . . . . . . . . . . .46 I S N.O. T. . . .P.R.O. D. U. C. E. D. . . . . . . . .158 I T I Strand A . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P Strand CO Strand B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . K. .59 OOK B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169 S I B S I O H Developing Interpretation PLE BO IVEN FOR T Strand C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175 M A S Objective 1 . . . . .T.H.IS. . . . . . .S. N . .O.T. G. .60 I Strand D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 N IO 5) Identify Structure/Organization ISS(CCSS M R E P Objective 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Use Context Clues (CCSS 4)

Draw Conclusions (CCSS 1, 6)

Objective 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Support Conclusions (CCSS 8)

Strand B: All Together . . . . . . . . . . . . .83

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f Common Core State Standards f College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading These standards define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of each grade. They correspond to the College and Career Readiness (CCR) anchor standards below by number. The CCR and grade-specific standards are necessary complements—the former providing broad standards, the latter providing additional specificity—that together define the skills and understandings that all students must demonstrate. Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Craft and Structure

4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, . connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices STERshape A M E meaning or tone. WAY. CKLIN

A BLA

ANY

D IN and larger OT E 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, N C U S I D T RO to each other and ED. I or stanza) Tscene, portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, REPrelate H E G B I R O PY KT the whole. K IS CO S BOO

BOO THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO and Ideas Integration of EKnowledge P RM

THI

OR PLE or purpose 6. Assess how pointSAofMview IVEN F shapes the content and style of a text.

7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

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Correlations

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Reading Comprehension Strands and Objectives Correlated to the Common Core State Standards Reading Comprehension Strand A: Forming a General Understanding The reader will demonstrate understanding of the text’s general content. Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

Objective 2: Identify or infer important characters, settings, problems, events, relationships and details.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

Correlates to Common Core State Standards:TER. AS and Y. 2. Determine central ideas or themesIN ofE aMtext L WA K C Y A L N analyze their development; summarize the key A B A N OT ideas. DUCED I supporting details S Nand I T I . D and why 3. Analyze individuals, TEhow REPRO events, and ideas H E G B I R O K T over the course of a text. COPYdevelop andOinteract

K IS S BO I O H O T B R FO MPLE ENCorrelates V I to Common Core State Standard: G Objective 5: THIS SA T NO S I 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a Use context clues to determine N SIO text, including determining technical, connotative, meanings of P unknown ERMIS or and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

word choices shape meaning or tone.

Reading Comprehension Strand B: Developing Interpretation The reader will interpret and/or explain the text. Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

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Reading Comprehension Strands and Objectives

Objective 2: Correlates to Common Core State Standards: Draw conclusions about the author’s 1. Read closely to determine what the text says purpose for choosing a genre or for explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite including or omitting specific details specific textual evidence when writing or speaking in the text. to support conclusions drawn from the text. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Reading Comprehension Strand C: Making Reader/Text Connections The reader will connect or associate the text with one’s own life.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Objective 2: Correlates to Common Core State Standard: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas information within the text to write develop and interact over the course of a text. a personal response to the text. STER.

E MA N I AY. L W K C Y A L N AB D IN A OTStructure E N C U S I D Reading Comprehension Strand D: Examining the Content & T I PRO REtext’s HTED. about E G B I The reader will elaborate on the text and makeYR judgments the quality and themes. O P KT O O C O S I B BOOK Correlates Objective 1: R THIS to Common Core State Standards: E O L F P N M E A how point of view or purpose shapes the Analyze and evaluate OT GIV 6. Assess THIS S theofISauthor’s N content and style of a text. craft, including the use literary N O I S S I 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific devices and textual elements. PERM

claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite information within the text(s) to specific textual evidence when writing or speaking extend or evaluate the text(s). to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s customs and beliefs included in the text.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

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Introduction

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Reading Strand Mastery: Applying the Common Core State Standards is divided into two parts, Instruction and Assessment. Both parts have four sections, each focused on one reading comprehension strand. The four strands are: Strand A: Forming a General Understanding Strand B: Developing Interpretation Strand C: Making Reader/Text Connections Strand D: Examining the Content and Structure Each strand is correlated to the Common Core State Standards. Part A: Instruction

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Each strand contains several objectives that describe what reading comprehension skills students are expected to know. Each objective includes modeled instruction, guided practice, and independent practice.

At the end of each strand, all the objectives for the strand are assessed together. TER.

MAS AY. W Y L N OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T TED. I O BE REPRO Part B: Assessment H G I R COPYwith Iits OOK T objectives. The S I B Part B assesses each of the reading strands respective K S O H OR T LE BOeach Vone Ffocused Ptests, N M E A assessment contains four on one strand with fiction and/or S I OT G THIS N S I nonfiction passages.ISSION PERM NE Students read full-length passages and answer the questions that follow ACKLIthem.

The book contains multiple-choice questions and open-ended questions.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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H Strand A

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Forming a General Understanding The reader will demonstrate understanding of the text’s general content. Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. TER.

Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

Correlates to Common Core State Standards: 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Objective 5: Use context clues to determine meanings of unknown or multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

E MAS WAY. N I L K C LA Standard: Objective 2: Correlates to Common Core A BState IN ANY T D O E N C U IS why individuals, Identify or infer important D events, and ideas 3. Analyze how Tand . Iinteract PROcourse D E E T R H characters, settings, problems, E develop and over the of a text. G RI TO B K events, relationships and details. IS COPY O O OK HIS B O T B R E O L F P Objective 3: THIS SAM GIVENCorrelates to Common Core State Standard: T O N 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and Select and use relevantIOinformation N IS S S I analyze their development; summarize the key from the text in M to summarize ERorder P supporting details and ideas. events and/or ideas in the text.

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Strand A

H

Objective 1

Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

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Modeled Instruction

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Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Coral Islands

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Tiny, shell-covered animals called coral can cause islands to form. These creatures grow hard coverings of limestone. When they gather into colonies, their bodies form giant reefs underwater. If the sea level drops or the ocean floor rises, the tops of these reefs will sometimes rise above the water. Sand and dirt may gather along the top of these reefs over centuries, causing the formation of coral reef islands like the Florida Keys.

TER.

1 What is this passage mainly about? E MAS WAY. N I L K C A BLA passage The correct answer is the answer that describes what the whole IisN ANY T D O E N C U IS D mainly about. TED. IT REPRO

YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C IS ? A What the Florida KeysOO isKlike HIS B T B R E O L F P This answerSis because GIVEN the passage mentions the Florida Keys IS AMincorrect T H O T N as an exampleOof N IaS coral island, but the purpose of the passage is not to I S S I describe PERMthe Florida Keys. ? B How coral islands form This answer is correct because the whole passage describes how coral islands form.

? C How coral grows This answer is incorrect because the passage describes how coral grows, but only to support the main purpose of explaining how coral islands form.

? D What a coral reef looks like This answer is incorrect because the passage describes coral reefs, but this is not the main purpose of the passage.

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Strand A, Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

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Guided Practice

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Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Penguins Penguins are superbly adapted to an aquatic life. Their wings have become flippers and are useless for flight in the air. In the water, penguins are very agile. Within the smooth feathers, a layer of air is preserved, which ensures buoyancy. This is the reason a chain of air bubbles stretches behind a diving penguin. The air layer also helps insulate the bird

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

in the icy waters of the Antarctic.

2 Which sentence best states the main idea of the passage?

? F Penguins are interesting creatures. ? G Penguins are unable to fly.

STER. . A M E ? H Penguins live in the Antarctic. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I ? J Penguins are excellent swimmers. T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I HINT O H RT LE BO passage FisOdescribing. Pwhole N M E A Think about what the Read each answer and think V S I TG HIS O T N S I about whether it describes the whole passage. Remember that an answer might SSIONthe passage, but the correct answer describes the main idea describe a P detail ERMIfrom of the whole passage.

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Strand A, Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

Rodeos in Modern Times In recent years, many people have criticized the practices of the rodeo. These critics claim that the contests are dangerous to the animals involved. Supporters of rodeos have countered with arguments of their own. They claim that the animals are kept safe and suffer few injuries. In fact, more volunteer riders are injured during the games than animals. Rodeo associations nationwide have been taking steps to prevent injuries to humans and animals. They hope to make the rodeo a safe and entertaining sport.

3 What is this article mainly about?

? A The history of rodeos ? B How rodeos have changed

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? C How entertaining rodeos are ? D The safety of rodeos

HINT This question is asking you to work out what the main topic of the article is. The main topic is an idea found throughout the article. What do all the ideas presented STER. . A M in the article relate to? E IN AY

ACKL L ANY W B A N I T D O E IT IS N REPRODUC . D E T YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Strand A, Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

Lonely Sam Sam had no friends in school because everyone considered him to be annoying, but the problem was just that he didn’t know how to deal with others in a pleasant way. To get attention and try to make friends, he acted like the world’s biggest pain. In an attempt to be friendly, he often made fun of people because he thought it would make people laugh. It had never occurred to him that he might be hurting people’s feelings.

4 What is the main idea presented in the story? Use information from the story to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM HINT Think about what the main idea of the story is. What is the paragraph telling you about Sam? Remember that it is not just describing what Sam does, but is also explaining why. In your answer, describe the main idea of the story. Be sure to use details from the story in your answer.

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Strand A, Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

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Independent Practice

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Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Letting Off Steam Geysers begin to form when rainwater travels into the ground through spaces in dirt and rocks. The water goes deeper and deeper underground until it reaches an area where the rock around it has been heated by magma. The heat causes the pools of water that are deep under the earth’s surface to come to a boil, which means they are producing steam. If the water boils in a small enough space, the steam creates a great deal of pressure. That

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

pressure forces the water to move upward to the surface of the earth. When it reaches the surface, the water bursts from the ground, producing an explosion of steam and extremely hot water. Watching a geyser erupt is a breathtaking thing to see.

1 What is this paragraph mainly about?

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B ? B Why geysers are dangerous A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . ? C How geysers form GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H ? D What a geyser eruption is like PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM ? A Where geysers can be found

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Strand A, Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

Hungry Hummingbirds Hummingbirds spend most of their time flying, which requires a lot of energy. This energy needs to be fueled by food. To get enough food, hummingbirds must eat around every ten minutes all day long. Hummingbirds get a lot of energy from sugar, which comes from the nectar of flowers, as well as from a mixture of sugar and water that many people place in hummingbird feeders. Hummingbirds have long bills and long tongues that let them reach into flowers or feeders.

2 What is this paragraph mainly about?

? F Why hummingbirds need energy ? G The eating habits of hummingbirds

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ALDay at the Fair ! Y L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8

? H What to feed hummingbirds ? J How hummingbirds move

R. AY. LIN W K C Y A L N the dog shows and survey the livestock. But his sister Becky was B N Aride on D Ito OT A determined E N C U S I D T O rides. James’s I the enormous Ferris wheel and wanted to spendTthe day on ED. whole REPRthe H E G B I R O mother wanted to spend the day strolling OK T and rows of quilts and other COPYdownISthe Orows S I B K O H crafts. James’s father wanted automobile show to admire all the old cars. FOR T PLEtoBOvisitIVthe N M E A S G S I T H O T James’s parents refused to let separate, so they were all stuck not knowing what IS Neveryone N O I S S I to do first. PERM TE They had just entered the fair, and already James was frustrated. He wanted E MtoASattend

3 Which sentence best states the main idea of the paragraph?

? A One day is not enough time to see everything at the fair. ? B James and his family members all want to do different things at the fair. ? C James was looking forward to the fair but is not having a good time. ? D James’s sister wants to ride on the Ferris wheel and the other rides.

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Strand A, Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text.

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge The Mid-Atlantic Ridge runs from north to south through the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. Along the ridge, magma from within the earth rises and hardens into new crust. This pushes the oceanic plates apart. Scientists estimate that the Mid-Atlantic Ridge spreads slightly less than one inch per year. That may not seem like a lot, but over the course of hundreds of millions of years, those inches have added up to thousands of miles.

4 What is the main idea presented in the paragraph? Use information from the paragraph to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand A

H

Objective 2

Identify or infer important characters, problems, settings, events, relationships and details.

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Modeled Instruction

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Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

The Squirrel and the Bird

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Long ago, a squirrel sat on a tree branch gazing at the wonders of the forest around him. He saw a raccoon washing his food in the stream, and a fox cleverly planning to snatch food from the other animals when they were not paying attention. Suddenly, a colorful bird swooped past the squirrel’s face, gliding on her majestic wings. The squirrel watched the bird in amazement, marvelling at how she moved smoothly through the air. He thought she was the most perfect creature he had ever seen. For the next few days, he

. E AY. LIN W K C Y A L N sad with the thought that squirrels simply lacked the ability to fly. OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R PYthe story? COin OOK T 1 What is the squirrel’s main problem S I B K S I O H FOR Tmain problem. PLE BOtheIVsquirrel’s The correct answerSAdescribes N M E THIS NOT G S I N ? A He is unableISto M SIOfly. R E P This answer is correct because the squirrel’s main problem is that he

thought about flying constantly. He tossed and turned each night, becomingMincreasingly ASTER

wants to fly but is unable to fly.

? B He is scared of the fox. This answer is incorrect because the passage mentions a fox as a minor detail, but the fox is not related to the squirrel’s main problem.

? C He cannot get to sleep. This answer is incorrect because this is a detail related to the main problem, but it does not describe the main problem.

? D He sees a bird flying. This answer is incorrect because this is an event that leads to the main problem, but it does not describe the main problem.

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Strand A, Objective 2: Identify or infer important characters, problems, settings, events, relationships and details.

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Guided Practice

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Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

The Speech The day before the speech, after poor Abby had just listened to me practice for the fortieth time, I announced that I was not going to do it. As my deadline approached, I had begun to picture the entire class watching me as I talked, even though so far it was usually only Abby. As soon as I saw them all in my mind, my nerves kicked in and my

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

imagination took control. I could see them all staring at me, laughing at me, and then I saw myself faint and fall to the floor. In my mind, I saw Ms. Summers writing a large “F” on the sheet of paper in front of her, and then it was over.

2 Which word best describes the narrator?

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? G Anxious S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE ? H Impatient I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H ? J Humorous PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N HINT MISSIO R E P Focus on what you can tell about the narrator from the story. The correct answer is ? F Confident

something you can tell about the narrator from what the story tells you about her reaction to having to give a speech.

16 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 2: Identify or infer important characters, problems, settings, events, relationships and details.

Stacking the Shelves A stack of books awaited Donovan in the “Returns” section. He grabbed a cart, loaded it with books, and began his daily rounds. He started with the history and geography shelves, which were closest to the front desk, and worked his way toward the fiction and literature shelves.

3 Where does this story probably take place?

? A In a library ? B At a mall ? C At a grocery store ? D In a classroom

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

HINT This question is asking you to work out the setting of the story, which is where the story takes place. The story does not tell you the setting. You have to work out where the story is taking place based on the details given in the story and what is happening in the story.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

17 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 2: Identify or infer important characters, problems, settings, events, relationships and details.

Local Artist Showcase A collection of local artist Stan Maverick’s work will open at the Hyde Street Gallery this weekend. Maverick has been working on the collection for more than two years. The collection includes landscape paintings of many different regions in Long Island. Maverick grew up in Long Island and created the collection as a tribute to the area that inspired him. He has created the paintings in the hope of sharing his love of Long Island with the world.

4 The second paragraph is mostly a description of

? F where the artwork can be viewed.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? G where Stan spent his childhood. ? H why Stan is a successful artist.

? J why Stan created the artwork.

HINT Remember that this question is asking only about the second paragraph. Be R. to TEsure S A M E focus only on the second paragraph, and not on the whole passage. AY. LINWhich Nanswer W K C Y A L A describes the main purpose of the second paragraph? OT A B ED IN

IT IS N REPRODUC . D E T YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

18 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 2: Identify or infer important characters, problems, settings, events, relationships and details.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Vacation Day “Danny, hurry up or we’re going to miss the plane!” called Danny’s mother from the bottom of the steps. Danny zipped his suitcase, made sure he wasn’t forgetting anything, and then hurried down the stairs and out the door. On the way to the airport, he kept going over everything he had packed, hoping that he hadn’t forgotten anything. When they arrived at the airport, Danny helped his father carry the suitcases. Danny was

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

concerned when they handed their bags to an airport employee. He wondered what would happen if the airline lost their suitcases or forgot to put them on the airplane.

1 Which word best describes Danny?

? A Angry

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? C Easygoing S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I ? D Disorganized R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM ? B Tense

19 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 2: Identify or infer important characters, problems, settings, events, relationships and details.

The Pumpkin Before they’d left on their trip, Mr. Patterson had shown the class a picture of the largest pumpkin ever grown. It looked massive, and Mr. Patterson explained that it weighed more than one thousand pounds! Kelly didn’t think that she spotted any pumpkins that hefty, but there were some pretty big ones growing on the vines. Then she spotted one far in the distance and her heart started to beat faster. She raced along the rows and rows of neat pumpkin vines, pulled the thick leaves apart, and uncovered the largest pumpkin she had ever seen.

2 Where does this story probably take place?

? F On a farm

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L Y L L RAL The99Play A R . . 8 8 8

? G In a classroom ? H In a store ? J On a beach

STER. . A M E IN WAY Y LACKLHe N Andy is very outgoing, so speaking in front of others is easyTfor him. also has an A B A N O CED I Umany S Nand I D T O I outrageous sense of humor. People naturally take to him, he has friends. I R . TED R EP H E G B I R O T have two or three close friends, including and acquaintances, but that is COPY Andy, OOKseveral S I B K S I O H O T B R the extent of my socialization. nervous when I have to talk to people I N FO Epainfully AMPLE TI Gget V S I S I H O don’t know or Teven to large of people I do know. Unlike Andy, I despise being the IS Ngroups N O I S S I center of attention. PERM I know that if I attempt to try out for the school play, I will tremble, my face will flush, I will feel queasy, and my neck and arms will be covered in red blotches. But I would really like to be part of the drama club, and think that I might actually enjoy acting, if I could just get over my nerves.

3 What is the narrator’s main problem in the story?

? A His acting skills are poor. ? B His friend Andy gets all the attention. ? C He does not have any good friends. ? D He is too nervous to try out for the school play. 20 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 2: Identify or infer important characters, problems, settings, events, relationships and details.

Cable Cars Cable cars were first introduced because they were far more reliable and could carry more passengers than the steam-powered trolleys. Still, cable cars came with their own set of unique problems. The number of cables, pulleys, and tracks involved in a cable car system cost trolley companies large sums of money. These expenses caused the price of passengers’ fares to rise, which led to a decline in ticket sales. Even so, cable cars continue to be used in cities across the country.

4 The second paragraph is mostly a description of

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? F why cable cars remain popular. ? G the main benefits of cable cars.

? H the major changes to cable cars. ? J the problems with cable cars.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

21 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A

H

Objective 3

Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Too Many Trains

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

All day and all night, trains went chugging noisily through Maggie’s town. She heard them late at night when she was trying to get to sleep, she heard them in the morning because they woke her from her sleep, and she often had to stop to let them pass when she was riding her bike to school. Maggie wished that for just one day, all the trains would stop, and she could have a day without them. Then one day, the train drivers all

. went on strike, and all the trains did stop for the day. All the people that caught ASTERthe

Y. INE M D IN after all. OT Asuch aDnuisance E N C U S I everywhere. Maggie suddenly realized that the trains weren’t T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P WA CKL and traffic trains to work and to school had to drive their cars, so there were ANYjams BLAcars

22 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

1 How does Maggie change in the story? Use details from the story to explain your answer. Think about what Maggie is like at the start of the story. How does she feel about the trains? How does this change in the story? What happens that makes Maggie appreciate the trains? In your answer, explain how Maggie feels about the trains and how this changes.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

23 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Another World Shandra plopped into a chair beside her friend and relayed her strange tale. She had been seated in the science fiction section of the library, engrossed in her reading, when she rose and stubbed her toe on a shelf. She was suddenly thrust into another dimension. Shandra explained that time went much faster in the other dimension than it did at

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

home. From what she had been able to work out, one minute in her time was equivalent to about twenty-four hours in their time. Shandra had spent a few hours in the other dimension, before suddenly arriving back in the science fiction section of the library.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

24 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

2 Briefly summarize the main events of the story in the order that they occur.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

HINT ER . STYour A M This question is asking you to write a summary of what happens in the story. E AY. LIN W K C Y A L N answer should describe the important events of the story. Start D IN Athe first OT A Bby describing E N C U S I D T important event in your own words. Then describe the next important event that .I PRO D E E T R H E G RI end of Othe occurs. Then describe what happensOatPYthe O B Remember to write only K Tstory. C O S I B K story and about the important eventsBO inOthe THItoS describe the events in your own words.

FOR PLE N M E A V S I THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

25 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

An Endangered Species Bat populations have been falling for several reasons. Most of these reasons lead back to human ignorance. In the past, rumors of attacks on humans by vicious bats with rabies scared the public into destroying bats. While some bats do have rabies, they almost never attack humans. They swoop down to eat insects, not to harm people. The population has been drastically reduced by cavers who disturbed hibernating bats. In the past, even scientists have unknowingly harmed the animals. As a result, bats have reached their present level of endangerment.

3 Explain why bat populations have been falling. Use information from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT This question is asking you to explain why something that is described in the passage happens. The author gives several reasons that bat populations are decreasing. To answer this question, describe these reasons in your own words.

26 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

Mathew Brady As a young man, Mathew Brady was one of the early students of photography. He quickly became one of the country’s leading photographers. In 1856, he had an office in Washington, D.C. His goal was to take pictures of the world’s great figures. Brady understood the power of the photograph and knew it was important to use that power. At first, Brady focused on recording the images of political greats. Some of his most famous works are a group of thirty-five photos of Abraham Lincoln, taken in 1860. Lincoln was so impressed with Brady’s work that he credited the portraits as having played a major role in his being elected president.

4 What important facts about Mathew Brady have you learned from this passage? Use details from the passage to explain why those facts are important.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT This question is asking you to summarize what you have learned about Mathew Brady. Remember that you do not need to describe every detail, but only those that are most important. In your answer, describe the facts you have learned and explain why they are important.

