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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM


RALLY! EDUCATION 22 Railroad Avenue Glen Head, NY 11545 888-99-RALLY Fax: 1-516-671-7900 www.RALLYEDUCATION.com LESLIE@RALLYEDUCATION.com …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Responding to Open-Ended Questions, Themed Reading, & Paired Passages ………….. Paired Passages Grade Levels 3–8 • Designed to prepare students to answer questions about paired passages • Four sets of passages per book • Each set of passages includes one informational and one literary passage, with a shared theme. • Includes multiple-choice, short-response, & extended-response questions Level C D E F G H

Grade Level 3 4 5 6 7 8

25-Pack 4139-0 4142-0 4145-1 4148-2 4151-2 4154-3

100-Pack 4140-6 4143-7 4146-8 4149-9 4152-9 4155-0

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM


PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G

Contents To the Teacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Part 1: Practice with Shorter Passages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Part 2: Practice with Full-Length Passages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 How to Use Paired Passages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Part 1: Practice with Shorter Passages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Practice Set 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Practice Set 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part 2: Practice with Full-Length Passages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Passage Set 1 Passage Set 2 Passage Set 3 Passage Set 4

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N Acknowledgments ISSIO PERM Executive Editor: Amy Collins Editor: Caren Churchbuilder Design Director: Jean-Paul Vest Design/Production: Erik Schuman Illustration: Donna Stackhouse ISBN 978-1-4204-4174-1 R 4174-1 Copyright ©2009 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. Printed on recycled paper. C 1208.MAQ RALLY! EDUCATION, 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545, (888) 99-RALLY

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G

To the Teacher Paired Passages is designed to prepare students to read and answer questions on paired passages. A paired passage is one literary and one informational passage that share a common theme.

Part 1: Practice with Shorter Passages Part 1 of Paired Passages provides practice on how to read and answer questions about paired passages. Students will read two short, paired passages and answer two short-response questions and one extendedresponse question. To answer the extended-response question, students must use their knowledge of both passages.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part 2: Practice with Full-Length Passages

Part 2 of Paired Passages provides practice using the reading comprehension skills students practiced in Part 1 with full-length passages. Part 2 of this book provides four different sets of paired passages R. and questions for students to practice their reading skills. MASTE

AY. LINE W K C Y A L N OT A B DUCED IN A N S I T How to Use Paired Passages TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R PY OK Tinformal practice for your Oand Paired Passages can be used asCOinstruction S I B K S I O H T the four sets of paired passages as if E BO students. YouAcan each FOR of PLadminister N M E V S I TG HISactual test. it were Tan in the teacher key are the directions for NOIncluded S I N O I S administering ERMIS each set of paired passages. The format of Paired Passages P allows you to use the “instruct-practice-instruct-practice model.” Scoring To score short-response questions, use the 4-point holistic rubric for Reading Comprehension. To score extended-response questions, use the 4-point holistic rubric for Reading Comprehension and the 3-point holistic Writing Mechanics rubric. Each short-response question is worth a total of 4 points and each extended-response question is worth a total of 7 points.

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G

Part 1: Practice with shorter passages Practice Set 1 Mollusks are creatures that usually live in the ocean. There are thousands of types of mollusks. Some mollusks—such as octopuses, squids, and sea slugs—have no outer shell. It is believed that the ancestors of these animals used to have shells. However, as the animals developed, they lost the need for the shells. Other mollusks are less developed, though, and need shells for protection. To grow shells, mollusks excrete chemicals from their skin. These chemicals harden on the skin of the mollusk, forming the shell. The shell grows as the mollusk grows. The shell helps to shield the creature from predators. When the creature dies, its body decays and disappears. The shell, however, remains. These shells are commonly called seashells. Seashells have long been popular to collect. Throughout history, seashells have been collected for many purposes. Some people collected them to make tools out of them. Others collected them to be used SasTER. . A M E AY LIN decoration. Some even collected them to use as currency! ANY W BLACK

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

1

D IN OT A E N C U S I D T TED. I O BE REPRO H G I R OPY Carticle. Read this sentence from Kthe OOK T S I B S I O H BO FOR T to collect. PLElong N M E A V Seashells have been popular S I THIS NOT G S I N IO Explain how RMISSthe author supports this statement. Use details from the E P article to support your answer.

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G Jessica was walking along the beach with her parents. As she looked into the tide, she saw a long, pointy seashell that seemed to be struggling to get ashore. At first she thought she was imagining this; however, as she watched, Jessica became sure that the shell was moving! To her parents’ dismay, she quickly ran into the water to catch this strange, moving shell. When Jessica picked the shell up, a gooey creature shot back inside the shell. Terrified, Jessica dropped it in the water and the tide pulled it underneath the waves. Afraid of the creature, Jessica hopped backward and asked her parents what it was. Her parents told her not to worry. They said it was a harmless conch—which is a type of mollusk. Jessica’s parents explained that many mollusks grow shells to protect themselves. A wave splashed over Jessica’s feet. She looked out into the ocean and imagined what other strange creatures were living there.

