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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STER. . A M E ACKLIN IN ANY WAY L B A S NOT PRODUCED I T I . GHTED BE RE I R O Y T P K O K IS C R THIS BOO O O B N FO MPLE E A V S I G S I T TH IS NO N O I S IS PERM


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Focus on NY ELA Skills for Reading Comprehension, Grammar, Listening, & Writing

………….. NY ELA Test Success Series Grade Levels 3–8 The NY Test Success Series consist of 4 books to focus on specific skills on the NY ELA Test. Each title is purchased separately. • •

NY Higher-Order Thinking and Reading Skills Long reading passages with higher-order thinking questions NY Listening Literary and informational listening passages (read by the teacher) with multiplechoice and extended-response questions NY Grammar, Punctuation, & Word Usage Skill review and multiple-choice practice assessments and extended-response questions NY Reading and Writing Reading passages with short- and extended-response questions NYC Contract NYSTL/FAMIS Approved NYC Vendor #RAL-040000 NYC Contract #7000-617

Price 30-pack: $208 Higher-Order NY Thinking & Grammar Reading

NY Reading NY & Writing Listening

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Reading and Writing • Level E

Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The New York English Language Arts (ELA) Tests NY ELA Reading/Writing Tests

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Part 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Part 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Directions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NY Performance Indicators Correlated to RALLY!’s Reading Comprehension Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part 1: Practice with Shorter Passages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Part 2: Independent Practice

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Executive Editor: Amy Collins Design Director: Jean-Paul Vest Editor: Shelley Wake The New York State Education Department has neither endorsed nor authorized this practice test booklet. ISBN 978-1-4204-5598-4 R 5598-4 Copyright ©2011 RALLY! EDUCATION. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced in any form by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the copyright owner. Printed in the U.S.A. 1010.MAQ RALLY! EDUCATION • 22 Railroad Avenue, Glen Head, NY 11545 • (888) 99-RALLY

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Reading and Writing • Level E

Introduction The New York English Language Arts (ELA) Tests Test Success Series: Reading and Writing prepares students for the NY ELA Tests. The tests are used to measure how well students are learning the New York State Learning Standards. The ELA Tests assess standards for reading, listening, and writing.

NY ELA Reading/Writing Tests The NY ELA Tests include a Reading/Writing section. In this section, students read several passages and answer short-response questions. Students then answer an extended-response question that requires using information from two passages. This section assesses how well students understand the passages and how well they complete the writing task.

Part 1

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Part 1 provides practice in answering short-response and extended-response questions. Students complete two practice sets. Each set contains two short passages. Each short passage is followed by a short-response question. Students then answer an extendedresponse question about both passages.

Part 2

Part 2 provides additional practice in answering short-response and extended-response questions. Students read several pairs of longer passages. Students answer short-response questions about each passage, and one extended-response question about each pair of passages.

Directions Test Success Series: Reading and Writing includes space for students to write their answers. Students may look back at the passages as often as they like. Students are scored on how well they answer the question, how clearly they express their ideas, and how correctly they use grammar, spelling, punctuation, and paragraphs. Students should plan and check their writing.

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Reading and Writing • Level E

Grade 5 NY Performance Indicators Correlated to RALLY!’s Reading Comprehension Skills Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. R5-1-a: Locate and use school and public library resources, with some direction, to acquire information

Not Applicable

R5-1-b: Use the table of contents and indexes to locate information

1 Facts and Details 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences

R5-1-c: Read to collect and interpret data, facts, and ideas from multiple sources

1 3 6 7

R5-1-d: Read the steps in a procedure in order to accomplish a task, such as completing a science experiment

1 Facts and Details 3 Sequence

R5-1-e: Skim material to gain an overview of content or locate specific information

1 Facts and Details 2 Main Idea

R5-1-f: Use text features, such as headings, captions, and titles, to understand and interpret informational texts

1 Facts and Details 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences

R5-1-g: Recognize organizational formats to assist in comprehension of informational texts

3 Sequence 10 Draw Conclusions 13 Literary Forms and Sources

R5-1-h: Identify missing information and irrelevant information

7 Compare and Contrast 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences 14 Prior Knowledge

R5-1-i: Distinguish between fact and opinion

8 Distinguish Fact from Opinion

R5-1-j: Identify information that is implied rather than stated

10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences

Facts and Details Sequence Cause and Effect Compare and Contrast

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Reading and Writing • Level E

R5-1-k: Compare and contrast information on one topic from multiple sources

7 Compare and Contrast

R5-1-l: Recognize how new information is related to prior knowledge or experience