27 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Too Many Courses Charlotte was usually a great cook, but she had never made three courses at once before. She placed the meatballs in a frying pan to brown them and, as she waited for the pan to heat, started to frost the cake. She immediately discovered that the middle of the cake had collapsed, creating a large depression. As she turned to go back to her cooking station to check on the spaghetti and meatballs, she let out a cry of alarm. She raced toward the

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

stove where the frying pan was almost hidden by billowing black smoke. She grabbed some baking soda from the cupboard and doused the flames that were shooting from the pan. Her meatballs were burnt to a crisp. Charlotte threw the scorched meatballs into the trash can, scooped some soggy spaghetti onto four plates, covered the spaghetti with some rather salty tomato sauce, and nervously served the meal to her guests.

1

STER. . A M E Briefly summarize the main events of the story in the order that LIN occur.NY WAY ACKthey L B A D IN A OT E N C U S I D T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

28 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

A Trip to the Moon The tour guide led us to the site where Neil Armstrong positioned the American flag more than one hundred years ago. Neil Armstrong’s flag continues to fly. There’s also a roped-off area where his footprints are still impressed into the ground. When I first saw them, I couldn’t believe that the footprints looked so perfect after so many years. It was like the footprint had only just been made. The tour guide explained that no wind exists on the moon to blow the moondust around, so a footprint can linger forever.

2 Explain why Neil Armstrong’s footprints can still be seen. Use information from the story to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

29 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

The Inuits The Inuits are a group of people who live in Alaska and northern Canada. For hundreds of years, the rest of the world did not know much about them. Outsiders called them “Eskimos” and made many assumptions about the way they live. More recently, people realized that the name “Eskimo” does not fit the Inuits. Many of the ideas outsiders have about the Inuits are also incorrect. The Inuits are a lot more like modern Americans than some people realize. They are not always bundled up in large fur coats, and igloos are now rare in Alaska. Most Inuits live in houses in villages and wear Americanized clothing. They have grocery stores and other businesses where they shop and work.

3 What important facts about the Inuits have you learned from this passage? Use details from the passage to explain why those facts are important.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

30 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

The Goofiest Gutter Ball Celia groaned as the bowling ball rolled straight into the gutter. Celia took everything she did seriously, and she did not like doing anything poorly. She was frustrated with herself for being unable to bowl well. “Nice one, Celia,” Jerry said. “But next time make a goofy face as you bowl.” An embarrassing moment passed before Celia realized that Jerry wasn’t teasing her. He had a big grin on his face, and the other kids were clapping! From then on, everyone competed to see who could do the goofiest gutter ball. They pulled faces as they bowled, bowled balls as they faced the other way, bowled with their eyes closed, and even hopped up to the lane before releasing the bowling ball. Celia was laughing so much that she forgot all about being the perfect bowler and just tried to have as much fun as possible.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

4 How does Celia change in the story? Use details from the story to explain your answer.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

31 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A

H

Objective 4

Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

A Bad Start

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

When they reached their vacation destination of Providence, Jamison and his family tried to check into their hotel. Unfortunately, the hotel clerk claimed that she didn’t have a reservation for them. “I’m sorry,” she said. “Normally I would just give you another room, but we’re completely booked out.” “I guess we’ll have to sleep outside,” Jamison muttered to himself. His younger brother William overheard and started to cry at the thought of sleeping outside in the dark. Jamison explained that he was only

. E AY. LIN W K C Y A L N help anyway. “There are plenty of hotels in the area,” she reassured William, who was OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T still sniffling. “I’m sure we’ll find somewhere lovely TED. I to stay.” REPRO H E G B I R O COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

joking and gave William a comforting hug. Jamison’s mother thanked theMclerk ASTERfor her

32 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

1 What will Jamison’s mother probably do next? For this question, you have to guess what will happen next based on the story. You can use details in the story to guess what will happen next.

? A Get ready to sleep outside This answer is incorrect because Jamison makes a joke about sleeping outside, but this is not what Jamison’s mother is likely to do next.

? B Cancel the vacation This answer is incorrect because the family has a problem to solve, but it is more likely that they will find somewhere else to stay than cancel their vacation.

? C Demand to be given a room This answer is incorrect because Jamison’s mother thanks the clerk and then mentions finding another hotel. This does not suggest that she will demand to be given a room.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? D Search for a new place to stay

This answer is correct because at the end of the story, Jamison’s mother tells William about the many hotels in the area and says she is sure they will find somewhere lovely to stay. This suggests that she will search for a new hotel. ER .

MAST E N I AY. L W K C Y A L N OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

33 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Air Firefighting Air firefighting is one of the most important safeguards against wildfires and has saved thousands of lives around the world. The airtankers used to fight fires come in many shapes and sizes. Some are giant airplanes with several engines. These can carry thousands of gallons of water. Other airtankers are smaller planes, which carry less liquid

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

but are easier to manage. Aside from airtanker planes, helicopters are also used in air firefighting. When they’re able to carry water, these choppers are called helitankers.

2 If the author added another paragraph to the end of the article, it would most likely

? F describe how wildfires start.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? H show how airtankers and helitankers put out fires. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y ? J list other uses of airplanes and helicopters. P CO OOK S I B K S I O H LE BO VEN FOR T P M A S HINT OT GI THIS N S I This question isSS ION you to make a prediction about what would be likely to come I asking M R E P article. Each of the answer choices relates to a detail in the article. The next in the ? G explain how to prevent wildfires.

correct answer describes a paragraph that would continue with the main idea of the article.

34 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

A Wish Granted Every day when Charlie walked to school, he passed a brick house where a friendly golden retriever lived. The dog would often wag his tail happily as he watched Charlie walking by. Charlie had wanted a dog for as long as he could remember, and he constantly asked his parents for a pet of his own. His parents had always insisted that Charlie was too young to handle the responsibility. But as Charlie got older, they had started to reconsider their decision. They had now finally decided that Charlie was a responsible young man.

3 If the author added another paragraph to the end of the story, it would most likely describe

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? A Charlie making a plan to steal the golden retriever.

? B Charlie telling his parents that he does not want a dog anymore. ? C Charlie’s parents telling him that he can have a dog.

? D Charlie’s parents reminding him that he is not mature enough. HINT STER. . A M E This question is asking you to predict what will happen next in the are IN There WAY CKLstory. Y A L N A B A N I last two details in the story that are clues to what will happen next. ED the NOT Focusing UCon Sanswer. I D T O I R . sentences of the story will help you to find the right TED R EP

YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

35 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

Spring Musical Flyers announcing when and where students could try out for Lincoln Middle School’s annual theater production were plastered all over the halls. Brad smiled as he passed a flyer taped to the door of the school gymnasium. Last year, Brad had been given the lead role in the show. He felt a rush come over him as he recalled taking his final bow to the sound of enthusiastic applause from the audience. He wanted to experience that feeling again this year, and he felt fairly confident that Mr. Campbell, his theater teacher, would cast him in another starring role.

4 According to the story, “Spring Musical,” which of these is most likely to happen?

? F Brad will decide to work behind the scenes.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? G Brad will take down all the flyers.

? H Brad will try out for the leading role.

? J Brad will ask for a non-speaking role.

HINT This question is asking you to make a prediction based on the informationTin . ERthe S A M E story. Read each answer choice and think about whether it is likely. AY. LINThe correct W K C Y A L N answer is something that is likely to happen based on what IN Ayou Dtells OT A Bthe story E N C U S I D T about Brad. TED. I REPRO

YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

36 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Winning a New Bike Alicia told Terry that she had just heard that their school was going to sponsor a science fair contest next month. Terry didn’t seem very interested until Alicia mentioned that the student with the best project would win a new mountain bike. Terry perked up a little after hearing this. He and Alicia liked to take their bikes everywhere. The friends had a pair of respectable bikes, but both of them were starting to look a little worn. Terry was

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

saving money by doing odd jobs for his parents, and Alicia babysat for her neighbors, but it would still be a while before either of them had enough money for a new bike.

1 What will Terry probably do next?

? A Buy a new bike

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? C Tell Alicia that he is not interested S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I ? D Clean his father’s car R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM ? B Decide to enter the contest

37 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

Finding Your Way Long ago, before modern cities and roads, much of the land was covered in thick forests. The Native Americans decided to make trails through the forests. These trails would lead the way between villages and to good hunting and fishing areas. The trails served the native people well, but it was easy to become lost. As you may imagine, it was difficult to find caves for shelter, neighboring villages hidden deep in the forest, or the best river crossings. So these people decided to create a system of marking special places.

2 If the author added another paragraph to the end of the passage, it would most likely

? F explain why the landscape changed over time. ? G describe the system created by the Native Americans.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E Trolleys ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? H describe how people find their way today.

? J explain why the Native Americans needed to cross rivers.

R. AY. LIN W K C Y A L N engine space, these trolleys were usually underpowered andTnot A with DinINcities O A B practical E N C U S I D T steep hills. This led to the invention of the cable RO pulled along a . I Cable Ecars TEDcar. REPwere H G B I R O Y that hung grooved track in the road by a moving COPcable OOK Tabove the street. The cable car S I B K S I O H BO proved to be an extremely mode FORofTtransportation. Cities like San Francisco PLEpopular N M E A V S I G IS NOTcars. became famousTHfor their cable S I N ISSIO PERM

E limited The first completely mechanical trolleys were operated by steam engines. ASTto E MDue

3 If the author added a section on San Francisco today, it would most likely describe

? A the current use of cable cars there. ? B how it has many steep hills. ? C the major tourist attractions. ? D how people travel mainly on foot.

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Strand A, Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read.

Career Day Billy groaned as he thought about how it was career day at school, and all of his friends would bring a parent to talk about his or her job. Becky’s dad, a policeman, would speak first, and then Jose’s mom, an architect, would show drawings. Billy’s mother had an important meeting to attend that day, but she promised to make an appearance at career day, even if she arrived a little late. Billy wished that he could be late for career day. The idea seemed boring to him, because he had already decided he wanted a career in sports.

4 According to the story, “Career Day,” which of these is most likely to happen?

? F Billy will decide to become a policeman. ? G Billy’s mother will arrive early and give a long talk.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? H Billy will give a speech about being an athlete. ? J Billy will not pay attention to the speeches.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

39 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A

H

Objective 5

Use context clues to determine meanings of unknown or multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Family Reunion

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

My ancestors on both sides of my family are Italian. But I was born in America and had never left the country. So when my mom told me that she and my dad were planning to take me to Italy in June, I was overjoyed. I had heard many stories about Italy and seen photographs of it, but the thought of actually being there was different. Not only would I get to see the many attractions of Italy, but I would also get to meet some of my

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A NOT UCED D Overjoyed is probably another way of sayingD. IT IS O R P HTEsame asTOoverjoyed. Gthe BE RE You can work out I R Y The correct answer is a word thatCmeans P K OO K IS atO how Sis Bused I O H O what the word means Lby looking it in the passage. T B R FO PE N M E A V S I THIS NOT G ? A confused. S I N SIO ThisPanswer ERMIS is incorrect because the word confused does not mean the same

relatives. I had cousins, uncles, and aunts that I had never met before. 1

as the word overjoyed, and the narrator is not describing himself as confused.

? B disappointed. This answer is incorrect because the word disappointed means the opposite of overjoyed.

? C delighted. This answer is correct because the word delighted means the same as the word overjoyed.

? D surprised. This answer is incorrect because the narrator could be described as surprised, but this is not what the word overjoyed means.

40 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 5: Use context clues to determine meanings of unknown or multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

The Black and White Ogre Kachinas The Black and White Ogre Kachinas are in charge of disciplining bad children. Hopi parents keep their children in line by telling them that the Ogre Kachinas will eat them whole if they do not behave. This may seem somewhat extreme, but it is generally effective.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

2 Read this sentence from the passage.

The Black and White Ogre Kachinas are in charge of disciplining bad children. Which word means about the same as disciplining in the sentence above?

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B ? G Identifying A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . ? H Scaring GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H ? J Hiding PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N HINT ISSIO PERisM asking you to find another word that means the same as the word This question ? F Punishing

disciplining. Read the sentence and focus on what the word disciplining means in the sentence. Then look for the answer that has a word that means about the same thing.

41 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 5: Use context clues to determine meanings of unknown or multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

Home Economics Portia seated herself at a table in the rear of the home economics room and scanned the foreign environment. On one side of the room, heaps of cloth in various patterns and colors were piled on shelves. On a few desks were large sewing machines, which looked extremely complicated to Portia. On the opposite side of the room, tables and chairs were arranged to resemble a dining room.

3 Read this sentence from the story. Portia seated herself at a table in the rear of the home economics room and scanned the foreign environment.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

In this sentence, foreign means

? A from another country. ? B unfamiliar. ? C not relevant.

? D distant or far-off.

STER. . A M E HINT WAY CKLIN Y A L N A B A N Some words have more than one meaning. This question OisT asking about CEDaIword that can Uforeign. S Nfor I D T O I R . mean different things. Each answer is a correct meaning the word To answer TED R EP H E G B I R O T is used in the sentence. the question, work out which meaning COPYof theISword OOKforeign S I B K O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand A, Objective 5: Use context clues to determine meanings of unknown or multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

Alone Time Amanda had to admit that at first, spending time with her cousin Lola was a lot of fun. She was like the little sister Amanda never had, and she followed Amanda everywhere she went. However, after a while, Amanda grew tired of having a tail. It wasn’t that she didn’t love Lola, it was just that she wasn’t used to never having any time to herself.

4 Read this sentence from the story. However, after a while, Amanda grew tired of having a tail. What does the underlined part of the sentence mean?

? F Amanda wanted to go to bed and sleep.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? G Amanda was annoyed because she had a tail.

? H Amanda was sick of Lola following her around.

? J Amanda wanted to spend some time by herself.

HINT This question is asking about the meaning of a phrase used in the passage. Remember TER. Sthe A M to focus on the meaning of the whole phrase and not just on the words in E AY. LIN W K C Y A L N phrase. The way the phrase is used in the passage can be used outINwhat D A it OT A Bto work E N C U S I D means. Think about what meaning of the phrase makes sense in the passage. T PRO D. I

GHTE BE RE I R O Y T P K K IS CO R THIS BOO O O B AMPLE T GIVEN FO S S I H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Strand A, Objective 5: Use context clues to determine meanings of unknown or multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

First Finds Almost as soon as Germaine put the metal detector near the ground, it started to beep wildly. He eagerly dug into the ground to find the hidden object, but to his dismay, it was just a bent nail. He kept on searching the field, but all he managed to find were three nails, a penny, parts of an old soda can, and a rusty piece of iron.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . Off to 8 8 8 New York

1 Dismay is probably another way of saying

? A surprise. ? B excitement. ? C confusion.

? D disappointment.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . Raymond gazed out the window of the airport E RE taking off and landing GHTatEDthe large Bplanes I R O Y T P K O something on the runways. He couldn’t fathom K IS Chow S BOO so enormous and heavy could I O H O T B R FO hardly believe that he would be in New York AMPLEthe Tair.GIVHeENcould actually fly safelyISthrough S H T IS NO N in just over an hour. O I S IS PERM 2 Read this sentence from the story. He couldn’t fathom how something so enormous and heavy could actually fly safely through the air. Which word means about the same as fathom in the sentence above?

? F Adjust ? G Understand ? H Conclude ? J Relate 44 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A, Objective 5: Use context clues to determine meanings of unknown or multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

The Eagle Kachina Kwahu, the Eagle Kachina, is the messenger to the spirit world. His main role is to rule the sky. He symbolizes strength and is greatly respected. He can be called upon in prayers for more eagles, which are considered honored guests among the Hopi and are often given gifts, just as children are.

3 Read these sentences from the passage. Kwahu, the Eagle Kachina, is the messenger to the spirit world. His main role is to rule the sky. In this sentence, rule means

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A Excerpt from Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea R . 9 9 . 8 8 8 ? A to draw a line. ? B to govern.

? C a law or guideline.

? D a custom or norm.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L By Jules Verne B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . ED MuchBEtoREmy surprise, I was in my The next day I woke up with my head unusually GHTclear. I R Y P K TOin their cabin without noticing O O C O S I B stateroom. No doubt my companions had been put back BOOK R THIS E O L F P N M it any more than I had. A Like me, theyEwould have no idea what took place during the THIS S IS NOT GIV night, and to unravelSthis IS ION mystery I could count only on some future happenstance. M R E P 4 Read this sentence from the passage. The next day I woke up with my head unusually clear. What does the underlined part of the sentence mean?

? F He was no longer confused. ? G His head felt heavy. ? H His head looked different. ? J He woke up earlier than usual.

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D

Strand A: All Together

Objective 1: Determine the main idea (nonfiction) or theme (fiction) within the text. Objective 2: Identify or infer important characters, problems, settings, events, relationships and details. Objective 3: Select and use relevant information from the text in order to summarize events and/or ideas in the text.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Objective 4: Use information from the text to make a prediction based on what is read. Objective 5: Use context clues to determine meanings of unknown or multiple-meaning words or figurative language.

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the questions that follow it.

STER. . A M E LIN this Nstory WAY Michael’s sister enjoys writing stories and essays. When Michael Y ACKfound L A B A N T NOsister about a girl entering a writing contest, he gave it TtoIShis to Dread. UCED I O I R . GHTED TO BE REP I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H E BO FOR T PLThe N M E A V S I THIS NOT GEssay Competition S I N SIO RMISheard When Cheryl about the essay PEfirst competition from her literature teacher, Mr. Langford, she could hardly contain her enthusiasm. Cheryl had been writing short stories, poems, and essays ever since the first day of kindergarten. Now was her chance to put all those years of practice to good use and produce an award-winning composition. A few days later, Cheryl received a large gold envelope in the mail containing the writing prompt for the essay competition: If you could do one thing to make the world a better place, what would you do and why?

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Strand A: All Together

As Cheryl settled in for a long evening of writing, she started to think that it might be impossible to select just one way to make the world a better place. Should she build homes for the homeless, cure all illnesses and diseases, or teach everyone to read? Should she make sure that every child could attend school from kindergarten through college, save the rainforest, or protect an endangered species? Cheryl’s thoughts spiraled out of control. Feeling overwhelmed, she decided to take a few days to give the topic of her composition more thought. She was confident that by the end of the week she would have a clear idea in her mind. The weekend arrived, and Cheryl awoke early on Saturday morning so she could spend the whole day perfecting her essay. She shuffled to the computer in the family room, certain that at any moment a brilliant idea would appear in her head. Unfortunately, the longer she stared at the blank screen, the farther away a good idea seemed. She began to

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

panic that the deadline would pass before she ever thought of an idea. It wasn’t long before Cheryl’s thoughts had drifted to events completely unrelated to her essay. She thought about the visit she had paid to her cousin the previous summer, the movie she had seen earlier that week, and the craving she had for blueberry pancakes. The sound of other family members waking up and moving around yanked Cheryl .away

STER K ANY W A BLAC passed N I passed and her computer screen was still blank. Just then, N her mother through T D O CE IT IS RODU P E the family room on her way to the kitchen. IGHTED. R O BE YR T P K O O C O OK IS OR THIS B O B E L “You’re up early for a Saturday,” she said. EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S “I’m trying toPthink ERMISof an idea for this essay competition,” said Cheryl. “I have to

A from her thoughts. She glanced at the clock, surprised to find that nearly LINEanMhour hadAY.

deliver it to the mailbox at the post office by Monday morning and I still haven’t thought of a topic.” Her mother promised to give it some thought as well, and then reminded Cheryl that they were having guests for dinner. Grammy, Pop-Pop, Uncle Paul, Aunt Trudy, and her cousins, Sandy, Billy, and Christopher, would all be arriving at around five o’clock that night. The remainder of the day was no more successful for Cheryl than the morning had been. She decided that she would have to write the essay on Sunday and went to help her mother prepare for their dinner guests.

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Strand A: All Together

Cheryl’s relatives arrived right on time and everyone gathered around the table to eat. Including Cheryl’s father and little brother, they had eleven people at dinner. It was as loud as ever. However, for the first time that week, Cheryl managed to push all thoughts of the essay competition from her mind and enjoyed a huge meal with her family. They had lasagna, salad, and garlic bread covered with cheese and tomatoes. Then for dessert, they had slices of homemade cherry pie. After dinner, Cheryl’s mother made coffee for the adults and hot chocolate for the kids, and they all played cards. That night, as Cheryl turned down the blankets on her bed, she thought about how much fun dinner had been. She thought about how wonderful it would be if everyone

E L P SAM CATION U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8

in the world could have as much fun as she had just sitting down to a great meal with their families.

“That’s it!” exclaimed Cheryl, racing downstairs to the computer.

She typed furiously, letting the words flow from her mind to her fingertips to the screen.

ER . ACKLI IN ANY WA L B was that she had finally developed an idea. A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . RE GHTEDthe world BaEbetter I R O Y T If I had the opportunity to change one thing to make place, she typed, I P K CO OO S I B K S I O H T to eat so that they could enjoy not only a would make sure that all families enough FOR food PLE BO had N M E A V S I IS stomach,Nbut OT Galso spending time with each other. great meal and aTHfull S I N ISSIO PERM

ST She would have time to proofread and edit her work on Sunday. The important NE MA thingY.

Cheryl finished the entire essay in a matter of minutes. The following day she checked each and every comma and colon before printing it on the special stationery she had purchased. Then she slipped the finished essay into a large envelope and dropped it in the mailbox at the post office. It would be several weeks before the winners of the essay contest were announced in the newspaper, but Cheryl was no longer concerned about winning. She felt as if she had already won.

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Strand A: All Together

1 Read this sentence from the story. Cheryl’s thoughts spiraled out of control. What does this sentence mean?

? A Cheryl started spinning around. ? B Cheryl felt dizzy and sick. ? C Cheryl could not stop thinking. ? D Cheryl became upset and angry. 2 What is Cheryl’s main problem in the story?

? F She has to help her mother prepare lunch.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? G She cannot think of an idea for her essay. ? H She is distracted by her family members. ? J She has never written an essay before.

