Page 1


Housing First Model as an Evidence-Based Model: The At Home / Chez Soi Project in Canada Tim Aubry, Ph.D., C.Psych Professor, School of Psychology, University of Ottawa Habitat International Conference Madrid, Spain October 2, 2015


Overview of Presentation 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

/2

Canadian context Overview of Housing First At Home / Chez Soi study design Quantitative research findings Economic research findings Qualitative research findings Fidelity research findings Scaling up Housing First in Canada


Homelessness and Mental Illness  Homelessness is a significant social problem in Canada (Estimates of 235,000 individuals per year)

 Prevalence of mental illness and substance abuse/dependence is high and associated with poorer outcomes  Higher use of health, criminal and social services

/5


Canadian Drivers of Homelessness 1. 2.

3. 4.

/6

Social conditions leading to unpreparedness for the labor market (e.g., high rates of functional illiteracy) Federal disengagement from low-income housing in 1990s + rising private-market rents Modest (often declining in real terms) disability and welfare benefits Provincial services mostly focused on two systems: • Emergency shelters that are beginning to evolve • Health and social services not specifically designed for homeless people


At Home/Chez Soi Demonstration Project  2008 federal budget allocated $110 million over 5 years to the Mental Health Commission of Canada  Action research on how to support people with severe mental illness to exit homelessness  85% funding into services and 15% into research  Largest study of its kind in the world

/7


Research on Interventions for Homeless People with SMI • Best approach in the literature to help people achieve stable housing is “Pathways - Housing First” (Tsemberis & Eisenberg, 2000; Tsemberis, Gulcur, & Nakae, 2004; Tsemberis, 2010)

/8


Overview of Housing First

/9


Level of independence

Permanent housing Transitional housing Shelter placement

Homeless

Treatment compliance + psychiatric stability + abstinence

/ 10


Housing First Approach

Subsidized Housing

/ 11

+

Support (ACT or ICM)


Characteristics of Housing

• No pre-conditions for housing • • • •

/ 12

Scattered site private market units Maximum of 30% of income for rent Participants hold their own lease Rights and responsibilities as a tenant


Types of Support Services Assertive Community Treatment (ACT): ACT • Multi-disciplinary team / wrap around service • Services and crisis coverage are available 24/7 • Staff to client ratio of 1:10 Intensive Case Management teams (ICM): • Case managers with individual caseloads • Outreach and coordination with other services • Teams available 12 hours per day • Staff to client ratio of 1:15

/ 13


Logic Model of Housing First

Housing First

/ 14

Engagement + Stable Housing + Health and Social Services

Recovery = Functioning + Community Integration + Quality of Life


At Home / Chez Soi Study Design

/ 15


16


Design of Study (Goering et al., 2012)  Pragmatic, multi-site, randomized, mixed methods field trial in five sites across Canada (Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montreal, & Moncton)  Investigation of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Housing First in Canadian contexts  Two fidelity assessments & two implementation evaluations  Model being tested with support at two levels of intensity (high needs = ACT) (moderate needs = ICM) vs. usual care

/ 17


/ 18


Who is in At Home/Chez Soi? • 2148 participants • 1158 in Housing First (HF) • 990 in Treatment as Usual (TAU)

• Primarily middle-aged • 32% of participants are women • 22% of participants identified as being an Aboriginal person •

Typical total time homeless in participants’ lifetimes is nearly 5 years

• All have one or more serious mental health issue

• Majority have a concurrent disorder • More than 90% had at least one chronic physical health problem

/ 19


Quantitative Research Findings

/ 20


Housing First is Effective in Cities of Different Sizes and Composition Across Canada

Vancouver Pop: 578, 000

Moncton Pop: 107,000

Montreal Pop: 1,621,000

Winnipeg Pop: 633, 000 Toronto Pop: 2,503,000


Housing First Achieves Similar Housing Outcomes for Moderate and High Need Participants Percentage of time housed

/ 22

(Stergiopoulos et al., 2015; Aubry et al., 2015)


A Higher % of HF Participants Stably Housed All the Time in Last 6 Months of the Study 70% 60%

50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Housed all of the time

Housed some of the time

Housing First / 23

TAU

Housed none of the time


Greater Improvements in Community Functioning for HF Participants

• Average post BL differences are SIG for both ICM and ACT • Group (ICM & ACT) X Time interaction SIG at 18 mos. but not 24 mos. / 24


Greater Improvements in Quality of Life for HF Participants

• Average post BL differences are SIG for both ICM and ACT • Group (ICM) X Time interaction SIG over 24 mos. • Group (ACT) X Time interaction SIG at 18 mos. but not 24 mos. / 25


Similar Improvements in Health Outcomes for Both Groups • Both groups report improvements in: • Substance use • Mental health • Both groups maintained their physical health

/ 26


Economic Research Findings

/ 27


Cost Offset Findings (Ly & Latimer, in press) Cost Analysis: HF with ACT • HF ACT costs $22K CAD ($14.8K EUR) per person per year • Average net cost offset of $21.4K CAD (96%) per person. • $10 CAD invested in HF with ACT saved $9.60 CAD

Cost Analysis: HF with ICM • HF ICM costs $14K CAD ($9.4K EUR) per person per year • Average net cost offset of $4.8K CAD (34%) per person. • $10 CAD invested in HF with ICM saved $3.42 CAD

/ 28


Cost Offset Analysis – based on Service Use (High Users) $10 CAD invested in HF for TOP DECILE group : Average savings of $21.72 CAD 250.000 $ 200.000 $ 150.000 $

HF

100.000 $

50.000 $ -$

TD-TAU

TD-HF Baseline

TD – Top Decile

/ 29

TD-TAU

TD-HF

0M to 21/24M


Cost Analysis – based on Service Use (High Users) Major cost offsets are hospitals, home visits, jail/prison office visits Hospital Home visits Office visits Hospital (Psychiatric) (non-study) Jail/prison (non-study) (Physical)

$5.000

$0

$(5.000)

$(10.000)

$(15.000)

$(20.000)

/ 30

Contacts with the police

ER Visits

Crisis housing

SRO (w support)

Psychiatric residential program


Qualitative Research Findings

/ 31


Qualitative Findings: Consumer Narratives • N=197 at 18-months, 10% of the total sample • Participants interviewed at baseline and 18-months • 13 life domains re: changes – e.g., typical day, education, work, housing • Each interview coded for life changes – (Kappa=.77 for inter-rater reliability)

/ 32


Consumer Narratives: Coding Examples • Positive life change – “This is the first time, you know, that I’ve had a home… And, this is the first place like I… feel like I love to go home…I feel so safe. And…being safe is a major issue for me, you know?” • Mixed/neutral life change – “That’s what life is, cause it’s just like I said, like picking up, losing it all, picking up, losing it all, picking up, losing it all.” • Negative life change – “They discharged me to a hotel. I left the next day. It was noisy, bug-infested, full of drugs.”

/ 33


Comparison of HF & TAU Life Changes (Nelson et al., 2015) Housing First

Treatment As Usual

100 80 60 40 20 0

100 80 60 40 20 0

Mantel Haenszel χ2=28.5, df=1, p=.0000001 / 34


Fidelity Research Findings

/ 35


Why is Housing First Fidelity Important? • Fidelity matters because it is related to outcomes. The greater the fidelity, the better the outcomes of Housing First (Davidson et al., 2014; Gilmer et al., 2014; Goering et al., in press)

/ 36


Fidelity Standards for Housing First Approach Fidelity Domains

Description

Housing Choice and Structure

Standards focusing on the provision of housing to consumers (e.g., housing choice, housing availability, integrated housing)

Separation of Housing and Services

Standards focusing on the relationship between housing and support provided by program (e.g., no housing readiness, standard tenant agreement, commitment to re-house)

Service Philosophy

Standards focusing on the principles and values guiding the delivery of services (e.g., service choice, harm reduction, assertive engagement, person-centered planning)

Service Array

Standards focusing on range of services available to consumers (e.g., psychiatric services, integrated substance abuse treatment, nursing services, supported employment services)

Program Structure

Standards focusing on service delivery characteristics (e.g., frequency of contact with participants, participant / staff ratio, team approach, peer specialist on staff)

/ 37


Housing Availability Item – Anchors • •

All items are rated on a 4-point scale 4 =high fidelity; 1 = low fidelity

• 1. 2. 3. 4.

/ 38

Extent to which program helps participants move quickly into units of their choosing. Less than 55% of program participants move into a unit of their choosing within 6 weeks of having a housing subsidy 55-69% of program participants move into a unit of their choosing within 6 weeks of having a housing subsidy 70-84% of program participants move into a unit of their choosing within 6 weeks of having a housing subsidy 85% of program participants move into a unit of their choosing within 6 weeks of having a housing subsidy


Fidelity Findings (Nelson et al., 2013; Macnaughton et al., 2015) • Overall, strong fidelity to the Housing first model • Improvement on fidelity standards

 71% rated above 3 (4-pt.scale) at 9-13 months (M = 3 .47)  78% rated above 3 at 24-29 months (M = 3.62)

• Variation at individual program level and by service delivery

type (e.g., more challenges for ICM regarding service array domain)

 Staff expertise, partnerships, leadership facilitated fidelity  Staff turnover, rehousing, isolation, limited vocational /

educational supports impeded housing impeded fidelity

/ 39


Relationship of Fidelity to Program Processes and Participant Outcomes (Goering et al., in press) • Higher fidelity in the in the 12 programs (5 ACT, 7 ICM) was related to greater direct and indirect service time and more contacts with participants (corr. = .55 to .60) • Higher fidelity was associated with greater housing stability (% of time in housing) (OR = 1.11) and larger improvement in quality of life (d = .10) and community functioning (d = .11) over the course of the study

/ 40


Scaling Up Housing First in Canada

/ 41


42


Knowledge Synthesis and Translation • Peer-reviewed publications • Reports and summaries written in accessible language and readily available on the web • National Film Board – Here at Home, including short videos featuring participants • Canadian Housing First Toolkit (2014), http://www.housingfirsttoolkit.ca/

/ 43


Canadian Housing First Toolkit – Homepage

/ 44 modules are visible above in the home screen and the top menu The


Overview Module – Key Questions

/ 45


Technical Support and Delivery System • Support system – Training and technical assistance (TTA) consultation provided by Pathways to Housing National (Sam Tsemberis), funded by the Mental Health Commission of Canada • Delivery system – 61 Canadian communities receive HPS funding; shift to Housing First approach; in the 10 largest communities, > 60% to Housing First / 46


Early Response to Scaling Up in Canada • Some initial resistance and questioning of the Housing First model that accompanied the shift in HPS funding • Challenges experienced bringing together stakeholders who have not previously partnered with one another, especially mental health and housing sectors • Considerable interest in forming regional Housing First networks to support Housing First implementation

/ 47


Redesigning the System: Housing First Approach Permanent housing (scatter-site, off site services) Permanent Single Site (on-site services) Community-based, Residential Treatment (on-site clinical staff) Longer term Institutional Care

Least restrictive to more restrictive setting


http://www.mentalhealthcommission.ca


Acknowledgements The national At Home/Chez Soi project team: Jayne Barker, PhD, (2008-11), Cameron Keller (2011-14), and Catharine Hume (2014-present) MHCC National Project Leads; Paula Goering, RN, PhD, Research Lead, and over 50 investigators from across Canada and the US. In addition there were 5 site coordinators and numerous service and housing providers as well as persons with lived experience. This research has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada to the Mental Health Commission of Canada. The views expressed herein solely represent the authors.