1 Facts and Details 7 Compare and Contrast 14 Prior Knowledge

R5-1-m: Identify main ideas and supporting details in informational texts to distinguish relevant and irrelevant information

1 Facts and Details 2 Main Idea

R5-1-n: Make inferences and draw conclusions, on the basis of information from the text, with assistance

10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Standard 2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. R5-2-a: Read, view, and interpret literary texts from a variety of genres

1 Facts and Details 5 Character, Plot, and Setting 6 Cause and Effect 7 Compare and Contrast 9 Prediction 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences 13 Literary Forms and Sources

R5-2-b: Define characteristics of different genres

13 Literary Forms and Sources

R5-2-c: Select literary texts on the basis of personal needs and interests and read silently for enjoyment for extended periods

Not Applicable

R5-2-d: Not Applicable Read aloud from a variety of genres; for example, read the lines of a play or recite a poem R5-2-d1: Use inflection and intonation appropriate to text read and audience

Not Applicable

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Reading and Writing • Level E

R5-2-e: Recognize that the same story can be told in different genres, such as novels, poems, or plays, with assistance

10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences 13 Literary Forms and Sources

R5-2-f: Identify literary elements, such as setting, plot, and character, of different genres

4 Language and Vocabulary 5 Character, Plot, and Setting 6 Cause and Effect 10 Draw Conclusions

R5-2-g: Recognize how the author uses literary devices, such as simile, metaphor, and personification, to create meaning

4 Language and Vocabulary 7 Compare and Contrast

R5-2-h: Recognize how different authors treat similar themes

5 Character, Plot, and Setting 7 Compare and Contrast 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences 12 Point of View and Purpose

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

R5-2-i: Identify the ways in which characters change and develop throughout a story

5 Character, Plot, and Setting 6 Cause and Effect 7 Compare and Contrast 9 Prediction 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences

R5-2-j: Compare characters in literature to people in own lives

5 Character, Plot, and Setting 7 Compare and Contrast 14 Prior Knowledge

R5-2-k: Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words by using context clues, a dictionary, or a glossary

4 Language and Vocabulary

Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. R5-3-a1: Evaluate information, ideas, opinions, and themes in texts by identifying a central idea and supporting details

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1 Facts and Details 2 Main Idea 5 Character, Plot, and Setting 6 Cause and Effect 7 Compare and Contrast 9 Prediction 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences

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Reading and Writing • Level E

R5-3-a2: Evaluate information, ideas, opinions, and themes in texts by identifying details that are primary and those that are less important

1 Facts and Details 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences

R5-3-a3: Evaluate information, ideas, opinions, and themes in texts by identifying statements of fact, opinion, and exaggeration

8 Distinguish Fact from Opinion 10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences 12 Point of View and Purpose

R5-3-a4: Evaluate information, ideas, opinions, and themes in texts by identifying missing or unclear information

10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences 14 Prior Knowledge

R5-3-b: Use established criteria to analyze the quality of information in text

10 Draw Conclusions 11 Make Inferences

R5-3-c: Identify different perspectives, such as social, cultural, ethnic, and historical, on an issue presented in one or more than one text

7 Compare and Contrast 12 Point of View and Purpose

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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PRACTICE WITH SHORTER PASSAGES

Part 1: Practice with Shorter Passages Practice Set 1 Buzz couldn’t believe his eyes. Only a few inches of glass separated him from a hammerhead shark! He had read many books about the sharks, but he never thought he would see one up close. Buzz studied the hammerhead’s giant body. He thought it must have been about ten feet long. The shark’s wide head swayed from side to side in the water. Its mouth hung open. Buzz could see the animal’s sharp teeth. It looked like he could reach out and touch the shark. The hammerhead didn’t seem to notice Buzz, though. It swam alone through the large tank. Buzz followed the animal as it swam along the glass. Suddenly, the shark turned toward the glass and looked right at him! Buzz’s eyes grew wide as he stared into the shark’s face. Then, the shark quickly turned away. It swam into the dark blue water and out of sight. Amazed, Buzz sat down on a bench near the exit of the aquarium to take it all in.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Buzz is amazed after seeing a hammerhead shark at the aquarium. Explain why Buzz was amazed. Use details from the story to support your answer.