3 Based on information in the story, which of these is most likely to happen?

STER. . A M E ? B Cheryl will decide not to enter another essay competition. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A NOT UCED Smore I D T O I R . ? C Cheryl will approach another essay competition calmly. GHTED TO BE REP I R Y P K competition. CifO she wins OOessay S I B ? D Cheryl will give back the prize the K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM ? A Cheryl will be even more nervous the next time she writes an essay.

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Strand A: All Together

4 How does Cheryl change in the story? Use details from the story to explain your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

50 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A: All Together

Anthony and his classmates were asked to find some examples of successful female scientists. Anthony found this article about Jane Goodall.

Jane Goodall Jane Goodall has lived almost her whole life with chimpanzees in Africa. Goodall grew up along the seashore in England. When she was little, Goodall loved playing outside and especially loved to watch the animals that lived in her own backyard. Goodall also loved to read, and she read many books about Africa, including The Jungle Book. Goodall told her family that she wanted to go to Africa to live someday.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Goodall’s mother, a well-known author, supported Jane and encouraged her to follow her dreams. Goodall went to school until she was eighteen years old, and then worked until she could travel to Africa. When Goodall first went to Africa, she lived in a country called Kenya. After about a year, she heard about a man named Louis Leakey, who was working in Africa.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A D humans Goodall learned that Leakey wanted to study apes to determine apes UCEand S NOT how I D T O I R . P D he thought were alike. Leakey planned to study chimpanzees GHTEand BE RE Goodall would do a I R O Y T P K OO S CO asHhis good job on his project, so he hired They made plans for K IGoodall S Bsecretary. I O O T B R E O L F EN Stream Game Reserve. Goodall’s exciting AMPin the Gombe Goodall to live in aIScamp TH S IS NOT GIV adventure began there ON1960. ISSIin M R E P Gombe Stream Game Reserve

Leakey spent his own money building the camp and paying for supplies. Goodall got ready to go to the jungle camp where she would live on her own. Some people thought that it wasn’t safe for her to travel alone in the jungle, so Goodall asked her mother to come with her. They took a guide to lead them to the camp, which was located near a lake deep in the jungle.

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Strand A: All Together

Meeting the Chimpanzees When they arrived at the camp, Goodall climbed up to a high point and began to watch the chimpanzees. She wanted the chimpanzees to trust her and was very disappointed when they would not let her near them. She did not know how to get the chimpanzees to trust her, but then she had an experience that helped her find a way. One day a chimpanzee in a tree outside her tent was stomping and screaming. Goodall thought that he wanted a banana that was on a table inside her tent, so Goodall started to leave bananas outside so the chimpanzees would come near the tent to get them. Goodall patiently let the chimpanzees get used to her and eventually, the chimpanzees began to trust Goodall. The chimpanzees would let Goodall

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E walked through the ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A jungle. In time, they S NOT PRODUCED I T I . greeted her just like GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S they greeted each I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S other, suggesting THIS NOT G S I N that they were IO RMISS Photo © copyright iStockphoto/Gary Wales E P beginning to accept

follow them as they

Goodall as one of them. She gave the chimpanzees names like Flo, Flint, Roots, and Shoots. Goodall saw the chimpanzees dance with joy, she saw them fight, and she saw them care for each other just as humans care for other human beings. New Discoveries Goodall’s discoveries about chimpanzees were truly amazing. For example, people thought chimpanzees ate only plants and fruits and maybe a few bugs. One day Goodall watched a male chimpanzee named David Greybeard eating a baby bush pig. This was the first time that anyone had ever seen a chimpanzee eating meat of any kind.

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Strand A: All Together

Not long after, Goodall was watching David Greybeard again, and she observed him picking up a thick blade of grass. He peeled part of the grass blade away to make the blade smaller, and then shaped the grass blade to use it to dig into a termite mound. This was the first time anyone had seen a nonhuman make a tool to accomplish a task. Enter Grub! As word spread of Goodall’s discoveries, a Dutch photographer named Hugo van Lawick came to take pictures of Goodall and the chimpanzees. He and Goodall both loved the jungle and the animals that lived there. They got married and had a son who was named after his father, but was nicknamed Grub. Goodall worked among the chimpanzees in the morning and spent the rest of her day with her son. Goodall had seen how loving and patient the chimpanzee mothers were with their babies, and she was the same with Grub.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Leakey convinced Goodall that she should return to England to go to school and get her degree. He thought that people wouldn’t take her work seriously if she didn’t have the right education. She completed her work at school quickly so that she could get back to Africa and the animals she loved so much.

ER . AY. LIN W K C Y A L N B later married about what she saw. Goodall and van Lawick got divorced, and D IN A Derek OT Ashe E N C U S I D T Bryceson, who was the head of the national parks EPRObeing married only TEDin. ITanzania. RAfter H E G B I R O PY she kept K T about the chimpanzees five years, Derek died. Goodall was sad, CObut OOlearning S I B K S I O H LE BOshe loved. FOR T and found comfort in the Pwork N M E A V S I THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO Continued Research PERM AST Goodall continued her work with chimpanzees and wrote many books and E Mstories

Today, Goodall still strives to protect chimpanzees in the wild. She provides homes for chimpanzees that are orphaned or injured and works to make sure that chimpanzees living in zoos are treated well. Her lifetime of work with chimpanzees has earned her the nickname “The Chimpanzee Lady.”

53 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A: All Together

5 Which word best describes Jane Goodall?

? A Easygoing ? B Passionate ? C Impatient ? D Modest 6 What is the section of the article called “Meeting the Chimpanzees” mainly about? Use information from the article to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand A: All Together

7 What important facts about Jane Goodall have you learned from this article? Use details from the article to explain why those facts are important.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

55 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand A: All Together

Davis’s mother is a photographer. When she saw this advertisement in a newspaper, she applied for the position.

Photographers Wanted Group Pictures Plus is a leading company in the supply of professional photographs to schools, colleges, and community organizations. Group Pictures Plus has a solid client base and is currently rapidly expanding. To meet the demand for our services, we are seeking experienced photographers to join our team. There are currently full-time and part-time positions available, as well as positions with flexible hours. All positions include the opportunity

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

to advance to area manager level.

We provide full training and all equipment, though experience in photography is required. Applicant Requirements

STER. . A M E • Ability to use digital and SLR camera equipment ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A • Experience developing prints S NOT PRODUCED I T I . TEDwork well RE children • Strong communication skills and the ability GHto BEwith I R O Y T P K BOO K IS COcustomer S relationships • The ability to develop andBmaintain I O H O T R AMPLE T GIVEN FO S • Own vehicle and license S I H T IS NO N O I S IS Formal qualifications PERM are not required, and students studying photography are • At least eighteen months photography experience

encouraged to apply. Freelance photographers seeking an additional opportunity are also encouraged to apply. The position is mainly weekday work, though some weekend work may be required on occasion. If you are interested in joining our team, please apply by sending a cover letter explaining your interest in the position, a current resume, and a sample of your work. Samples of portrait photographs are preferred. Successful applicants will be contacted for an interview, and may be required to undergo a short trial period.

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Strand A: All Together

8 According to the passage, “Photographers Wanted,” which of these is most likely to happen?

? F Group Pictures Plus will consider people without experience. ? G Group Pictures Plus will replace old staff with newer staff. ? H Group Pictures Plus will employ several new staff. ? J Group Pictures Plus will start offering wedding photography. 9 Read this sentence from the passage. Group Pictures Plus has a solid client base and is currently rapidly expanding. In this sentence, solid means

? A frozen. ? B reliable. ? C hard. ? D pure.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

10 Which sentence best states the main idea of the first paragraph?

STER. . A M E ? F Group Pictures Plus provides photographs mainly to schools,CKcolleges, Y WAY A LIN IN and L N A B A community groups. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTEDopportunity BE REto experienced ? G Group Pictures Plus is offering anPexcellent I R O Y T K K IS CO R THIS BOO photographers. O O B EN FO that is currently growing to meet ongoing AMPLE is an V S I G S I T ? H Photography services industry H T IS NO demand. MISSION PER ? J Leading photography company Group Pictures Plus is growing and needs additional staff.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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H Strand B

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Developing Interpretation

The reader will interpret and/or explain the text. Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or R. STEstanza) A M relate to each other and the whole. E AY. LIN

BLACK D IN ANY W A T O UCE Objective 2: Correlates to Common State ODStandards: IT IS N Core R . P D E E T R Draw conclusions about the author’s 1. Read what the text says RIGHcloselyOtoKdetermine O BE logical Yexplicitly T P O C purpose for choosing a genre or for and to make inferences from it; cite O B K IS Stextual I O H O T B including or omitting specific details specific evidence when writing or speaking R FOto support conclusions drawn from PLE N M E A V S in the text. I the text. OT G THIS N S I 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the ISSION M R content and style of a text. E P Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

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Strand B

H

Objective 1

Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Letter to the Editor

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The Springfield Public Park has long been a source of pride for Springfield. Parents and children alike walk the nature trails in hopes of spotting a squirrel, a chipmunk, or even a deer. Children play on the swings and slides, and families eat picnic lunches on the grass. It’s a beautiful place to spend quality time with family, friends, and nature. Recently the park has started to look run down, and action must be taken to return it to

. how it once looked. The council needs to make more of an effort to ensure A that STERthe NE M D IN E C U D O

Y.

I visit. NY WA parks in our city remain clean and tidy places that families willBwant LACKLto A OT A N S I T TED. I O BE REPR H G Leyton Jackson I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

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Strand B, Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

1 In the first paragraph, the author This question is asking how the information in the paragraph is organized. Find the answer that describes how the first paragraph is organized.

? A asks a question and answers it. This answer is incorrect because the author does not ask or answer a question in the passage.

? B gives details and states the main idea later. This answer is correct because the author gives details in the first paragraph, and then states the main idea later in the second paragraph.

? C states his or her main idea and gives examples of it. This answer is incorrect because the main idea is stated in the second paragraph, while the first paragraph only includes details.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? D describes a problem and offers solutions.

This answer is incorrect because the author describes a problem and its solution in the second paragraph.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand B, Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Fossils Fossils are traces of ancient life that have been preserved by nature. Fossils are fascinating remnants of the past. Some fossils are the bones of ancient land animals or the shells of aquatic creatures that lived long before humans. Other fossils, known as trace fossils, provide records of animals’ movements or behaviors. Fossilized burrows and

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

footprints are trace fossils that have been left behind by ancient life.

2 The first sentence contains

? F a comparison. ? G a definition.

STER. . A M E ? H a list. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I ? J an opinion. T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I HINT O H T BO FORfirst PLEyou N M E A This question Iis asking about the sentence of the article. Remember to V S I TG HS O T N S I focus only on theIO N sentence when answering the question. Is the first sentence S first ISthings, M R comparing two defining something, listing things, or stating what E P someone thinks?

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Strand B, Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

Spotting Armadillos You probably won’t see an armadillo during the day. This is because the strong sun is just too hot for an armadillo. While it can survive in very warm weather, the armadillo would much rather come out of its burrow in the evening the air is cooler.

3 Which of these graphics below best shows how this passage is organized?

? A

Compare/contrast

? B

Main idea/support

? C ? D

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Cause/effect

Sequence of events

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY HINT L B A T UCinEDthe passage is S NOinformation The correct answer is the answer that describes how the I D T O I R . EP HTEDthe last Gand organized. Focus on how the first sentence two work together. BE Rsentences I R O Y T P K O O C O S I B BOOK R THIS E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

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Strand B, Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

Two Kinds of Trees A pine tree and an oak tree are both tall trees often found in forests, but they have very different characteristics. Pine trees are a type of conifer. Conifers are plants with thin needle-like leaves. Two of the most important characteristics of conifers are that they produce cones, with these cones containing the seeds, and that they do not produce flowers. Oak trees are different because they produce flowers, and their seeds are contained within a nut called an acorn. Oak trees also change the color of their leaves in winter, while pine trees remain the same throughout the year.

4 The chart below shows some facts about pine trees and oak trees. What is another difference between pine trees and oak trees?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Different

Do not change color in winter

Different

Alike Tall

Found in Do not produce flowers forests

Change color in winter

Produce flowers

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A Pine Tree OakISTree NOT UCED D T O I R . GHTED TO BE REP I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H R T do not. FOtrees PLE BOwhile N Mseeds, ? F Pine treesIShave oak E A V S I TH NOT G S I N ? G Pine trees SSIO cones, while oak trees do not. Iproduce PERM ? H Pine trees have leaves, while oak trees do not. ? J Pine trees have acorns, while oak trees do not. HINT This question is asking you to compare the two types of trees described in the passage. The diagram lists ways that the trees are alike in the area where the circles overlap. The ways that the trees are different are listed in the areas where the circles do not overlap. Find the answer choice that describes another difference between pine trees and oak trees described in the passage.

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Strand B, Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Singing Star Yesterday I had my first opportunity to sing in front of a live audience. I was assisting the stage manager backstage at a charity concert when I spotted my favorite musician, Kenny King, entering the area. My hands began sweating, and I could barely understand the instructions that the stage manager was giving me. I watched Kenny prepare to perform, and he must have sensed my gaze because he looked over at me and smiled. I stammered

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

some compliment, which he accepted with a smile. Then he asked about my own musical background. I told him that my ambition was to become a professional singer. No sooner had I spoken the words than I was being steered onto the stage by Kenny himself!

1 In the first sentence, the author

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B ? B states the main idea. A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . ? C describes a problem. GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P OOK S CO B S I H ? D states an opinion. E BOOK I FOR T PL N M E A V S I THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM ? A asks a question.

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Strand B, Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

Challenging Tasks Jordan was an excellent student, did well in most of her classes, and was always proud of how hard she worked. But while Jordan was very good at essays, exams, and quizzes, she was quite bad at practical tasks. She had first learned this in a sewing class when she had failed to successfully make a simple pillowcase. Her teacher guaranteed Jordan that she would be able to improve her grade in cooking class. Her words of encouragement were wasted, however, because Jordan knew that the one thing she did worse than sewing was cooking. 2 The first sentence contains

? F a comparison. ? G a definition. ? H a question.

E L P SAM ATION C U D Making Clothes E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? J a description.

Sandra cut two identical pieces of red fabric. With a special pencil, she drew lines R.on the

ASTE AY. W C Y A L N A sewing T A BshortsUunder D INthe together with several straight pins. Finally, she placed the Ogym E N C S I D T .I REPRO machine and sewed the fabric together. RIGHTED E B O COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E SA 3 Which of these below OT GIVbest shows how this passage is organized? THIS graphics N S I ISSION M R E P M material to use as a guide while sewing. Then she pinned the two pieces KLINEof cloth

? A

Compare/contrast

? B

Main idea/support

? C

Cause/effect

? D

Sequence of events

66 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand B, Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns.

The Perfect Concrete Regular concrete is very useful, but it has flaws. For instance, concrete wears down quickly and can crack under heavy weights. It cannot be twisted or folded at all. Also, concrete is difficult and costly to repair once it’s been damaged. Bending concrete, better known as ECC, may someday reduce these problems. ECC, which stands for Engineered Cement Composites, is a clever, but simple, invention. Regular concrete is usually made of cement, sand, pebbles, and broken stone. ECC uses the same ingredients, but does not use the pebbles and broken stone. These ingredients make the concrete unbendable. Instead, ECC uses bendable fibers. These fibers are mixed into the wet concrete. Later, after the concrete dries and hardens, the fibers allow it to bend.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

4 The chart below shows some facts about regular concrete and ECC. What is another difference between regular concrete and ECC?

Different

Contains pebbles

Different

Alike

Does not contain pebbles

STER. . A M E Does not ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A contain fibers Contains OT UCED Contains . IT IS N D O R P sand GHTED fibers BE RE I R O Y T P Regular K O K IS CO R THIS BOECC O Concrete O B AMPLE T GIVEN FO S S I H T IS NO N O I S RMIS is useful, while ECC is not. PEconcrete ? F Regular Contains cement

? G Regular concrete can be folded, while ECC cannot. ? H Regular concrete is a new idea, while ECC is not. ? J Regular concrete cannot bend, while ECC can.

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Strand B

H

Objective 2

Draw conclusions about the author’s purpose for choosing a genre or including or omitting specific details in the text.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Yawning

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

You’re sitting in class in the afternoon trying to listen to the lesson, when suddenly you find your mouth opening wide as you start to yawn. Everyone has experienced yawning, especially when they are bored or tired, but what exactly is a yawn?

A yawn is an action in which people open their mouths and breathe deeply. Many animals, from fish to monkeys, also yawn. The average yawn lasts for six seconds and

R. AY. LIN W K C Y A L N humans know how to yawn before they’re even born. OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R 1 Why did the author include the first COPYparagraph? OOK T S I B K S I O H BO to decideFOwhy R T the author included the first paragraph. This question is asking PLEyou N M E A V S I G THIS NOTabout S I ? A To describe Ssome facts yawning N IS IO M R E ThisPanswer is incorrect because the author describes some facts about fills the lungs with air. We know that yawning is very important to people ASTE E Mbecause

yawning in the second paragraph.

? B To introduce the topic of yawning This answer is correct because the author describes a person yawning in the first paragraph to introduce the topic of yawning.

? C To explain what a yawn is This answer is incorrect because the author asks what a yawn is in the first paragraph, but explains what it is in the second paragraph.

? D To persuade readers to start yawning This answer is incorrect because the author is not trying to persuade readers to start yawning by describing a person yawning in class.

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Strand B, Objective 2: Draw conclusions about the author’s purpose for choosing a genre or including or omitting specific details in the text.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

The Wings of Hummingbirds Wings are important to most birds, but they are especially important to hummingbirds. Hummingbirds flap their wings more than fifty times every second, using their wings to fly around in all directions. A hummingbird’s wings are very strong, but its feet and legs are not. Their legs aren’t strong enough to hold up much weight, so they generally fly

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

everywhere instead of walking. When hummingbirds get ready to fly, they use their wings to lift them up because their feet and legs are not strong enough to give them a good lift.

2 The author includes the first sentence in order to

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? G explain how hummingbirds use their wings to fly.NOT UCED S I D T O I R . HTED TO BE REP ? H show that hummingbirds are good toIGwatch. R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H BO of the article. ? J introduce the main FOR T PLEtopic N M E A V S I THIS NOT G S I N HINT ISSIO PERM ? F describe an interesting fact about hummingbirds.

This question is asking you to decide what the author’s purpose was for including the first sentence of the article. Remember to focus only on the first sentence of the article. Focus on how the first sentence relates to the whole article.

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Strand B, Objective 2: Draw conclusions about the author’s purpose for choosing a genre or including or omitting specific details in the text.

Letter to the Editor To the Editor, After a recent series of minor car accidents in town, residents have started buzzing about the need for a traffic light at the intersection of Clyde Road and Iris Street. I, for one, do not think that we need to put a traffic light at this intersection. If people would simply drive slowly and cautiously through town, there would be no need for extra traffic lights. I urge all citizens simply to slow down! Beth Evans 3 One of the author’s purposes in this passage is to

? A entertain. ? B instruct. ? C inform. ? D persuade.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

ER .

HINT MAST E N I AY. L W K C Y A L N This question is asking you to decide what the author’s main purpose is. Why do TAB D IN Ainform, Oentertain, E N C U S I you think the author wrote the letter? Was it mainly to instruct, D T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I or persuade? R T PY

CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand B, Objective 2: Draw conclusions about the author’s purpose for choosing a genre or including or omitting specific details in the text.

Ancient Roman Games Today, people all over the world play ballgames, but it is amazing to realize that children were playing ballgames way back in ancient Rome. Paintings from ancient Rome show men and boys playing many types of ballgames including handball, soccer, field hockey, and catch. Roman girls also played sports, and they are shown playing catch and volleyball, as well as lifting weights. One of the most popular children’s games in ancient Rome was a strange one. It involved one player riding on the back of another, while the players riding on top threw and caught balls. This game was played by both girls and boys, and it is still played today in northern Greece.

4 Write one fact and one opinion included in the passage.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT The passage includes both facts and opinions about ancient Roman games. To answer this question, identify a fact in the passage and describe the fact. Remember that a fact is something that is known to be true. Then identify an opinion in the passage and describe the opinion. Remember that an opinion is what somebody thinks and cannot be proven to be true.

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Strand B, Objective 2: Draw conclusions about the author’s purpose for choosing a genre or including or omitting specific details in the text.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Pearls Pearls form when foreign material such as a grain of sand or a piece of shell gets stuck inside a mollusk’s shell. The material irritates the mantle, which is the organ that produces a mollusk’s shell. In order to defend itself from this irritation, the mollusk releases a substance called nacre. You are probably more familiar with nacre’s common name, mother-of-pearl. The nacre covers the problem-causing material. The mollusk

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

repeats this process several times. Over time, the layers of nacre turn into a pearl.

1 Why did the author write the paragraph?

? A To describe what pearls look like ? B To explain how pearls form

TER. S A M E ? C To show that pearls are rare AY. LIN W K C Y A L N OT A B DUCED IN A N ? D To describe what a mollusk is S I T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

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Strand B, Objective 2: Draw conclusions about the author’s purpose for choosing a genre or including or omitting specific details in the text.

Hard Work Life was difficult for Sekhti, and just to provide the basic essentials for his family, he had to exert great effort. Crops would not grow on the harsh sand dunes of Egypt’s Salt Country, so farming was unimaginable. In the Salt Country, as its name implies, the major resource was salt. The peasants there, like Sekhti, spent their days toiling in the salt mines. Sekhti worked six days a week, and on the seventh day, he would load his wagon and go to market. When he could, Sekhti also sold people reeds from the small marshes of the Salt Country, which were used to make floor mats and other simple creations. This is how Sekhti made a living and supported his children.

2 The author includes the first sentence in order to

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RARepairing A R . a Screen 9 9 . 8 8 8

? F introduce the main character.

? G describe the setting of the story.

? H explain when the story took place.