/ 50


Contact: taubry@uottawa.ca

Visit: www.mentalhealthcommission.ca (for detailed information and reports)

Visit: www.nfb.hereathome.ca (for video short stories about the project and our participants)

Visit: www.housingfirsttoolkit.ca (for the Canadian Housing First Toolkit) / 51


Programa H谩bitat Alejandro L贸pez


รNDICE

1. Programa Hรกbitat 2. Las personas 3. El equipo 4. Las viviendas

5. Los resultados 6. El futuro 7. Contacto


1

El programa Hรกbitat


Programa Hábitat

El inicio del proyecto • Desde el 2012 empezamos a interesarnos por un modelo que se dirigía a las personas sinhogar en situación más extrema y en los resultados que obtenía. • Empezamos a conocer datos objetivos en cuanto al Mantenimiento de la Vivienda. En EEUU el 88% de las personas participantes en los programas mantienen la vivienda 5 años después. En las experiencias europeas el porcentaje de mantenimiento de la vivienda está entre el 80 y el 93% tras dos años. • Según el Departamento de Vivienda y Desarrollo Urbano de EE.UU (HUD) el número de personas sin hogar crónicas en las calles se redujo entre 2005 y 2007 en un 30 por ciento, esta reducción se vincula con el enfoque Housing First. • Desde 2011, la Comisión Europea impulsa pruebas piloto en cinco ciudades europeas: Ámsterdam, Budapest, Copenhague, Glasgow y Lisboa a través del proyecto Housing First Europe.


Programa Hรกbitat

Housing First frente a modelo tradicional


Programa Hábitat

Nuestro objetivo Contribuir con una experiencia española al desarrollo del movimiento internacional Housing First, mediante la demostración del valor añadido de las aproximaciones de este modelo en la cobertura de las necesidades de las personas sin hogar más excluidas y demostrar su eficiencia económica.


Programa Hábitat

Nuestro proyecto • Un programa innovador, pionero en España • Un programa internacional, basado en las evidencias de éxito del modelo en EEUU y que pretende estar enlazado con el movimiento HF que existe en Europa. • Un programa pensado para incidir sobre las personas sin hogar en situación más extrema. • Evaluación: el programa conlleva un proceso de evaluación riguroso que tratará de demostrar los mejores resultados de las personas que participen en él frente a las alternativas tradicionales. • Sostenibilidad: El modelo con un coste similar al servicio tradicional (staircase system) pretende conseguir resultados medibles en distintos ámbitos más efectivos, lo cual desde un enfoque global coste/beneficio lo hace extremadamente eficiente (permanencia en las viviendas, salud, servicios sociales, ámbito judicial)


Programa Hábitat

Perfil de las personas a las que dirigimos el programa • Mayores de 18 años. • Encontrarse en el momento actual en situación de sin techo, considerando como tal quienes se encuentren en un espacio público o exterior o en centros de acogida de emergencias (categorías 1 y 2 de ETHOS)

• Contar

con una dilatada trayectoria en esta situación,

considerando como tal:

que lleven un mínimo de tres años en la situación actual (categoría 1 ó 2 de ETHOS) y/o centros de acogida para personas sin hogar (categoría 3 de ETHOS). que lleven más de un año pernoctando de modo continuo en espacios públicos (categoría 1 de ETHOS) y/o en centros de acogida de emergencias (categoría 2 de ETHOS).

• Que tengan un problema de salud mental y/o adicciones y/o discapacidad, añadido a su situación de sinhogaismo.


Programa Hábitat

Proceso de derivación

• Ajustamos el proceso a cada ciudad. • Contacto con las entidades de las redes municipales (públicas y privadas) que mantienen contacto con las personas que cumplían con el perfil. • En Madrid: SAMUR Social, Centros de Día con servicio de comedor social Luz Casanova y Programa Integral SVP) y se informó a las entidades más representativas que trabajan en calle (Solidarios, Acción en Red y Bokatas). • En Barcelona: a través de los servicios municipales de atención a psh y con las entidades que trabajaban con el perfil (fundamentalmente el Centre d’Acollida ASSIS y Arrels Fundació). • En Málaga: con los servicios municipales de la Puerta única y el Centro de Acogida Municipal y con FAISEM, el Comedor Santo Domingo, Centro de Día y comedor San Juan de Dios.


Programa Hábitat

Que les ofrecemos a los participantes en el programa • La participación en Hábitat supone disfrutar de una vivienda unipersonal, así como de cobertura de necesidades básicas y apoyo del equipo. • No hay exigencia de cambio ni de participación en programas de inserción o tratamientos. Máximo respeto a las decisiones de las personas; se ofrece apoyo si deciden iniciar estos procesos, y deciden cuándo y cómo. • La participación en el proyecto no tiene fecha de finalización y no depende del cumplimiento de ningún objetivo.


Programa HĂĄbitat

Los 4 compromisos 1

2

Aceptar como mĂ­nimo una visita semanal del equipo

Aportar 30% de sus ingresos (en caso de contar con ellos

1

1

1

3 1

4

Mantener reglas bĂĄsicas de convivencia con los vecinos

1

Mantener una entrevista de evaluaciĂłn semestral


2

Las personas


Las personas

Inicio del proyecto para las personas beneficiarias • •

El 6 de agosto del 2014 se incorpora la primera persona al programa, en uno de los pisos de Madrid. Se realiza una incorporación un progresiva para dedicar el tiempo necesario a cada proceso de entrada. La última persona se incorpora el 27 de enero de 2015, en una de las viviendas de Barcelona.

Las principales claves que contribuyen al éxito del proceso de incorporación en el programa (de acuerdo con el modelo) son: 1. Aceptación radical del punto de vista de la persona 2. Diseñar servicios/apoyos que sean lo suficientemente flexibles para abordar las necesidades de las personas. 3. Eliminar los obstáculos que aparezcan, siempre que sea posible. 4. Asumir la responsabilidad de los apoyos, garantizando que todas las personas reciban los servicios que buscan y en el orden en que ellos los buscan.


Las personas

Perfil sociodemográfico Edad

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

La edad media 47,6 años. La persona más mayor tiene 68 años y el más joven 27 años.


Las personas

Perfil sociodemogrテ。fico PERFIL SOCIODEMOGRテ:ICO SEXO

Mujeres 18%

Hombres 82%


Las personas

Perfil sociodemográfico PERFIL SOCIODEMOGRÁFICO NACIONALIDAD

60,7% Española 39,3% Extranjera

11,6 años de media en España


Las personas

Datos de cumplimiento de perfil: estancia en calle y problemática añadida Problemática añadida a su situación de exclusión % de personas

89,3%

100,0%

80,0%

60,0%

35,7%

32,1%

40,0%

20,0%

0,0%

Tiene un problema de salud mental

Tiene una adicción

Tiene una discapacidad

Estancia en calle:

Media de estancia en calle: 9,7 años Media en Mad: 14,1 Media en Bca: 7,8 Media en Mlg: 5,2


3

El equipo


El equipo

Seis Principios 1

Las personas pueden recuperarse, reclamar y transformar sus vidas

2 Es importante centrarse en las fortalezas individuales

3

4

1

La comunidad es una fuente de recursos, no una barrera

La persona es quien dirige su propio proceso de ayuda

5

6 El principal espacio para intervenir, es la comunidad

1

1

La relaci贸n entre el cliente y el profesional es b谩sica y esencial

1

1

1


4

Las viviendas


Las viviendas

ASÍ NOS VEN NUESTROS USUARIOS Vivienda pública y/o privada

Obtención de viviendas tanto en el mercado privado de alquiler (Barcelona y la mayoría de Málaga) como en el mercado público (Madrid –a través del programa Viviendas solidarias EMVS, Ayto. de Madrid y 1 vivienda en Málaga-a través de la vivienda pública municipal). Integración en el entorno Todas integradas en comunidades de vecinos de barrios residenciales. A nombre de RAIS Fundación. Firmado acuerdo con cada una de las personas que garantizan sus derechos de disfrute de la vivienda.

. Equipamiento y suministros

Equipadas con todo lo necesario para su ocupación. Dificultades administrativas para la puesta en marcha


5

Los resultados


Resultados

Situación administrativa, sanitaria y económica % de personas 100,0%

80,0%

82,1% 17,9%

82,1%

82,1%

7,1% 28,6%

60,0%

71,4% 32,1%

40,0%

64,3%

75,0% 53,6% 39,3%

20,0%

0,0%

Está empadronada

Está empadronada en Tiene tarjeta sanitaria la ciudad que reside

Cuando entró en el programa

Evolución

Momento actual

Percibe alguna prestación


Resultados

Uso de recursos, relaciones sociales y familiares % de personas 100,0%

82,1% 80,0%

78,6% 14,3%

60,0%

57,1%

39,3%

53,6%

21,4% 40,0%

35,7%

64,3% 20,0%

42,9%

35,7%

17,9% 0,0%

Hace uso de los servicios sanitarios normalizados

Mantiene relaciones con el entorno

Cuando entrĂł en el programa

Mantiene relaciones "normalizadas" (comercio, vecinos/as,‌) Evolución

Momento actual

Mantiene relaciones con familiares


Resultados

Satisfacci贸n de las personas usuarias

Me encuentro satisfecho/a con este programa 4,0

96,0

Bastante de acuerdo

Totalmente de acuerdo

Puntuaciones medias por bloques 5,56

5,73

5,62

5,62

5,79

5,86


6

El futuro


El futuro

Líneas de futuro del programa Hábitat • En el desarrollo del propio programa: •

• • •

Desarrollo y aumento en las ciudades que estamos: Madrid, Málaga y Barcelona. Incorporación de nuevas ciudades. Incorporación de ciudades en Comunidades Autónomas distintas. Llegar a las 100 viviendas para el 2017

• En la evaluación • En el modelo •

Queremos seguir desarrollando el proyecto en las claves del modelo. Contribuyendo en el “movimiento Housing First en Europa”.


7

CONTACTO


Gracias por vuestra atenci贸n Contacto:

Alejandro L贸pez Subdirector General T茅cnico Coordinador del programa H谩bitat

@espadania alopez@raisfundacion.org www.raisfundacion.org


MetodologĂ­a de la evaluaciĂłn del impacto en las personas del Programa HĂĄbitat. Resultados de fidelidad al modelo Housing First Sonia Panadero Universidad Complutense de Madrid


Guión • Introducción • Objetivos de la evaluación • Propuesta metodológica ▫ Evaluación de resultados ▫ Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo


Guión • Introducción • Objetivos de la evaluación • Propuesta metodológica ▫ Evaluación de resultados ▫ Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo


Introducción La evaluación de programas proporciona criterios para la toma de decisiones… 1. Sobre la implementación de las políticas sociales e información para la justificación del gasto público. 2. Sobre la estructura y funcionamiento de los programas

MEJORAR LA ATENCIÓN


Introducción La evaluación ha acompañado al modelo Housing First y ha permitido su expansión

1. Evaluación de resultados 2. Evaluación de aspectos económicos 3. Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo


Introducción La evaluación ha acompañado al modelo Housing First y ha permitido su expansión

1. Evaluación de resultados


Evaluación de resultados • Situación de alojamiento (Tsemberis, Kent y Respress, 2012; Aubry y Nelson, 2014)

• Uso de alcohol y drogas (Padgett, Gulcur y Tsemberis, 2006; Tsemberis, Kent y Respress, 2012; Collis et al, 2012)

• • • • • •

Salud física y mental (Tai, Mares y Tsemberis, 2010; Pearson et al, 2009) Satisfacción con el programa (Tsemberis, et al, 2003) Calidad de vida (Bean, Safer y Glennon, 2013) Apoyo social (Thompson et al, 2004; Polvere, MacNaughton y Piat, 2013) Motivación al cambio (Collins, Malone y Larimer, 2012) Uso de recursos: ▫ De intervención en problemas de alcohol y drogas (Padgett et al, 2006) ▫ Sanitarios generales (Bean, Safer y Glennon, 2013) ▫ Del sistema judicial (Bean, Safer y Glennon, 2013)

• Ingresos hospitalarios de (generales y psiquiátricos) (Gulcur et al, 2003)


Introducción La evaluación ha acompañado al modelo Housing First y ha permitido su expansión

1. Evaluación de resultados 2. Evaluación de aspectos económicos (Gulcur et al, 2003; Tsemberis et al, 2004; Gilmer et al, 2010; Gilmer et al, 2009)


Introducción La evaluación ha acompañado al modelo Housing First y ha permitido su expansión

1. Evaluación de resultados 2. Evaluación de aspectos económicos 3. Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo (Guilmer, Stefancic, Sklar y Tsemberis, 2013; Watson et al, 2013)


Introducci贸n La evaluaci贸n ha acompa帽ado al modelo Housing First y ha permitido su expansi贸n

Proyecto Housing First Europe (Busch-Geertsema, 2013)


Guión • Introducción

• Objetivos de la evaluación • Propuesta metodológica ▫ Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo ▫ Evaluación de resultados


Objetivo general de la evaluación Conocer la utilidad y viabilidad en el contexto español de los modelos de Housing First en la población sin hogar con importantes dificultades añadidas (situación crónica, problemas de salud mental, discapacidad, problemas relacionados con el consumo de sustancias, etc.)