2

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Circle the word below that you think best describes Jessica in the story.

imaginative

anxious

curious

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Explain your choice using details from the story.

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G

3

Write an essay in which you describe the focus of the article and the story. Explain how their focuses are similar. Use details from both the article and the story to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to include • a description of the focus of the article and the story • an explanation of how the focus of the article and the story are similar • details from both the article and the story to support your answer Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

Go On

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G

Practice Set 2 Ralph Bunche was an American who served his country and community for most of his life. Ralph was born on August 7, 1904, in Michigan. He and his family moved to New Mexico and then to California. From a young age, Ralph was an excellent student who did well in many subjects. He went on to college, where he worked to pay for his expenses. Later, he attended Harvard University. Ralph became active in the civil rights movement during the 1930s. He did research and wrote on the subject of race. Ralph was also active in the fight for equal rights for all people. Soon, he became involved in the government and the United Nations. Ralph became famous for his negotiating skills. He worked to end national and international conflicts. He devoted his life to fighting for equal rights for everyone. Today, Ralph Bunche is remembered as a strong voice in the fight for equality and freedom.

1

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Circle the word below that you think best describes Ralph Bunche.

STER. . A M E WAY CKLIN Y A L N A B A N I Explain your choice using details from the article. S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM hardworking

intelligent

dedicated

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G Tonya sat in her history class, doodling in her notebook. Suddenly, she realized her teacher, Mr. Young, had asked her a question. Tonya sat frozen in her seat—she hadn’t been paying attention. Another student offered the correct answer and the class went on. When the bell rang, Mr. Young stopped Tonya. He told her that she could learn a lot from the class. He told her that she was very bright and could do a lot with her talent. Mr. Young assigned Tonya a 500-word essay on the life of Ralph Bunche. Tonya went home and began researching. The more Tonya learned about Ralph Bunche, the more interesting the assignment became. Before she knew it, Tonya had written 1,000 words! The next day, Tonya handed in her assignment. Then, she told Mr. Young that she was inspired by Ralph Bunche’s life. She wanted to win the Nobel Peace Prize, too. She also wanted to work hard in school and maybe become a member of the United Nations. Tonya sat down in her seat, opened her book, and got ready to learn.

2

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Based on details in the story, explain how Tonya’s attitude changed from the beginning of the story to the end. Use details from the story to support your answer.

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G

3

Write an essay in which you describe the effect that Ralph Bunche had in his lifetime, and the effect he still has today. In the essay, include your opinion of which achievement had the greatest impact on people’s lives and why. Use details from both the article and the story to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to • describe the effect that Ralph Bunche had in his lifetime and the effect he still has today • include your opinion of which achievement impacted people the most and why • use details from both the article and the story to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

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PAIRED PASSAGES – LEVEL G

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Part 2: Practice with full-length passages In this part of the book, you will practice the reading and writing skills you have learned. There are four paired passages and sets of questions for you to use as practice. Read each set of paired passages and answer the questions.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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TIPS FOR TAKING THE TEST Here are some suggestions to help you do your best on the section of the test that has paired passages: • Be sure to read carefully all the directions. • Plan your time. • Read each question carefully and think about the answer before writing your response.

You will be writing about texts that you will be reading. Your writing will be scored on

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

• how clearly you organize your writing and express what you have learned • how accurately and completely you answer the questions being asked • how well you support your responses with examples or details from the texts • how correctly you use grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and paragraphing

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . E your writing. Whenever you see this symbol, be and HTEDto plan Gsure BE Rcheck I R O Y T P K K IS CO R THIS BOO O O B AMPLE T GIVEN FO S S I H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Passage Set 1 Reading and Writing

D

irections You are going to read an article called “No Escape!” and a poem called “Spectacular Comet.” You will answer questions 1 through 4 and write about what you have read. You may look back at the article and the poem as often as you like.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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No Escape! by Camille Miran

When thinking back to our earliest science classes on space, most of us think of our solar system. The elements of our solar system work in an amazingly balanced arrangement. Planets revolve around our central star, the Sun, in very specific patterns. The moons of each planet do the same, with the planet as the central object of each arrangement rather than the Sun. Also incredible is that fact that these balanced systems are all kept in place by the constant force of gravity. STER.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

E MA N I AY. L W K C Y A L N These systems are obviously well structured. THowever, IN A D does O A B DUthis E N C S I T not mean we should assume that all D. Ispace functions TEof REPRO in such an H E G B I R O PYsmall, rocky orderly manner. Asteroids, COor OOK Tbodies that exist in S I B K S I O H O materials outer space, and FOR Tsuch as space rock and ice often PLE Bother N M E A V S I IS one another. crash THinto NOT G Meteor showers rain down rock and other S I N ISSIO fragments PERM that impact nearby planets with tremendous force and create gaping craters on the planet’s surface.

