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Deconst_Arc

Project Team: Gkerliotou Vaia_Ntrenogianni Antonia_Savvoulidou Eirini_Steliou Spyridoula


Academic Year: 2015/2016_2nd Semester

Project Title:

Deconst_Arc Pavillion

Course:

Techne Project Tutor:

Symeonidou Ioanna Project Team:

Gkerliotou Vaia Ntrenogianni Antonia Savvoulidou Eirini Steliou Spyridoula 3


Introduction & Aims

The Deconstr_Arc is an experiment of a wooden Pavilion conceptualized in its physical fabrication placed on the area of

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.

It is an experiment of a student team of the master class of

Advanced Design: Innovation and Transdisciplinarity

in Architectural Design Master Programme in Architecture in summer semester

2016. It is an experiment of an

academic pedagogy of intensive manufacturing.

This is a

project of four students. The two-week Induction Studio provides an intensive introduction to the techniques of contemporary design production. Design software tools are learned through a series of the two-week workshop.

These covered the fundamentals of 3d modeling, generative and parametric modeling techniques, and the principles of integration with digital fabrication. The intention was to provide the cohort with a shared foundation and confidence in these tools.

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Navigation of design process

The

The process of

design and make agenda of the programme offers

the project

an extraordinary opportunity for the team to push the boundary of an architectural design methodology beyond convention. Throughout the design process, a great amount of scale models and many sketches initiated key ideas which were followed through with ing with plans of an

1:10 prototyp-

1:1 scale. These prototypes tested

and verified directly on issues of constructability.

The

team engaged the design with physical models in order to generate and communicate thoughts thoroughly. Digital modeling came to take part in the process as well in or-

After

project was completed after the intensive work-

on how the tools could be used to create ‘real-life’, built

shop through which an integrated digital-material, de-

construction in contrast to the speculative parametric

sign-make methodology was established.

explorations.

On

this inten-

sive workshop techniques were learned and applied to

Each team had to select an existing construction tech-

the formation of an individual digitally-derived materi-

nique, research and analyze its process, and develop a

al-spatial speculation that is potentially relevant for the

generative parametric digital model that allows that

subsequent build project.

techniques to be deployed in a non-conventional way.

The project iteration was to be a fully articulated and

Then, each team fabricated a prototype in 1:10 scale with

documented proposition that exists as:

the appropriate material, which enhanced the design pro-

- a digital tool and representation

duced through this digitally-controlled technique.

-

der to refine and develop geometrically these sketches and prototypes.

The

a physical piece manufactured at

Aristotle University

and

several mock-ups, drawings and

- a paper documentation of the process, the proposition

digital iterations, the design became more tangible and

and its applicability

moved towards spatial reality.

The

two-week workshop was divided into digital tool

tuition and presentations about relevant design projects and tutorials/design sessions on parametric tools in

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Rhino and Grasshopper software. Emphasis was given 7


Index

“Tectonics is primarily concerned with the making of architecture in a modern world. Its value is seen as being a

Concept Design Process

partial strategy for an architecture rooted in time and place, as well as an architecture of “depth.” In bringing

Fabrication Process Model Failures

the physical into the meta-physical, tectonics begins to talk of a poetic of construction.”

(Maulden, Robert, http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/78804)

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Concept

The primary goal was to design and fabricate a parametric topology of an abstract figure in order to create a pavilion structure.

The

form features the fragmented corro-

sion of the whole. entity still

The broken pieces of an straggling to be, an emergent

condition that never ceases to evolve and transform.

Therefore,

the design priority

was a non rhythmic, non symmetric, non recurrent pattern.

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Initially

the design was based on

a curve which

meant to become a walking path for the visitors inside the structure. This path would have been consisted of wooden panels so as to create a closed space -that of the pavilion structure.

Due to some

difficulties that arose during the construction

,mainly

on the connections of the panels, led the

design to the use of a simpler curvature as a path.

Furthermore

in order for the structure to have

some protection from the weather conditions and a better static behavior the panels were placed on an arc assembly.

This

design helped to share the

forces and the weight of the panels on the ground uniformly.