Objetivos específicos ▫ Conocer los resultados obtenidos por el programa en comparación con alternativas tradicionales de intervención con personas sin hogar. ▫ Identificar posibles dificultades o problemas durante la puesta en marcha y ejecución del programa así como posibles desviaciones del modelo original de intervención. ▫ Realizar una estimación de costes del programa frente a alternativas convencionales de tratamiento.


Guión • Introducción • Objetivos de la evaluación • Propuesta metodológica ▫ Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo ▫ Evaluación de resultados


Guión • Introducción • Objetivos de la evaluación • Propuesta metodológica ▫ Evaluación de resultados ▫ Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo


Objetivos específicos ▫ Conocer los resultados obtenidos por el programa en comparación con alternativas tradicionales de intervención con personas sin hogar. ▫ Identificar posibles dificultades o problemas durante la puesta en marcha y ejecución del programa así como posibles desviaciones del modelo original de intervención. ▫ Realizar una estimación de costes del programa frente a alternativas convencionales de tratamiento.


Objetivos específicos ▫ Conocer los resultados obtenidos por el programa en comparación con alternativas tradicionales de intervención con personas sin hogar.

EVALUACIÓN DE RESULTADOS


Metodología • Diseño experimental • Grupo de comparación equivalente Usuarios del programa Hábitat vs Alternativa tradicional de atención

• Asignación aleatoria • Medidas repetidas (cada 6 meses)

Social Experimentation. A methodological guide for policy makers (J-Pal Europe, 2011)


PROCESO DE DERIVACIÓN


PROCESO DE DERIVACIÓN

Participantes 1. Mayores de 18 años. 2. Encontrarse sin hogar (categoría 1 de ETHOS (FEANTSA, 2005)). 3. Mínimo de tres años sin hogar (categoría 1 y 2 de ETHOS) o más de un año pernoctando de modo continuo en la calle (sin utilizar los recursos de la red, excepto en emergencias). 4. Problema de salud mental, adicciones o discapacidad


PROCESO DE DERIVACIÓN

ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Procedimiento aleatorio estratificado proporcional en función del género (20% mujeres) por ciudad


ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Usuarios del programa Hábitat 1. Mayores de 18 años. 2. Encontrarse sin hogar (categoría 1 de ETHOS (FEANTSA, 2005)). 3. Mínimo de tres años sin hogar (categoría 1 y 2 de ETHOS) o más de un año pernoctando de modo continuo en la calle (sin utilizar los recursos de la red, excepto en emergencias). 4. Problema de salud mental, adicciones o discapacidad Personas que, tras asignación aleatoria, se incorporan al programa Hábitat


ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Usuarios del programa Hábitat TAMAÑO MUESTRAL Determinado por el número de plazas del programa Hábitat


ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Alternativa tradicional de atención 1. Mayores de 18 años. 2. Encontrarse sin hogar (categoría 1 de ETHOS (FEANTSA, 2005)). 3. Mínimo de tres años sin hogar (categoría 1 y 2 de ETHOS) o más de un año pernoctando de modo continuo en la calle (sin utilizar los recursos de la red, excepto en emergencias). 4. Problema de salud mental, adicciones o discapacidad

Aquellas personas que obtuvieron plaza en el programa a pesar de cumplir los requisitos para su incorporación al mismo, y quedan en lista de espera para su posible incorporación posterior


ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Alternativa tradicional de atención TAMAÑO MUESTRAL Determinado a partir de las experiencias previas de estudios longitudinales en personas sin hogar en España (Muñoz et al, 2003; Panadero, 2004) Usuarios del programa Hábitat x 2


PROCESO DE DERIVACIÓN

ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Usuarios Hábitat

28 personas - 7 no incorporadas

Asignación aleatoria + 7 personas

Alternativa tradicional de atención

56 personas - 2 fallecidas - 8 ilocalizables

Asignación aleatoria + 12 personas


PROCESO DE DERIVACIÓN

ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Usuarios Hábitat

28 personas

Alternativa tradicional de atención

56 personas - 2 fallecidas - 8 ilocalizables

- 7 no incorporadas

Asignación aleatoria + 7 personas

LÍNEA BASE

28 personas

Asignación aleatoria + 12 personas

58 personas


LÍNEA BASE

• Calidad y condiciones de vida. Distintos instrumentos ▫ Alojamiento. • Apoyo social. • Salud. Distintas fuentes de información • Uso de alcohol y otras sustancias. • Acceso y uso de recursos: ▫ sanitarios generales y especializados ▫ especializados en problemas de consumo de sustancias. ▫ sociales generales y específicos para personas sin hogar. ▫ del sistema legal. • Satisfacción con el programa. • Integración en la comunidad y conflictos. • Necesidades de apoyo. • Apoyo proporcionado.


LÍNEA BASE

• • • • •

• • • •

PARTICIPANTES Calidad y condiciones de vida. ENTREVISTA ESTRUCTURADA EuropAsi (Kokkevi y Hartgers, 1995) ▫ Alojamiento. GHQ-28 (Goldberg, 1996) Apoyo social. Qol (Lemanh, 1993) Salud. Encuesta de PSH (INE, 2012) Uso de alcohol y otras sustancias. Encuesta Nacional de Salud (INE, 1011-12) Acceso y uso de recursos: Encuesta Europea de Salud (INE, 2009)

▫ sanitarios generales y especializados ▫ especializados en problemas de consumo de sustancias. ▫ sociales generales y específicos para personas sin hogar. ▫ del sistema legal. Satisfacción con el programa. Integración en la comunidad y conflictos. Necesidades de apoyo. Apoyo proporcionado.


LÍNEA BASE

• Calidad y condiciones de vida. ▫ Alojamiento. • Apoyo social. • Salud. • Uso de alcohol y otras sustancias. • Acceso y uso de recursos: ▫ sanitarios generales y especializados ▫ especializados en problemas de consumo de sustancias. USUARIOS ▫ sociales generales y específicos para personasHÁBITAT sin hogar. CUESTIONARIO ANÓNIMO ▫ del sistema legal. Desarrollado por Rais Fundación • Satisfacción con el programa. Modelo SERVQUAL • Integración en la comunidad y conflictos. 24 items • Necesidades de apoyo. • Apoyo proporcionado.


LÍNEA BASE PROFESIONALES

• Calidad y condiciones de vida. CUESTIONARIO ▫ Alojamiento. GENCAT (Verdugo et al, 2008) • Apoyo social. • Salud. • Uso de alcohol y otras sustancias. • Acceso y uso de recursos: ▫ sanitarios generales y especializados ▫ especializados en problemas de consumo de sustancias. ▫ sociales generales y específicos para personas sin hogar. ▫ del sistema legal. • Satisfacción con el programa. • Integración en la comunidad y conflictos. • Necesidades de apoyo. • Apoyo proporcionado.


LÍNEA BASE

• Calidad y condiciones de vida. ▫ Alojamiento. • Apoyo social. • Salud. • Uso de alcohol y otras sustancias. • Acceso y uso de recursos: ▫ sanitarios generales y especializados ▫ especializados en problemas de consumo de sustancias. ▫ sociales generales y específicos para personas sin hogar. ▫ del sistema legal. • Satisfacción con el programa. PROFESIONALES • Integración en la comunidad y conflictos. HERRAMIENTA DE APOYOS • Necesidades de apoyo. • Apoyo proporcionado.


PROCESO DE DERIVACIÓN

ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Usuarios Hábitat

28 personas

Alternativa tradicional de atención

56 personas - 2 fallecidas - 8 ilocalizables

- 7 no incorporadas

Asignación aleatoria + 7 personas

LÍNEA BASE

28 personas

Asignación aleatoria + 12 personas

58 personas


LÍNEA BASE

ANÁLISIS DE LA EQUIVALENCIA DE LOS GRUPOS No se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre usuarios Hábitat y Alternativa tradicional de atención en: • • • • • •

Características sociodemográficas Calidad de vida Historia de la situación sin hogar Ingresos económicos Situación administrativa Uso de recursos


LÍNEA BASE

ANÁLISIS DE LA EQUIVALENCIA DE LOS GRUPOS Sólo se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre usuarios Hábitat y Alternativa tradicional de atención en algunas variables relacionadas con: • Apoyo social


LÍNEA BASE

n 27 14 6 12 14

96,4% 50,0% 22,2% 42,9% 50,0%

Alternativa tradicional de atención n 55 94,8% 29 50,0% 13 22,8% 26 45,6% 34 60,7%

17

63,0%

33

58,9%

,124

10

35,7%

34

60,7%

4,677*

Hábitat

Tiene familia Tiene hijos Tiene pareja Tiene amigos con hogar Tiene amigos/as sin hogar En este momento, ¿tiene usted alguien con el que poder hablar cuando se encuentra triste, agobiado, disgustado? En este momento, ¿tiene alguien con el que está seguro de poder contar en caso de apuro o de necesidad? ¿En qué medida se siente solo o abandonado? Nada Poco Bastante Mucho

2

,109 ,000 ,004 ,058 ,875

2,626

7 12 1 7

25,9% 44,4% 3,7% 25,9%

15 17 7 17

26,8% 30,4% 12,5% 30,4%


LÍNEA BASE

ANÁLISIS DE LA EQUIVALENCIA DE LOS GRUPOS Sólo se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre usuarios Hábitat y Alternativa tradicional de atención en tres variables relacionadas con: • Apoyo social • Historia laboral


LÍNEA BASE

Hábitat

Alternativa tradicional de atención

t

n

Media (dt)

n

Media (dt)

¿Cuánto tiempo hace de su último trabajo?

27

88,89 (64,189)

47

107,26 (117,633)

-,869

¿Cuánto duró el periodo más largo de empleo regular? (En meses)

26

126,31 (100,741)

47

165,98 (140,893)

-1,266

¿Cuánto duró el periodo más largo de desempleo? (En meses)

24

70,42 (39,388)

46

112,30 (115,231)

-2,229*


LÍNEA BASE

ANÁLISIS DE LA EQUIVALENCIA DE LOS GRUPOS Sólo se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre usuarios Hábitat y Alternativa tradicional de atención en tres variables relacionadas con: • Apoyo social • Historia laboral • Salud


LÍNEA BASE

Hábitat n

Alternativa tradicional de atención

t/2

n

Le ha dicho un médico que tiene usted alguna enfermedad grave o crónica

16

Puntuación total GHQ

24

Padece alguna discapacidad Tiene certificado de discapacidad En este momento considera que tiene un problema con el consumo de drogas En este momento, considera que tiene un problema con el consumo de alcohol En el último mes, ¿cuánto ha bebido habitualmente en un sólo día? (Media (dt)) En el último mes, ¿cuántos días ha tomado más de cinco bebidas alcohólicas en la misma ocasión? (Media (dt))

13 8

7,17 (5,61) 46,4% 80,0%

4

57,1%

17

30,4%

5,615*

24 13

8,57 (8,39) 42,9% 68,4%

14,3%

6

10,5%

,256

9

33,3%

11

19,3%

1,989

17

10,24 (11,627)

25

11,04 (10,990)

-,228

27

4,67 (10,795)

57

3,96 (9,874)

,295

44

-,822

,097 ,440


PROCESO DE DERIVACIÓN

ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Usuarios Hábitat

28 personas

Alternativa tradicional de atención

56 personas - 2 fallecidas - 8 ilocalizables

- 7 no incorporadas

Asignación aleatoria + 7 personas

LÍNEA BASE

28 personas

Asignación aleatoria + 12 personas

58 personas - 2 renuncias - 3 bajas - 3 fallecidas - 5 ilocalizables - 4 pasan a Hábitat


PROCESO DE DERIVACIÓN

ASIGNACIÓN ALEATORIA

Usuarios Hábitat

28 personas

Alternativa tradicional de atención

56 personas - 2 fallecidas - 8 ilocalizables

- 7 no incorporadas

Asignación aleatoria + 7 personas

Asignación aleatoria + 12 personas

LÍNEA BASE

28 personas

58 personas

6 MESES

28 personas

41 personas


Guión • Introducción • Objetivos de la evaluación • Propuesta metodológica ▫ Evaluación de resultados

▫ Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo


Objetivos específicos ▫ Conocer los resultados obtenidos por el programa en comparación con alternativas tradicionales de intervención con personas sin hogar. ▫ Identificar posibles dificultades o problemas durante la puesta en marcha y ejecución del programa así como posibles desviaciones del modelo original de intervención. ▫ Realizar una estimación de costes del programa frente a alternativas convencionales de tratamiento.