? J state his opinion about Salt Country.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A OT CED Uthread. S Nstrong I D T O I To repair a hole in a screen, first, thread a long needle with nylon Cut a R . TED R EP H E G B I R O Y hole. Then, piece of screen that is slightly larger than COPthe OOK Tremove the screen from the door S I B K S I O H T handle the needle on both sides of the or window and set it upright can FOReasily PLEsoBOthatIVyou N M E A S T Ghole. Carefully push the needle through both the patch THISpatch over NOthe screen. Position the S I N IO and the screen. RMISSsmall, even stitches, sew around all sides of the patch. When you PEUsing have finished attaching the patch to the screen, tie the end of the thread. Use scissors to cut the loose end of the thread. Then place the screen back in the door or window.

3 One of the author’s purposes in this passage is to

? A instruct. ? B entertain. ? C inform. ? D persuade.

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Strand B, Objective 2: Draw conclusions about the author’s purpose for choosing a genre or including or omitting specific details in the text.

Trolleys Trolleys are no longer as popular as they once were. However, they are still considered an important part of transportation history. New Orleans is noted for its continued use of trolleys. San Francisco also continues to have a trolley system. Other cities have set up new streetcar systems to celebrate this transportation of the past. Trolleys have a fascinating history and are a great way to get where you’re going.

4 Write one fact and one opinion included in the passage.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

74 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand B

H

Objective 3

Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Flea My mother agreed to let us adopt Flea from the animal shelter on one condition: I had to take charge of Flea’s housebreaking and training. This was easier said than done,

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

however. While Flea is adorable and friendly, he’s not a genius. It took him two months to learn to do his business outside in the yard, and he still has the occasional accident in the house. Teaching Flea to behave was an even more daunting task. Flea chewed everything he could reach and that included furniture, shoes, and books. He did not understand basic commands such as “sit” or “come.” When you tried to take Flea for a walk, he took you for a walk, scraping your knees and elbows in the process. 1

STER. . A M E Which sentence can be supported with information in the passage? ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A To answer this question, you have to work out whichSconclusion can ED reached NOT UCbe I D T O I R . based on the details in the passage. GHTED TO BE REP I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I ? A Flea’s owner should try harder. O H OR T Fthis PLE BObecause N M E A V S This answer is incorrect is an opinion that a person could I OT G THIS N S I have about Flea’s ISSIONowner, but it is not a conclusion that can be made M R E P passage. from the ? B Flea’s owner dislikes her dog. This answer is incorrect because there are no details in the passage to suggest that Flea’s owner does not like her dog.

? C Flea is a difficult dog to train. This answer is correct because the passage includes details that show that Flea is a hard dog to train, such as how long it took to teach Flea to do his business outside and how Flea does not understand basic commands.

? D Flea is an unfriendly pet. This answer is incorrect because the passage says that Flea is adorable and friendly, so this conclusion cannot be reached based on the passage.

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Strand B, Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Novelty Carrots Novelty carrots are a special group of carrots that are sometimes bred for particular purposes. The name suggests that the carrots are bred only for fun. However, novelty carrots can actually be bred to have useful characteristics. Growers can mix different types of carrots to produce new carrots with special features. One recent novelty carrot is

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

the maroon carrot. This carrot is a purple vegetable that contains special vitamins. Scientists developed the carrot to help fight disease.

2 With which statement would the author probably agree?

? F Novelty carrots were created to be amusing.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? H Carrots with special features can be harmful. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y ? J Scientists should not try to alter carrots. P CO OOK S I B K S I O H LE BO VEN FOR T P M A S HINT OT GI THIS N S I This question isSS ION you to draw a conclusion based on the information in the I asking M R E passage. P Focus on what the author says about novelty carrots and read through each ? G Novelty carrots can have useful purposes.

answer choice. Which one has information in the passage to support it? Which one describes what the author thinks about novelty carrots?

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Strand B, Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

Joseph Stanley Joseph Stanley wanted to be a cartoonist since he was a young boy, and practiced his craft for many years. A short time after he graduated from an art college, he had a big break. Stanley convinced two major newspapers to pick up his comic strip. Once these papers began publishing his strip, other papers wanted to run it as well and it became more and more popular. It appeared daily in newspapers all over the country. Joseph worked hard for many years building up his fan base, always doing his best to make each cartoon more entertaining than the one before it.

3 What type of person do you think Joseph Stanley was? Use details from the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT This question is asking you to draw a conclusion about what Joseph Stanley was like. You have to decide what type of person Joseph Stanley was based on what the passage tells you about him. Once you have decided what type of person Joseph Stanley was, explain why you think this, using details from the passage.

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Strand B, Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

Letter to the Editor Five Oaks Golf Course has created a major problem for people traveling on the busy Hamilton Road. The golf course is situated on both sides of the road. To play two of the holes, golfers must cross the road in their golf carts and then cross the road again to finish their game. Two “golf cart crossings” have been placed on the road to allow the safe passage of golfers from one side to the other. Almost every day on my way home from work, golfers in golf carts jet across the street in front of me without so much as a glance to make sure there is no oncoming traffic. More than once, I’ve slammed on my brakes to avoid hitting a golf cart in the middle of the road. If golfers at Five Oaks fail to pay more attention at these dangerous crossings, someone is going to get seriously injured or killed. Bartholomew Canton

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4 Do you think the situation can be described as dangerous? Use details from the passage to explain why you do or do not think so.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT To answer this question, you have to decide whether or not you think the situation described in the passage is dangerous. You make this decision by focusing on the details given in the passage. To answer the question, first write a sentence stating whether or not you think the situation is dangerous. Then explain why you think this by using details from the passage. 78 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand B, Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Exploring Mexico City Our first stop in Mexico City was at the Palace of Fine Arts to see the Ballet Folklorico. This is a dance show that celebrates Mexican culture. What immediately jumped out at me were all of the bright colors that decorate Mexico and make everything seem festive. While waiting in the theater for the show to begin, I was amazed by the vivid murals. I searched for the right words in my Spanish phrasebook and then asked a worker about

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the murals. She said that most of the works were by a famous Mexican artist named Diego Rivera.

1 Which sentence can be supported with information in the passage?

? A The narrator speaks perfect Spanish.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? C The narrator is taking ballet classes. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I ? D The narrator goes to Mexico CityPoften. R Y CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM ? B The narrator enjoyed visiting Mexico City.

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Strand B, Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

Butter Long ago, butter was not conveniently available at grocery stores. Instead, people used to make their own butter. First, farmers milked their cows and placed the fresh, whole milk in a cool place, such as a cellar. They let the milk sit for a while until the cream from the milk had floated to the top, and then they skimmed the cream off and poured it into a butter churn. Then they churned the cream until the fat from the cream had collected to make butter. Farmers put the butter into a bowl and pressed on it with a wooden paddle to remove a liquid known as buttermilk. Then they washed the butter with cold water. They continued to wash and press the butter until the water that ran off was clear. Finally, they added a bit of salt to the butter for flavor, and it was ready for cooking and baking.

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2 With which statement would the author probably agree?

? F Freshly made butter tastes better than store-bought butter. ? G In the past, butter was healthier than it is today.

? H People in the past were lucky they did not have stores.

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? J Making butter was a long and involved process.

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Strand B, Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

Letter to the Editor Most residents of our town have probably passed by the Twin Pines Golf Course, and some have played golf there. Twin Pines is a beautiful, well-maintained golf course, and we are all lucky to have such a lovely place available to play golf. Unfortunately, membership is decreasing every year, and I fear the golf course might soon be unable to support itself. Even though the annual fee is quite high, people have to remember that it costs a lot to maintain a golf course and keep it looking great. I urge all residents to consider joining the club. It’s great exercise, a great day out, and well worth the annual fee. Ben Humphrey

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3 What type of person do you think Ben Humphrey is? Use details from the passage to support your answer.

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Strand B, Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

Learning to Fly Squirrel called to Bird and requested that she come to speak with him. Bird glided from the treetop and landed gracefully on Squirrel’s branch. “Bird, I think you are the most perfect creature in the entire forest, and I was hoping that you could teach me to fly and chirp,” said Squirrel. Flattered by Squirrel’s comments, Bird agreed to instruct him in both flying and singing. Every day for the next month, Bird gave directions, and Squirrel carefully listened. After she had gone home, Squirrel continued to practice and tried several times each day to fly and sing. No matter how hard he tried, he could not master either activity, but he refused to give up.

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4 Do you think Squirrel can be described as determined? Use details from the story to explain why you do or do not think so.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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D

Strand B: All Together

Objective 1: Identify or infer the author’s use of structure/organizational patterns. Objective 2: Draw conclusions about the author’s purpose for choosing a genre or for including or omitting specific details in the text. Objective 3: Use stated or implied evidence from the text to draw and/or support a conclusion.

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the questions that follow it.

E L P SAM ATION C An Unlikely Hero U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The students in Quentin’s class were asked to find examples of stories about heroes. Quentin found this story about an unlikely hero.

Aaron observed Dr. Capponelli as she molded the plaster cast to his leg. She had just told

ER . LIN WA Y ACKwith L N A B that he might have experienced on the camping trip he had planned his family A N I S NOT PRODUCED I T I . and friends for that weekend. GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H T BO from the Aaron said little on the ride room, his mind replaying the FORemergency PLEhome N M E A V S I G S I T H O T that had fraction of a second his whole summer vacation. He was rounding IS Nruined N O I S second base and MIS for third when he saw the ball out of the corner of his eye and PERheading

ST Aaron that he had a broken leg, which was certain to destroy any amountEof MAenjoyment Y.

slid through the dirt to make the play. As his foot connected with the bag, he heard a loud snap, which was immediately followed by an explosion in his leg. The sound of his father’s voice brought Aaron back to the present. “Don’t worry, Aaron, you’ll still have a good time on the camping trip this weekend.” Aaron sighed; he knew his father was trying to make him feel better, but he was beginning to think that skipping the camping trip altogether sounded like the best idea.

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Strand B: All Together

The next day, Aaron teetered in the driveway on his crutches, watching as Lisa, his little sister, Benjamin and Tyrell, his best friends, and his parents bustled back and forth from the house to the camper with tents, sleeping bags, and coolers. Aaron resigned himself to the fact that he was going on this camping trip no matter what. When the camper was loaded, everyone clambered in and buckled up. It took about two hours to reach their favorite campsite, a clearing at the edge of a river renowned for its marvelous whitewater rapids. Aaron felt useless as everyone busied themselves setting up tents, gathering wood for the campfire, and preparing food for dinner. He sat on the ground and rested his throbbing leg on a cooler filled with bottled water. When darkness fell, everyone settled into their tents and fell fast asleep.

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The next morning, Aaron awoke to the sound of chirping birds and the aroma of bacon cooked over an open fire. For a moment, he forgot that he had a broken leg and drank in the sights and sounds of a forest in the morning. As he rolled over, however, the dull ache in his left leg reminded him that he would be spending a long day by himself, lounging at the edge of the river with a book and a fishing pole.

STER. . A M E AY W Y ACKLINto the As everyone embarked on their individual adventures, Aaron Ahobbled edge of the L N A B N I OT UCEDagainst S Nleaned I D T O river and seated himself in a warm patch of sunlight. He his head a rock I R . TED R EP H E G B I R O and closed his eyes. COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M SA long he GIVEbeen napping when the sound of a girl shouting for Aaron wasn’t sure OThad THIShow N S I N slumber. Scanning the water, his eyes locked on a girl who had help roused him from ISSIOhis M R E P somehow gotten her bright green kayak stuck between two boulders in the roughest part

of the rapids. She waved her arms and bellowed, “Hey, help me, please!” Aaron grabbed his crutches and struggled to his feet. ���How am I going to help her with this cast on my leg?” he mumbled. He suddenly remembered that his father had stowed a length of rope in one of the drawers in the camper. He dug quickly through some odds and ends until he found the rope, and then limped back to the edge of the river. He tied a knot in the rope to form a

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Strand B: All Together

loop, swung it over his head like a lasso, and gave it a powerful toss toward the girl. Unfortunately, the rope didn’t quite reach the girl, so Aaron pulled it back and once again thrust it toward the girl. It was no use. The rope was so light that it was being carried by the wind. He couldn’t throw it far enough for the girl to reach it, and he knew that if she tried to jump into the water to grab it, she would be swept away by the raging waters. I need to tie the rope to something heavier so I

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can throw it further into the water, thought Aaron, eyeing the crutches he had

propped against a tree. He grabbed one, tied the rope around it, and heaved it toward the girl in the kayak like a javelin-thrower aiming to set a new world record. The girl in the kayak caught the crutch in midair and, gripping it tightly in her hands, .

STER YW ACK ANher BLhand A N I eventually she was close enough that Aaron was able to grasp her and pull T D O E IT IS N REPRODUC . D E from the water. T YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L F The girl, whom Aaron A later learned was Katie, thanked him numerous times as MP EN named V S I G S I T H he handed her aTtowel. After IS aNOwhile, she had dried off and managed to relax, and Aaron N O I S IS offered her a bottle PERM of cold water and a peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwich. She talked to MA butAY. jumped into the river. It was difficult to pull the girl through the bubbling LINE rapids,

Aaron as she munched on the sandwich. “I guess it’s a good thing you have a broken leg,” she commented. “Why do you say that?” Aaron inquired. “Well, if you didn’t have a broken leg, I doubt that you would have been sitting here or heard my cries for help. You’re my hero,” said Katie.

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Strand B: All Together

1 Which of these graphics below best shows how the story is organized?

? A

Compare/contrast

? B

Main idea/support

? C

Cause/effect

? D

Sequence of events

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2 Do you think Aaron can be described as a hero? Use details from the story to explain why you do or do not think so.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand B: All Together

Kasumi enjoys baking. When she found this recipe in a magazine, she decided to bake a carrot cake.

Carrot Cake For a cake that is healthier than most cakes, consider baking a carrot cake. This cake contains no sugar and eight carrots, making it a healthy choice. Most carrot cakes have cream cheese frosting, but this frosting adds a lot of unnecessary sugar and fat to the cake. Keep this cake simple by not frosting it, and you have a healthy snack where the delicious taste of the carrots can stand out. Ingredients

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3 cups self-raising flour 1 tsp baking powder 1 tsp baking soda 2 tsp cinnamon

STER. . A M E 2 tsp vanilla ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A 3 eggs S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B Preparation K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N 1. Heat an oven to 350 degrees. Photo © Copyright iStockphoto MISSIO R E P 2. Grease and flour a cake pan. 8 carrots, finely grated

3. Grate the carrots. 4. Mix the flour, baking powder, baking soda and cinnamon in a large bowl until the mixture is smooth. 5. Add the carrots, vanilla and eggs. Mix well to combine. 6. Pour the batter into the cake pan. 7. Bake the cake for thirty minutes. 8. Let the cake cool on a wire rack for about ten minutes. 9. Carefully remove the cake from the pan and let it cool completely. 10. Store the cake in a refrigerator.

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Strand B: All Together

3 The author includes the first paragraph in order to

? A explain that the cake will be easy to make. ? B convince people that the cake will be good for them. ? C describe what is needed to make the cake. ? D show that the cake should be eaten in small servings. 4 The first sentence contains

? F a definition. ? G a comparison. ? H an opinion. ? J a fact.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand B: All Together

Oscar is learning to play the violin. Oscar’s music teacher gave him this article to read about a famous violin maker.

The Sounds of Stradivarius 1.

Violins are small musical instruments with strings. Musicians can produce beautiful sounds by rubbing a stretched ribbon of horse hair over these strings. For hundreds of years, violin players have been adding their instruments’ special sounds to musical works

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of all sorts. However, no violins sound just like those known today as Stradivarius violins. 2.

Stradivarius violins were made by one man,

Antonio Stradivari. Stradivari was born in Italy in 1644. He began studying musical

STER. . A M E maker encouraged Stradivari’s interest in that ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A instrument. In 1680, Stradivari opened his S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I own shop, in which he spent his days building R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O and fixing violins. H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S OT G THIS Nviolins S I N People had been making in Italy for almost two hundred years before ISSIO M R E StradivariPopened his shop, but Stradivari quickly proved that he was special. He instruments as a young man. One local violin-

3.

became famous for his love of violins. The high quality of his work also made him stand out from everyone else. Even today, Stradivari’s violins are thought to be among the finest musical instruments in the world. 4.

What made Stradivari’s violins merit such praise? Throughout his life, Stradivari was always looking for new and better ways to improve his work. He seemed to know more about violins than most people. He also seemed to be willing to experiment with his work. He soon developed ideas about violin-making that people still don’t fully understand today.

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Strand B: All Together

5.

It is hard to say for sure exactly what made the violins so special. All we can say for sure was that Stradivari used at least two different kinds of wood in each violin. Some of this wood might have been from certain trees that had grown thick to live in cold weather. The wood also might have been soaked in sea water. Stradivari coated the wood with a type of paint that included honey and eggs. He then held the violin parts together with a special kind of glue.

6.

Stradivari also studied every inch of his violins to make sure they were perfect. He fretted over the size and shape of the violins. Some people have noticed odd details in his instruments. For example, every violin has two S-shaped holes in the front to let the sounds out. On Stradivari’s violins, these holes were not lined up equally. This tiny detail might have made the wonderful Stradivari sound.

7.

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The violins made by Antonio Stradivari came to be known as “Stradivarius” or “Strad” for short. There were hundreds of Strads made, and today there are still around 650 of them. Stradivari also made other musical instruments. Some people believe that he made more than one thousand in his life. These included guitars, violas, cellos, and even a big harp.

8.

9.

ER . AY. LI W K C Y A L N death in 1737, many people around the world wantedTtheir Strads. D IN AViolinO A B own E N C U S I D T makers worked hard to make violins that Tlooked ED. I andBsounded REPROlike Stradivari’s. They H E G I R O K T They did not mean to trick even put labels reading “Stradivarius” COPY onIStheir OOviolins. S I B K O H OR T were similar to Stradivari’s. LE BOthatVthe Fviolins buyers, but onlyAto Pshow N M E S I THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO Sometimes PERMit is difficult today to tell if an old violin was made by Stradivari himself Although there were many Strads, there still weren’t enough. After MAST NEStradivari’s

or by a copycat. Experts at museums have to carefully look at violins to decide if they came from the greatest violin-maker. Those violins that were made by Stradivari are prized by many people today. They are some of the most important musical instruments in the world. 10. The most well-known violins made by Stradivari have been named, usually by their owners. Some of the names are the last names of the owners, while other names are strange or even silly. These violin names include Soil, Hammer, Ruby, and Hercules.

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Strand B: All Together

11. Amazingly, Strads have stood the test of time and many are still played today! World-class musicians love playing Strads in concert. Sadly, these Strads cost a lot of money, so only a few music lovers can afford to buy them. 12. After hundreds of years, the wonderful violins of Antonio Stradivari are still offering lovely music to the ears of many. The idea of Stradivarius violins is strong all over the world. In fact, in America, some people use the word “Stradivarius” to mean anything that is of excellent quality.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand B: All Together

5 Which sentence can be supported with information in the article?

? A Strads are very special to their owners. ? B Strads are used by most violinists. ? C Strads were not meant to be used for hundreds of years. ? D Strads cannot be found in any American museums today. 6 Why did the author include paragraph 4?

? F To show where people can buy Stradivari’s violins ? G To describe what Stradivari’s violins were like ? H To explain why Stradivari was special

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? J To encourage readers to improve themselves

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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H Strand C

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Making Reader/Text Connections The reader will connect or associate the text with one’s own life. Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. TER.

E MAS WAY. N I L K C LA Standard: Objective 2: Correlates to Common Core A BState IN ANY T D O E N C U IS why individuals, Select, synthesize and/or use relevant 3. Analyze how D events, and ideas Tand . Iinteract PROcourse D E E T R H information within the text to write E develop and over the of a text. G OB YRI T P K O a personal response to the text. O C O OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Strand C

H

Objective 1

Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Exploring the Oceans

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In 1950, Jacques Cousteau purchased a ship called the Calypso. He traveled to some of the most fascinating waters in the world to study the creatures of the oceans. Jacques recorded his travels in books and on film in the hopes of increasing the public’s knowledge about what lies under the sea. His work was extremely popular all over the world. Jacques won several awards for his work and was later asked to make a television series. For eight years, The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau could be seen on television

. E AY. LIN W K C Y A L N underwater look at our planet. OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

STER screens in dozens of countries. The show provided millions of viewers with MAan

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Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

1 If Jacques Cousteau were alive today, what would you most like to ask him? Use information from the article to support your answer. This question is asking you to relate to the text. Think about what interested you the most about the article. Is there one thing you would like to know more about? For example, you might like to know why Jacques was so interested in studying the ocean or what the most interesting part of his career was. In your answer, explain what you would like to ask Jacques about and explain why. Be sure to include details from the article in your answer.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Young Hero Honored Mayor Sharon Littleton presented seventh grade student Chris Baker with a medal of honor in a ceremony held yesterday at the Hayworth Court House. Baker, a student at Thomas Jefferson Junior High School, demonstrated courage when he rescued a dog trapped in rising floodwaters last month. Baker said in a brief acceptance speech that he

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“wasn’t trying to be a hero.” He was merely trying to help a friend in need. He saw the dog struggling in the water and knew that he had to help it.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

2 Think about someone who did something brave. Tell how that brave act was like the brave act of Chris Baker in the passage.

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STER.

HINT E MA N I AY. L W K C Y A L N A in B This question is asking you to relate someone in the story you D INknow OTtoA someone E N C U S I D T your own life. The story describes a boy who bravely a Edog PROfrom drowning. TED. I saves Rbrave. H E G B I R O Think about someone you know who has done something Then describe the PY KT O O C O S I B K brave act the person did and why BOOexplain R TitHIisS similar to the brave act that Chris E O L F P N M Baker did. T GIVE HIS SA

T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

Early Career During high school, David Reid got his first chance to move his cartoons from his notebooks to a newspaper. The first Magic Marvin cartoon strip was printed in his school paper, the Clydesdale Chronicler. It was warmly received. “People fell in love with the characters,” said Mona Alvarez, a former editor of the newspaper. “It was my first big break,” recalled Reid. Later, after graduating high school, he began looking for a cartooning college. He showed the college officials copies of the Clydesdale Chronicler in which his cartoons appeared, and they accepted him right away.