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PRACTICE WITH SHORTER PASSAGES Hammerhead sharks are some of the most interesting-looking creatures in the deep. These animals get their name from their wide, flat heads. Their oddly shaped heads help them to find food. Their eyes are set far apart on opposite sides of their heads. This allows the sharks to see more. Their wide heads also have organs that help them discover food that is hard to find. Hammerhead sharks have very sharp teeth. There are at least nine types of hammerhead sharks. The great hammerhead is the largest type. Hammerheads are usually eleven feet long, but there was once a great hammerhead that was twenty feet long! On average, hammerhead sharks live to be about twenty to thirty years old. These sharks usually swim in warm waters. In the summer, though, they swim to cooler waters. Hammerhead sharks usually swim alone. Other sharks stay away from them because hammerheads sometimes feed on other sharks. Hammerheads also hunt stingrays and other fish. Most hammerheads do not hurt humans.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Complete the chart by identifying two parts of a hammerhead shark’s body that help it and by describing how these body parts are helpful. THE BODY OF A HAMMERHEAD SHARK

Body Part

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How the Body Part Helps the Shark

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PRACTICE WITH SHORTER PASSAGES

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Think about how the story and the article both describe hammerhead sharks. Write an essay in which you tell how the story and the article say similar things about hammerhead sharks. Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to • tell how the passages say similar things about hammerhead sharks • include details from both passages to support your answer Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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PRACTICE WITH SHORTER PASSAGES

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Go On 12

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PRACTICE WITH SHORTER PASSAGES

Practice Set 2 When people think of France, they usually think of one building. This building is one of the best-known symbols in the world. The Eiffel Tower is a symbol of Paris and of France. The Eiffel Tower was finished in 1889. It was built to honor the French Revolution. There was a contest to design the building. Gustave Eiffel’s design was chosen among 700 entries. Construction on the building started in 1887. The tower took 300 steel workers two years to complete. From 1889 to 1930 the Eiffel Tower was the largest building in the world. The tower was a great achievement. At first, people in Paris did not like the tower. They thought it did not fit in with their city. Over time, however, the tower became one of the most famous places in France. Stairs and an elevator make it possible for people to travel to the first and second levels of the tower. Today, many people visit the tower so they can see a great symbol of France.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Use details from the article to support the opinion that the Eiffel Tower is a great achievement.

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PRACTICE WITH SHORTER PASSAGES Ellie loved learning about other places. She and her parents often made foods from new and different places. A member of her family would choose a country to study for a week. They would read books and watch TV programs about that country. Then, at the end of the week, they made a meal from the country. One week, Ellie’s mother chose to study France. Ellie was excited. She did not know much about France, but she wanted to learn more. The thing Ellie thought about most often when she thought of France was the Eiffel Tower. Ellie found a few articles about the Eiffel Tower and other things France is known for. Ellie found out that the workers finished the Eiffel Tower in 1889. At first, people in Paris did not like the building. Ellie learned that the country is also famous for its fashion, food, and drink. She learned that French cooking is known around the world. Ellie couldn’t wait to make dinner with her family. Finally, on Friday night, Ellie and her family made a fantastic French dinner.

2

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The author says, “Ellie loved learning about other places.” How is what Ellie’s family does to learn about other places similar to and different from what an average person might do? Use details from the story to support your answer.

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PRACTICE WITH SHORTER PASSAGES

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Think about how the article and the story both describe France and the Eiffel Tower. Write an essay in which you tell how reading these passages might encourage a reader to visit France and the Eiffel Tower. Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to • tell how reading the passages might encourage a reader to visit France and the Eiffel Tower • include details from both passages to support your answer Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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PRACTICE WITH SHORTER PASSAGES

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STOP 16

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Part 2: Independent Practice Directions: Read each selection and answer the questions that follow it. Then use both selections to answer the last question. You may look back at the passages as often as you like.

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FAQ

Links

Page 1 | 2

Renaissance Means “Rebirth”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The period of time known as the Renaissance began in Italy during the 15th and 16th centuries. The name “Renaissance” is a French word meaning “rebirth.” The Renaissance was an important point in history, and marked the end of Medieval times and the beginning of Modern times.

But what made the Renaissance stand out as a time of great change? One of the greatest changes was in the way man viewed himself. The middle classes were now reading more than ever, and educating themselves to be businessmen. For example, in order to do business with different kinds of people they had to speak different languages and learn arithmetic. There was also a focus on the art, literature, and philosophy of Greece and Rome, as many Greek and Roman texts were now being translated into languages such as French, Spanish, and Italian. Before the Renaissance, educating the young focused on spiritual development. The teaching of literature, philosophy, and art was a major difference in the Renaissance, and one that was responsible for man’s new view of himself. This “new view” is called “humanism.” Humanism is the idea that mankind is independent in this world. In other words, the Renaissance celebrated mankind and all he/she could do here on Earth. This was a sharp contrast to Medieval thought, which followed the idea that man was put on Earth to prepare himself for heaven.