Objetivos específicos ▫ Conocer los resultados obtenidos por el programa en comparación con alternativas tradicionales de intervención con personas sin hogar. ▫ Identificar posibles dificultades o problemas durante la puesta en marcha y ejecución del programa así como posibles desviaciones del modelo original de intervención.

EVALUACIÓN DE LA FIDELIDAD AL MODELO


Metodología Adaptación de la metodología utilizada en diferentes programas de EEUU y Canadá (Aubry et al, 2012; Mcnaughton et al, 2015)

ESTUDIO PILOTO


Metodología Adaptación de la metodología utilizada en diferentes programas de EEUU y Canadá (Aubry et al, 2012; Mcnaughton et al, 2015)

Estrategias Cuantitativas → Cualitativas Determinar el ajuste al Modelo HF del programa Hábitat

Identificar barreras y facilitadores para la implementación del programa


Metodología Adaptación de la metodología utilizada en diferentes programas de EEUU y Canadá (Aubry et al, 2012; Mcnaughton et al, 2015)

Participantes Profesionales y responsables del programa


Metodología Estrategia cuantitativa Primeros pasos para la adaptación de una escala de fidelidad al modelo: Pathways HF Fidelity Scale (Stefancic et al. 2013) ▫ Número de ítems: 38. ▫ Escalas:  Proceso y estructura de alojamiento  Vivienda y servicios  Filosofía del servicio  Oferta de servicios  Estructura del equipo/recursos humanos


Metodología Estrategia cuantitativa Primeros pasos para la adaptación de una escala de fidelidad al modelo: Pathways HF Fidelity Scale (Stefancic et al. 2013)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Traducción de la escala Revisión Aplicación en las tres ciudades Revisión dudas de los profesionales Análisis de los resultados Revisión

Supervisión Dr. T. Aubry


Metodología Estrategia cualitativa 1. Entrevistas a los gerentes del programa Hábitat → Pauta de entrevista (Aubry et al, 2012) 2. Grupo de discusión con los gerentes del programa Hábitat


Resultados Análisis de los resultados de la escala + Revisión de las dificultades informadas por los profesionales + Entrevistas a responsables + Grupo de discusión

Ha permitido… Detectar dificultades con la versión inicial en español de la escala Necesidad de continuar trabajando


Resultados Análisis de los resultados de la escala + Revisión de las dificultades informadas por los profesionales + Entrevistas a responsables + Grupo de discusión

Ha permitido… Detectar diferencias entre las tres ciudades donde se ha implantado Hábitat → Diferencias de contexto, recursos y formas de trabajo


Resultados Análisis de los resultados de la escala + Revisión de las dificultades informadas por los profesionales + Entrevistas a responsables + Grupo de discusión

Ha permitido… Identificar un importante ajuste al modelo, especialmente en los aspectos de: Filosofía del servicio, Proceso y estructura de alojamiento y recursos humanos


Resultados 50

46

45 39

40 35

20 15

Puntuación Hábitat Puntuación máxima

30

29

30

25

41

32

25,67 20,33

22,67

25,33

10 5 0 Proceso y Vivenda y estructura de servicios alojamiento

Filosofía del servicio

Oferta de servicios

Recursos humanos


Resultados Análisis de los resultados de la escala + Revisión de las dificultades informadas por los profesionales + Entrevistas a responsables + Grupo de discusión

Ha permitido… Identificar posibles áreas de mejora


Conclusiones Evaluación de resultados: •Es factible realizar evaluaciones rigurosas en este contexto que proporcionen información relevante para la toma de decisiones sobre los mismos

Evaluación de la fidelidad al modelo: •Es necesario preguntarse por la implementación de estos programas y su ajuste al modelo original •Permite identificar áreas de mejora y líneas de trabajo •Es imprescindible comenzar a considerar este aspecto desde los primeros momentos


MetodologĂ­a de la evaluaciĂłn del impacto en las personas del Programa HĂĄbitat. Resultados de fidelidad al modelo Housing First Sonia Panadero Universidad Complutense de Madrid


Evaluaci贸n H谩bitat. Resultados en las personas Roberto BERNAD


Alojamiento. 100% de retención de la vivienda a los 6 meses 100%

3,6%

90%

10,7%

80%

7,1% 3,6% 3,6%

70%

1,7% 5,2% 6,9% 1,7% 5,2% 12,1%

10,7%

6,9%

60%

8,6%

10,7% 50%

100,0%

4,9% 2,4% 17,1% 7,3% 4,9% 4,9% 4,9% 12,2%

40% 30% 51,7%

50,0%

41,5%

20% 10% 0% M0

M6

HÁBITAT En la calle En un albergue para personas sin hogar Piso facilitado por una ONG Piso ocupado En un piso o casa alquilado En piso, habitación,… cedido/a gratuitamente En otro lugar (hospital, cárcel, etc.)

M0

M6

ALTERNATIVA TRADICIONAL DE ATENCIÓN En un centro de acogida de emergencia En espacios no adecuados para vivir Pensión pagada por una ONG En un piso o casa en propiedad En una habitación alquilada, pensión o similar En una chabola


Alojamiento. Satisfacción * (Datos estadísticamente significativos) • La mejora en la satisfacción con la situación de alojamiento es notable y rápida. • Las personas participantes señalan la importancia de tener un lugar propio y seguro desde el que poder avanzar en otras áreas

¿Qué opina acerca de las condiciones del sitio donde vive? (QoLI) 7

6,04 6 5

4

1 GH M0

6

5

5

3,69

GH M6

*

2,33

ATA M0

ATA M6

6,16

4

3,03 3

*

¿Qué opina acerca de la intimidad que tiene allí? (QoLI)

6

4

3,47

2

7

6,29

3,28

3

¿Qué opina acerca de las perspectivas de permanecer en ese sitio durante un largo periodo de tiempo? (QoLI) 7

3,68

3

3,75

3,94

ATA M0

ATA M6

2,72

2

2 1 GH M0

*

GH M6

*

1 ATA M0

ATA M6

GH M0

*

GH M6

*


Actividades de la vida cotidiana • Se reduce en mayor medida el % de personas que dejan de comer algún día en la última semana

Ha dejado de comer algún día (última semana) 53,6%

48,8% 43,1%

• Aumenta el % de personas que realizan algún hobby o afición 14,3%

• Aumenta su satisfacción con el uso de su tiempo libre

Hábitat *

¿Qué opina de la forma en que utiliza su tiempo libre? (QoLI)

M0

M6

Alternativa Tradicional de Atención

*

El mes pasado realizó algún hobby/afición

7

60,70% 6 5

5,22 4,26

41,40%

35,70%

4

35,00%

3 2 1

Hábitat M0

M6

*

Hábitat

* M0

M6

Alternativa Tradicional de Atención

*


Condiciones de vida. Apoyo social Frecuencia con la que estuvo con la familia*

• Aumenta frecuencia en las relaciones familiares y disminuyen las personas que nunca están con un miembro de la familia

100%

89,3%

80%

64,3%

60%

• Mejoría en sentimiento de soledad y en la seguridad de poder contar con alguien en caso de necesidad

40%

28,6%

20%

3,6%

0%

M0

*

Nunca

¿Tiene alguien con el que está seguro de poder contar en caso de apuro o de necesidad?

M6 Al menos una vez al mes

¿En qué medida se siente solo o abandonado? 100%

11,1% 7,4%

100%

32,1%

80% 60%

64,3%

80%

25,9%

3,7%

29,6%

60% 44,4% 40%

40% 20%

67,9%

51,9%

20%

35,7%

25,9% 0%

0%

M0

No

M6

MO

Nada

M6

Poco

Bastante

Mucho

*


Condiciones de vida. Seguridad Le han insultado o amenazado últimos 6 meses *

• Disminuye el número de insultos o amenazas.

35,70%

• Disminuye el sentimiento de discriminación. • Aumenta en mayor medida la percepción de seguridad.

7,10% M0

Percepción de Seguridad (QoLI) 7

5,9

6

Se ha sentido discriminado (últimos 6 meses) 100%

*

3,60%

7,10%

3,60%

17,90%

80%

25,00%

14,30%

5 4

*

M6

4,2

3,8

4,3

60%

17,90% 40%

3

67,90%

2

42,90%

20%

1

Hábitat

Alternativa Tradicional de Atención

M0

M6

0%

M0

Nunca

Algunas veces

M6

Muchas veces

Constantemente

Ns/Nc


Condiciones de vida. Fuente principal de ingresos El acceso a prestaciones (RMI, PNC) aumenta en los dos grupos, así como se reduce la mendicidad y/o las actividades marginales (chatarra, aparcacoches, etc.). ALTERNATIVA TRADICIONAL DE ATENCIÓN

HÁBITAT 100%

8,70%

100%

3,85%

12,50%

14,71%

23,08% 80%

80%

Otras fuentes

39,13%

23,53%

15,38% 60%

Empleo Beca Hábitat

40%

52,17%

57,69%

20%

Ingresos informales

60%

47,92%

40%

61,76% 20%

39,58%

Prestaciones 0%

0%

M0

M6

M0

M6


Condiciones de vida. Ingresos • Disminuye la cantidad de ingresos y la cuantía disponible para gastos personales. • Mejora la satisfacción con la situación económica en mayor medida que en grupo de control.

Cuantía de ingresos mensuales (€)

-12,36€

+48,87€

€373,31

€365,55

€360,95

€316,68

Satisfacción con la situación * económica (QoLI)

Hábitat

Alternativa Tradicional de Atención M0

M6

7 6

HÁBITAT

5 4 3

Dinero mensual para gastos personales

3,8 2,2

2,2

2,6

€150,50

2

€58,56

1 Hábitat

Alternativa Tradicional de Atención

M0

M6

M0

M6

*


Condiciones de vida. Salud Percepción de Salud (QoLI)

• Mejora la percepción de salud mental, especialmente en el área de ansiedad e insomnio (seguridad ontológica).

7 6

4,4

5

4,5

4,3

4

• La evolución de la salud es una tendencia a medio-largo plazo, en algunos casos escasa.

3 2 1 0

Hábitat

HÁBITAT Total GHQ (no dicotomizadas) 36

M0

*

8,26

9 8

26,48

7

20,05 18

9

Alternativa Tradicional de Atención M6

HÁBITAT. Puntuación áreas GHQ 7,59

7,04 6,22

6,04

5,3

6

MEJOR

27

4,4

5

4

4

3,36

3 2

1 0

0

M0

M6

Síntomas somáticos

Ansiedad e Disfunción social Depresión grave insomnio * M0

M6


Condiciones de vida. Adicciones ¿Considera que tiene un problema con el consumo de alcohol?