3 If David Reid were here today, what would you most like to ask him? Use information from the article to support your answer.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT This question is asking you to respond to what you have read. The article describes some information about a successful cartoonist called David Reid. To answer this question, think of something that you would like to ask David about. Make sure that your question relates to what the passage tells you about him.

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Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

Making a Difference Noah Webster grew up in Connecticut where his father worked as a farmer and weaver. He was a very intelligent young man who did well in school. Noah dreamed of becoming a lawyer someday, so his parents found a way to send him to college. Noah went to Yale University, but by the time he was finished, his family didn’t have enough money to send him to law school. Noah decided to become a teacher instead. He quickly decided that American schools were in poor shape. Many classrooms were overcrowded and the books that teachers used came from England. Noah decided that he was going to change this and improve the American education system.

4 Think about what this article says about people in general. In what ways does it remind you of people you have read about? Support your answer with evidence from the article.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT To answer this question, you have to make connections between what you learned about Noah Webster and other people you have read about. For example, you might have read about other people who noticed a problem and decided to do something to improve things. You could write about this person and explain how they are similar to Noah Webster. 99 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

The Big Game Glenn practiced shooting hoops in his family’s driveway. He began to feel queasy as he shot the ball and missed the hoop time after time. It kept smacking the rim or the backboard and landing on the pavement with a hollow thunk before bouncing back to him. Finally his sister, Marta, came out of the house and approached him. “Hey, I was watching you from inside, and the reason you keep missing that basket is

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that you’re way too tense!” she exclaimed.

“I’m just so apprehensive about this game, Marta,” Glenn said. “I know that if I shoot like this while I’m playing tomorrow, the coach will put me on the bench, and that’s where I’ll sit all next year.”

1 Think about someone who felt worried or nervous about something. Tell Show TER.that A M E . experience was like the experience of Glenn in the story. Y WAY ACKLIN

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100 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

2009 Arts Awards The winners of the 2009 Arts Awards were announced on Thursday. The winners of the awards each received $2,000 to use toward continuing their work as artists. The 2009 Young Artist of the Year was also announced. Michael Tobin won the award. He received $1,000 and the chance to show his work at the local art gallery. Tobin will also get to work with a local professional artist, who will help to guide Tobin and develop his talent.

2 If Michael Tobin were here today, what would you most like to ask him? Use information from the article to support your answer.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

Alexander Calder Alexander Calder was a successful and talented artist. He was also a human being who cared a great deal about the people and the world around him. He helped other artists whenever he could. And as Calder created his lighthearted artwork, he kept his eye on the happenings around the world. He donated pieces of art to be auctioned for money to help disaster victims. In 1975, Calder was awarded the United Nations Peace Medal.

3 Think about what this article says about people in general. In what ways does it remind you of people you have read about? Support your answer with evidence from the article.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand C, Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge.

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet In 1817, Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet opened the first school for deaf children in America. Gallaudet taught the children sign language. It was the first time sign language had been taught in America. Gallaudet served as the school’s principal until 1830. His contributions to deaf education didn’t end there. Gallaudet’s youngest son, Edward, carried on his father’s legacy. In 1864, he helped to found the first college for deaf students in the world, known today as Gallaudet University. The work of Thomas and Edward Gallaudet was important for many reasons. It not only gave deaf people across the United States the chance to earn an education, it gave them a voice.

4 If Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet were alive today, what would you most like to ask him? Use information from the article to support your answer.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand C

H

Objective 2

Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Barrow’s Strange Days and Nights

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The city of Barrow, Alaska, is the northernmost city in the United States. Each year between May and August, the city of Barrow experiences up to eighty-four days of constant daylight. The sun never sets during this time. The area is called the land of the midnight sun. It may seem great to have twenty-four hours of continuous light, but think about how difficult it would be to sleep! Fortunately for residents of Barrow, they

. can make up for lost sleep between the end of November and the end of January. ASTER During INE M NY WAY. D IN A OT A E N C U S I D T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

CKL this time, the city is plunged into darkness because the sun never BLArises.

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Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

1 Using information from the passage, write a brief paragraph telling why you would or would not like to live in Barrow. Use information from the passage to support your answer. To answer this question, you have to decide whether or not you would enjoy living in Barrow based on what the passage tells you about Barrow. The passage includes both good and bad points about living in Barrow. You can decide either way, but be sure to use the details given about Barrow to explain your decision.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Making a Difference Throughout the summer, Janelle and her friends looked for places in their neighborhood in need of a cleanup. They were surprised by how many places were littered, but they didn’t let the scale of their task ruin their enthusiasm. Janelle even wrote a letter to the town’s mayor, asking for recycling bins to be placed in all public places. The more Janelle

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and her friends did, the more other people in the town noticed their efforts and started to pitch in. After three weeks, Janelle felt like they were making a real difference.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

2 Which part of the story do you think was most important? Use information from the story and your own life to explain why you chose that part.

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STER.

HINT E MA N I AY. L W K C Y A L N A B all the This question is asking for your opinion on the story. Think D INthings OT Aabout E N C U S I D T that happened in the story and everything that RO story. Focus on EPthe TEDis. Idescribed Rin H E G B I R O which part of the story you think is O most important. Be sure to explain your choice PY KT O C O S I B K in your answer. R THIS E BOO

AMPL T GIVEN FO S S I H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

107 ŠRALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

Students Abroad The Students in Europe program was created five years ago to promote understanding and cooperation. Students are chosen from schools around the United States. After attending a training program, the students are assigned to a host family in Europe. Students spend three weeks living with their host family. Students get the chance to experience another culture and to find out how people from around the world live. Each family has a child the same age as the student who will stay with them for three weeks.

3 Using information from the passage, write a brief paragraph telling why you would or would not like to take part in the Students in Europe program. Use information from the passage to support your answer.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT To answer this question, you have to decide whether or not you would like to take part in the program described in the passage. You should use details in the passage to make your decision, but you can also include your own personal opinion.

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Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

Amazing Mushrooms Mushrooms are much larger and more powerful than their appearance suggests. The part that we see is only the smallest part of the fungus. Beneath the soil, honey mushrooms have a system of root-like tentacles that can spread out for miles underground. These tentacles take in nutrients, making the mushrooms bigger and stronger and killing the other plants and trees. When large groups of trees in one Oregon forest started dying, scientists came and studied the soil. What they found was a giant group of mushroom tentacles that had been growing for more than 2,500 years. The mushroom had an area of three and a half square miles, making it the largest organism in the world!

4 Which part of the passage was most interesting or surprising? Use information from the passage to support your response.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT This question is asking for your opinion on the text. You have to decide which detail in the passage you think is the most interesting or the most surprising. There is no right or wrong answer to this question. You can choose any detail in the passage that you think is interesting or surprising. However, be sure to explain why you found this detail interesting or surprising.

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Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Ancient Batteries The first modern battery was made in 1800, but ancient batteries have been found that are more than two thousand years old. These ancient batteries could not have made much electricity. In fact, you would have needed more than five of them just to power a modern clock radio. The ancient people could not have done much with these batteries. Scientists have decided on a few possible uses, however. One possible use was for healing

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aches and pains. Ancient people might have thought electricity could make them feel better. Other scientists think the ancient battery was used to make jewelry. There is a simple way to make gold-plated jewelry using small electrical charges. The ancient battery may have been used to do this.

1 Which part of the article was most interesting? Use information from the article TER. to S A M E support your response. WAY. KLIN

BLAC A IN ANY T D O E N C U . IT IS E REPROD D E T H G PYRI K TO B O O C O S I B BOOK R THIS E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

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Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

The Last Minute Project Over the next two weeks, Jerome started working on his project. Jerome found that building a volcano was a little more complicated than he had originally thought. The papier mâché proved to be difficult to work with and took ages to dry. Although he had started the project two weeks before it was due, Jerome still found himself working late on the volcano the night before the fair. Now he realized that maybe he should have sacrificed a couple of trips to the park and spent a little more time on his project.

2 Which part of the story do you think was most important? Use information from the story and your own life to explain why you chose that part.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

111 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

A Mexican Tour After lunch we visited Xochimilco. It is a gorgeous area of Mexico City that features countless colorful flowers and canals in which people travel in brightly colored boats. Long ago, Xochimilco was a thriving place to live, but now it is more of a tourist attraction. Our whole group piled into one boat and drifted down the waterway. We saw impressive buildings and the magnificent collection of flowers that makes Xochimilco famous. Many people on these other boats were taking the same tours as us, but not every boat contained tourists. Merchants sold their art and souvenirs right from their boats! Some boats were full of bands that played amazing Mexican music as they sailed down the waterways.

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3 Using information from the passage, write a brief paragraph telling why you would or would not have enjoyed visiting Xochimilco. Use information from the passage to support your answer.

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Strand C, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

The Cheese Rolls Alone Every country has its own unique traditions and celebrations. There are some celebrations that might seem a bit extraordinary to people from other parts of the world. Citizens of Brockworth, England, celebrate one such tradition. The Cooper’s Hill Cheese Rolling is an annual attraction that brings in tourists from across the globe. A large wheel of Double Gloucester cheese is hurled down the hill. Groups of young people anxiously wait at the top of the hill for one second before pursuing the cheese. The person who reaches the bottom of the steep hill first wins the cheese.

4 Which part of the passage was most interesting or surprising? Use information from the passage to support your response.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

113 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


D

Strand C: All Together

Objective 1: Make connections between the text and outside experiences and knowledge. Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text to write a personal response to the text.

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the questions that follow it. Blake’s class is learning about the 1940s. Blake’s teacher started the lesson by reading this article to the class.

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Caroline Keating looked around the quiet streets of Beasley, where she had grown up. The town had always been small. In fact, only a few hundred people had ever lived .

TER AY. L W K C Y A L N OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T O young men in I When America entered World War II in December many PRthe TED.1941, REof H E G B I R O T to say goodbye to their Beasley decided to join the armed Iforces. COPYTheseISmen OOKhad S B K O H LE BO and families, friends, homes, jobs FOR asT they moved to faraway bases for training. Pschools, N M E A V S I T G brave sons and fathers, but were also extremely sad to HIS proudISofNOtheir Many families Twere N ISSIO see them leave. PERM S there. But now, at the beginning of 1942, Beasley seemed tinier than ever. INE MA

Caroline’s family was one of these. Her brother, Jack, had joined the Air Force and was being sent to a training camp. The Keating family gathered to drive him to the railroad station and bid him farewell. As they drove, Caroline, Jack, and their sister Marianne looked out the windows, thinking of all the fun they’d shared during their lives in Beasley. When they passed one large building, though, they started to wonder. This building was an automobile factory where Jack and several of his friends had worked for years. Now that Jack and the others were leaving, who would run the factory?

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Strand C: All Together

Caroline, Marianne, and their parents brought Jack to his train and wished him the best of luck with his flight training. Right before Jack disappeared into the train, Caroline whispered to him, “We’re so proud of you, Jack, and we’ll do whatever we can here to support you.”

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Marianne overheard this pledge and later commented, “I want to help out, too, but I’m not sure how we can best do that.” Caroline agreed that it was a tricky question. At the time, most women did not serve in the armed forces or even hold jobs outside their homes. Caroline and Marianne could not imagine a way to join in the national effort as much as they wanted to.

STER. . WAY Y ACK L N A B A N people of America that they had already given much, but that moreCEhelp U D I would be S NOT even I D T O I R . EP necessary. The soldiers would need plenty of Ifresh and new jeeps GHTEDfood, Twarm BE Runiforms, R O Y P K OO would have to change many of and airplanes. Roosevelt suggested IS COthe United Kthat S BStates I O H O T B R FO MPLE theGIbest its old ways in orderS to to its soldiers. EN assistance Aprovide V S I T H O T N N IS O I S S I The people of P Beasley ERM heard this call for help. Within MA the In the coming days, President Franklin D. Roosevelt spoke over the radio, LINEtelling

a few days, there was a lot of activity around the old automobile factory. New machines were being brought in and old machines were being moved around and altered. Tons of new supplies were piled up in front of the building. Caroline and Marianne walked to the factory one day and asked what was happening. They found out, much to their excitement, that the factory was being converted. Instead of making cars, it would be making airplanes! The sisters had only seen a few airplanes in their lives and they looked at all the airplane parts in wide-eyed wonderment. There were great mountains of wing sections, engines, propellers, and instruments all around them. “I’d love to learn how all these bits and pieces fit together,” marveled Marianne, and her sister agreed.

Photo courtesy of The Library of Congress

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Strand C: All Together

A woman standing nearby smiled at them. She was wearing grimy overalls, and her hands were covered in oil and dirt. It looked like she was helping to unload all of these heavy metal parts from nearby trucks. Caroline and Marianne approached her, and they quickly noticed that she had her own work crew, and they were all women. The sisters asked what was happening. The woman in the overalls, whose nametag read “Laura McCoy,” explained that something new was taking place. The people of Beasley were going to answer President Roosevelt’s call for assistance by making world-class airplanes for America’s soldiers. Since many of the men were away, the factory would be staffed almost entirely by women. Caroline and Marianne eagerly inquired about joining the workforce. Within a few days, the sisters had secured jobs in the new Beasley airplane factory. Marianne was put to

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work driving a forklift. Caroline was given a job on the assembly line. Caroline helped to assemble the planes’ wings by attaching sheets of metal with strong brass staples called rivets.

The Keating sisters, and thousands of other women across America, toiled for long hours in factories. They did work that, until that time, few people thought women could do.

STER. . A M E AY Wmany Y ACKLIN people, The entire world was shocked to see how eagerly and efficiently American L N A B A N I UCEDresponded S NOTThePworkers I D T O of them women, built the things their soldiers would need. by I R . TED RE H E G B I R O Y increasing their efforts. Soon, American were COPfactories OOK Tmaking almost a hundred S I B K S I O H thousand airplanes eachPyear! LE BO VEN FOR T M A S OT GI THIS N S I People were soRimpressed ISSION with the work of women in America that many traditional M E P ideas changed. Soon, men and women alike were able to find good jobs, and began to work equally well, side by side. Caroline’s job at the Beasley factory was difficult, but when the factory completed its first airplane, she felt all her work had been worth it. The beautiful flying machine was rolled out into the street, and the workers gathered around it and cheered. Caroline thought that maybe this plane would be sent to American pilots being trained, and she thought of her brother, Jack.

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Strand C: All Together

1 Think about what this story says about people in general. In what ways does it remind you of people you have read about? Support your answer with evidence from the story.

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STER.

2 Which part of the story do you think was most important? Use information E MA fromWAthe Y. N I L K C Y A L N A story and your own life to explain why you chose that part. OT A B ED IN

IT IS N REPRODUC . D E T YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Strand C: All Together

Marco’s class is learning about different types of artists. The teacher gave his class this article to read.

All-Around Artist Some kids need to know how things work. They might take apart bicycles or construct model airplanes. Other kids like to make art and take pleasure in colors and shapes. When the famous artist Alexander Calder was young, he liked to do both these kinds of activities. Artistic talent was in his family: His father and grandfather were sculptors who created many famous statues of people and animals, while Alexander’s mother was a skilled portrait painter.

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Photo courtesy Wikimedia/ creativecommons.org

During Alexander’s childhood, the Calder family moved several times. His father was frequently hired to create a sculpture, and the family would have to move to where he needed to work. Despite the frequent moves, the Calders always ensured that Alexander had a place where he could create his artwork. When Alexander was just five, he began

. inventing little toys and games for him and his sister Peggy to play with. At age STEReleven,

MA AY. W Y N OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T .I TtoEDcollege REPRO an engineer. After Putting aside his artistic interests, Calder went to become H E G B I R O OK Tday, while working on a ship, he COPY of jobs. OOne B finishing school, Calder took Oon aIS variety K S I O H FAsORheT described it, there was “a fiery red sunrise” PLE B hisIVlife. N M E A saw a sight that would change S OT G THIS Nlooking S I N on one side and “the moon like a silver coin” on the other. This sight filled him ISSIO M R E P NE he made two simple sculptures out of brass as gifts for his parents. LACKLI

with an awe of nature and rekindled his creative interests. He decided to move to New York City to study to become an artist. Alexander Calder delved into different kinds of art. He drew illustrations, created

advertisements, and he even designed a one-man puppet show. In yet another project, using wire, leather, cloth, and wood, Calder built humorous characters and created a comic circus with them. He played the ringmaster and made the objects move to music. Calder traveled around Paris and New York giving shows with his circus, and people enjoyed them.

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Strand C: All Together

Encouraged by the success of his toy circus, Calder decided to make more sculptures using wire. He made large shapes that stood up high in the air and wire shapes that looked like his friends. He always carried wire and pliers with him, so he could make new pieces of art at any time he chose. He described what he did as “drawing with metal.”

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Calder was influenced by many artists he met in Paris. They inspired him to look at new and different ways to create art. Calder loved the primary colors and geometric shapes he saw in their work. He began to make circles and squares and other shapes out of metal and plastic. Calder spent many hours finding just the right balance for his creations. With his mechanical training, he experimented with ways to make these shapes move in the air. In the beginning, he used ropes and gears to make the sculptures move. Soon. he

STER ACK ANY W BLfreestanding A N I creations “mobiles” because they moved. When Calder then made T D O SN DUCE Ostood IT Ibecause R . P D E E sculptures, another friend named these worksIG “stabiles” they still. T R H BE R O Y T P K IS CO THIS BOO K O O B Calder was making his artPand it LE showing FOinR Paris and New York City. Around this time, N M E A V S I THIS while Itraveling he met Louisa James NOT G on a ship between America and Europe. They S N ISSIO married and began PERMlooking for a place to live where

MA theseAY. learned how to make them move using just a slight breeze. A French friend LINE called

Alexander could build his ever-larger works of art. Alexander and Louisa settled in an old farmhouse in Connecticut, where Calder set to work building pieces of art that can now be found all over the world. Alexander Calder’s brain seemed to always be working, and his hands were always creating new things. Experts have made a list of more than 17,000 pieces of art made

Photo courtesy Wikimedia/creativecommons.org

by Calder. These included not only his huge sculptures, but also tiny items. Calder often made presents for his family and friends, such as silver and steel jewelry, little toys to pull on a string, and carved little animals. Calder’s artwork reflects his boundless curiosity. Throughout his life, Calder painted and created other kinds of art, but always came back to sculpture. Alexander Calder’s art can be seen all over the world. Some sculptures are placed outside public buildings, some in city squares, others in natural settings, such as sculpture gardens. Numerous pieces are in museums throughout the world, many in the United States and France. Calder created works for the World’s Fair in Paris and the Olympics in Mexico, and he even created large pieces to hang in airports!

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Strand C: All Together

3 If Alexander Calder were alive today, what would you most like to ask him? Use information from the article to support your answer.

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STER.

4 Which part of the article was most interesting or surprising? Use information from E MA N I AY. the L W K C Y A L N A article to support your response. OT A B ED IN

IT IS N REPRODUC . D E T YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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H Strand D

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Examining the Content and Structure The reader will elaborate on the text and make judgments about the text’s quality and themes.

Objective 1: Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including the use of literary devices and textual elements.

Correlates to Common Core State Standards: 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. STER. . A M E 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument WAY CKLIN and specific Y A L N A B A N I the claims in a text, including of T the validity CED sufficiency Uand IS asNOthe D T O reasoningDas well relevance of I R . TE R EP H E G B I the evidence. R O Y T

COP OOK S I B K S I O H FOR T to Common Core State Standard: Objective 2: PLE BO IVENCorrelates M A S S Select, synthesize use N relevant OT G 1. Read closely to determine what the text says THIand/or S I N explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite information withinSthe text(s) to SIO Ithe M R specific textual evidence when writing or speaking extend or evaluate text(s). E P to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s customs and beliefs included in the text.

Correlates to Common Core State Standard: 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

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Strand D

H

Objective 1

Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including use of literary devices and textual elements.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

Jimmy and Sam

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Jimmy had the misfortune of being assigned a desk next to Sam in algebra class. Jimmy groaned as he approached his seat, anticipating the worst because everyone considered Sam the class bully. His face always looked mean, and he was known for making nasty comments to the other students.

ER .

ST point of. 1 The point of view of a passage refers to who is telling the story. WhatE is MAthe N I L WAY Y ACK L N view in the story? A B A N OT UCED I S Nthe I D T O This question is asking you to work out who is telling story. I R . D EP GHTE BE R I R O Y T P K ? A First person K IS CO R THIS BOO O O B This answer is because PLE EN FOa story with a first person point of view AMincorrect V S I G S I T H T has a narrator telling IS NOthe story. N O I S MIS PERperson ? B Second This answer is incorrect because a story with a second person point of view is told as if the reader is the main character.

? C Third person objective This answer is incorrect because the third person point of view is not objective because the person telling the story knows how the characters feel.

? D Third person omniscient This answer is correct because an outsider is telling the story and knows everything, such as how Jimmy feels. This is a third person omniscient point of view.

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Strand D, Objective 1: Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including use of literary devices and textual elements.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Excerpt from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner By Samuel Taylor Coleridge Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

2 A simile is a comparison of unlike things using “as” or “like.” The author uses a simile by saying that they were “As idle as a painted ship / upon a painted ocean.” The author used the simile to

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B ? G explain how tired they felt. A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . ? H describe their location. GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H ? J show why they did not move. PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I HINT N IO MISSthe Think about simile is used to show. Focus on the image of a painted ship on PERwhat ? F emphasize how still they were.

a painted ocean. What does this image create a sense of?

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Strand D, Objective 1: Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including use of literary devices and textual elements.

A Lazy Holiday Outside, the sun was shining, the birds were singing, and the sound of children’s laughter filled the air. Inside, the curtains were closed, the television was on, and Emily was sprawled out lazily on the couch. It was the first week of summer vacation, and Emily planned to do absolutely nothing. She thought it was nice not to have any tests or homework to worry about.

3 The tone of a passage is how the author feels about the subject. Which word best describes the tone of the passage?

? A Proud ? B Serious ? C Uncertain ? D Relaxed

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

HINT Remember that the tone refers to the author’s attitude, or how the author feels about the subject. Focus on how the author feels about what he is describing. Would. you STER . A describe the author as proud, serious, uncertain or relaxed? M E Y N

ACKLI IN ANY WA L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand D, Objective 1: Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including use of literary devices and textual elements.