Perhaps most fascinating is the mystery that surrounds space. One of the more interesting phenomena astronomers have encountered in the outer reaches of space is the existence of areas called black holes. A black hole is a region of space that has so much mass concentrated in it that a nearby object cannot possibly escape its gravitational pull. It is almost like a vacuum cleaner tidying up its surrounding area by sucking up dirt and dust. Most researchers agree that black holes were most likely formed by massive stars that have burned out. In fact, early researchers called

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black holes “frozen stars” because it seemed as if the stars had become frozen in their dying state. Let’s first consider some background information on gravity before we attempt to understand black holes. Using Einstein’s theories on relativity, scientists have determined that each object in space (such as a planet) has something called escape velocity. Imagine trying to hurl a small rock into outer space. You would have to throw the rock with enough force so that it could escape the Earth’s gravity. Though this is not possible, inventing imaginary situations such as this one can often help us understand complicated scientific theories. The force it would take for an object to escape a planet’s gravitational pull is called the escape velocity. Furthermore, the denser a planet or star is, the more mass it has in a given space. Therefore, the gravity of a very dense planet is greater than the gravity on a planet with less mass.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Now, we’ve already determined that a black hole has such a concentration of mass that once inside, nothing can escape its gravitational pull. But how is this possible? The answer lies in those burned-out stars. Research has shown that when a big enough star starts to run out of “fuel” and burn out, it is unable to support itself against its own gravitational pull. It therefore collapses into a black STER. . A M E hole. Because it is believed that black holes originate from WAY Y ACKLINburned L N A B A N I out stars, they are also called stellar black holes. IS NOT DUCED

. IT D E T REPRO H E G B I R O Y average Astronomers assume Sthat K T for a stellar black COPthe OOmass I B K S I O H O the mass hole is about Pten LE Btimes FOR Tof the Sun. It logically follows that N M E A V S I the more OT G hole has, the more space it takes up. THIS massISa Nblack N SIO ERMIS of their massive size, black holes actually alter the space PBecause surrounding them. Research shows that due to this distortion, black holes appear to have something called an event horizon. The event horizon is a spherical surface that marks the boundary of the black hole. Once an object passes through the horizon, the gravitational field is so strong that it is impossible for the object to escape. Black holes have a very high concentration of mass in such a small amount of space. This means that the escape velocity (amount of force it takes to escape the object’s gravitational pull) is greater than the velocity (speed) of light.

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However, science tells us that nothing can go faster than the speed of light. This means that anything caught in this object’s gravity would not be able to escape its gravitational field. Therefore, astronomers found the name “black hole” to be more fitting than “frozen star,” due to the discovery of the strange properties of this out-of-this-world wonder.

1

In the chart below, name two everyday objects the author uses as examples to explain the information in the passage. Then describe how the author uses the examples.

Everyday Object

1.

How the author uses the object to explain information in the article

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S S NOT G 2. THI S I N ISSIO PERM

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2

Read this sentence from the article “No Escape!” The elements of our solar system work in an amazingly balanced arrangement. Explain how the author supports this statement. Use details from the article to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Spectacular Comet by Martin Colmes

In your journey around the Sun, so shrouded in mystery, a brief trail in the night sky, you’ve existed throughout history.

We have named you without knowing you, spied your spectacular scene, a show of burning beauty more majestic than a queen.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

From where do you arrive? How much do you see below? With your elevated wisdom won’t you tell us what you know?

TER.

Your grace a lovely gift to us E MAS WAY. N I L K C A BLA CED IN ANY before you’re forced to run. T O N U IS We’ll continue to chase you HTED. IT PROD E R E G I TO B PYRSun. in your journey around IS COthe BOOK

BOOK R THIS E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV ISSION M R E P

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3

Read these lines from the poem “Spectacular Comet.” With your elevated wisdom won’t you tell us what you know? Explain what these lines mean in the context of the poem. Use details from the poem to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Planning Page You may PLAN your writing for question 4 here if you wish, but do NOT write your final answer on this page. Your writing on this Planning Page will NOT count toward your final score. Write your final answer on Pages 21 and 22.

Answer

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4

Write an essay in which you describe the focus of “No Escape!” and the focus of “Spectacular Comet.” Explain how their focuses are similar. Use details from both the article and the poem to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to include • a description of the focus of the article and the poem • an explanation of how their focuses are similar • details from both the article and the poem to support your answer

Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Passage Set 2 Reading and Writing

D

irections You are going to read a story called “Avary and Envi” and an article called “A Collection to Share.” You will answer questions 1 through 4 and write about what you have read. You may look back at the story and the article as often as you like.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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AVARY

AND ENVI

A retelling of Aesop’s Fable “Avaricious and Envious” Avary and Envi were the top students in their art program, although neither of them could stand when the other received more recognition. Envi would do anything to keep herself a step ahead of Avary. When Avary bought herself the most expensive set of colored pencils she could find, Envi, full of jealousy, strutted in to class the next day with a set of watercolor pencils and brushes. Using her new supplies, Envi painted a beautiful painting of flowers, vases, and fruit. Avary could not be outdone, so she immediately began a painting of an entire outdoor scene, which also included flowers, vases, and fruit. Avary glued fragments of clay to parts of her picture to make them look three-dimensional. She added glitter to the water, and glow-in-the-dark spots to the stars. Their teacher praised Avary’s creativity.