¿Considera que tiene un problema con el consumo de drogas? 100%

100%

80%

80%

60%

81,5%

85,7%

40%

20%

14,3%

18,5%

M0

M6

33,3%

22,2%

M0

No

100%

80%

80%

77,8%

40%

No

En el último mes ha consumido alcohol (por encima del umbral)

100%

67,9%

M6 Sí

En el último mes ha consumido drogas (cualquier sustancia)

20%

77,8%

0% Sí

60%

66,7%

40%

20%

0%

60%

60%

64,3%

74,1%

40%

32,1%

22,2%

0%

20%

35,7%

25,9%

0% M0

M6 Sí

No

M0

M6 Sí

No


Calidad de vida. QoLI HÁBITAT

Alternativa Tradicional de Atención

Satisfacción con la vida en general

Satisfacción con la vida en general

7

Seguridad

7

6

Alojamiento

5

Seguridad

4

3

3 2

Ocio

1

Relaciones sociales

Salud

Relaciones familiares GH M0

Alojamiento

5

4

2

Sit.Económica

6

GH M6

Sit.Económica

Ocio

1

Relaciones sociales

Salud

Relaciones familiares ATA M0

ATA M6


Percepción de cambio Personas que perciben mejora respecto a 6 meses

Percepción subjetiva. QoLI Satisfacción con la vida en general

*

7

Seguridad

*

6

5

Alojamiento

Vida en general

*

100% 80%

4

Situación laboral

40%

2

Sit.Económica

Alojamiento

60%

3

*

20%

Ocio

1

0%

Relaciones sociales

Relaciones sociales

Ocio y tiempo libre

Salud Relaciones familiares *

Alternativa Tradicional de Atención ATA M6 Hábitat GH M6

Relaciones con familia

Hábitat

*

Salud

Grupo de comparación


Conclusiones • Los datos confirman tendencias de los resultados de las evaluaciones de otros proyectos HF internacionales. • La vivienda es un punto de anclaje clave para la recuperación de la confianza y el inicio de procesos de cambio. • La seguridad es el área en la que mayor cambio -objetivo y subjetivo- se ha producido y una de las claves del proceso de integración. • La recuperación de relaciones familiares y las actividades de vida cotidiana y ocio son áreas en las que se detectan cambios sustanciales. • Salud, situación económica y adicciones son áreas de recuperación más lenta.


Gracias por vuestra atenci贸n Roberto BERNAD @R_Bernad_Rais roberto.bernad@raisfundacion.org www.raisfundacion.org


EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DEL PROGRAMA HÁBITAT


ESTRUCTURA DE LA PRESENTACIÓN

1. La evaluación en el ámbito de los programas sociales 2. Dificultades en el camino: ¿por qué es tan complejo medir? 3. Metodología seguida 4. Resultados de la evaluación económica del Programa Hábitat


EVALUAR EN PROGRAMAS SOCIALES

EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA COMO INNOVACIÓN • Transparencia • Comunicación

• Apoyo a la gestión • Mejora continúa


¿POR QUÉ ES TAN DIFÍCIL LA MEDICIÓN ECONÓMICA?

…Y ¿DEBERÍA SERLO? • Dificultad para obtener datos reales • Información descentralizada en datos y acceso

• Falta de homogeneización en los escasos datos existentes • Falta de cultura de transparencia


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT Planteamiento metodológico Fase 1

Identificación de los ámbitos de recursos (social, sanitario, justicia, etc.) y el tipo de servicios (la cartera de servicios correspondiente a cada ámbito) utilizados por las personas sin hogar

Fase 2

Diseño del cuestionario y realización del pre test

Fase 3

Cálculo de los costes asociados a cada servicio.

Fase 4

Determinación del uso de los servicios y estimación de los costes asociados a cada programa

En 2014 hemos :

En 2012 hemos : Estimación del Índice de Calidad de Vida de las Personas sin Hogar Atendido a 5.462 menores Atendido a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias Fase 5

Colaborado con 140 centros educativos Colaborado con 42 escuelas Contamos con 127 profesores

Trabajado con 159 profesores


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT ÁMBITOS DETECTADOS Alojamiento SOCIAL

Comida Servicios sociales

INGRESOS ECONÓMICOS EMPLEO Y FORMACIÓN ADMINISTRATIVO - JUDICIAL Consultas médicas Atención hospitalaria SALUD

Medicación Transporte

Odontología

En 2014 hemos : SALUD MENTAL

Atendido a 5.462 menores

ADICCIONES

En 2012 hemos :

Atendido a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias

Colaborado con 140 centros educativos Colaborado con 42 escuelas Contamos con 127 profesores

Trabajado con 159 profesores


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT FUENTES DE INFORMACIÓN Resoluciones de adjudicación de contratos de servicios en el marco de una convocatoria de concurso público.

Memorias de ejecución de actividades publicadas por organismos públicos. Información facilitada por otras entidades: SOCIAL

RAIS Fundación

Arrels Fundació

Fundación San Martín de Porres

Samur Social

Comedor Social Luz Casasnova

Ordenanzas municipales de multas sobre ruido y consumo de alcohol.

Legislación sobre consumo y tráfico de drogas. ADMINISTRATIVO

Encarcelamiento: estudio de referencia Aebi, M.F. &Delgrande, N. (2015). SPACE I – Council of

- JUDICIAL

Europe Annual Penal Statistics: Prison populations.Survey 2013. Strasbourg: Council of Europe.

Justicia gratuita: legislación de cada Comunidad Autónoma. Tasas judiciales: legislación estatal.

En 2014 hemos :

SALUD FÍSICA Y

Órdenes y regulación dictada por las Comunidades Autónomas.

En 2012 hemos : Medicamentos: listado de precios de medicamentos según precio de venta al público publicado por

MENTAL el Colegio Oficial de Farmacéuticos de Pontevedra. Atendido a 5.462 menores Atendido a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias

Odontología: fuentes secundarias, publicaciones de referencia sobre estudios de mercado.

Colaborado conCOMPLETOContamos 42 escuelas Información facilitada AQUÍ por otras Colaborado con 140 centros INCLUIR ELentidades: CUADRO ADICCIONES con 127 profesores  

Madrid Salud

Trabajado con 159 profesores

Fundación Proyecto Hombre Madrid


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT INDICADORES DE COSTE/GASTO

SOCIAL

ADMINISTRATIVO

- JUDICIAL

Alojamiento

Coste por estancia

Comida

Coste por menú

Servicios sociales

Gasto por uso del servicio por día/estancia

Multas

Importe de la sanción administrativa

Juicio

Coste por juicio celebrado

Asesoramiento jurídico

Coste por consulta

Asistencia jurídica gratuita

Coste del proceso judicial

Centro penitenciario

Coste por día y estancia en el centro penitenciario

No hospitalización

Coste por consulta Coste por tratamiento

Hospitalización

SALUD FÍSICA Y

Coste por consulta Coste por prueba diagnóstica

MENTAL

Odontología

En 2014 hemos :

Medicamento Transporte sanitario

Coste por tratamiento

Coste por dosis de medicamento

En 2012 hemos :

Coste por servicio

Atendido a 5.462 menores Desintoxicación residencial Atendido Precio por plaza a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias ADICCIONEScon Colaborado

Centro de Asistencia Básica

Costecon por 42 paciente atendido escuelas 140 centros educativos Colaborado Sociosanitaria

móviles Contamos con 127Unidades profesores

Coste paciente atendido Trabajado conpor159 profesores


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT Índice de calidad de vida de las personas sin hogar ÍNDICE

Dimensión

PERCEPCIÓN GENERAL DEL BIENESTAR DE LAS PERSONAS SIN HOGAR Alojamiento Actividades de la vida diaria Relaciones familiares ÍNDICE DE CALIDAD DE VIDA DE LAS

Relaciones sociales

PERSONAS SIN HOGAR (IBPSH)

Situación económica Empleo Seguridad Salud

INDICADOR DE CALIDAD DE VIDA

En 2014 hemos : Atendido a 5.462 menores

Media geométrica

Indicador por dimensiones

En 2012 hemosMedia : geométrica

Indicadores deAtendido base a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias Media ponderada

Colaborado con 42 escuelas Colaborado con 140 centrosResultados educativos Normalización, ponderación de la encuesta a

Contamos con 127 profesores

PSH Trabajado con 159 profesores


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT Coste del programa Hábitat versus otras opciones COSTE POR ESTANCIA DIARIA

PROGRAMA HÁBITAT

(INCLUYE TODOS

LOS SERVICIOS)

Hábitat Madrid

28,61

Hábitat Málaga

31,22

Hábitat Barcelona

42,21

TOTAL (media)

34,01

Coste por estancia y día

45,00

39,34

40,00

34,01

35,00 30,00

28,32

25,00

25,45

20,00

12,38

15,00 10,00

En 2014 hemos5,00 :

En 2012 hemos :

-

Centro de acogida Piso facilitado por Pisos Albergue para Atendido a 5.462 menores a 5.141 menores y 1.787personas Familias de emergencia una ONG uAtendido correspondientes Pensión facilitada sin

organismo

Colaborado con 140 centros educativos

al programa Hábitat Colaborado con

por una ONG u organismo 42 escuelas

Contamos con 127 profesores

Trabajado con 159 profesores

hogar


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT ¿Cuál es el coste estimado…? Algunos ejemplos Coste medio mensual por persona asociado a la comida principal Escenario base Usuarios/as Grupo de Diferencia Hábitat control H-GC 62 € 134 € 73 €

Escenario seis meses Usuarios Grupo de Diferencia HHábitat control GC 30 € 134 € 104 €

Evolución Usuarios Grupo de Hábitat control -51% 0%

Coste medio mensual por persona en el ámbito jurídico-administrativo (no incluye centro penitenciario) Escenario base Usuarios Grupo de Diferencia HHábitat control GC 36 € 15 € 21 €

Escenario seis meses Usuarios Grupo de Diferencia HHábitat control GC En hemos 112012 € 22 :€ 11 €

Evolución Usuarios Grupo de Hábitat control -70% 47%

Atendido a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias Colaborado con 42 escuelas Trabajado con 159 profesores


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT El ámbito social • Uso de servicios sociales asociado a mayor normalización

El ámbito jurídico administrativo • Impacto de la lentitud de la justicia • Reducción del número de multas El ámbito de la salud física y mental • Mayor uso de atención primaria 2012 hemos : • Menor uso de consultas de En urgencias

En 2014 hemos :

Atendido a 5.462 menores

Atendido a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias

Colaborado con 140 centros educativos Colaborado con 42 escuelas Contamos con 127 profesores

Trabajado con 159 profesores


LA EVALUACIÓN ECONÓMICA DE HÁBITAT ÍNDICE DE DE CALIDAD DE VIDA DE LAS PERSONAS SIN HOGAR

Escenario base Dimensiones

ÍNDICES

¿En cuánto ¿En cuánto mejoran los mejoran/ Diferencia usuarios empeoran (H-GC) Hábitat? las personas

Escenario 6 meses ÍNDICES

Hábitat

GC

Diferencia (H-GC)

42,9 57,8 41,5 63,6 34,6 54,2 60,9

56,6 61,7 59,8 64,6 34,3 57,4 59,4

-13,6 -3,9 -18,3 -1,0 0,3 -3,2 1,5

CALIDAD EnÍNDICE 2014DE hemos : DE LAS 49,7 PERSONAS SIN HOGAR Atendido a 5.462 menores

55,3

En 2012 -5,6 hemos 71,9:

50,8

Atendido a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias

Alojamiento Actividades de la vida diaria Relaciones familiares Relaciones sociales Situación económica Seguridad Salud

Opinión en general

61,9

11,1

Hábitat

GC

85,5 75,5 66,1 69,0 57,2 86,0 68,2

56,9 66,7 59,5 62,0 35,6 61,1 63,1 56,9

76,7

52,0

Colaborado con 140 centros educativos Colaborado con 42 escuelas Contamos con 127 profesores

Trabajado con 159 profesores

28,6 8,8 6,6 7,0 21,6 24,9 5,0

42,5 17,8 24,6 5,4 22,6 31,8 7,2

0,3 5,1 -0,3 -2,6 1,3 3,7 3,7

15,0

22,1

1,6

24,7

14,8

1,2


GRACIAS!! mercedes.valcarcel@tomillo.org

En 2014 hemos :

En 2012 hemos :

Atendido a 5.462 menores

Atendido a 5.141 menores y 1.787 Familias

Colaborado con 140 centros educativos Colaborado con 42 escuelas Contamos con 127 profesores

Trabajado con 159 profesores


Housing First. Jornada Internacional El papel de las corporaciones locales como implementadores del modelo Housing First Carme Fortea. Jefa del Departamento de Atención a Personas Vulnerables. Àrea de Drets Socials. Ajuntament de Barcelona Madrid, 2 de Octubre de 2015


Personas

2


Motivo implantación municipal • Disponer de un modelo de intervención municipal en personas sin hogar “en escala” consolidado y consensuado a nivel de Red (XAPSLL de Barcelona)

• Existencia de un colectivo de personas sin hogar en situación crónica que no se vincula a los recursos existentes, utilizándolos de manera puntual. Recurrencia del 34%

• En los casos que se consigue una vinculación y la persona mejora no hay una salida de estos recursos o bien la salida es a habitación de realquiler, a pensión,...