Bath Time I carried a large plastic tub and set it near the hose, and then used buckets of warm water to fill the tub. When I called Sebastian, he ran over and jumped excitedly into the water, apparently quite pleased with the idea of having a bath. Once Sebastian was soaking wet, I poured some dog shampoo into the palm of my hand and started washing Sebastian’s long fur. I giggled as Sebastian wagged his tail wildly and splashed me with water. As I reached for the hose to rinse Sebastian’s fur, he jumped out of the tub and raced toward the clean washing on the clothesline. Before I could stop him, Sebastian had the sheets wrapped around his soapy body. He rolled around on the ground, struggling to break free, but only getting more entangled. Within moments, the freshly clean sheets were a muddy mess.

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4 How did the author create humor in the paragraph? Explain.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT In this paragraph, the author uses humor. To answer this question, explain how the author creates humor. Focus on what the author describes, as well as how the author describes it.

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Strand D, Objective 1: Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including use of literary devices and textual elements.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

Rialto Bridge One of my favorite attractions to visit is the Rialto Bridge. It is a very large bridge, and it used to be the only way to get from one side of the canal to the other when it was first built in 1688. We got off of the boat here and walked across the bridge, which actually has a row of shops on each side. I bought a souvenir mask, and my mother bought a red linen tablecloth.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

1 The point of view of a passage refers to who is telling the story. What is the point of view in the story?

? A First person

? B Second person

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B ? D Third person omniscient A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P O CThe OOK S I B Quiz K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S Ms. Joslyn asked, is T Gcapital of what western European country?” Robert, THIS“Brussels NOthe S I N SIOour arms like rockets from a launch pad, but Kimberly kept her Patrick, and I shot ISup PERM ? C Third person objective

face pointed toward the window.

2 A simile is a comparison of unlike things using “as” or “like.” The author uses a simile by saying that “Robert, Patrick, and I shot up our arms like rockets from a launch pad.” The author used the simile to show that the arms

? F collided with each other. ? G moved quickly. ? H moved to the left. ? J were pointed. 126 ©RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Strand D, Objective 1: Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including use of literary devices and textual elements.

Excerpt from Black Beauty By Anna Sewell The first place that I can well remember was a large pleasant meadow with a pond of clear water in it. Some shady trees leaned over it, and rushes and water lilies grew at the deep end. Over the hedge on one side we looked into a plowed field, and on the other we looked over a gate at our master’s house, which stood by the roadside; at the top of the meadow was a grove of fir trees, and at the bottom a running brook overhung by a steep bank.

3 The tone of a passage is how the author feels about the subject. Which word best describes the tone of the passage?

? A Mournful ? B Anxious ? C Playful ? D Calm

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand D, Objective 1: Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including use of literary devices and textual elements.

The Wobbly Trash Can Squirrels are quite well known for going through trash cans. It’s not an uncommon sight to see a squirrel perched on top of a bin staring down in search of delicious edible trash. But it can be quite concerning if that squirrel topples off the edge and lands in the bottom of the trash can. That’s exactly what happened at Edward’s place on Thursday, when the trash can suddenly started wobbling. Edward stood well back, worried that the trash had somehow come alive and was trying to wobble itself free. It was lucky that Edward did stand back, because just as he was feeling brave enough to take a closer look, the frightened squirrel came flying out of the top of the trash can and flew past Edward’s head. Edward screamed and ducked. When he looked up again, the squirrel was calmly chomping on a half-eaten apple it had discovered in the trash.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

4 How did the author create humor in the paragraph? Explain.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand D

H

Objective 2

Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

The Works of Wendell Taylor

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Wendell Taylor is a cartoonist best known for his ongoing series titled “Barking up the Wrong Tree.” Taylor remembers getting in trouble for doodling in his notebook in school. He was actually sketching some interesting characters, two dogs named Chester and Humphrey, when he should have been studying algebra. “It’s no wonder that, to this day, I’m terrible with numbers,” Taylor joked. What Taylor didn’t know then, was

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

that these two dogs would someday make him a famous cartoonist.

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Strand D, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

1 If the author had added another paragraph to the end of the passage, it would most likely describe This question is asking you to think about what information could be added to the passage. The information that is added should relate to the main idea of the passage.

? A Taylor’s cartoon. This answer is correct because the passage is introducing Taylor and the cartoon that made him famous, so it would make sense for the next paragraph to describe the cartoon.

? B Taylor’s family. This answer is incorrect because the passage does not mention Taylor’s family, so it would not be logical for this to come next.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? C Taylor’s school results.

This answer is incorrect because the passage mentions Taylor studying algebra only to show how he created his famous characters while he was at school.

? D Taylor’s pets.

This answer is incorrect because the passage mentions two dogs, but it is not describing Taylor’s pets, so it would not be logical for this to come next. ER .

MAST E N I AY. L W K C Y A L N OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

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Strand D, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

A Chance to Sing My first real concert was the first time I had ever tried to sing in front of a crowd of people and a true test of my nerves. My knees knocked together as one of my fellow stage hands equipped me with a microphone. As I perched on the stool, my throat felt so parched I feared I wouldn’t be able to make a sound. Then the piano player played

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

the first few notes of “Emotion Commotion.” I relaxed into the sound of the beautiful melody, let the song ease my anxiety, and started to sing along with the rest of the students. When it came time for my solo, I belted it out with a confidence I didn’t even know was possible.

R. 2 If you wanted to describe how the narrator changed in the story, what would STEyou A M E Y. N write about? LACKLI NY WA ? F ? G ? H ? J

OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T How his knees knocked together TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R Y How his throat felt dry K IS COP OOK T B S I O H E BO FOR T PLthe N M E A V S How he listened to piano player I THIS NOT G S I N IO solo confidently How he R sang ISSthe PE M

HINT At the start of the story, the narrator is nervous about singing in front of a crowd of people. Which event would you write about to show how this changed for the narrator? Focus on what the narrator did that showed that he has changed.

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Strand D, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

A Mysterious Book Randall was in the science fiction section when he pulled the very last book off its shelf, a beautiful volume with a brown leather cover and no title. Flipping open the cover, Randall was astonished to find no words inside. Its cream-colored pages were completely blank. He read the call number along the spine of the book: Z 1000. The call number was bizarre. After working at the library for a few months, he had become accustomed to the Dewey Decimal System and was fairly certain that the numbers stopped at 999. Additionally, he wondered why the library would retain the book. Who would check out a book without words?

3 Using the information in the passage, write a paragraph that could have appeared in Randall’s journal.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT This question is asking you to write a journal or diary entry based on what happened in the passage. Imagine that you are Randall and you are writing a journal entry. For this question, you should use the events in the passage, but you can also be creative.

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Strand D, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

Hummingbird Communication Hummingbirds sometimes chirp and make weak attempts to sing, but they are usually not good singers. Hummingbirds often communicate with each other by showing their feathers and moving their heads from side to side. Like most other birds, the females are not as brightly colored as the males. The male hummingbirds display their brightcolored feathers to attract females. Some male hummingbirds that live in the south also get together and sing to attract females.

4 Imagine that you were going to give a talk to your class about how hummingbirds communicate. Using information from the passage, write two important ideas that you would use in your speech.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT The passage includes many details about how hummingbirds communicate. This question is asking you to choose two ideas from the passage that you think are important. In your answer, describe two ideas from the passage that you would include in your speech, but be sure to use your own words when you describe the ideas.

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Strand D, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

How Fossils Form Fossilization is a complicated and delicate process. Many factors must work together to preserve proof of past life. First, an animal must die and fall to the ground. Swampy areas are best because the animal’s body will be covered in mud. As time passes, the animal’s skin, muscles, and organs will rot away until only the hard parts, such as the creature’s skeleton and teeth, remain under thick layers of mud. Next, a process called

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

chemical alteration must take place.

1 If the author had added another paragraph to the end of the passage, it would most likely

? A describe what happens during chemical alteration.

STER. . A M E WAY CKLIN Y A L N A B A N I ? C list some interesting fossils that have been found. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . HTED TO BE RE ? D give facts about the ages of different Gfossils. I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM ? B explain how scientists use fossils to gain information.

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Strand D, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

Unpacking Alexander’s father was getting tired of him moping around and getting in everyone’s way. He suggested that Alexander grab his box of sports gear and stack it all in the little shed in the corner of the yard. Alexander shrugged, but decided he may as well since there was nothing else better to do. As Alexander prepared to unload his baseball bats and mitts, basketball, soccer balls, and tennis rackets, he noticed that the shed wasn’t completely empty. There was a dusty old box perched high up on the top shelf. Alexander carefully pulled it down, opened it, and was surprised to see rows and rows of ancient-looking baseballs. Alexander was amazed by the find, and his mood suddenly lifted. He raced inside to share his exciting find with his father.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

2 If you wanted to describe how Alexander changed in the story, what would you write about?

? F How he was moping around ? G How he went outside

? H How he started to unpack his things

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

? J How he raced inside to find his father

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Strand D, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

A Trip through Time Max gazed at the glowing portal for a minute, pinched his arm to make sure that he wasn’t dreaming, and then stepped through the entranceway. As Max hurtled through time and space, he feared he had used poor judgment in stepping through the mysterious doorway without knowing where the portal would lead. He was relieved when he came to rest gently in the middle of a dense forest. Feeling as if he had just stepped off a roller coaster, Max lay still for a few moments, waiting for the treetops above him to stop spinning. Placing a hand on a nearby tree to steady himself, he stood and heard voices in the distance. He headed toward the voices.

3 Using the information in the passage, write a paragraph that could have appeared in Max’s journal.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand D, Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s).

Volcanic Islands Volcanoes can do a lot of damage when they erupt, but volcanoes also do something wonderful. The activity of volcanoes can create islands. Many volcanoes actually explode underwater. Just like volcanoes on land, these spew lava that cools and hardens into rock. When enough of this dried lava builds up, it can reach heights that rise above the surface of the water. This forms a volcanic island, like the islands of Hawaii.

4 Imagine that you were going to give a talk to your class about volcanoes. Using information from the passage, write two important ideas that you would use in your speech.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand D

H

Objective 3

Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

f

Modeled Instruction

f

Directions: Read the passage. Then answer the question that follows it. The text in blue explains how to answer the question correctly.

The State Science Quiz

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

When the other students arrived for our last practice session before the finals of the State Science Quiz, we studied biology and chemistry. Josephine remained silent throughout our practice session. Before I departed, I pulled her aside. “I’m aware you don’t yearn to be on this team, but you could at least attempt some questions,” I said. “Ms. Joslyn believes you’re an advantage for our team, but the way you’re acting, I don’t see how

. that’s possible.” The last thing I wanted was to upset Josephine, but winning TERState ASthe

Y. INE M IN Dmany OT Adidn’t Dknow E N C U S I goal. Josephine tried harder after our discussion, but she still of the T .I PRO D E E T R H E G answers to the quiz questions. PYRI K TO B O O C O S I B BOOK R THIS E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P L WA Science Quiz was my lifelong dream, and I was willing to do anything ANYmy BLACK to achieve

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Strand D, Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

1 How does the author show that the science quiz is important to the narrator? The science quiz described in the story is very important to the narrator. This question is asking you how the author shows that the science quiz is important to the narrator.

? A By explaining that the team is studying biology and chemistry This answer is incorrect because this is a detail describing the team preparing for the quiz, but it does not show that the quiz is important to the narrator.

? B By stating that the narrator and her team have reached the finals This answer is incorrect because this is a detail about the science quiz, but it does not show that the quiz is important to the narrator.

? C By describing how the narrator asks Josephine to try harder

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

This answer is correct because the narrator confronts Josephine and asks her to try harder. This shows that doing well on the science quiz is important to the narrator.

? D By showing that Josephine started trying harder

This answer is incorrect because this is a detail that suggests the quiz is important to Josephine, but it does not show that the quiz is important R. to the narrator. MASTE

AY. LINE W K C Y A L N OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

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Strand D, Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

f

Guided Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it. Each question is followed by a hint to help you focus on the response.

Teamwork We all arrived early to the solar powered car contest, but Karen was nowhere to be seen. Suddenly, she hurried in from a side door, her arms overloaded. “Hey teammates,” she proclaimed, “I made us jerseys!” Karen furnished us with matching T-shirts decorated in our school colors with our names across the back. When I thanked Karen, she said it was

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

the least she could do because she felt terrible about bringing our team down in the design department. She felt bad that she hardly provided any assistance, so she wanted to contribute in a different way.

2 How did Karen’s beliefs guide her actions?

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? G Her guilt over not helping made her get the jerseys UCED S NOTmade. I D T O I R . P HTEDher teammates Ghelp BE RE look good. ? H Her desire to win made her want to I R O Y T P K CO BOO OK IS ORmade HIS her T BOteammates ? J Her confidence P inLEher choose not to help. F N M E A V S I THIS NOT G S I N HINT MISSIO R E P Think about why Karen acted the way she did in the story. How did Karen’s thoughts ? F Her lack of interest in helping made her late for the contest.

or concerns guide her actions?

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Strand D, Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

Saving Indiana Myotis Bats Indiana Myotis bats are an endangered species. Education seems to be the key to saving these bats. One way that people can help is by building bat boxes where the bats can hibernate in peace. Also, conservation organizations now close off hibernation caves in the winter so that cavers will not disturb the bats. With continued efforts such as this, perhaps the Indiana Myotis has a chance for survival.

3 Why do you think the author chose to write about Indiana Myotis bats?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM HINT This question is asking you to think about why the author wrote about the topic. You can guess why based on how the passage is written and the information the author includes. Focus on how the author wants to influence readers of the passage.

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Strand D, Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

Family Dinners One evening, as I settled into my history homework, I couldn’t stop thinking about how my family never shared family dinners at my home. I loved learning about different cultures around the world. So far I’d found that most cultures made time to share meals with their families. They often used this time to talk about their days. The Oromo people of Ethiopia managed to meet twice a day for family meals. My parents both worked late, so it was almost always just me and my sister eating by ourselves. We rarely even sat at the dinner table to chat, instead eating in front of the television.

4 How are your customs the same or different from the customs described in the passage? Use information in the passage to support your answer.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

HINT In the passage, the narrator describes his family’s customs by describing how he and his sister eat dinner alone instead of having a family dinner. Compare these customs to your own. If your customs are similar, explain what is similar about them. If your customs are different, explain what is different about them.

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Strand D, Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

f

Independent Practice

f

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the question that follows it.

James McNeill Whistler Most artists show that they created a work of art by signing their name on it. Instead of signing his name on his paintings, James McNeill Whistler created a symbol that looked like a butterfly. He signed his works with this symbol. The symbol changed over the course of his career. For example, he added a flower to the symbol when he got married. Using a symbol as a signature was actually a demonstration of Whistler’s beliefs about

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

art. Changing his signature from written words to a symbol demonstrated the idea that art was about pictures, not words. Sometimes Whistler applied his signature to the frame instead of the painting. Whistler often designed and built frames for his paintings to show that the entire presentation was important to how people viewed his paintings. 1 How does the author show that using the symbol was important to Whistler?ER.

? A ? B ? C ? D

MAST E N I AY. L W K C By describing how the symbol looked like a butterfly Y A L N OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T By describing how the symbol sometimes D. I TEchanged REPRO H E G B I R O T OPY OKideas Crepresented Ohis S I B By explaining how the symbol about art K S I O H O T B R E O L F EN his own frames AMP GIVbuilt By explaining T O THIS Sthat IWhistler N N S O I S S I PERM

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Strand D, Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

Mr. Zorn Jamie, Ashley, and I were walking home from the market when we noticed Mr. Zorn sitting in the rocking chair on his terrace reading a book to an empty chair. Jamie started pointing and laughing at poor Mr. Zorn. He acknowledged us with a polite wave without ever interrupting the rhythm of his story. After Jamie and Ashley had gone home, I felt embarrassed that my friends had laughed at Mr. Zorn. I returned to Mr. Zorn’s house to apologize for their rude behavior.

2 How did the narrator’s beliefs guide her actions?

? F Her rudeness made her laugh at Mr. Zorn. ? G Her politeness made her apologize to Mr. Zorn.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? H Her need to fit in stopped her from standing up to her friends. ? J Her concern for others made her worry about Mr. Zorn’s health.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand D, Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

Pearls When many people picture pearls, they mistakenly picture long strands of perfectly round, glistening white beads. In reality, very few pearls are actually white, and most pearls are gold, cream, or light pink. Some pearls can also be blue, green, and even black. The sizes and shapes of pearls also vary, with few pearls being perfectly round. In fact, if you ever see a long strand of perfectly round pearls, they are probably fake versions made out of plastic or ceramic material.

3 Why do you think the author chose to write about pearls?

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand D, Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s values, customs and beliefs included in the text.

Christmas Time To my brother, Christmas is all about the presents. When I was younger, I used to think the same thing. These days, Christmas is all about family. There is no other day of the year when everyone in my family puts everything else aside and puts family time first. My father forgets all about work, my sister forgets about ballet practice and watching movies and being with her friends, and my mother forgets all about her many volunteer activities. On Christmas Day, we all focus on spending a wonderful day together sharing stories, food, and games. And of course, we do share presents too, which always makes my brother smile.

4 How are your customs the same or different from the customs described in the passage? Use information in the passage to support your answer.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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D

Strand D: All Together

Objective 1: Analyze and evaluate the author’s craft, including the use of literary devices and textual elements. Objective 2: Select, synthesize and/or use relevant information within the text(s) to extend or evaluate the text(s). Objective 3: Demonstrate an awareness of an author’s or character’s customs and beliefs included in the text.

Directions: Read each passage. Then answer the questions that follow it.

E L P SAM ATION C U D Fourth !ofE July Surprise Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Demi’s class is learning about different national holidays. Demi’s teacher started the lesson by reading this story about the Fourth of July to the class.

. “What do you mean they’re not coming?” I asked my mother in disbelief. I couldn’t ASTER

INE M AY. D IN OT A E N C U S I D balloon fight with Uncle Troy. T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R PY COgot OOK Tat work, and he’s not able to S I B “Aunt Barbara said that Uncle Troy just a promotion K S I O H T BO FORmother PLaEvacation,” N M E A take time off right Inow for my explained. “You’re old enough to V S I OT G TH S N S I understand that sometimes ISSION other things take priority, Meredith.” M R E P

W imagine a Fourth of July without my long talks with Aunt Barbara ACKLmy annual ANYwater BLand

Oh, I understand, I thought to myself. I understand that my Fourth of July is ruined. Over the next few days I moped around the house and refused to help my mother with any of the Fourth of July preparations. “I’m skipping the Fourth this year,” I declared. “You’re going to be awfully lonely here at home while everyone else is at Grandma and Grandpa’s house eating scrumptious homemade food, hiking in the woods, and swimming in the pool,” said my mother. “Well, maybe I’ll come to eat,” I said. I was very upset, but that was no reason to pass up a helping of my grandmother’s tasty macaroni and cheese. Besides, I didn’t want to hurt her feelings.

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Strand D: All Together

On the morning of the Fourth, I awoke to the sound of my little brother begging my mother to let him taste the frosting for the cupcakes. “Please, please, pleeease,” he whined until my mother finally agreed to give him a spoonful of bright blue icing. I got dressed in my usual Fourth of July outfit: a bright red T-shirt, a pair of white shorts, and blue sandals. No sense scrapping all of my traditions, I thought as I pulled the T-shirt over my head and checked my reflection in the mirror. At lunchtime, I helped my mother pack the car with food and other supplies, and soon we were on our way to my grandparents’ house. As we drove up the hill to the house, I could see that several of my aunts, uncles, and cousins had already arrived. A plume of hamburger-scented smoke rising from the grill reminded me how hungry I was. I grabbed a star-spangled napkin and a red and white striped plate, which I promptly

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

loaded with delicious, homemade treats.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

I tried to enjoy myself for the rest of the day, but I couldn’t stop thinking about how different it felt without Aunt Barbara and Uncle Troy at the picnic. At dusk, my father called everyone to the front yard to watch the fireworks display, and my family lined up lawn chairs and blankets on the hill overlooking the town dock. Within minutes, the sky was filled with an amazing display of colorful flashes. Fireworks crackled and boomed and echoed for nearly half an hour. The sky became a sea of sparkles and flashes of light, as if hundreds of stars were whizzing around almost within my reach.

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Strand D: All Together

When the display was over and the humid air was still and silent once again, I gathered up my blanket and prepared to retreat into the house. Suddenly, someone behind me covered my eyes and whispered in my ear, “Guess who.” I grinned from ear to ear at the sound of Uncle Troy’s voice, and I turned around and jumped into his arms. “Uncle Troy, I thought you and Aunt Barbara weren’t coming!” I exclaimed, half angry that they had deceived me and half overjoyed to see them standing there. “Well, we didn’t want to get anyone’s hopes up,” said Aunt Barbara. “We knew that the doctor wouldn’t allow me to fly, so we told everyone that because Uncle Troy had gotten a promotion at work we couldn’t make it.” I frowned when I heard the word “doctor.” I was about to ask what was wrong with Aunt Barbara when Uncle Troy must have

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

noticed the look of concern on my face and quickly continued the story. “A few days ago, Aunt Barbara saw the doctor again and explained how important the Fourth of July celebration is to our family. He said that he didn’t have a problem with Aunt Barbara traveling, as long as it was by car, bus, or train. He just didn’t want an expectant mother so close to her due date to fly on an airplane.”

ER . ACKLI IN ANY WA L B Aunt Barbara with a smile. A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . ED RE words registered in my GHTgrew BE two I At first, I was a little confused and then my eyes wide as R O Y T P K IS CO THIS BOO brain: “expectant mother.” E BOOK FOR PL N M E A V S I G THIS IS NOI Tcried. “You’re going to haveSaIObaby!” N IS PERM

T “Before you could blink an eye, we loaded the car and drove here to see N everyone,” E MAS saidY.

Aunt Barbara nodded and, moving aside the bag she was carrying, revealed her growing tummy. I threw my arms around her and gave her a bear hug. “I think she likes the Fourth of July as much as you do, because she’s been moving around ever since we arrived,” said Aunt Barbara. Later that night, I climbed into bed exhausted from the day’s events and delighted by the way the day had ended. This was the best, and most surprising, Fourth of July celebration ever.