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Envi nearly exploded with fury. She decided to take home most of the art supplies so she could have an advantage the next day. STER. . A M E WAY KLIN Y ACpaintbrush Before leaving class that day, Envi stuffed every single L N A B A N UCED I S NOTintoPRher I D and every tube of acrylic paint she came across backpack. T O I . D E GHTEthrough BE Rsnow. I R Envi smirked as she marched home the Suddenly, O Y T P K O O C O S I B OK of ice she slipped overE aBO patch THISthe bursting zipper on her Rand O L F P N M A VE fumbled to gather all of her art supplies backpack OTAsGIshe THIS SgaveISway. N off the SSION she heard a voice coming from a nearby snowman. Iground, M R E P she looked over at it, an elf popped its head out from under When the snowman’s hat. “Envi, you seem to be having a lousy day!” crooned the elf. Envi looked around in shock only to come face to face with Avary, who had just crossed the street. Both girls stared at the elf, who winked and said, “I know just how to help you two. I can give you both the power to get whatever you wish for—” “Yes!” shrieked Avary.

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“I’ll take it!” yelled Envi, trying to be a bit louder than Avary. The girls ran off in opposite directions to each of their houses, as though getting home first would finalize their new powers. “Wait,” cried the elf, looking slightly concerned. “There’s one condition, let me explain!” he called after them, but they were too caught up in their excitement to turn around. The elf sighed, “Oh, silly humans,” then snapped his fingers and disappeared back under the snowman’s hat, waiting for someone else to come along with a wish. He whistled happily to himself and chuckled, thinking of how surprised the girls would be when they realized the rest of his promise. Before art class on Monday, Envi woke up smiling and ready to test her new power. She remembered that her teacher had entered their paintings into an art show over the weekend. She wished her painting had won a prize. Eager to see if it worked, as soon as she reached the art room she sped over to her painting, where, sure enough, a certificate was tacked on the front. She had won second place in the landscape category. Her teacher congratulated her and presented her with a certificate. Envi stared at the certificate in awe, and then glanced over at Avary’s painting to give it a final sneer. But what was that? A similar piece of paper was stuck to STER. A E Mthat N I AY. L Avary’s painting. Envi read the certificate, which announced W K C Y A L N B IN A Avary had won first prize for her work! IS NOT A DUCED

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

. IT D E T REPRO H E G B I R O Y noticed T By testing out her power, about her COPEnvi OOKsomething S I B K S I O H wishes. EveryPtime LE BOEnviVwished FOR Tfor more clay, she would get it. But N M E A S I G size would appear in front of Avary. When a fresh THISbucket Itwice NOTthe S N Envi MISSIO for a two-day extension on the project, Avary PERwished immediately received a four-day extension.

Although Avary was happy to always get more, she resented that Envi had got anything at all, so she thought of a way to get around their power. Avary wished that the top of her own sculpture would crack, and it happened immediately. Their teacher gasped, and Avery felt as if she would cry. Then Envi’s sculpture cracked completely from top to bottom, and Envi looked heartbroken.

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Avary and Envi tried hard to fix their work during class, but no matter what they did, their work suffered because of the other girl’s wishes. As they left class, Avary stopped Envi outside of the classroom. She took a deep breath, reached out her hand, and said, “Truce.” Envi reached out her hand too, and as the girls’ hands touched, their powers evaporated into thin air. At that moment, Avary and Envi realized that they could make even more incredible artwork if they worked together instead of against each other. “I wish you all the best,” Envi said. “I wish you the same,” Avary said with a smile.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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1

Complete the chart below to describe the main problem the young girls have and how their problem is resolved. Use details from the story “Avary and Envi” to support your answer. The young girls’ main problem

2

How the young girls’ problem is resolved

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Circle the word below that you think best describes Avary in “Avary and Envi.”

brave

clever

competitive

STER. . A M E Explain your choice using details from the story. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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A Collection to Share by Tamara Kenley Famous works of art have survived through many years because people collected and traded them. Sometimes, wealthy collectors might sponsor an artist and pay for paintings created specifically for the collectors. At one time, the walls of collectors’ huge mansions were absolutely covered with these works of art. These families and their privileged guests had the opportunity to see beautiful works by very famous artists firsthand. The art became a part of their interior decorating. They might purchase a painting to R. STE match the new carpet or the elaborate architecture of theLIbuilding. NE MA