3


Motivo implantación municipal • El conocimiento de la existencia del modelo Housing First y la valoración hecha por otras ciudades y países que ya la han ensayado (entre el 80% y 97% de éxito en la permanencia de la persona en la vivienda) •2010 grupo de trabajo con personas sin hogar EUROCITIES, visitas a Francia, Portugal, Holanda, sesiones de trabajo con Tania Tull (California, “Path beyond Shelter”), Dennis Culhane (University Pennsylvania), José Ornelas (Lisboa), Equip Chez Soi d’abord (Paris), Roch Hurtubise (Québec “Chez soi”)… • Consenso a nivel de XAPSLL ( Red de Atención a las Personas sin hogar Ayuntamiento y entitades, en el marco del Acuerdo Ciudadano-) para ensayar su puesta en funcionamiento en la ciudad

• Voluntad política de abordaje de la falta de vivienda con carácter social: prevención (subvenciones al alquiler), contención (realojamiento rápido de familias desahuciadas) y acceso a vivienda (acuerdos con bancos, derecho a retracto, compra vivienda, habitat3,..) 4


Inicio Experiencia 2014

• Ayuntamiento de BCN establece un convenio de colaboración con RAIS para la puesta en funcionamiento de 10 viviendas dentro del proyecto impulsado por Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad

Julio 2014

• Empieza el proyecto HABITAT en BCN en paralelo en Málaga y Madrid Los participantes en el proyecto HABITAT provienen de recursos del Ayuntamiento y de entidades sociales

2014

• El Ayuntamiento de Barcelona diseña el proyecto municipal de Housing First y el modelo de evaluación (impacto, indicadores evaluación individual Outcom star y evaluación cualitativa)

2015

• Durante el primer trimestre se realiza concurso público para la adjudicación de la gestión de 50 viviendas y se realiza el proceso de selección de los candidatos (grupo programa, grupo comparación y grupo reserva)

1 de juny de 2015

• Se inicia el programa municipal piloto con metodología Housing First “PRIMER LA LLAR”. Puesta en marcha gradual hasta junio de 2016 5


Cambios respecto al modelo escala RECURSO A Instalación, equipo y definición atención

RECURSO B Instalación, equipo y definición atención

RECURSO C Instalación, equipo y definición atención

Vivienda

Persona

Modelo Escala

Modelo “Primer la Llar”

Propietario Vivienda

Equipo soporte

Persona Vivienda

Entorno y comunidad 6


Cambios respecto al modelo escala

Alojamiento

• Vivienda permanente • La persona no cambia de vivienda • Pisos distribuidos por la ciudad • Desinstitucionalización • Normalización de las condiciones de vida

Proceso de atención

• Equipo acompañamiento y soporte que se desplaza por los pisos • Persona como eje central de la atención • Individualización y suporte personalizado • Empoderamiento y acompañamiento • No hay límite de tiempo • La persona decide cuando y que quiere hacer • El profesional acompaña las decisiones, orienta y da apoyo

7


Programa municipal BCN Housing First “Primer la Llar” QUE

Modelo intervención

Prueba piloto

FINALIDAD

Mejora de la calidad de vida

Que la persona se pueda mantener en la vivienda

COMO

Vivienda permanente

QUIEN

Mayores de 18 años

CONDICIONES ACCESO

Una visita semanal

EVALUACION

Impacto

Intervención social: persona decide cuando y como

Solos o en pareja o relación amistad positiva

Aporte económico individualizado

Cualitativa

No hay temporalidad

Larga trayectoria de calle o centros (+1 año)

Correcta convivencia

De proceso

Profesional acompaña sin dirigir

Con trastorno mental y/o adicciones

reducción de daños inicialmente.

Autónomos funcionalmente Motivados para vivir en vivienda y solos

8


Equipo Profesionales Evaluación externa

Vivienda mercado

“PRIMER LA LLAR”

Trabajo en red

Metodología de Intervención

HOUSING FIRST

Perfil

Tipo de gestión

Cobertura de gastos de contrato 9


Equipo “Primer la Llar”

Equipo Social • Educador/a Social • Trabajador Social • Peer • Integrador social

Persona Otros Servicios • CAP • CAS • Centro de Día (insertor Laboral..) • Centro Cívico...

EQUIPO “PRIMER LA LLAR”

Equipo Salud Mental • Psiquiatras • Enfermeros/as

10


Evaluación externa

Salud y calidad de vida

Historias de vida

Apoderamiento y Recuperación de habilidades Participación y Soporte social

G. Reserva 19

• Experiencia de trayectoria de vida explicando el proceso vivido de los participantes

Working Proces (Relatos de práctica) • Sistematizar la construcción del proceso de acompañamiento • El investigador acompaña el equipo de “Primer la llar” • Ayudar en el cambio de metodología e intervención.

G. Programa 50 G. Comparación 70

Cuestionarios

1. Inicio 2. 9 meses 3. 18 meses 11


Tipo de gestiĂłn Concurso pĂşblico

50 Viviendas

2 lotes de 25 pisos distribuidos por la ciudad (2 gestores) Gestor proporciona vivienda de mercado y el equipo social. Inicialmente asume todos los gastos (ayudas, alquiler, suministros‌)

12


Características de los pisos Vivienda de mercado ordinario La vivienda no es compartida, es per a una persona o dos máximo que funcionen como pareja o relación de amistad positiva Dispondrá de una habitación máximo dos Las viviendas estarán equipadas con mobiliario, menaje, electrodomésticos y ropa del hogar Las viviendas estarán distribuidas por la ciudad, no es concentraran en un edificio, máximo 2. No pueden superar el 10% en el mismo edificio Se cubrirán los gastos de alquiler, dotación inicial, mantenimiento y ayudas económicas inicialmente por parte del gestor El contrato de alquiler va a nombre del gestor y luego tendrá que ponerse a nombre de la persona


Tu nuevo hogar‌

14


En que momento nos encontramos En funcionamiento 13 viviendas (9 hombre, 2 mujeres.

En fase de construcción….

Construyendo con los gestores el modelo de Barcelona: • proceso entrada en la vivienda • ajuste de las funciones de los distintos profesionales • definiendo sobre la práctica cual ha de ser la intervención/creación de vinculo • sesiones de casos • Implantación metodología Outcome Star para hacer evaluación de proceso

Primeras impresiones y valoraciones de los participantes: Dificultades para la consecución de vivienda de mercado : resistencia propietarios, subida alquileres, proporción tipo vivienda y precio alquiler alto

- Emoción - Cambios importantes

- Incredulidad - Mejora aspecto físico - Sentimiento de pertenencia - Disminución consumo 15


Condicionantes/Retos Como encaja el modelo Housing First con el modelo en escala con el que ha de coexistir. No se dispone de vivienda social para destinar al proyecto. Pisos de mercado. Garantizar la tenencia de la vivienda por parte de la persona Mantener la vivienda i superación de la soledad Nivel de ingresos de prestaciones al que pueden acceder las personas usuarias muy bajo para garantizar la plena autonomía económica Evaluación de resultados, establecer indicadores que permitan la comparativa y orienten a la continuidad del modelo

Modelo Housing First unicamente para colectivos excluidos y en situación crónica, ampliación a otros colectivos Concepción de la vivienda como una necesidad principal, tanto para el colectivo sin hogar como para personas en situación de exclusión residencial y con gran fragilidad de vivienda Salida del programa: cuando acaba y hacia donde se deriva … 16


The French experimentation « Un chez soi d’abord » From social experiment to public policy

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: New experimentations on evidence based Housing First October 2nd 2015 Caixaforum Madrid

Dr P. Estecahandy DIHAL


General context (1/2) Homelessness is a key issue for French public policy • 3.5 million people live without a decent house • 141 500 roofless people • Between 2001 and 2012 the number of homeless people has increased by 44%


General context (1/2) • The second European budget to fight homelessness(PIB/Hbts)- 1.5 Billion/year • One of the European country with highest numbers of citizens in Europe feeling afraid to become homeless one day • A housing led policy with a stair case system • Universal financial assistance for housing • Strong welfare system


Process engaged (1/4) How homeless people with psychiatric disorders became a « public policy’s matter »? A down/up and top/down process Transversely : evaluation/research Identifying the issue

Formulation and adoption of policy

Claim change

Designation of causes

Put to the political agenda


Process engaged (2/4) • Social movement with a huge media attention in 2005 and 2006 (tents in Paris) – 2007 the DALO Law : the right to housing – a « priority to housing » strategie was decided by the ministery of housing

• 2008 Report on Emergency Housing by French parliamentarian, Etienne Pinte – « revolving doors » and unadapted system for groups of people with hight needs – Creation of the DIHAL (Interministerial Delegation for Access to Housing for the Homeless and Inadequately Housed)


Process engaged (3/4) • 2008 research/evaluation « SAMENTA » - observatoire SAMU SOCIAL : – 30% of the homeless people suffer from severe mental illness – the mainstream services inefficiency for homeless people with mental disease and addiction • Experience of a therapeutic squat in Marseille by activist in 2007 visited by the Minister of Health


Process engaged (4/4) • 2010 A national report on “health of homeless population” recommending HF program – Foreign experiences as evidence-based practices – Reduction of social health inequalities / health ministry – Housing led policy / housing ministry – Social experimentation and randomised evaluation (efficiency)/ budget ministry – coalition of interests and shared values with members of national administrations


« Un chez soi d’abord » Research and social experimentation • « Pathways to Housing » model • • • • • •

ACT team (multidisciplinary team) Research: Canadian protocole National program in 4 cities during 5 years (2011/2016) 353 participants included in the HF project 382 apartments - 11.5% in the public sector Budget in 2015 : – Ministry of Heath: 2,7 M€ and Ministry of housing : 3 M€ – 43 euros/ day/participants


Experimentation National coordination

• French government

Local coordination

• Governor • City Hall • Social and Medical partners

Principal actors

• About 60 professionals • 14 Structures involved in governance • A research team consortium


Quantitative and Qualitative research • The randomized controlled trial

– Population : Homeless with severe mental illness” – HF versus Treatment as usual

• 705 participants included in the research program (353/352)

– evaluation every 6 months over 2 years – Principal outcome: number of hospitalized days – Secondary outcome: quality of life,recovery, clinical aspects, social cost, addiction – Comparisons cost / effectivness

• qualitative evaluation

– Analysis of implementation – Recovery individual process and trajectory – Professional practices