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Strand D: All Together

1 Imagery is the use of words that make the reader imagine what the characters see, hear, taste, touch, or smell. Which words from the passage help the reader imagine what the fireworks display sounded like?

? A Amazing display ? B Crackled and boomed ? C Sea of sparkles ? D Flashes of light 2 How are your customs the same or different from the customs described in the passage? Use information in the passage to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Strand D: All Together

The students in Bevan’s class were asked to find examples of people who had made exciting discoveries. Bevan found this article about Marcel Ravidat and the Lascaux Caves.

The Secret Gallery: The Lascaux Caves On September 8, 1940, a teenager named Marcel Ravidat was rabbit hunting in the

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

French village of Montignac. His dog Robot stepped into a hole left by a large uprooted tree. Robot became stuck. As Ravidat pulled his dog free, he noticed that the gravel falling into the hole traveled quite a distance into the ground below. Ravidat realized that this was not just a hole, but an opening to a cavern. He wanted to explore the passageway, but he was alone and did not have a light. So Ravidat left, keeping his discovery a secret.

STER. . A M E N secret Y WAY According to one version of the story, Ravidat believed that he had found ACKLIthe L AN his B A INand T D O underground vault of the nearby Montignac Castle. Ravidat returned with tools E N C U . IT IS on ESeptember PROD 12. The four boys D E E T R H friends Jacques Marsal, Georges Agnel, and Simon Coencas G PYRI K TO B O O C O S I B widened the hole with a pickaxe. the hole, slid down a rocky tunnel, K Ravidat IS BOOThen R THentered E O L F P N M E and landed in a huge SA His friends OT GIV soon joined him. When the boys lit the room, they THIS cave. N S I realized that they were in one of humankind’s earliest art galleries. ON ISSIstanding M R E P The dim light of Ravidat’s homemade lamp revealed the sprawling paintings of what is now referred to as “The Great Hall of the Bulls.” This hall contains sixty-five feet of wall paintings depicting bulls, horses, and deer in motion. As they continued down a narrow passageway, they found themselves in a cave now known as “The Painted Gallery.” The cave was covered with scenes featuring horses, cows, bulls, bison, and other animals. Scientists would soon discover more painted halls inside the cave. The teenagers could not help but tell their teacher, Leon Laval, what they had discovered. Laval knew that he could not keep the boys’ secret. Soon everyone in the village of Montignac knew about the ancient art gallery. They decided to call the site “Lascaux.”

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Strand D: All Together

Scientists discovered that the cave paintings were created 17,000 years before. A new entrance was created to allow large numbers of people to access the cave complex and view the paintings. Within a few years, Lascaux was a major tourist attraction, drawing in around 1,200 visitors per day. Ravidat even became a tour guide at the cave. Why did so many people want to see the cave paintings? This well-preserved gallery shed some light on the lives of the ancient artists who had created it. It showed that they were more advanced than many had previously guessed. These early artists used simple tools to create beautifully detailed masterpieces. Scientists also believe that these artists employed assistants to hold their torches, mix their paints, and build the platforms that must have been necessary to allow the painters to create such massive images.

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Because so much time and resources were used creating the paintings, scientists believe that the artwork was very important to these early people. Some of the “paints” were created from mixtures of more than one hundred different minerals. With these paints and handmade brushes, these artists created vivid and accurate animal pictures.

ER . Y WA ACKLI AfterINmonitoring L N A B that the carbon dioxide expelled by visitors was harming the pictures. A UCEDthat the only S NOT PRdecided I D T O I . the carbon dioxide levels for a few years, the French government GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P O off the way to preserve the paintings was Ito cave. Cseal OOK It was officially closed to visitors S B K S I O H O FOR T on April 20, 1963. AMPLE B N E V S I THIS NOT G S I N IO with computers to monitor its environment and track the ISScave Scientists setPup ERMthe ST In 1955, scientists realized that the paintings were beginning to fade. Studies NE MA showedY.

progress of the natural painting repair. Though the paintings had been saved, the public still wanted to be able to view the paintings in person. The French tourism authority came up with the idea to create a life-sized copy of the interior of “The Great Hall of the Bulls” and “The Painted Room.” Eleven years of hard work were poured into “Lascaux II.” It was created about 600 feet from the original site, and eventually opened in 1983. The detail of the original caves has been copied exactly. The original Lascaux Caves are now enclosed by a high fence to protect them from unwanted visitors. However, members of the public are now able to enjoy the reproduced gallery each day.

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Strand D: All Together

3 Using the information in the passage, write a paragraph that could have appeared in Marcel Ravidat’s journal.

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STER. . WAY Y ACK L N A B A N I By describing how he found the caves by accident S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTEDat theTOcaves BE RE YRIguide By explaining that he became CaOtour P K K IS S BOO I O H O T B R O the caves today LE By comparing A the caves MPoriginal EN Fwith V S I G S I T H T IS NOtried to keep the caves a secret N By stating that Ravidat O I S IS PERM

A 4 How does the author show that the caves remained important to Ravidat? LINE M ? F ? G ? H ? J

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Strand D: All Together

Rosita enjoys completing craft projects. When she saw this article in a magazine, she decided to make a kachina doll.

How to Make a Kachina Doll Hopi artists traditionally created kachina dolls to help teach younger Hopi about the spirits. These dolls are not intended as toys. They are religious representations of the spirits, and each is said to contain a portion of the spirit’s power. Kachina dolls are also given as gifts as a good luck wish for future health and wealth. Today, many people collect genuine Hopi kachina dolls, but you can make your own

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

dolls using items you can find around the house. Materials

• Cardboard square or wide block of wood • Toilet paper tube or wooden spools

STER. . A M E • Scissors ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I • Clear tape and masking tape T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y • Glue P CO OOK S I B K S I O H T head • A styrofoam or other kind ORdoll’s Fthe PLE BofO ballIVfor N M E A S G • Tempera or poster THIS paintISand NOTpaintbrushes N ISSIO • Decorative paper PERM scraps, fabric scraps, beads, feathers, yarn, • Modeling clay

leaves, corks, or other craft materials Instructions Step 1 Make a base for your kachina doll out of a thick cardboard square or block of wood. Make sure that the piece of cardboard or wood that you use is wide enough to hold your kachina doll. Dolls will vary in size, depending on the materials you use to make the doll’s body and head. Your doll will stand on top of the base.

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Strand D: All Together

Step 2 Though the Hopi make their kachina dolls out of cottonwood root, you can make the body of your kachina doll from a toilet paper roll, spools of thread, or modeling clay. If you use a toilet paper roll, you can cut two or three inches into the roll on each side and then roll and tape the cut pieces to make two legs. If you use spools of thread, you can stack two spools to make a body and use two smaller spools for legs, and then glue the spools together. Kachinas made from modeling clay should have thick, sturdy legs that can hold the weight of the doll. Step 3 Make a head for your doll by gluing a styrofoam or other kind of ball onto the doll’s body. If you wish, you can make one out of modeling clay, but keep in mind that you

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

probably won’t be able to draw or paint on the clay, so you’ll have to come up with different decoration ideas. Step 4

Give your kachina a face. If you cannot draw or paint on the surface of your kachina head, you can make facial features out of clay and stick them onto your kachina’s head, or use beads, buttons, sequins, or other craft materials.

NOT A S I T I Decorate your kachina doll’s clothes. You ED. wrap your HTcan G I R Y kachina body in decorative paper, or anything IS COPfabric . K Rscraps, E O T O S B A E L your Lkachina else that will help INE M doll unique. AMPmake BLACK THIS S Step 5

Step 6 Add the finishing touches to your kachina doll. You can paint hair onto your doll or use glue to attach yarn or paper to the doll’s head. You can use feathers, beads, or other craft materials to decorate your doll as well. Step 7 Glue your kachina doll onto the base. If you wish, you can also decorate the base of your kachina doll.

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Strand D: All Together

5 The tone of a passage is how the author feels about the subject. Which word best describes the tone of the first paragraph?

? A Casual ? B Proud ? C Encouraging ? D Serious 6 Imagine that you were going to give a talk to your class about kachina dolls. Using information from the passage, write two important ideas that you would use in your speech.

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STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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H Assessments

E L P M A ION SAStrand T A C U D E ! Y L L A B ALLY R Strand R . 9 9 . 8 8 8 Strand C Forming a General Understanding

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B Making Reader/Text Connections K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO Strand D PERM Develping Interpretation

Examining the Content and Structure

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Strand A: Assessment

STRAND A ASSESSMENT Directions: Read each passage. Then read each multiple-choice question and determine the best answer. Mark the answer in the space on your answer sheet. Write the answers for the openended questions on the lines provided. Danielle’s teacher asked each student to choose a short story to share with the class. Danielle chose this story about a budding archaeologist.

Maura, the Archaeologist 1.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 2.

Maura sat in her bedroom, bored and

“An adventure is absolutely

miserable, thinking about how she

impossible today,” thought Maura,

was supposed to be playing softball

“because I can’t even go outside; I

TER. ACtoKLspace.” L ANY W B A N the ocean, or with its heavy rain, bright lightning, I T D O E IT IS N REPRODUC . D and loud thunder, was not being E T O BEMaura sulked, her mother YRIGH 3.OOKWhile T P O C cooperative. She looked out the OK IS OR THIS B O B E L entered her bedroom. “Maura, you window, staring at the NF MP muddyGImess E A V S S I T H O T N could have an adventure in the the rain was making NinISher backyard. O I S S I house, despite the weather,” she said, Maura yearned PERM to go on an adventure

with her friends today. The weather,

AS jungle,Yto definitely can’t go E Mthe INto A.

with her friends. Maura and her

trying to be helpful.

friends had great imaginations, and 4.

they liked to pretend they were

“Oh, Mom, this house doesn’t have

scientists or explorers. They went on a

any adventures. Today is the worst

lot of adventures—traveling through

day,” exaggerated Maura.

the jungle of woods down the street 5.

or venturing into the unexplored waters of the community pool.

Maura’s mother left the room, and she hoped that Maura would be less melancholy. Maura watched her

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Strand A: Assessment

mother leave, and then she slumped onto the bed. She hung her head off of the bed, looking down at the floor and wishing the rain would just stop already. Suddenly, Maura saw something shiny on the floor. It was peeking out from the corner of the blanket. Maura said, “That’s odd. I didn’t notice that before.” 6.

She crawled down off the bed and onto the floor. She started to dig. “I remember reading about famous archaeologists discovering

ran downstairs into the kitchen and

dinosaur bones and ancient pottery,”

grabbed a spoon. As she returned

she thought to herself, “but I don’t

upstairs, she yelled, “Mom, can I use

ever remember hearing about any

these tools?”

E L P SAM UCATION D E ! Y RALL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

archaeologists discovering anything quite like this before.” Maura, the

7.

8.

Knowing that Maura was finally

archaeologist, knew she was going to

having an adventure, her mother

need some tools to unbury this

smiled and responded, “Yes, you

. E WAY. KLIN C Y A you’re done.” N L A B OT A ED IN N C U S I Maura ran down the hall into the D O T TED. I O BE REPR H G I R bathroom—she needed to find some Mom,” Maura yelled as she KT COPY I9. OO“Thanks S B I S K O H suitable tools to use forLEher ran upstairs. FOR T P BOscientific N M E A V S I IS grabbedNOher examination.THShe TG S I N IO and took out a mother’s makeup ISSbag 10. Maura went back into her bedroom, PERM delicate, shiny object.

can. Just put them back STER MAwhen

big brush that her mom used to put

which was no longer a bedroom—it

makeup on her cheeks. Then, she

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Strand A: Assessment

was now an archaeological dig

She walked them to her bedroom

located in the middle of the desert.

desk, which became her new

She took out her shovel—the

archaeological office. Maura turned

spoon—and continued her dig.

on her desk lamp and set the sketch

Finally, the shiny object was not

of the necklace next to the open

covered by the dirt. She removed it

book. Pretending that she was

carefully and used her brush—her

examining the necklace to discover

mother’s makeup brush—to dust it

what era it came from, she began to

off. She carefully cleaned the

flip through the book. On the paper,

necklace, brushing off dirt that was

she jotted down legible notes,

hundreds or thousands of years old.

writing details she discovered about

She was careful not to damage the

the necklace. With precision, Maura

ancient object.

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closely studied the necklace, drawing lines between points and using a

11. She carefully examined the shiny

ruler to measure and calculate the

ornament, identifying it as a

approximate length of the jewelry.

necklace. What culture and era,

Using a magnifying glass, she

however, could the necklace be

intensively examined the small links

. of the chain. She discovered ASTERa

from? It would take some amount of

Y. NE M N OT A charm EofD Ithe N C U S I ornamental necklace. and place of the necklace. She would D O T .I PR D E E R T H E G B have to study some books and OPYRI S BOOK TO C S I K compare the necklaceLEwith BOOother R THI 13. Finally, Maura exclaimed, “Eureka! I O F P N M E A know where this necklace is from!” ancient treasures. THIS S SheIS NOT GIV N IO With that, Maura leaped from her enthusiastically a notebook ISSgrabbed PERM

work to identify the original time

A CKLI engraved microscopic ANY Won the BLAmessage

and sketched a picture of the

chair and sprinted downstairs,

necklace. She did not want to carry

carrying the necklace with her. Maura

the necklace with her—it could get

approached her mother and held the

damaged. Maura made sure that her

necklace out. “Mom, I think you

sketch was exact—she needed an

dropped this in my bedroom,” she

exact replica of the necklace to

said, as she threw her arms around

contrast to ones previously found.

her mother. “Thank you,” Maura said, acknowledging that her mother

12. Maura went over to her bookshelf

had dropped the necklace and given

and selected an assortment of books.

her an exciting afternoon adventure.

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Strand A: Assessment

Answer questions 1 through 7. 1

2

4

Which word best describes Maura?

? A Dainty

? F Complain that she is bored again

? B Unruly

? G Find another indoor adventure

? C Famous

? H Try on her mother’s necklace

? D Creative

? J Go outside with her friends

Read this sentence from the story.

5

Maura yearned to go on an adventure with her friends.

? F Expected ? G Planned

Where does this story probably take place?

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? A Maura’s house ? B Maura’s backyard

Which word means about the same as yearned in the sentence above?

? C Maura’s school ? D Maura’s front porch

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A ? J Liked S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K IS CO THIS BOO KMaura O What important lesson does O B N FOR MPLE E A V S learn in this story? I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS ? A Rainy days PERMare never fun. ? H Longed

3

What will Maura probably do next?

? B Adventures can happen anywhere.

? C You should ask before borrowing things.

? D Mothers have all the answers.

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Strand A: Assessment

6

7

Explain why Maura’s mother does not mind if Maura borrows her makeup brush. Use information from the story to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

. E WAY. KLIN C Y A N L A B OT A ED IN N C U S I D O T TED. I O BE REPR H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV SION S I M R PE

Briefly summarize the main events of the story in the order that theyMoccur. ASTER

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Strand A: Assessment

James is going on an overnight hike with members of his adventure club. A week before the hike, the adventure club leader gave everyone this article to read.

Packing Your Backpack 1.

You’re participating in an overnight hike and now that you’ve chosen your trail, studied your maps, checked the terrain, and gotten permission to tent overnight, you need to dust off your backpack and securely pack the items you’ll need for the trip. A backpack

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 can quickly become uncomfortable if the

weight isn’t properly distributed, which is

why packing a backpack is an art that takes some trial and error.

2.

Before you pack, you should make a checklist of all of the items you will need. As you pack, check

A T I HTED. hungry after a long day’s hike. Many hikers you’re opener can be aggravating when G I R Y IS COP EtoMremind STER. them what they need. It stands for A K use the acronym O ESSENTIALS O EB KLIN Extras, Navigation, Toiletries, Incidentals, PLSustenance, ACShelter, M L A B S Emergencies, S THI

off the items. Realizing that you forgot matches IS NOTor a can

Attitude, Light, and Something that will carry all of it. 3.

Emergency items include a first aid kit with medical supplies and bandages. Other emergency essentials are dry matches in a waterproof container, a fire starter, and a whistle.

4.

Items that fall under Sustenance include food, pots and pans, utensils, a cup, a bowl, a can opener, a portable stove, and garbage bags.

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Strand A: Assessment

Be sure to include a repair kit and fuel with your stove. Aluminum foil is handy for many purposes including fashioning a windscreen for your stove. Pack biodegradable (environmentally friendly) dish detergent, a scrubbing pad, and a dish towel. Plan your food carefully for weight and ease of cooking. Nuts, dried fruit, and nutrition bars are easy-to-eat items that don’t require cooking. Don’t forget that many items, such as rice and pasta, require water for cooking. Check ahead of time to see if there is clean water close to your camping area. 5.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Under Shelter, you should include a tarp or tent, poles, and stakes. In addition, pack a ground cloth to keep the floor of your tent dry. You’ll also want a warm sleeping bag and a comfortable sleeping pad.

6.

Extras include items such as extra clothing, snacks, and water. Essential clothing includes dry socks, a complete change of clothes, a windbreaker or sweater, and rain gear. Weather conditions and climate will determine whether you shouldASpack TER.a

Y. NE M D INnecessary OT Ais a heavy Ebut N C U S I around camp when you remove your hiking boots. Water D O T I EP R Rup TED.have H E G B I R O extra, especially in areas where drought might dried typical water sources. KT OPY O C O S B I BOOK R THIS E O L F P N M E A Your Navigation OT GIVmaps, a compass, a pen, and paper. Carry maps in THIS SneedsISinclude N ION and learn how to use your compass before your hike. Sbags, S zippered plastic I M R PE

A CKLI or sandals swimsuit or a coat, hat, and gloves. Pack a comfortable pair BofLAshoes ANY Wto wear

7.

8.

Don’t forget essential Toiletries, which include the following: a toothbrush and toothpaste; a hairbrush or comb; biodegradable soap; sunblock and lip balm; and blister ointment.

9.

Incidentals are items that you might not need, but that might come in handy, such as binoculars. Other incidentals include a magnifying glass, a camera, a deck of cards, and a fishing rod, reel, and license.

10. The “A” in ESSENTIALS stands for Attitude. Being pleasant and patient is essential. Rain, heat, and formidable trails can try your nerves. Adjust to your conditions, and take time to look around and enjoy the scenery. Keep your fellow hikers upbeat along difficult stretches.

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Strand A: Assessment

11. Next on the list is Light. Be sure to pack a flashlight, as well as extra batteries. You may also want to bring a lantern. Some lanterns require fuel, while others run on batteries, so be sure to bring whichever you need to keep your lantern illuminated. 12. Finally, you will need Something that will carry all of your belongings. For an overnight hike, a heavy-duty backpack with a waterproof pack cover should work. Include a small daypack in your backpack for short hikes around the campsite. That way you won’t have to haul your large, heavy pack with you. 13. Be sure to pack certain items within easy reach. If it starts to pour, you don’t want to dig to the bottom of your pack for your rain gear. Most backpacks have lots of zippered pouches accessible from outside the pack. Reserve these spaces for the items

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

you’ll want to get at easily. As you hike, you’ll want your water bottle close at hand. Choose a water bottle that seals tightly. It’s no fun to find that your water has leaked onto your dry clothing. Keep snacks readily accessible. Pack your insect repellant, maps, and compass within reach as well. Place a well-stocked first aid kit in an outside pocket, too.

. 14. For an overnight hike, you’ll probably carry a portable stove, fuel, and cooking ASTER

Y. NE M N TA Oweight ED Ihips, N C U S I over your hips and feet. Some hikers prefer to distribute on their while D O T .I PR D E E R T H E G others prefer to keep the majority ofOP the YRIweightObetween K TO B their shoulders and hips. O C S B I BOOK R THIS E O L F P N M E A Pack medium-weight lower OT GIVto provide stability. Most backpacks have a zippered THIS S gear N S I SIONbottom of the pack. Consider placing your sleeping bag and tent compartment atISthe M R PE

I A utensils. Place heavy items toward the top of the backpack soBtheir spreads LACKLweight ANY W out

15.

in a waterproof container in this compartment. This provides easy access to your tent

in case you have to set it up in the rain. Roll clothing to save space and wrap it within a waterproof sack inside your backpack. Use empty spaces for personal items. Leave an extra sweater or jacket and socks near the top of your pack for easy access. 16. With planning and preparation, a well-packed backpack, and a good attitude, your overnight hike will be the trip of a lifetime.

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Strand A: Assessment

Answer questions 8 through 15. 8

The fourth paragraph is mostly a description of

? F finding meals along the hiking trail. ? G protecting food from water damage. ? H preparing an emergency food kit. ? J planning meals for an overnight hike. 9

The title of this article is “Packing Your Backpack.” What could be another title for it? Support your answer with information from the article.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Strand A: Assessment

10

If the author added a section on choosing the right tent to the article, it would most likely describe

12

Which sentence best states the main idea of the article?

? F Heavy-duty backpacks can carry

? F how to clean your tent when you

many hiking essentials.

return home.

? G Certain necessities should be

? G how to estimate what size tent

within your reach during a hike.

you will need.

? H Good planning and packing are

? H which tent color is most popular

the keys to a successful hike.

among hikers.

? J The right backpack will help to

? J which stores have the largest

evenly distribute weight.

variety of tents.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 13

11

Read this sentence from the article.

Formidable is probably another way of saying

? A scenic.

Realizing that you forgot matches or a can opener can be aggravating when you’re hungry after a long day’s hike.

? B difficult.

? C peaceful.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L Which word means about the same as B A OT information UCEDin the article, IS Non D aggravating in the sentence above? 14D. Based O T I R P RE is most likely GHTE which BofE these I R O Y T P K O ? A Annoying K IS C R THIS BOOto happen? O O B LE N FO E ? B FrighteningIS SAMP V I G T TH ? F Letting negative thoughts get to IS NO N O I S ? C Exhausting IS you will ruin your hike. PERM ? D mysterious.

? D Intriguing

? G Packing extra clothing will weigh you down too much.

? H Choosing trails before leaving will make the hike seem boring.

? J Carrying the right backpack will make any hike a success.