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

AY. W K C Y A L N B D IN A OT A works E N C U S I Collectors’ hobbies of buying and storing great of art D T TED. I being REPRorO damaged by H E G B I prevented masterpieces from accidentally lost R O COPY IS BOOK T S I K O neglect. The only problem was TH most people who were not in BO R that E O L F P N M highTH social IS SA circlesNOnever T GIVEhad a chance to see the famous works. It S I ION would be for a stranger to knock on a wealthy family’s ISSstartling M R E P door to ask for a tour of their home. An idea for a solution to this problem was the creation of museums. The Enlightenment Era in the 18th century first made museums popular in England. Great thinkers wanted to improve all of humanity through knowledge. To do this, more people needed access to education. With more knowledge, they could stop depending on outdated traditions and superstitions. They could use reason to address problems in society.

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In addition to schools and books, making art more accessible helped people learn about their country’s creative traditions and history. Even illiterate people could appreciate fine art. Illustrations of historical events and scientific findings could teach without words. Many famous paintings and sculptures were of mythological figures, such as gods and goddesses, or respected soldiers and royalty. By being able to visualize these different people, museum-goers could learn about their significance. Also, by seeing art that represented different countries, ordinary people could develop broader world views, even if they did not have the money to travel. The British Museum is one example of a museum that allowed average people access to cherished aspects of history and culture. The museum’s history begins with Sir Hans Sloane, a wealthy doctor who loved collecting. He had many drawings of plants and animals, along with artifacts he found interesting. He received more objects from his friends and from buying other people’s entire collections. By the end of his life, he had collected more than 70,000 objects! He had to keep buying bigger houses to store it all. In his will, Sir Hans Sloane gave his collection to King George II to share with England in exchange for a smaller amount of money for his daughters. This STER. . A way, Sloane’s collection would be preserved and others would get M E IN WAY Y ACKLdecided L N A B the chance to appreciate it as much as he did. Parliament to A N DI NOT UCEthe S building I D T O I collect money through a public lottery for a called R . E REP GHTEDin 1759 Band I R O Y T P British Museum. The museum opened has amassed K CO OO S I B K S I O H T many more collections. international artifacts, such FORhouses PLE BO IVItENnow M A S G Egypt. This stone contains writing in IS as the Stone THRosetta NOTfrom S I N ISSIO and ancient Greek. By studying this stone, scholars hieroglyphics PERM were able to translate the decrees written on it. This helped them learn more about deciphering hieroglyphics.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The British Museum is still free today, so even students and thrifty tourists can stop in for a little while to browse through its impressive contents. There are guidebooks in many different languages, so international travelers can learn just as much as native English speakers can. The objects in the museum’s current collection were donated or bought from other museums worldwide.

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Special exhibits sometimes go on tour around the world and make a stop at the British Museum. The building itself is very impressive. It has a huge covered courtyard and a reading room in the center. All the materials stored in the museum help scholars such as archeologists and historians gather more research for their studies. Museums offer people of all different backgrounds a chance to educate themselves. They are also a means for people to share some of the most beautiful pieces of art. People, no matter their education or background, can feel a common connection to the exhibits, as well as learn more about themselves and other cultures. Museums can be seen as one of the great examples of sharing collections, instead of competing to see who can get the most pieces of artwork.

3

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Read this sentence from the article “A Collection to Share.” In addition to schools and books, making art more accessible helped people learn about their country’s creative traditions and history.

TER.

S Explain how the author supports this statement. Use detailsLIfrom E MAthe N AY. W K C Y A L N article to support your answer. D IN A OT A B E IT IS N REPRODUC . D E T YRIGH OOK TO BE P O C OK IS OR THIS B O B E L EN F AMP V S I G S I T H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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Planning Page You may PLAN your writing for question 4 here if you wish, but do NOT write your final answer on this page. Your writing on this Planning Page will NOT count toward your final score. Write your final answer on Pages 32 and 33.

Answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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4

Write an essay in which you describe the benefits of working together as artists and art collectors. In the essay, include your opinion of whether the artist or the person who appreciates art is more important and why. Use details from both the story and the article to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to • describe the benefits of working together as artists and art collectors • include your opinion of whether the artist or the person who appreciates art is more important and why • use details from both the story and the article to support your answer Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

PAGE 32 © RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

STOP PAGE 33 © RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Passage Set 3 Reading and Writing

D

irections You are going to read a poem called “The Mysterious Test” and an article called “What’s in a Dream? The History of Dream Interpretation.” You will answer questions 1 through 4 and write about what you have read. You may look back at the poem and the article as often as you like.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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The Mysterious Test by Anne Allowell

A massive test is placed in front of me and my palms start to sweat immediately. I cautiously flip through all the pages— it looks as if this test will take ages! Before I can select an answer choice, the teacher announces in a blunt voice, “Pencils down please! Turn your tests in to me.” I find this all completely baffling.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Before I find a moment to complain, I think I hear someone calling my name. I turn around and the world seems to shift— I’m in the jungle with an elephant. As I try to fathom my current state, the elephant starts to communicate. He says what I seek is under my nose, but before he could finish I arose.