Main results at 12 months


Applications oriented by outreach teams for people meeting the eligibility criteria ( n = 779) Excluded by interviewers (n = 74) -

Eligibility criteria not verified (n = 32) Refusal (n = 14) No follow up (n = 28)

Included persons (n = 705)

Randomized in TSAU group (n = 352)

Randomized in HF group (n = 353)

Allocated (n = 337)

Left housing at M12 (n = 9)

Followed in housing at M12 (n = 328)

Non allocated (n = 16) Including 2 patients who died shortly after inclusion


Characteristics of study participants All sites Characteristics of the study participants Sex: male Age, in years Nationality: French Education: bachelor's degree and more Marital status: single Had children Voluntarily committed military Incarceration 2 years before the inclusion Disease Diagnostic: schizophrenia Severity: ICG Dual diagnosis / abuse or dependance Homelessess history “Absolute homelessness" at inclusion Total time of being without a home, entire life, in years Total time in streets or public space, entire life, in years

Lille

Marseille Paris

Toulouse

82,80% 86,50% 38,8 ± 10 38,9 ± 9,7 85,80% 89,30% 27,50% 18,70% 77,80% 78,30% 37,40% 37,70% 7,10% 3,30% 22,90% 24,70%

80,90% 78,20% 84% 40,1 ± 10 42,1 ± 9,8 35,3 ± 9,4 85% 79,80% 87% 26,20% 31,80% 30,20% 70,50% 81,40% 83,20% 44% 26,50% 37,50% 14% 0,90% 7,10% 22,60% 12,90% 27,40%

69,30% 4,6 ± 1,3 78,90%

84,90% 4,6 ± 1,3 75,30%

70,40% 4,8 ± 1,2 73,30%

67,20% 4,6 ± 1,2 85,50%

55% 4,4 ± 1,4 83,80%

66%

67%

70,40%

54,60%

67,70%

8,5 ± 7,8

8 ± 7,6

9,3 ± 8,2 10,2 ± 8,2

7,2 ± 7,1

4,3 ± 5,7

3,3 ± 4,5 4,7 ± 5,8

7 ± 7,4

3,9 ± 5


Main results • Housing retention : >86% • Comparing the 2 groups : • decrease in symptoms • the number of hospitalization are similar, but the average duration of hospitalization is 50% decreased • there is a significant difference in recovery (managing illness, self-confidence and relationship) improvement in relationships with family, well-being and autonomy .


Retrospective residential calendar – TSAU group Repartition of the conditions of spending nights during the last 180 nights Hospital

180

160

17,9

17,9 6,5

15,3

140

7,7

33,5

120 29,6

100

4,9

80 60

30,5

17,3

22,5

17,6

36,9

40 51,3 20

9,4

0

22,6

Inclusion

12 months later

Prison

Stable housing Temporary hosted / squat (Ethos 8) Longer term support for homeless (Ethos 7) Hostel/temporary/transitiona l (ethos 3) Emergency accomodation (Ethos 2) Public space (ethos 1)


Retrospective residential calendar – HF group Repartition of the conditions of spending nights during the last 180 nights Hospital

180 160

20,4

140

9,3 6,1

120

31

100

4,2

10 4,5

Stable housing

16,1 143,5

80

Prison

23,1

Temporary hosted / squat (Ethos 8) Longer term support for homeless (Ethos 7)

60 40

Hostel/temporary/transitiona l (ethos 3)

56,3 20 8 0,7 2 1,6 2,4

0

Inclusion

12 months later

Emergency accomodation (Ethos 2) Public space (ethos 1)


Retrospective residential calendar: Nights spent in street or public space Number of nights Group in street The last 6 months Housing first All sites Treatment and services as usual

p value

Inclusion

12 months later

56,2 ± 69,2

2,4 ± 14,4

51,3 ± 67,7

22,6 ± 49,2

0,357

0,000***

60 50

40 30

HF group

20

TSAU group

10 0

Inclusion

M12 17


MCSI – Self -perceived symptoms at M0, M6 and M12 MCSI

Bras

Tous sites Housing first Treatment and services as usual p value

Inclusion

M6

M12

21,1 ± 11,4 21,7 ± 11,6

19,1 ± 14,1 21,5 ± 14,7

15,7 ± 10,6 19,0 ± 12,7

0,522

0,094

0,003*

25

20

15

HF group 10

TSAU group

5

0

Inclusion

M6

M12

18


Index SQoL –Quality of Life at M0, M6 and M12 SQOL All sites

Group Housing first Treatment and services as usual

p value

Inclusion

6 months after

12 months after

47,2 ± 17,3

54 ± 16,7

54,3 ± 16,8

47,8 ± 17,7

48,7 ± 19,4

50,3 ± 21,4

0,665

0,005*

0,003*

56 54 52

50

HF group 48

TSAU group

46 44 42

Inclusion

M6

M12

19


RAS – Recovery scores at M0, M6 and M12 Index Bras RAS Tous sites Housing first Treatment and services as usual p value

Inclusion

M6

M12

63,6 ± 15,2

66,2 ± 14,7

66,9 ± 15,4

63,4 ± 16,3

61,4 ± 18,7

64,0 ± 18,5

0,941

0,003*

0,006

68 67 66 65 64 63

HF group

62

TSAU group

61 60 59 58

Inclusion

M6

M12

20


Difference between the average medical costs per participant Un Chez Soi / TSAU at M0 and M12

14000 12000 10000 8000

Bras UnChezSoi 6000

Bras OH

4000 2000 0

M0

M12


Perspectives • French Prime Minister – recognized this research model with high level of evidence – emphasized the interest of the first 12 months results. – decides to initiate in 2016 a new public policy for homeless people with mental illness based on the experiment learnings

– According results at 24 months, he decide : • Perennisation for the 4 sites from 2017 • Scaling up from 2018 ( 16 more sites)


strengths and limitations • A rigorous evaluation and a randomized trial is a key to promoting “Evidence based policy” – But widespread critics for the randomized trial and “cost benefit” approach is important in social experimentation

• But it’s not enough – The timing of the “research” is not the timing of the “politics” – The “moment “ of the political decision : limited time frames – Consider political factors : ideological, social, economic and legal issues

• the evaluation has to be a part of the decisional process • Qualitative analyze is important to understand “how it works” and “what works”


strengths and limitations • To develop a HF program you need to invest money : – It’s a solution for a sub-group of the homeless population with high needs and huge medical or social cost – A high level of services for people with high needs – Relevant / public funding

• HF provide a high level of housing retention • No predicted criteria to measure the capacity to live in a house • but it’s not a “magic solution” and the support “as long as the participant need” is necessary


Conclusion • For young homeless people with mental disease it can be a prevention tool

• Homeless people have potential of recovery and can became citizen and productive for the society


Thanks for your attention Dr Pascale Estecahandy DIHAL pascale.estecahandy@developpement-durable.gouv.fr


Housing First in Europe HÀBITAT International Conference: New Experimentations on Evidence Based Housing First: The Case of the Hábitat Project October 2nd 2015 – Caixaforum (Madrid) Prof. Dr. Volker Busch-Geertsema GISS – Association for Innovative Social Research and Social Planning, Bremen, Germany Coordinator of European Observatory on Homelessness and the Housing First Europe Project


What is Housing First (in the European context)?

Research findings from Housing First Europe project Challenges and lessons learned Programme fidelity and need for adjustments Recent developments and further evidence Housing First and Housing Led, from pilot projects to broader policies

Conclusions and recommendations


Housing First provides homeless people with immediate access to ordinary scattered housing and on-going support Housing First approach fits long-term trends in social services De-institutionalisation and decentralisation of service provision Normalisation of living conditions (including housing conditions) Individualisation of support From place-centred support (supported housing) to personcentred support (support in housing)

Alternative to staircase systems and approaches requiring “treatment first” and making people “housing ready” before they can move to ordinary, permanent housing


Staircase of Transition Secondary housing market

Primary housing market

regular dwelling with (time-limited) occupation agreement based on special conditions shared housing, “training dwellings”, etc.

reception stage

regular self contained dwelling with rent contract “final dwelling”, full security of tenure

time-limited, no security of tenure

shared dwellings near institution, stay time-limited and based on special conditions, shared facilities

institutional setting, hostels, shelters, etc.

more less

Adapted from Sahlin 1998

individual support, care, control, discipline private space, autonomy, normality

less more


Stress and dislocation because of need to move between different "stages" Little privacy and autonomy at lower stages, lack of service user choice and freedom – revolving doors,  frequent flyers  Standardised support in different stages Skills learned in structured congregate settings often not transferable to independent living situation

Final move to independent housing may take years (or never happen) and too many service users get "lost" Homelessness may increase rather than decrease with such systems (extending lower stages, bottleneck at upper end)


In Sweden homelessness in «secondary housing market» (shelters, hostels, training flats) grew rapidly after introduction of staircase systems and remained lower where it was not introduced. Stepsystem in Vienna: grew by more than 80 % between 2005 and 2011 (when it reached 4,500 places); annual costs: € 43 m

Landlords refer potentially «risky» tenants back to the secondary housing market, barriers for access to housing increase («housing readiness certificate», no applicants without regular income…..) «Success» in the staircase system means having to move on, disrupting any contacts with communitiy in and outside the house


Housing First

regular self contained dwelling with rent contract

regular dwelling with (time-limited) occupation agreement based on special conditions shared housing, “training dwellings�, etc. reception stage

homelessness

flexible individual support in housing


Ending Homelessness instead of managing it Swimming can better be learned in the water than anywhere else Maintaining a tenancy can best be learned while having one

Challenges: Regular payment of rent and utilities, managing scarce financial resources, regulating debts, getting along with neighbours, keeping a household, cleaning, cooking, shopping, coping with loneliness, having visitors and controlling the door, setting and following individual goals, finding something meaningful to do‌‌.


1. Housing as a basic human right: (Almost) Immediate provision of self-contained housing without condition to be “housing ready�

2. Respect, warmth and compassion for all clients 3. A commitment to working with clients for as long as they need 4. Scattered-site housing; independent apartments 5. Separation of housing and services (Services are provided on voluntary basis, though weekly visits have to be accepted)

6. Consumer choice and self-determination 7. A recovery orientation 8. Harm reduction


Approaches requiring preparation, therapy, abstinence Projects requiring to complete previous steps in a programme to make service users “housing ready� outside the housing market Programmes which offer transitional housing, temporary accommodation and other types of housing where the stay is time-limited and dependent on the duration of support Shared housing (if not the expressed will of service users) Projects which evict tenants because of reasons over and above those which are standard in rental contracts At least controversial: Congregate housing with on-site support


Social experimentation project funded by European Commission Evaluation of five test sites and mutual learning with five peer sites implementing (elements of) the approach 5 test sites (Amsterdam, Budapest, Copenhagen, Glasgow and Lisbon) 5 peer sites (Dublin, Ghent, Gothenburg, Helsinki, Vienna) High profile steering group (including Sam Tsemberis from Pathways to Housing, Prof. Suzanne Fitzpatrick, Prof. Judith Wolf, Feantsa, Habitact,‌.) Project period: August 2011 to July 2013 Main contractor: Danish National Board of Social Services Coordinator: Volker Busch-Geertsema, GISS, Bremen, DE


European evaluation based on local test site evaluations of Dorieke Wewerinke, Sara al Shamma, and Judith Wolf (Amsterdam) Boróka Fehér and Anna Balogi (Budapest) Lars Benjaminsen (Copenhagen) Sarah Johnsen with Suzanne Fitzpatrick (Glasgow) José Ornelas (Lisbon)

Local evaluations had different focus, different starting points and time-frames and followed different evaluation concepts. European report outcome of systematic collation of results on a number of guiding key questions All evaluations (local as well as European) available on www.housingfirsteurope.eu


Five different test sites in five different welfare regimes

Followed PtH in many respects but none of them exact replica No fidelity test, but main principles of PtH broadly covered by 4 of 5 HFE Test Sites; all served homeless people with complex and severe support needs Weekly visits condition (in Lisbon six visits per month) Client-centred approach, individual support plans Relatively high staff - service user ratios: 1:3-5 to 1:11 24/7 availability of staff (mobile phone for emergencies) Budapest special case


Deviations (confirming need for “programme drift�) Target group everywhere people with complex needs, but only in one project restricted to people with diagnosed mental illness; one project targeted exclusively people with active addiction ACT only used in Copenhagen, close cooperation with specialist services (addiction, mental health) in 3 of 4 others Copenhagen also provided opportunity to analyse (and compare) effects of both, congregate housing and scattered housing, all others used scattered-site housing only Use of social housing (in 3 projects), using allocation rights with priority for homeless people in social housing (esp. in DK and UK) Direct contracts with landlords (in 3 projects, with pros and cons) No use of peer-experts in 2 projects


Lisbon project probably highest share of service users with psychiatric diagnosis, but lowest proportion of people with addiction to drugs and alcohol (29.7%) High proportion of substance abuse in other projects, highest in Glasgow (where it was eligibility criterion)

Single long-term homeless men, aged 36-45 and older, predominate Most nationals, significant proportion of ethnic minorities in Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Budapest

Support needs: housing, finances, mental and physical health, worklessness and social isolation


Amsterdam

Copenhagen

Glasgow

Lisbon

Budapest

Total number of service users housed

165

80

16

74

90

Unclear cases (death, left to more institutional accommodation, left with no information if housed or not etc.)