Science changed, too, as more scientists conducted experiments and looked hard at nature and the world around them. Before the Renaissance, monks copied books by hand. During the Renaissance a man named Gutenburg invented the printing press. As a result, many more books were available to many more people. In the world of art, artists found a way to apply mathematics to draw pictures in perspective. Drawing in perspective means that an artist can draw a building, for example, and the building will look three-dimensional, or 3-D.

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FAQ

Links

Page 1 | 2

You might already know many names of artists, writers, and scientists from the Renaissance. Here is a list of a few:

1) Leonardo da Vinci: Born in 1452 in the small town of Anchiano, which was close to Vinci, Italy. He was a master painter and a master scientist. He was also a sculptor, musician, engineer, and inventor. He is probably the most famous person from the Renaissance period.

2) Michelangelo Buonarroti: Born in 1475 in Italy. He was a sculptor, painter, and poet. He is best known for his larger than life sculptures, such as the Pieta (Jesus and his mother, Mary, 1499), and the David (1501-1504). His masterwork is the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel painted between 1508 and 1512.

3) Galileo Galilei: Born in Pisa, Italy on February 15, 1564. He was a master scientist. Among his great inventions was the invention of the telescope. He also is famous for discovering that all objects, both heavy and light, fall at the same rate of speed.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

4) William Shakespeare: Born in Stratford-upon-Avon, England in 1564. He wrote plays and poems. His plays and poetry have greatly influenced the English language. Some of his most important and popular plays are: Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, King Lear, Romeo and Juliet, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

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1

The chart below summarizes information about important people from the Renaissance. Complete the chart using details from the website. Name

Born

What He Was Known For

Leonardo da Vinci

Michelangelo Buonarroti

Galileo Galilei

William Shakespeare

2

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

One change in the Renaissance was that people began to learn more. Give two reasons that people were able to learn more in the Renaissance. Use details from the website in your answer. 1.

2.

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THE RENAISSANCE COMES TO NEW JERSEY! by Blaire Morgan

My father is a Renaissance re-enactor. He travels around the country and performs as William Shakespeare. William Shakespeare was a poet and a writer of plays. He was born in England in 1564 in a town called Stratford-uponAvon. My father has acted in many of Shakespeare’s plays, even Hamlet. Hamlet is a very difficult role to play because the main character, Hamlet, is crazy, wise, and funny all in the same play. My father says it’s a very demanding role.

The knights used a long pole called a lance to try and knock each other off their horse. These knights don’t get hurt, though, because they are actors. They practice for long hours to learn how to ride and how to fall without getting injured.

There is also a Maypole Dance that is held in the morning. Maypole dances were usually held on May 1, and were practiced by many Renaissance people to welcome the spring. It is believed that the Maypole dance began in Rome to worship the goddess, Maia, a goddess of spring. Traditionally, young girls hold onto long ribbons and dance around a decorated pole. As they dance, they wind the ribbons around the pole. It’s wonderful to watch!

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

The Renaissance changed the history of our world. Without the Renaissance, many things would not be what they are today. For example, we would not have books if it weren’t for Johannes Gutenberg. He invented the printing press in 1450. This allowed many people to purchase inexpensive books. (By the way, the first book off the printing press was the Gutenberg Bible!)

At the New Jersey Renaissance Fair, there will be many fun things to enjoy. There will be a joust. A joust was a game played by knights to sharpen their fighting skills. Each knight rode a horse.

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There are many other things to do at the fair: there are jugglers, and Kings and Queens, and there is even a battle of knights at the end! So won’t you join my father and his friends for a day of fun—the Renaissance way! Hours: June 12th 11:00 a.m. —6:00 p.m. Admission: $12.00

&

13th,

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3

What is the author's main purpose for writing the article? How do you know this is the main purpose? Use details from the article to support your answer.

4

The author includes facts about the Renaissance in the article. Complete the chart below with three facts the author includes in the article.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Facts the Author Includes

1)

2)

3)

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Planning Page You may PLAN your writing for question 5 here if you wish, but do NOT write your final answer on this page. Your writing on this Planning Page will NOT count toward your final score. Write your final answer on Pages 23 and 24.