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H I sit and ponder my dream— E BO FOR T PLfantastic N M E A V S I T G mean? HIS could I wonder, TWhat itNO possibly S I N ISSIOto start the day. I’m finally ready PERM I try to get up, but something’s in my way.

I fell asleep with a huge book on my chest. No wonder I didn’t get any rest! I instantly realize, with great dismay I must take my zoology exam today!

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1

Complete the chart below to describe one of the symbols in the speaker’s dream and explain what you think it means. Use details from the poem “The Mysterious Test” to support your answer. Symbol in the speaker’s dream

2

The symbol’s meaning

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Circle the word below that you think best describes the speaker in “The Mysterious Test.”

unprepared

confused

imaginative

STER. . A M E Explain your choice using details from the poem. ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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WHAT’S IN A DREAM? THE HISTORY OF DREAM INTERPRETATION E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 by Robert S. Black

For centuries, people have questioned why human beings dream, and for almost as long, others have tried to interpret their nightly visions. Dream interpretation is a practice that dates back to Ancient Greece. Dreams were often considered messages from STER. . A the gods. Dream interpreters would help people understand the M E WAY KLIN wished. Y LACgods N A B meaning of their dreams so that they might doTasA the N O C ED I Uwith S Ncure I D T O I The Greeks also built dream temples to help people R . HTED TO BE REP Ggods I R Y P illnesses. They believed Sthat the would CO OOK send people who slept I B K S I O H T BO cures they in these temples through a dream. Once a FOR needed PLE the N M E A V S I person THISawoke,IaS dream NOT G interpreter would help analyze the dream N ISSIO to find PERM a solution to the medical problem. Dreams were taken so seriously by the Greeks that generals would take dream interpreters with them into battle. They believed that understanding a dream might enable them to defeat their enemies. In Ancient Egypt, priests often served as dream interpreters. Those that had especially vivid dreams were thought to be gifted and might possibly have the ability to predict future events. The Egyptians also believed that dreams were divine messages from the gods. On the advice of interpreters, kings and other leaders would make important decisions about where to build temples and when to go to war.

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Dream interpretation was largely ignored throughout the Middle Ages and beyond. It was revived at the end of the nineteenth century when a doctor named Sigmund Freud published The Interpretation of Dreams. The doctor called dreams “the royal road to the unconscious.” He believed that dreams help people better understand themselves. Instead of asking someone else to interpret the dream, Freud believed that the dreamer’s own thoughts on the vision would provide the most insight. A friend of Freud, Carl Jung, believed that paying close attention to your dreams could help you achieve your goals. Jung also felt that dreams were very personal and only the dreamer knew what they really meant. Today, many different books offer explanations of dreams. Usually these texts suggest that the images in our dreams carry some sort of symbolic meaning. One of the most common dreams that people have is one where the dreamer looses a tooth. Don’t worry too much about your teeth falling out in real life if you have this dream. Dream interpreters say that this usually means that the dreamer is worried about embarrassing him or herself. Other common dreams include flying, taking a test, and traveling to a new place. Experts feel that people have similar dreams because human beings share common worries, concerns, and hopes.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E LIN If you’re interested in interpreting your dreams, it AisCKsuggested WAY Y L N A B A N T shouldUwrite that you keep a dream journal near your bed. C ED I S NOYou I D T O I R . P down everything you can recall about GHTED yourTOdream BE REimmediately I R Y P K O have about ninety IS CO that after waking up. ItOisOK believed you S BOonly I H T B R FO MPLE secondsSto your once you’re awake. This will EN dreams Aremember V S I G I T H O T N help you to recognize patterns in your dreams and see how they N IS O I S S I M R E P correspond to your waking life. Remembering your dreams and examining them might help you to better understand your own concerns and hopes for the future.

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3

Based on information in the article “What’s in a Dream? The History of Dream Interpretation,” explain how dream interpretation has changed over time. Use details from the article to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

Go On PAGE 39 © RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Planning Page You may PLAN your writing for question 4 here if you wish, but do NOT write your final answer on this page. Your writing on this Planning Page will NOT count toward your final score. Write your final answer on Pages 41 and 42.

Answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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4

Write an essay in which you describe the attitudes of both authors toward dream interpretation. Explain how their attitudes are similar. Use details from both the poem and article to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to include • a description of the attitudes of both authors toward dream interpretation • an explanation of how their attitudes are similar • details from both the poem and article to support your answer

Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

Go On PAGE 41 © RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

STOP PAGE 42 © RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.