In order to avoid obtuse angles on the connections of the panels, the curvature of the path was simplified, and connections were created vertically to the panels. The result was a linear path in which the arcs developed. In the end of the design process, a multi-layered structure, consisting of many sequential arches - each consisted of many separate componentsconnected together by joints, was developed. The intention was to create arches not in one piece but in many separate pieces, nevertheless able to stand and support. In order for the panels to be connect-

ed, a new type of joint of the components which we

called “comb� or vertical joints was used, aiming to create a particularly complex and unapparent infrastructure system.

During the process

structural system problems led to a more struction-driven based design.

a few con-

Laws of physics are

inevitable and impose certain demands in selecting shape and especially size of the construction components.

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Design Process digital

The techniques that were used on the prototypes were those of another assembling-industry (such as boat building) and contemporary techniques such as Japanese timber jointing, ship-lap, log-cabin. After finding the appropriate assembly technique for the project the team had to have an underlying component/geometric logic that can be extracted and codified within the Rhino/ Grasshopper interface. The

prototype had to be constructed at full component scale that should

demonstrate the capabilities of the system and how, through digital control,

the existing technique can be re-applied in a more sophisticated and flexible way.

The

digital control should lead to direct digital fabrication (i.e. through

a cnc workflow of a laser cut technique) of all parts and conjunction of

assembling parts of the whole pavilion structure. Inventive application and

acknowledgement of the interplay of digital, manual and machine processes were strongly encouraged.

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[STEP_1 DEFINE THE INITIAL ARC]

[1_defining the initial geometry and then contour by 20 steps ]

[2_divide each curve by 19 division points]

[3_define the plane of each curve

in order to ensure the same planarity]

[4_extract the vector of each division point]

[6_move the remaped division points on the y’y axis_ and create two lists of curves]

[5_remap the position of the division points]

[initial lines]

[top curves]

[waving the contoured lines]

[highlight area]

[highlight area] 16

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[STEP_2 DEFINE THE FRAMES OF THE PANELS]

[7_define the second division point of each curve]

[8_join the division points in order to define the frames of each panel]

[9_define the frames of each panel]

[highlight area]

[highlight area] 18

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[STEP_3 DEFINE THE PANELS] [ii_row: extruding each face]

[i_row: extruding each face]

[srf to project]

[10_define the panels] [the split idea did not work]

[extracting points

from projected curve]

[highlight area]

[highlight area] 20

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[STEP_4 DEFINE THE VERTICAL JOINTS]

[11_define the diagonal

between two continounig panels]

[12_define the centroid of the diagonal]

[13_define the axes of the vertical joints

[highlight area]

]

[14_extract the three axes

of the vertical joints]

[highlight area] 22

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[STEP_5 DEFINE VERTICAL JOINTS’ POSITIONS_ AND BOOLEAN WITH THE HORIZONTAL PANELS]

[15_creation of breps as vertical joints]

[highlight area]

[16_additional junctions]

[17_vertical juctions

after booleaned with the panels]

[highlight area] 24

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[STEP_6 CALIBRATE MANUALLY THE VERTICAL JOINTS IN ORDER TO ADJUST PROPERLY TOTHE PANEL]

[18_set of the model]

[highlight area] [highlight area] 26

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Design Process The

assembling

main supporting structure of this pavilion was

created by thin wooden elements the ‘vertical joints’ and the thinner wooden parts those of the addition-

al joints. The laser cut mdf pieces of the panels were connected and interlocked together with these joints and additional joints, forming a secure and assembly

construction. The assembly process of the prototype was a really tricky procedure.

The whole structure

was consisted of 216 wooden laser cut numbered parts which were iterations of trapeze shape. parts are the panels positioned

ditionally the engineering components of the pavilion

1st row

were 408 same, wooden, laser cut pieces and also the

panels

1st row

2nd row

vertical junctions

1.

These on 18 the arches. Ad-

Placing

2.

Placing

panels

5.

4th row

same number of the additional joints. The whole de-

panels

sign took into account the fact that the volume of the work, especially the fabrication and assembly time ,would be reduced dramatically if the wooden joints are all the same. At the same time the final morhology beacame doherent.

Placing

After placing on the working table the panels of the first row of the Pavilion, the first vertical joints had to be placed. Subsequently, the second row was placed and each part was passed through the vertical joints.