Answer

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5

Think about what you learned about the Renaissance on the website and in the article. Do you think the Renaissance would have been an exciting time to live? What do you think would have been most interesting about living during the Renaissance? Use details from both the website and the article to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to • explain whether or not you think the Renaissance would have been an exciting time to live • describe what would have been most interesting about living during the Renaissance • give details to support your opinions • use details from both the website and the article to support your answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Go On 24

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Directions: Read each selection and answer the questions that follow it. Then use both selections to answer the last question. You may look back at the passages as often as you like.

FAQ-Soil:What Is It? So, You Want To Know the Dirt on Soil…

Q: What is soil? A: Soils are composed of four major groups of materials: 1) minerals 2) organic matter (rotting leaves, insects, and animals) 3) soil water (water found in the soil) 4) soil air (air found in the soil).

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Q: Why is soil important? A: Soil is important because it anchors trees and plants. However, more importantly, everything around you is produced by soil. The food you eat, the clothes you wear, the house you live in, are all produced by soil. How is this possible? The food you eat is fed by soil. Plants like the tomato and the corn plant need minerals from the soil. The clothes you wear are made of natural fibers, such as cotton. The cotton plant is nourished by the soil. The unnatural fibers that make up your clothes are produced with oil from the soil! And, of course, the house you live in is made of wood or some kind of rock, and rocks are the “parent materials” of soil!

Q: What is a “parent material”? A: A parent material is the main source from which a soil comes from. For example: rocks are the parent materials of soil. Small particles of rock are worn away by wind and water. These particles contain minerals found in the rock, but now the particles have become soil.

Q: What does a plant need to live? A: Like most living things, plants need three basic things to live: food, water, and air. All green plants make their food by photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is a process by which a plant produces food using the energy of sunlight, carbon dioxide from the air, and water from the soil. However, they also need food from the soil. Minerals and rotting material break up in water and are taken up by the plant’s roots. The three most important minerals for a plant are nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium.

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Q: What is pH? A: pH measures the amount of acid or base found in something. The pH of a soil is very important when determining the health of a soil. A soil that has too much acid in it is not good for plants. The acid in the soil can disturb how a plant gets food. An example of something acid would be lemon juice. An example of something base would be seawater. Things that have a basic content are also called “alkaline.” The pH scale ranges from 1 to 14 with 7 being in the middle or “neutral.” An example of something neutral would be pure water, so it would have a pH of 7. Acid things have a pH between 1 and 7. Basic things have a pH between 7 and 14. See the scale below:

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Light Blooming Requirements Flower Color period

Soil type

large shrub small tree

sun

creamy white to creamy yellow spikes

adaptable

Roemer Acacia

large shrub small tree

sun

greenish white spring to creamy white, globeshaped flowers

Red Maple

medium to large tree

sun

red

spring, winter acid

Una de Gato

large shrub small tree

sun

white spikes

spring

alkaline

Red Buckeye

large shrub small tree

part sun, shade

red

spring

acid/adaptable

River Birch

medium to large tree

sun

males produce spring brownish catkins

acid

Pawpaw

small tree

sun or part sun

brownish red

spring

acid

White Shin Oak

large shrub small tree

sun

red

spring

alkaline

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Name:

Plant size:

Catclaw Acacia

spring, summer, fall

alkaline

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6

Why is soil important to plants? Use details from the website to support your answer.

7

The website describes how soil is given a number on the pH scale. What does the number on the pH scale tell you about the soil? Use details from the website in your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Planting Trees On Saturday morning Lilith attended a garden club meeting. After listening carefully to the head of the meeting, she wondered what kind of trees she could plant in her yard. Her yard was awfully flat and she thought the addition of some trees would help perk it up. At the meeting she was handed a list of trees native to Texas. She had just moved to Texas and wanted to honor her new home state. She thought she might like to plant some of the Texas trees in her yard. But what kind? She remembered the head of the meeting—her name was Nancy—said that soil was very important when determining what kind of plants to put together. For example: you wouldn’t put plants that liked “acid” soil with plants that liked “alkaline” soil. “Alkaline” or “basic” soil is soil that has a pH over 7. Lilith took her pH testing kit and tested the soil. She used litmus paper to test the pH of the soil. She learned from her garden club that litmus paper was a special type of paper containing a chemical that would tell her the pH of her soil. Depending on the color of the paper—yellow/yellow green for acid and blue for basic or alkaline—she could tell what trees would work together nicely. After testing the soil, she found that the soil around her house tended to be acidic. She consulted the tree chart that was given out at the meeting and chose which trees she would plant in her yard.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Spring Garden Club Meeting – June 1st Texas Native Trees