Passage Set 4 Reading and Writing

D

irections You are going to read an article called “Forging Friendships for Life” and a story called “Letters from Lica.” You will answer questions 1 through 4 and write about what you have read. You may look back at the article and the story as often as you like.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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Forging Friendships for Life:

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America by Dillon Reinhardt In 1902, a journalist named Ernest Coulter began to notice that an increasing number of children were moving through the court system of New York. He realized that these children were not getting the guidance and support that they needed to live successful, healthy lives. Coulter began his quest to assist these children by helping to organize New York’s first Children’s Court. This court would allow officials to more closely examine the cases of these troubled children and to address their individual issues and needs. Coulter became a clerk in this court under Judge Julius M. Mayer. Two years later, in 1904, Coulter and Mayer started STER. . A M recruiting volunteers to act as role models for these children. The E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B Big Brothers movement was born. A D OT

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

E IT IS N REPRODUC . D E T By 1916, Big Brothers groups in cities across GH BE Oninety-six YRIappeared T P K O O C O B a group of women called the United States. O Around OK IS theORsame HIS time, T B E L F EN work with the girls coming through the Ladies Iof AMP began GIVto T H S SCharity O T N New York Children’s Court. This group later became the Big Sisters N IS O I S S I M R E organization. In 1917, these two groups came together as the Big P Brothers and Big Sisters Federation, which would later become Big Brothers Big Sisters of America.

Big Brothers Big Sisters has evolved through the years. Today, the organization benefits many different types of children rather than just those who are in trouble. The organization’s aim is to keep kids on the right path by providing them with role models who will spend time with them. Volunteers also strive to provide children with new, interesting experiences that will add to their development as well-rounded people. Role-model volunteers are referred to as “Bigs,” while young people in the organization are called “Littles.”

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The organization does not accept just anyone as a volunteer. Potential Bigs must undergo a thorough screening process before becoming a volunteer. Candidates are interviewed and reviewed to make sure that they are an appropriate match for the program. The organization talks to their friends and family to find out more about the candidate’s background and life. Finally, acceptable candidates are trained and matched with a child whom the organization feels they are well suited. The idea is to create a match that will result in a lifetime friendship. This process provides both Bigs and Littles the opportunity to meet and spend time with someone who they most likely would not have met outside of the organization. Bigs devote one hour a week to spending time with their Littles, either in school, after school, or on the weekend. Activities include walking in the park, playing a game, sightseeing, working on a project, going to a show or sporting event, playing basketball or tennis, watching a movie, enjoying a meal, or just spending time talking and laughing. What is valuable about this program is not so much the activity, but more the general time spent together. Bigs and Littles often come from very different worlds and therefore have much to offer each other. They can teach each other things just by spending time together. Bigs can also encourage Littles to make good choices and to pursue their dreams. R.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

MASTE AY. E N I L CK makes Gaining the attention of a caring, supportive adult ANY W BLAoften A N I T D O N haveOacted a difference in children’s lives. Littles who DUCE out as IT ISmight R . P D E E T R H a cry for attention are no longer to OdoBEso once they gain YRIGinclined T P K O O C O S B improvement in family the friendship of BaOBig. often OK ILittles HIS show T R E O L F N Littles also show academic progress AMP and peer relationships asEwell. THIS S IS NOT GIV once theySIstart to spend time with Bigs, even if Bigs don’t study or IS ON M R E doPhomework with their Littles. The friendship and guidance Bigs provide can greatly influence the lives of their Littles. Bigs also benefit from the company of their Littles and from the knowledge that reaching out can make a difference.

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1

Circle the word below that you think best describes Big Brothers and Big Sisters volunteers.

noble

caring

dedicated

Explain your choice using details from the article.

2

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E N explain Based on information in the article “Forging Friendships for WAY Y ACKLILife,” L N A B A N how having a relationship with a Big Brother orNBig DI OT Sister has UCEimproved S I D T O I R . Pyour answer. children’s lives. Use details from the article GHTED to Tsupport BE RE I R O Y P K K IS CO R THIS BOO O O B AMPLE T GIVEN FO S S I H T IS NO N O I S IS PERM

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L ETTERS

FROM

LICA

by Kira West When I get home from school, I pour a glass of juice and grab the pile of mail on the kitchen counter. Junk, junk, bill, junk, bill, “Hailey Altman.” Woohoo! I got it! I’ve been waiting for a return letter from my pen pal, Alice Aida da Silva-Correa, who lives in Brazil. We’ve been pen pals for two years now. Her friends and I call her “Lica,” for short. In one of her first letters, she included a tape so I could hear her voice. She pronounces her first name “Ah-leece.” Her nickname, Lica, is pronounced “Lee-ka.” She explained that names get quite long and complicated in Brazil. Kids have several given names, or first names, and combinations of family surnames, or last names, passed down from generation to generation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

I can’t wait to get her letters. They’re always full of stories about her and her classmates and friends back home. Lica speaks Portuguese, as nearly all Brazilians do. She also has been learningTER. AS EM N I AY. English since she was in grade school. We usually write back and L W K C Y A L N T A BwordsUCinED IN A Onew forth in English, but she’s always teachingISme N T . I that EI would PRODnot know if D E E T R Portuguese. Lica teaches me lots of things H G B PYRI K TO shares O O C O S I B we had never started writing letters. She also her feelings OK HIS O T B R E O L F MP that I canN tell Lica anything. She has become one with me. I know HIS SA IS NOT GIVE T of my bestIO friends. N