The process continued with the placement of

the third and the fourth row which also were passed through the joints.

After

having successfully the

first four rows with the joints inside each hole of the panels, the vertical joints had to slide and moved on the Z axis so as to interlock on the panels. Having

1st row 2nd row

3rd row

vertical junctions

3.

Placing

vertical junctions

additional joints on the same holes with the vertical joints so as to stabilize them.

panels

4.

all these parts in place, it is time to insert the wooden

6.

Placing 28

Vertical Movement 29


details

1st row

7.

Placing

additional joints

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Design Process structural details

1.

2.

vertical joints placing in the panels

panels placing 2nd row

4.

3.

panels

5.

placing 3rd row

vertical joints

6.

placing 2nd row

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panels placing 4th row

vertical joints vertical movement 1st row

7.

additional joints placing

1st row

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Fabrication Process numbering

2.

Numbering pattern

1.

4.

3.

8.

6.

5.

7.

10.

9.

11.

12.

In order to prepare each board panel for the laser cut machine the pieces had to be numbered so as to manage the assembling. Each piece had to be printed out on a layout for matching the borders of the laser cut machine.

13.

Numbering pattern

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Fabrication Process assembling

Mdf prototype model base: 700x510mm height: 350mm material: mdf sheet 3mm After having all the parts cutted on the laser cut machine the appropriate process to start connecting them together had to be found. It was required to connect them in a way so as to hold the whole structure stable on the correct curvature of the arc. This process took some time of experimentation so as to find the perfect position of the panels in order to have the ability to slice the vertical joint and junction parts in the rows of the panels.

Finally

the most appropriate way was to put the first row of the panels horizontal on the working table and not vertical because it wasn’t feasible to keep them on an arc without having put all the vertical junctions and joints in order to make them rigid. The whole assembling process was a set of seven steps.

1. Placing first row of vertical junctions on first row of panels step 2. Placing first row of panels assembling them with the first row step

of

vertical junctions step 3. Placing second row of vertical junctions and assembling them on first and second row of panels step

4. Placing third row of panels assembling them with the first and the

second row of vertical junctions step

5. Placing fourth row of panels assembling them with the first and the

second row of vertical junctions step 6. Vertical movement on the Y axis of the two rows of the vertical junctions so as to slice in place step 7. Placing vertical joints to stabilize the two first vertical junctions and make them rigid on the cut slices of the panels

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process

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Model

Looking the structure of the pavilion it is obvious that a pattern of trapeze panels and thin vertical joints consist an interesting pattern. It is a rigid and void pattern imagining the voids as important static parts that help the forces to be shared on each panel and follow the arc so as to minimize the static difficulties until they reach the ground. fascinating game of shadows.

Inside

These solid and void areas create a

the internal space created by the orientation and the arc positioning

of the wooden panels, an interesting game of shadows and lights takes place The dense geometry of the of the wooden parts and vertical joints generate beautiful shadows during the day. At night-time, it produces a visually mesmerizing effect, creating an illusion of more depth and density. The geometric secrets of the structure ,like the hidden wooden joints, create an interesting pattern of dark and lighten areas on the ground for every visitor to discover. It is really interesting the fact that the shadows themselves disclose the engineering parts of the structure on a night view.

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3.50 7.00

5.10

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Failures vertical joints

vertical joints small profile

panels

1.

2.

Through experimentation on the first design outcome, serious infrastructure issues arose: the necessary structure stiffness was non-existent. The outcome was a need for a retrofitting due to: a) the combs (joints) were too small to withstand all the heavy load of mdf cardboard used, therefore they had to be significantly increased in shape (profile axis), b) enormous torsion forces applied on the combs, resulted in the collapse of the structure. This failure could be overcome by the use of transverse, supportive joints, an intent which was actually accomplished by duplicating the number of the vertical joints, putting them in couples, releasing many short length stringers for each arch. Furthermore, the length of the vertical joints increased, in order to transmit imposed

“The Chain effect� Failure in junction due to axis torsion

forces on a series of four sequential arches that would cooperate and work as one.

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Model

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Advanced Design | Techne, Spring 2016 | Pavilion, Team 1  
Advanced Design | Techne, Spring 2016 | Pavilion, Team 1  
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