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Strand A: Assessment

15

Explain why it is necessary to have a heavy-duty backpack filled with only essential items when you go on an overnight hike. Use information from the article to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Strand B: Assessment

STRAND B ASSESSMENT Directions: Read the passage. Then read each multiple-choice question and determine the best answer. Mark the answer in the space on your answer sheet. Write the answers for the openended questions on the lines provided. Emi’s music teacher asked each student to choose a musical instrument to research. Emi decided to research the djembe. She found this article while she was researching.

The Djembe 1.

E L P SAM ! Y L L RA N O I T A C U ED Y L L A R . 9 9 . 888

The most common drum in western Africa is the djembe (pronounced

GEM-BAY). The drum is shaped like a trophy, and drummers play the drum by striking it with their hands as

opposed to using sticks or mallets.

The djembe gets its name from the

djem tree, which drummers originally

used to make the drum. Drum makers carved the drum from the tree trunk,

and stretched an animal skin over the top. They secured the skin to the drum using a complicated tightening

©iStockphoto.com/Vasko Miokovic

process involving ropes. Today, they

Unique Sounds

use a different process to secure the skin to the top of the drum, but other

2.

than that, they make the drum in

Drummers use the djembe to create a unique range of sounds that inspire

basically the same way.

people to dance. Drummers may either stand or sit to play the djembe.

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Strand B: Assessment

When they stand, they attach the

3.

Bass is a very low sound that

drum to a shoulder harness.

drummers make by dropping their

Sometimes, they attach the drum to

hand in the middle of the drum with

their bodies with a strap wrapped

their thumb tucked in. Their palm,

around their waist. When drummers

fingers, and fingertips hit the drum all

sit, they wrap their legs around the

at once. Tone is a sound that is

drum to better control and balance

medium in pitch. To create this

the drum. They use both hands to

sound, drummers drop their hand

play the drum vigorously while

and fingers just outside the rim of the

concentrating on their breathing so

drum while keeping their forearm

they do not get out of breath. The

very stiff. Slap is a high-pitched sound

way drummers strike the drum with

drummers create in nearly the same

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

their hands affects the sound the

manner as tone, but with a relaxed

drum makes. While a djembefole, a

forearm. When drummers create a

master drummer, can create many

slap sound, they hit the drum in a

sounds using the djembe, the three

flicking or whip-like manner.

basic sounds are bass, tone, and slap.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

ŠiStockphoto.com/Peeter Viisimaa

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Strand B: Assessment

The History of the Djembe

combining the usual sound of the djembe with the sound of familiar instruments, musicians can change

4.

People can use the djembe to make

the texture of their music and create

very loud sounds, sounds that are

music that is new and exciting.

much louder than the human voice. Many years ago, before people used

Learning to Play

telephones and letters to communicate, people in Africa used

6.

the djembe to “speak” to each other

Learning to play the djembe, like any other musical instrument, takes

across long distances. Certain

dedication and practice. Most

drumming patterns represented

drummers recommend taking lessons

simple messages that people could

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

from a djembefola. You should be

recognize and understand.

aware that playing the drum is not as easy as it looks. It takes most

5.

Not many people outside of Africa

students two months of practice with

had heard the sounds of the djembe

the drum to be able to successfully

until an African dance group, called

create a sound, and it takes many

years to reach the level of TER. ASmaster

Les Ballets Africains, began touring

Y. NE M IN TA musicians in this group played the Oenough ED alone, N C U S I skillful to play he or D O T .I PR D E E R T djembe for the dancers. People in H E G O B learn to play in a group. K Tmust OPYRI S BOOshe C S I the audience were delighted Oand Intermediate drummers usually join BO K R THI E O L F P N M E A fascinated withISthe djembe and V S I drumming workshops with several TH NOTit.G In S I N wanted to learn how to play students and at least one djembefola. MISSIO R E P time, musicians in France and LI drummer. Once NY WA BLACaK beginnerAbecomes

Europe about 60 years ago. The

In these workshops, drummers learn

Belgium and eventually in the

new patterns. Drum rhythms are

United States also learned to play the

complex enough that trying to

djembe. While drummers in dance

reproduce them from written musical

groups still play the djembe today,

notation does not bring out the real

drummers in different types of bands

mood of the music. Students learning

also play the djembe. Many popular

to play the djembe need to

rock and jazz bands in the United

participate in a social setting, such as

States feature the djembe. Including

the workshops, where they can both

the djembe makes their music more

listen and learn.

interesting and distinctive. By

GO ON 171

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Strand B: Assessment

Answer questions 1 through 12. 1

4

Paragraph 1 contains

? A a list.

? F states his or her main idea and gives examples of it.

? B an opinion.

? G asks a question and answers it.

? C an argument.

? H states the opposite of what the

? D a description. 2

author believes.

? J gives details and states the main

One of the author’s purposes in this article is to

? F entertain. ? G convince. ? H inform. ? J debate.

In paragraph 6, the author

idea later.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 5

With which statement would the author probably agree?

? A It is easier to play a djembe without a harness while seated.

? B The djembe is easier to play than

3

most other drums.ASTER.

LINE M NY WAY. K C A L B ? C Playing A the djembe IN isA a relaxing T D O E N C U ODmost people. . IT IS activity PRfor D E E R T ? A It is easy to learn to play H E G TO B KD OPYRI S BOO? C S the djembe. Many people enjoy listening and I OK HI O T B R E O L F dancing to djembe music. AMP played ? B The djembe GIVinEN T O THIS Sis only N N IS O Africa. I S S I PERM Which sentence can be supported with information in the article?

? C It requires skill to play the djembe well.

? D Djembe drums are rare today.

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Strand B: Assessment

6

9

Why did the author include paragraph 5?

Paragraph 6 contains

? A an opinion.

? F To explain how people all

? B a comparison.

over the world learned about the djembe

? C a question.

? G To inform readers about a

? D a summary.

famous dance group that used the djembe

10

? H To describe what music created by the djembe sounds like

From information in paragraphs 2 and 3, you can tell that

? F someone learning to play the

? J To encourage readers to support

djembe would first learn bass, tone, and slap.

bands that have djembe players

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? G djembe drums are made using

7

the same traditional methods used long ago.

From the information in the article, you can tell that the most important thing when learning to play the djembe is

? H a djembe drummer learns to play alone before learning to play in STER. . A M E a group. CKLIN WAY

? A learning the drum’s history.

ANY BLA A N I T D O ? J DUCEthe same basic Ouses IT ISaNdrummer R . P D ? C being around other drummers. E E R T O BE movement to create the YRIGH OOK Thand P O C sounds bass and slap. ? D choosing the correct drum. OK IS OR THIS B O B E L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV SION 4 are S The ideas inRparagraph I M PE arranged to show ? B developing good dance skills.

8

? F the order of important events. ? G a main idea with supporting details.

? H how causes resulted in effects. ? J how two things are different.

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Strand B: Assessment

11

12

Using information from the article, explain how the djembe is different from other drums.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

Write one fact and one opinion included in paragraph 5.

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Strand C: Assessment

STRAND C ASSESSMENT Directions: Read the passage. Write the answers for the open-ended questions on the lines provided. Calvin’s class is learning about the history of technology. Calvin’s teacher started the lesson by distributing this article for each student to read.

New-Century Technology E 1.

L P M SA N O I T A C U D E ! Y RALL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

As the clock struck midnight on December 31, 1999, millions of

people anxiously experienced the

STER. . A M E They feared that emergencies and ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A misfortune were on the horizon. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . All electronics—computers, GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O clocks, and cash registers—might K IS C R THIS BOO O O B MPLEpeopleGIVEN FO A screech to a haltISbecause S TH NOTthe year S I N 2. A century ago, however, when 1899 could not technically change SIO S I M R PE to “2000.” People turned to 1900, people were fixated from “1999” first moments of the year 2000.

worried that computers worldwide

on technology for different reasons.

would suddenly cease working and

During the first decade of the

humankind might be unable to keep

twentieth century, from 1900 to

the planet functioning. People all

1910, new technology was unveiled

over the world breathed easier when

that changed the way people lived,

midnight arrived and departed, the

worked, and played. For the first

year 1999 became 2000, and the

time, people traveled in automobiles,

technological world continued to

talked on the telephone, and watched

operate smoothly in the new century.

illustrated songs.

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Strand C: Assessment

5.

The Automobile

Slowly, people’s sense of reason overcame their panic regarding the

3.

On the roads of New York City and

automobile. Their rationale was

in other places, automobiles slowly

obvious: since automobiles did not

replaced horse-drawn carriages and

require daily food and maintenance,

bicycles as a means of transportation.

they were easier to maintain than

Some people were thrilled with this

horses. Automobiles were more

modern invention, while others

convenient than trains because they

despised it. The first automobiles

allowed people to travel at their

were deafeningly loud and they

leisure without having to abide by

frightened people and horses. Some

schedules. More and more people

city’s inhabitants fought to make

became comfortable with the

automobiles illegal, and others

automobile as a means of

pushed for laws so strict that driving

transportation.

E L P SAM ATION The Telephone C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

legally became nearly impossible.

6.

Just as the automobile enabled

people to quickly and A conveniently STER.

Y. NE M N OT A ED Ilong N C U S I to communicate over distances. D O T .I PR D E E R T H E G TO B eagerly welcomed the OPYRI S BOOKPeople C S I Even people who lived inOcities telephone, which gave telephone B OK thatFOR THI E L P N M E A V allowed driving were in for an S I companies a surge of unexpected THIS NOT G S I N uncomfortable, bumpy journey. business. They suddenly hired many MISSIO R E P Although the United States had 2.3 A travel, theBtelephone LACKLI enabled ANY Wpeople

4.

additional operators to connect calls.

million miles of roads, few were

Managers originally hired teenage

paved. Most dirt and gravel roads

boys because these boys had been

were downright dangerous and often

excellent employees in telegraph

meant hitting large potholes and

offices, where they helped people

getting flat tires. Some companies

communicate by tapping out special

sold emergency survival motorist kits

signals called Morse code. Hiring

bursting with tools and even

these boys as telephone operators

chocolate—anything to relieve the

proved impractical, however, because

stranded driver.

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Strand C: Assessment

the young men lacked patience.

difficult, it helped women establish

They played jokes on callers,

that they were dependable and

misinterpreted requests, and easily

skilled workers outside of the home.

became annoyed with customers. Adult women replaced the boys,

Illustrated Songs

because managers considered

8.

women’s voices more pleasant than men’s voices and because, at this

to listen to music today, in 1900

time, women worked for less money

people had to depend on musicians

than men did. Tall women had a

playing instruments to listen to music.

distinct advantage because long arms

Many musicians bought sheet music

could more easily reach the top of

from publishers so they could play

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

songs and fill their homes with music.

the tall switchboard. 7.

While there are many different ways

9.

Telephone operators not only

One of the best ways to enjoy music

connected calls, but also informed

was to see a primitive kind of music

people about local issues such as

video known as illustrated songs. To

streetcar breakdowns, upcoming

make an illustrated song, people

. printed photographs on Aglass STERslides

thunderstorms, train arrivals, and

Y. NE M IN OT Aby hand ED make N C U S I with paint to them worked in large cities often had to D O T .I PR D E E R T H E G colorful. cope with up to 600 calls per hour! OPYRI K TO B They showed these glass O C O S B I OK Managers closely observed BOthem, R THIS slides on a screen in a movie theater, E O L F P N M VE IS SAseconds so that many people could see them. allowing only T GIcall Oper THfour N S I N SSIO to chat with As the images changed, a group of and forbidding Ithem PERM

even election results. Operators who

LI and then carefully NY WAin BLACK coloredAthem

callers. While the profession was

musicians played and sang.

10. Thousands of theaters began offering illustrated songs. After they finished showing the slides with the painted photographs, they showed a glass slide with the lyrics of a song on the screen, which gave the audience a chance to sing along.

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Strand C: Assessment

11. Between 1890 and 1914, people created millions of illustrated songs, which were extremely popular. The creators of these illustrated songs hired people to model for the pictures and artists to paint them. When film producers started making movies and showing them in theaters, these movies were often so short that they filled in the extra time with illustrated songs. In comparison to the black-and-white films, the brightly painted song slides were an enormous hit. 12. When movies and record players were invented, however, illustrated songs became a thing of the past. This trend regarding technology is true regardless of the century— the most recent technology will soon become old-fashioned because a newer and better technology is being invented to take its place.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Answer questions 1 through 6.

1

Which technology discussed in the article do you find most interesting or surprising? Use information from the article to support your answer. .

STER A M E WAY. KLIN C Y A N L A B OT A ED IN N C U S I D O T TED. I O BE REPR H G I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV SION S I M R PE

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Strand C: Assessment

2

3

Think about what this article says about people in general. In what ways does it remind you of people today? Support your answer with evidence from the article.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

If the people who rode in the first automobiles were alive today, what would R. STEyou A M E . most like to ask them? Use information from the article to support Y WAY ACKLINyour answer.

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Strand C: Assessment

4

5

Think about someone who experienced something new. Tell how that experience was like the experiences of the people in the article.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

. Using information from the article, write a brief paragraph telling why you or STERwould A M E . would not have enjoyed working as a telephone operator. Y WAY ACKLIN A BL IN AN T D O E N C U . IT IS E REPROD D E T H G B OPYRI S BOOK TO C S I BOOK R THI E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV SION S I M R PE

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Strand C: Assessment

6

Which kind of technology in the article do you think was most important? Use information from the article and your own life to explain why you chose that technology.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Strand D: Assessment

STRAND D ASSESSMENT Directions: Read the passage. Then read each multiple-choice question and determine the best answer. Mark the answer in the space on your answer sheet. Write the answers for the openended questions on the lines provided. Josephine’s sister has always wanted to travel to Asia. When Josephine found this article about Thailand in a magazine, she gave it to her sister to read.

Ter rific E L P M A S N O Thailand I T CA 1.

U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B independent nation for A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . nearly 700 years. Its GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O people originally came K IS C R THIS BOO O O B to the area from China N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T H brought to the east. TThey IS NO N O I S RMIS Buddhist with them PEmany Thailand has been an

and Chinese traditions.

©iStockphoto.com/Ritu Sainani

These traditions were mixed with the culture of the native people to create

will find ancient villages nearly

something distinctively Thai.

untouched by the hands of time. They will also find busy urban areas

2.

Four main regions make up the

complete with skyscrapers and crowds

country of Thailand. These areas are as

of people. The four main sections of

different in geography and climate as

Thailand are the southern, central,

they are in culture and food. Visitors

northern, and northeastern regions.

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Strand D: Assessment

3.

Starting in the southern region,

quiet rice paddy fields. The central

visitors can explore the long

region is also home to many natural

peninsula of Thailand. Travelers

parks, ancient temples, and old Thai

from all over the world visit the

cities. This region was the center of

beautiful coastlines. Modern resorts

the Golden Age of Buddhist art and

are being built on the beaches along

architecture. The first capital of

both sides of the peninsula. Visitors

Thailand is now part of a historical

can explore the many islands in the

preserve where visitors can walk

area. Diving among the reefs is

among the remains of the city.

popular. Cities along the mainland 6.

offer travelers postcard temples and

Thailand’s capital city of Bangkok is an interesting mix of old and new.

graceful old homes. Many fishing

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

ports dot the coastline. Southern

The expanding city has long

Thailand also has crops of rubber,

outgrown the old walls that protected

pineapple, and coconuts.

the city center. Now high-rise office buildings keep watch over the

4.

Because they are so plentiful,

ancient sections of the city. Visitors

coconuts are often used in the foods

can stay in beautiful hotels and eat in

. world-class restaurants. People ASTER from

of the southern region. Also plentiful

Y. NE M IN TA Oitems EDbronze, N C U S I to buy made of woven shrimp, lobsters, scallops, mussels, D O T .I PR D E E R T H E G B silks, and gems. and clams. Local harvests include OPYRI K TOjewelry, O C O S B I K cashews, bananas, pineapples, BOOand R THIS E O L F P N M E SA flat beans 7. Thai foods in the central region sataw, whichTare HISspicy OT GIVused N S I N center on sweet jasmine rice, in southern dishes. ISSIOSouthern Thailand PERM is the bounty of the sea: fresh fish,

LI around the world NY WA BLACK come to ABangkok

food includes curries seasoned with

vegetables, fish flavored with garlic,

cinnamon, cardamom, and cloves, as

black pepper, and chili peppers as

well as spicy peanut sauces.

hot as fire. Typical fresh fruit includes mangos, custard apples, and

5.

Traveling north, visitors come to the

durians, which are huge, thorn-

central region of Thailand, which is

covered fruits with a pungent flavor.

home to the modern city of Bangkok.

Also popular in the cities of

In contrast to the noisy city, the vast

the central region are several

central plains are home to miles of

noodle dishes.

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Strand D: Assessment

8.

9.

11. Moving to the northeastern region of

Traveling northwest, visitors enter the isolated country of northern

Thailand, travelers will find large

Thailand. The forest-covered

national parks and wildlife preserves

mountains of this region were

that are home to many elephants,

basically cut off from the rest of the

tigers, deer, and birds. In addition to

world until a railway linked the area

the wildlife of the area, guests can

to Bangkok in 1921. Northern

enjoy the many festivals that the

Thailand borders the countries of

people in the region hold throughout

Laos and Burma. The main city of

the year. Known for their hospitality,

northern Thailand has many

the people of northeastern Thailand

beautiful temples and countless shops

welcome visitors to their Rocket

filled with carved wooden treasures,

Festivals, during which they fire huge

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

woven cottons and silks, and

homemade rockets to ensure much

embroidered items.

needed rain for future crops.

12. Just as in the mountains to the west,

Visitors to the northern region can hike the highest mountain in

the northeastern Thais enjoy sticky

Thailand. They can also see remote

rice dishes. The country of Laos,

R. region, which lies to the northAS ofTEthis

villages that are home to several

NE M WAY. OT A Thai ED IN Common N C U S I northeastern dishes. The members of these tribes carry on D O T I PR REthis HTED. dishes E B O in area of Thailand ancient traditions and livelihoods, OPYRIG KT O C O S B I include sweet steamed rice with wearing embroidered costumes BOOK R THIS E O L F P N M E A V S I coconut milk, black beans rolled in accented with THISsilver jewelry. NOT G S I N bamboo, and an egg crepe stuffed ISSIO PERM LI has had much NY BLACKinfluence Aon

groups of people called hill tribes.

with spicy shrimp and bean sprouts.

10. As in the central plains, rice is a

staple food in northern Thailand. 13. Whether visiting the mountainous

However, the rice served in the north is sticky and is often rolled into small

north or the coastline of the

balls and used to soak up the liquid

southeast, traveling in Thailand is an

in the traditional dishes of milder

unforgettable experience. The beauty

curry. A spicy pork sausage is a

of the landscape, the flavorful foods,

favorite dish in northern Thailand.

and the warm hospitality of the people make Thailand an extraordinary country.

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Strand D: Assessment

Answer questions 1 through 9. 1

Why do you think the author chose to write about the foods from the different regions of Thailand?

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Strand D: Assessment

2

3

Using the information in the article, write a paragraph that could have appeared in the journal of someone who visited Thailand.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Personification is making ideas or objects appear to be human. Identify the STER. . A M E personification in paragraph 6 and explain why the author used LIN Y WAY ACKit.

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Strand D: Assessment

4

6

The tone of this article can best be described as

? F anxious.

If the author had added another paragraph to the end of the article, it would most likely have described

? F how the Thai people might

? G bewildered.

change in the future.

? H enthusiastic.

? G the best times to visit different

? J determined.

areas of Thailand.

? H facts about the economy 5

How does the author show that the Thai culture is important to the Thai people?

of Thailand.

? J the various regions of Laos and Burma.

? A By stating that the history of

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Thailand dates back to over 700 years ago

7

? B By explaining that there are four different regions of Thailand

? C By describing what visitors

A simile is a comparison of unlike things using “as” or “like.” The author uses a simile by describing the chili peppers as being “as hot as fire.” The author used the simile to

? A emphasize how spicy theRchili .

to Thailand can expect to experience

MASTE AY. E N I L BLACK D IN ANY W A T O ? D By showing how the people of N ? B the Dvivid O UCE colors of the IT ISdescribe R . P D E E R T Thailand have maintained O BE peppers. YRIGH OOK Tchili P O C their customs OK IS OR THIS B ? C suggest that the chili peppers O B E L F P N M E A V S I can be dangerous. THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO ? D warn people about touching the PERM peppers are.

chili peppers.

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Strand D: Assessment

8

9

What was the most important thing to the author of this article?

? F The changes that have occurred

If the author had added another sentence to paragraph 12, which of these would best belong?

? A In America, you can learn to

in Bangkok

cook these dishes by attending a Thai cooking class.

? G The early history of Thailand ? H The warm hospitality of the

? B Many Thai dishes have

Thai people

traditional recipes that have been passed on for generations.

? J The unique features of different areas of Thailand

? C The people of northeastern Thailand appreciate tourists and are always friendly.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

? D A healthy diet should include fruit, vegetables, meats, and grains such as rice.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM


READING STRAND MASTERY

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Reading Strand Mastery: Applying the Common Core State Standards is divided into two parts, Instruction and Assessment. Both parts have four sections, each focused on one reading comprehension strand. The four strands are: Strand Strand Strand Strand

A: Forming a General Understanding B: Developing Interpretation C: Making Reader/Text Connections D: Examining the Content and Structure

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A Each strand is correlated to the Common Core State Standards. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R Part A: Instruction O Y T P K O S BOOwhat reading K IS C thatR describe I Each strand contains several Bobjectives O H O T N FO to know. Each objective includes MPLE areGIexpected E comprehension skills students A V S S I T TH IS NOpractice, and independent practice. modeled instruction,Oguided N I S MIS At the end P ofER each strand, all the objectives for the strand are assessed together. Students read full-length passages and answer the questions that follow them. Part B: Assessment Part B assesses each of the reading strands with its respective objectives. The assessment contains four tests, each one focused on one strand with fiction and/or nonfiction passages. The book contains multiple-choice questions and open-ended questions.


Reading strand mastery g