ISS PERM

I write to Lica about stuff that happens at school and about my traveling soccer team. Of course, she calls soccer “football,” which is a huge sport in Brazil. Lica also writes about swimming and going to the beach with her family. I send pictures of my new baby sister, Annette, and she complains about her annoying little brother, Roberto. Lica also has a fifteen-year-old brother named Carlos. Lica and her brother go to the City of Sao Paulo to go to school. They travel about an hour to get to their apartment, where they stay with a nanny during the

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week. They go to a private school in the city and then return to their hometown and parents for the weekend. Alice’s parents are both doctors and own a small hospital in their town. The letter that arrived today begins, “My dear Hailey, I’m sending you a funny picture of Roberto getting licked by our German shepherd, Sebastiao.” Lica has included pictures of her little brother playing with Sebastiao in the backyard. Lica thinks it’s funny that we keep our dog Max in the house. In Brazil, many people own dogs, but they’re kept in enclosures outdoors. Lica writes that she is looking forward to Mardi Gras, which is still five months away. Mardi Gras is a big festival with parades, music, and colorful costumes. In Brazil, it seems that they spend the entire year preparing for Mardi Gras. Lica and her friends are working on their costumes already. When the costumes are finished, they will be covered with beads, feathers, and sequins. Lica and her family and friends will travel to Rio de Janeiro to watch the huge parade and join in the celebration.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

In Brazil, girls traditionally have a large party on their fifteenth birthday. I wrote to Lica and explained that in America, turning sixteen years old is a big deal. In Brazil, the Festa de Quinze Años STER. . A (fifteenth birthday party), is a big tradition for some families. Some M E WAY CKLINdancing Y Aand L N A B families rent ballrooms and provide food, live music, A N OT ED I UCinto S Nyoung I D T O I for their guests. It’s a party held to Tintroduce ladies R . P IGH ED K TO BE RE society as young adults.S COPYR OO

OK I HIS B O T B R E O L F P EN to teach high school math when I get AMbelieve LicaIcan’t I want TH S S IS NOT GIV out of school. ISSION She says math makes her head hurt. I know she’s M R E P at math, though. She sent me a copy of her school report. good

Lica wants to be a doctor like her mother and father. Lica has a long school day and does several hours of homework a night. It’s hard to get into universities in Brazil, and Lica has to work hard to be prepared for entrance exams. Lica says she’s lucky to go to her school in Sao Paulo. Many children in Brazil don’t go to school at all. She says that I should come to Sao Paulo to teach math. I am so glad that Lica and I started writing letters to each other. If we hadn’t, we never would have met because she lives so far away. Now I think of her as one of my best friends. I’ve learned so much from Lica. She says she’s

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learned a lot about my home in New York and about America from my letters and the photos I sent. I’d like Lica to come to the United States to visit someday. Until then, though, I know we’ll keep in touch. I think we’ll be friends for the rest of our lives.

3

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

In the chart below, name two reasons Hailey is glad that Lica is her pen R. pal. Then describe Hailey’s explanations for these reasons. MASTE

AY. LINE W K C Y A L N OT A B DUCED IN A N Why Hailey likes having S I T PRO shows it TED. I OHow REHailey H Lica as a pen pal E G B I R COPY IS BOOK T S I K O BO R TH E O L F P N M E A THIS S IS NOT GIV SION S I M R E 1. P

2.

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Planning Page You may PLAN your writing for question 4 here if you wish, but do NOT write your final answer on this page. Your writing on this Planning Page will NOT count toward your final score. Write your final answer on Pages 51 and 52.

Answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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4

Write an essay in which you describe the relationship between Bigs and Littles in “Forging Friendships for Life,” and the relationship between pen pals in “Letters from Lica.” In the essay, include your opinion of which relationship might have the greater impact on someone’s life and why. Use details from both the article and the story to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to • describe the relationship between Bigs and Littles and the relationship between pen pals • include your opinion of which relationship would impact someone more and why • use details from both the article and the story to support your answer Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N ISSIO PERM


E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED TO BE RE I R Y P CO OOK S I B K S I O H PLE BO IVEN FOR T M A S THIS NOT G S I N SIO Paired Passages is designed ERMIS to prepare students to read and P answer questions on paired passages. A paired passage is one literary and one informational passage that share a common theme. Open-ended comprehension questions are then asked about both passages combined. Part 1: Practice with Shorter Passages Part 2: Practice with Full-Length Passages Reading comprehension practice using the reading skills students used in Part 1 with full-length passages. Paired Passages can be used as instruction and practice with your students.


Paired Passages G1 SAMPLE