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Flower Color

Blooming Period

sun

creamy white to creamy yellow spikes

spring, summer, fall

adaptable

large shrub small tree

sun

greenish white to creamy white, globe-shaped flowers

spring

alkaline

Red Maple

medium to large tree

sun

red

spring, winter

acid

Una de Gato

large shrub small tree

sun

white spikes

spring

alkaline

Red Buckeye

large shrub small tree

part sun, shade

red

spring

acid/ adaptable

River Birch

medium to large tree

sun

males produce brownish catkins

spring

acid

Pawpaw

small tree

sun or part sun

brownish red

spring

acid

White Shin Oak

large shrub small tree

sun

red

spring

alkaline

Name:

Plant Size:

Catclaw Acacia

large shrub small tree

Roemer Acacia

Light Requirements

Soil Type

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8

After testing the soil, which types of trees did Lilith most likely choose? Use details from the story to support your answer.

9

Below are two words that describe Lilith. Circle the one word that best describes her.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 careful

thoughtful

Give two examples from the story to support your choice. 1.

2.

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Planning Page You may PLAN your writing for question 10 here if you wish, but do NOT write your final answer on this page. Your writing on this Planning Page will NOT count toward your final score. Write your final answer on Pages 31 and 32.

Answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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10

Think about Lilith in "Planting Trees." Explain how the information on the website would be helpful to Lilith. How could Lilith use the information to help with her planting? Use details from both the website and the story in your answer. In your answer, be sure to • explain what Lilith considers before choosing which trees to plant • describe how Lilith could use the information on the website to help with her planting • use details from both the website and the story to support your answer

Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Go On 32

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Directions: Read each selection and answer the questions that follow it. Then use both selections to answer the last question. You may look back at the passages as often as you like.

A young man shows kindness to an injured animal. As a reward, the bird seeks to help the man, but the man still has some important lessons to learn.

The Peaceful Husband adapted from Japanese folktale “The Crane Wife”

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8 Long ago, a poor man lived in a small hut at the edge of the woods. One afternoon, the man was walking home. He heard a strange cry. He followed the sound and found an injured crane lying at the edge of the road. An arrow was sticking through its wing. The young man’s heart went out to the crane. He knelt and gently pulled the arrow from the crane’s wing. The crane slowly rose and flew away. That night, the young man heard a knock at his door. To his surprise, a beautiful young woman stood there. She explained that she was lost and begged to enter. She soon fell asleep by the fire. In the morning, and for many days afterward, she rose and helped the young man around the little hut. They talked and laughed and became quite fond of each other.

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Soon, the young couple was married. Though they had few material things, they were content. Winter came and the food from their garden was dwindling. The young woman asked her husband to make a small loom in the tiny room at the back of the hut. When the young man finished the loom, his wife shooed him out of the room. Before she started weaving, she made him promise not to enter the room while she weaved. He agreed and went in search of firewood. When he returned, she came out of the tiny room with a small piece of beautiful cloth. He was amazed at her artwork. As he took the cloth to town, he dreamed of the money he’d get. He returned home with rice and tea and sugar. He was glad to have food on the table. Shortly, he asked his wife to make another cloth, although she was still quite tired and they had plenty of food. All he talked about now was the money they could get from her weaving.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Finally, she agreed. Before she closed the door to weave another cloth, she reminded the young man not to peek. But a few days later, the young man grew impatient and pushed the door open. The door to the room swung open and revealed not his wife, but a crane sitting at the loom pulling out its own feathers to weave a cloth. When the startled bird saw the man, it instantly changed into the young bride. She explained to the dazed young man that she was the crane he had saved. She had come to repay his kindness. She had given much of herself. She had only wanted to weave enough cloth to provide food until the next harvest. However, the young man wanted more than they needed. Now that her husband was no longer peaceful, she must flee. She changed from his beautiful bride back into a crane, and flew away.

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11 Complete the chart below by identifying two things that the young man does in the story and by describing how those actions influence the story. WHAT THE YOUNG MAN DOES Action

How the Action Influences the Story

12 At the end of the story, the wife says that her husband is no longer peaceful. How is her husband different at the end of the story from how he is at the beginning of the story? Use details from the story to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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Origami is a special kind of art that uses folded paper to create shapes and figures. People have made many beautiful paper animals and flowers with this unique art form.