23

16

2

6

na

Basis for calculation of housing retention

142

64

14

68

na

Positive outcome (still housed)

138 (97.2%)

60 (93.8%)

13 (92.9%)

54 (79.4%)

29 (< 50%)

122 (85.9%) 16 (11.3%)

57 (89.1%) 3 (4.7%)

13 (92.9%) 0

45 (66.2%) 9 (13.8%)

4 (2.8%)

4 (6.3%)

1 (7.1%)

14 (20.6%)

 Still housed with support from HF programme  Housed without support from HF programme

Negative outcome (lost housing by imprisonment, eviction, “voluntary” leave into homelessness etc.) Source: Local final reports, own calculations

0

29 (< 50%) na


Positive results for 4 of 5 HFE test sites, despite differences regarding target group and organisation of housing and support Data not as robust as in some US studies, no control groups

Nevertheless results confirm a number of studies in the US and elsewhere that homeless people even with the most complex support needs can be housed in independent, scattered housing Adds to evidence of positive housing retention rates of HF approach for people with severe addiction

Positive results for 4 of 5 HFE test sites, despite differences regarding target group and organisation of housing and support


Experience with congregate and scattered-site housing in same programme in Copenhagen Strong indications that gathering many people with complex problems in the same buildings may create problematic environments, conflicts and unintended negative consequences Clear preference of bulk of homeless people for scattered housing

Observations from Finland confirm that individuals living in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Communal Housing Firstâ&#x20AC;? still think of themselves as homeless and living in an institution (Kettunen, 2013) Results suggest that congregate housing should be reserved for those few persons who do either display a strong wish to live in such an environment or have not succeeded to live in scattered housing with intensive Housing First support


Progress for a majority in terms of substance abuse and mental health (but not for all and not in all projects) Copenhagen: staff reported positive changes of mental health for 25 % of service users, but negative changes for 29 % “Ontological security” (Padgett, 2007): housing increases personal safety and reduces stress; basis for constancy, daily routine, privacy and identity construction; stable platform for more normalized life

Less positive results for overcoming worklessness, financial problems and loneliness. Where community integration was measured results were mixed too. While some project participants were engaging in activities in their community, others “kept their privacy” and were less active.


Important challenge for most: Securing quick access to housing (and long waiting times in case of scattered social housing). Local shortage of affordable housing remains structural problem to be solved. Fixed address may lead to prison charges for offences committed earlier or creditors claiming back old debts. It may also be difficult for some of the re-housed persons to overcome loneliness and social isolation and some may experience a “dip in mood”, especially if they live alone and have cut ties with former peer networks dominated by problematic substance use. If they don’t cut such ties they often find that “managing the door” might be a particular challenge.


Housing First approach involves change in balance of power between service providers and service users, as compared with more institutional provision. To prevent disengagement of programme participants once they have been allocated permanent housing, support staff need to make support offers which are oriented towards the individual goals of programme participants and to meet their needs and preferences. Problems in securing continued funding particular challenge for the sustainability of the project in Lisbon. In Budapest, time-limited and too little funding and a particularly weak provision of general welfare support for housing costs and the costs of living inhibited more sustainable results.


Housing First should follow defined basic principles but they cannot always be used in the same form in every country because national, local and contexts are just too different.

Existing differences relate to the following main elements: Selection of services users: in many European HF projects do not exclusively support homeless people with diagnosed mental illness. The way of providing housing: in Europe more often social housing is used, full tenancy contracts are more frequent; ongoing debates about the use of communal housing with on-site support and shared housing, though evidence that independent scattered housing is more effective for majority of users and better for facilitating integration and choice.

The way to organise social support: ACT is rarely used, case management and close cooperation with specialised services more frequent; peer support is used less frequently; weekly meetings are not always obligatory.


Further evidence in Denmark, evaluation of national homelessness strategy http://www.feantsaresearch.org/IMG/pdf/lb_review.pdf International review of Finnish national homelessness strategy (https://helda.helsinki.fi/handle/10138/153258 ) Canada: results of huge national At Home/Chez Soi programme evaluation (Moncton, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg) First results of large scale evaluation in France (Un Chez-Soi dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;abord; Lille, Paris, Toulouse, Marseille)

Evaluations of HF in London (e.g. Camden project) and 9 projects in England https://www.york.ac.uk/chp/expertise/homelessness/publicationspresentations/ Evaluation of HF demonstration project in Dublin http://www.homelessdublin.ie/sites/default/files/publications/HFirst_Eval uation2015.pdf


Austria (Vienna: neunerhaus), Belgium, 9 projects with 150 participants (see http://www.housingfirstbelgium.be/ ) Italy (http://www.housingfirstitalia.org ). The Netherlands (17 projects), Norway (part of new national strategy)

Portugal (Cascais)â&#x20AC;Ś Spain (http://raisfundacion.org/es/que_hacemos/habitat and additional project commissioned by Barcelona municipality) ,

Swedenâ&#x20AC;Ś. Erasmus+ project on Housing First in CEE countries


European Conferences and new publications September 2013: European Research Conference on Homelessness: “Housing First. What’s Second?”

November 2013: European Peer Review on Danish Homelessness Strategy in Copenhagen December 2013: International Housing First Conference in Lisbon….. European review on “Improving Health and Social Integration through Housing First” by Nicholas Pleace and Deborah Quilgars New articles and contributions to Housing First debate in European Journal of Homelessness 7(2) and 8 (1) Work on FEANTSA Housing First Europe Guide


Most of the principles of HF as basic philosophy transferable to all groups of homeless people; less intensive support needed by many. And if it works for those with most complex problems, why should it not work for those with less severe difficulties? Jury on European Consensus Conference (2010): “Given the history and specificity of the term ‘Housing First’”, the jury recommends to use ‘housing-led’ as a broader, differentiated concept encompassing approaches that aim to provide housing, with support as required, as the initial step in addressing all forms of homelessness” The Jury therefore calls for a “…shift from using shelters and transitional accommodation as the predominant solution to homelessness towards ‘housing led’ approaches. This means increasing the capacity for both prevention and the provision of adequate floating support to people in their homes according to their needs.”


Denmark and Finland stand out with national strategies based on Housing First (national pilots in France and Belgium, housing led policy in UK/Scotland; some cities promote HF, e.g. Vienna), but in general scaling up slow process; why? Against interests of some service providers, resistance by some

Lack of political will at national/municipal level? Cultural change (mind shift) needed in practice Barriers for access to housing for most vulnerable groups are central problem (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Housing First is nice, but where is the housing?â&#x20AC;?) Deserving/undeserving debate where housing shortage is a problem for broader strata of population; broader social housing strategies required Lack of methods of needs assessment and of financing flexible support


Housing First approach is to be recommended as a highly successful way of ending homelessness for homeless people with severe support needs Results of HFE demonstrate once again that even homeless people with severe addiction problems are capable of living in ordinary housing if adequate support is provided Eight principles of Pathways to Housing appear to be a useful device for developing Housing First projects

Ordinary scattered housing and independent apartments should be the rule; congregate housing should be reserved for the minority who wish to live there or couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t manage in scattered housing with intensive HF support


Conditions for success Quick access to affordable housing must be procured  Social housing should be resource when allocation can be influenced and access barriers can be removed  Potentials of private rental market or even owner-occupied sector  Social rental agencies and Y-foundation examples, how access to housing for homeless people can be improved, but quantitative effects will be limited and other measures will be needed to overcome broader housing shortages (inclusionary housing, allocation rights….)

Housing costs (and costs of living for those who cannot earn it by work) must be covered long-term Multidimensional support of high intensity must be available for people with complex needs as long as it is needed  Either integrated in one team (ACT/FACT) or by close cooperation with specialised services


Support staff have to meet particular requirements: Need to show respect, warmth and compassion for all service users and put their preferences and choices at the core of their support work Have to be able to build up trusting relationship Support offers have to be attractive and meet the individual needs of their clients, always based on the firm confidence that recovery is possible.

Huge savings should not be predicted if broader groups are included, but much more effective use of money spent


Expectations of policy makers and service providers need to remain realistic. Ending homelessness provides a platform for further steps towards social inclusion, but is not a guarantee for it and for the most marginalised individuals relative integration might often be a more realistic goal than making people with complex problems â&#x20AC;&#x153;healthy, wealthy and wiseâ&#x20AC;? (Shinn and Baumohl, 1998). Nevertheless, for support workers the aim should always be to support service users in achieving the highest level of integration that is possible in their specific situation.

Further attempts to successfully overcome stigmatisation, social isolation, poverty and unemployment are needed, not only on the level of individual projects, but also on a structural level.


To effectively reduce homelessness Housing First projects must be embedded in broader Housing Led strategies Clear emphasis on improving prevention and access to housing for vulnerable groups â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tackling structural problems is essential Affordable housing on a broader scale must be made available for ALL groups in need of it, also for families and single parents with children, for people with migration background and for discriminated minority groups; choice and involvement is essential in this context as well (community development; empowermentâ&#x20AC;Ś) Services (floating support in housing) following main HF principles for people with less severe needs Innovative methods of needs assessment and of financing flexible support are needed


Erroneous developments in the history of advanced welfare regimes should not be copied by others Don’t build up or develop further costly and ineffective staircase systems So called “interim solutions” and “emergency measures” tend to become long-lasting, if not permanent The costs of homelessness and housing exclusion should not be underestimated. Costs are not only caused by services for homeless people, but also in the criminal justice system, the police, the health system etc., let alone the human costs The right to permanent housing is a fundamental human right and should not have to be “deserved”; alternative ways have to be chosen to tackle rent arrears and other tenancy related problems


Questions? Comments? Criticism? Suggestions?


Prof. Dr. Volker Busch-Geertsema Gesellschaft für innovative Sozialforschung und Sozialplanung e.V. (GISS, Association for Innovative Social Research and Social Planning) Kohlhökerstraße 22 28203 Bremen, Germany Fon: +49-421 – 33 47 08-2 Fax: +49-421 – 339 88 35 Mail: vbg@giss-ev.de Internet: www.giss-ev.de


Profile for RAIS

Ponencias Jornada Internacional Housing First - Hábitat  

Ponencias de la Jornada Internacional Impulsando el desarrollo del modelo Housing First en España. Presentación de los resultados del progra...

Ponencias Jornada Internacional Housing First - Hábitat  

Ponencias de la Jornada Internacional Impulsando el desarrollo del modelo Housing First en España. Presentación de los resultados del progra...

Advertisement