Modern Origami by Gerry Olenstein

Origami is an art form made most often with folded paper using no glue, tape, or scissors. It is a very old art that most likely began in Japan. The first kind of paper folding in Japan wasn’t an art form at all. It was used for key papers, such as certificates for tea ceremony masters. The paper was folded in such a way that it could not be copied. Another type of folded paper was noshi, which was tied to a gift to send good wishes.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L L Y L L RA A R . 9 9 . 8 8 8

Many years later, paper folding as an art form began in Japan. Mothers taught daughters how to fold simple animals and flowers. Nothing was written down on paper. When paper folding began in Japan, it was known by many names, including orikata, which meant “folded shapes.” The word origami was used in 1880 and came from the Japanese words oru (to fold) and kami (paper).

Paper folding was not just done in Japan. In northern Africa, people learned the art of paper folding. They created many beautiful designs during the 8th century. They taught the Spanish and, later in the 16th and 17th centuries, European birth certificates were folded into special shapes. In the 1800s, children in Germany were taught to fold paper objects in kindergarten. Eventually, this type of kindergarten lesson was used in Japan. Many folded paper designs changed shapes and names throughout the years. In the past, people changed their folds to put new twists on their designs. Today, many people follow a pattern of written directions. These directions use lines and arrows. The directions can be followed by people all over the world.

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Some origami is based on math models. Pattern makers start with a series of folds. The paper is then unfolded to show the creases. Computers are used to make models before the piece of paper is folded. Another type of origami shows off a different side of paper folding. These pieces aren’t figures of birds or fish, or other forms that people would know. They are pieces of art that are quite different. Many artists make their own paper. Other artists dye their own paper to get the colors they want. Some origami artists use the paper, color, and design to create original works of art. Other paper folders produce origami in the shape of flowers, birds, animals, and insects. They take great care to make sure the paper creations look very real. These are made in the same way as pieces made hundreds of years ago. The most recent paper creation to catch the world’s attention is the origami crane, but origami artists have been making cranes for a long time because the crane is used as the global sign for peace. Cranes often represent peace in fables and folk tales. In 1960, the origami crane was tied to the world peace movement. In the year 2000, the International Peace Project began to draw people together to work for peace and kindness around the world. The sign of the peace plan was an origami crane.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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13 Origami is an art form that can be used to create many beautiful things, but it is also a simple art that does not allow the artist much freedom. Describe what about origami allows artists to be creative and what about origami holds artists back. Use details from the article to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

14 What was the purpose of paper folding in Japan before it became an art form? Use details from the article to support your answer.

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Planning Page You may PLAN your writing for question 15 here if you wish, but do NOT write your final answer on this page. Your writing on this Planning Page will NOT count toward your final score. Write your final answer on Pages 40 and 41.

Answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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15

Think about what “The Peaceful Husband” and “Modern Origami” tell about cranes. Write an essay in which you tell how these passages say similar things about cranes. Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to • tell what similar things these passages say about cranes • include details from both passages to support your answer

Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Go On © RALLY! EDUCATION. NO PART OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER.

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Directions: Read each selection and answer the questions that follow it. Then use both selections to answer the last question. You may look back at the passages as often as you like.

THE LIFE OF A VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER by Leslie Stone

When I decided to become a volunteer firefighter, I had no idea how much time, commitment, and hard work it would be. Now that I’ve been a volunteer for several years, however, I wouldn’t think twice about joining all over again.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

Being a volunteer firefighter takes a true commitment. The job requires a lot of time and hard work. At times, it can be dangerous. However, it is also a way to give back to the community, learn about teamwork, make friends, help people, and feel good about oneself. Firefighting is a lot more than putting out fires. Our company responds to almost any disaster that occurs in the community. If a family’s basement floods during a rainstorm, we help them pump the water out. If mud and rocks wash out part of a road, we close it so people don’t get hurt. If strong winds knock over trees, we cut them up and clear them away. When we are not doing work in the community, we stay busy at the fire station. We never stop checking our fire gear to make sure it’s safe. We check hoses for signs of wear. We fill air packs in case we have to use them at a fire. In addition, we check helmets and other gear for cracks, holes, and other problems. All of this equipment is expensive so we try to keep it in the best shape possible. We also hold many events throughout the year to raise money. Because we are a volunteer organization, we rely on the community to help us stay in business. Among our many events are a hoagie sale, a spaghetti dinner, and a door-to-door collection. Each of these events takes careful planning and hard work to be a success.

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Because firefighting can be dangerous, our station places great importance on safety. Each new member must take a basic training class. This class teaches new members how to correctly wear the protective gear, how to tie knots, how to safely use ladders, and of course, how to use hoses to put out a fire. In addition, we do team-building and trust-building exercises. At the scene of a fire, everyone must work together. No one from our department enters a building without a partner. As a volunteer, I must be prepared to go to a disaster scene at any moment. When the fire tones ring, I go. I have missed many special times with my family and many nights of sleep because of my volunteer work. Even so, the feeling I get after I help a family or stop a fire from damaging a house makes it all worthwhile.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

16 In the chart below, describe two advantages and two disadvantages of being a volunteer firefighter. Use details from the article in your answer. BEING A VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER

Advantages

Disadvantages

1.

1.

2.

2.

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17 Use details from the article “The Life of a Volunteer Firefighter” to support the opinion that a volunteer firefighter must make a big commitment to the fire company.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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TYRIE’S GREAT IDEA by A. Portnoy Tyrie and his father walked up the sidewalk toward their apartment building. Each carried groceries in his arms. As they walked, Tyrie looked around. First, they passed the public park. It had a bike path, nature trails, and a duck pond. It was a beautiful place to spend a Saturday afternoon. Then, they passed the public library. Tyrie and his friends often studied there after school. Later, they passed Public Square. It had park benches, picnic tables, a fountain, and a playground. Many local businesspeople ate lunch in the park, and many children played there. They also passed the local fire and police departments. Tyrie knew that they kept the community safe.

E L P N O M I A T S A C U D E ! Y Y L L L L A A R R . 9 9 . 8 8 8

“Hey, Dad, who runs the library, the parks, and the fire and police departments?” asked Tyrie. “The mayor and other members of the city council, I suppose,” said Tyrie’s dad. “Why do you ask?” “Well, the city gives us so many things. I just thought it would be nice to give something back,” said Tyrie. “Well, you could volunteer your time to city projects,” said Tyrie’s dad. “Volunteering is a great way to show pride in your hometown while also helping others.” Tyrie was quiet for the rest of the walk home. He wondered how he could help the city. After all, he was only one eleven-year-old boy. How much could he possibly do?

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That night, Tyrie looked around his room. His eyes fell on the large piles of old books that no longer fit on his stuffed bookshelves. Tyrie wondered if the library would take his old books. Suddenly, he jumped off his bed and threw his hands in the air: “That’s it!” he cried. Tyrie talked to his father, and then quickly called his friends. He invited them to his apartment for a meeting the next day. When they arrived, he shared his brilliant idea with them. They all loved it and agreed to help him. A few weeks later, Tyrie could hardly believe his eyes when he looked around his school’s cafeteria. Cardboard boxes filled with books lined the tables and chairs. His classmates had collected hundreds of children’s books to give to the library. The head librarian, Mr. Johnson, shook Tyrie’s hand.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

“Excellent job, Tyrie,” he said. “I know that the young children at the library will really enjoy these books.” “That reminds me,” said Tyrie. “The books are not the only thing we plan to give to the library. We also plan to give our time.” “What do you mean?” asked Mr. Johnson.

“With your permission, my classmates and I would like to volunteer to read to the children during story hour at the library. It will let us practice speaking in front of people and help young kids learn to read,” explained Tyrie. “That sounds like an excellent idea to me,” said Mr. Johnson. Tyrie smiled. The book collection had been a lot of work, and he knew that volunteering would take away some of his free time. Even so, he couldn’t help but feel good about doing something to make his community a better place.

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18 Tyrie’s idea to help the library is good for the community, but it is also good for him and his classmates. Describe some ways Tyrie’s idea is good for the community and some ways it is good for him and his classmates. Use details from the story to support your answer.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

19 Do you think Tyrie will continue to find ways to help the community? Use details from the story to support your answer.

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Planning Page You may PLAN your writing for question 20 here if you wish, but do NOT write your final answer on this page. Your writing on this Planning Page will NOT count toward your final score. Write your final answer on Pages 49 and 50.

Answer

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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20

Think about how “The Life of a Volunteer Firefighter” and “Tyrie’s Great Idea” both describe different ways to volunteer in a community. Write an essay in which you tell how reading these passages might encourage a reader to volunteer in his or her own community. Use details from both passages to support your answer. In your answer, be sure to • tell how reading the passages might encourage a reader to volunteer in his or her community • include details from both passages to support your answer Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

STOP 50

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P SAM ATION C U D E ! Y L RAL 99.RALLY . 8 8 8

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E L P M SA N O I T A C U D E ! Y L L Y L A L R A R . 9 9 . 888

TER. S A M KLINE ANY WAY. C A L B NOT A ODUCED IN S I T I EPR ED. R T H E G B I COPYR IS BOOK TO S I K LE BOO VEN FOR TH P M A THIS S IS NOT GI ISSION PERM

ISBN 978-1-4204-5598-4


NYC-Reading-E