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EAST ASIA SUMMER CAMP PROGRAM

REPORT BOOK YOGYAKARTA 2013

School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development Institut Teknologi Bandung

in Collaboration with :


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

i Supervisor Widjaja Martokusumo, Ir. Dr.-ing. Editors Belly Munandar Nadya Chairunnisa Raden Agung Yogaswara Contributors Albertus Sunliang Wang Alicia Tiffany Beandda Belly Munandar Henry Hadathia Kania Thea Pradipta Nadya Chairunnisa Prathito Andy Wisambodhi Raden Agung Yogaswara Reina Rivenska Dissa Widjaja Martokusumo Production Reina Rivenska Dissa Exhibition Team Alicia Tiffany Beandda Henry Hadathia Kania Thea Pradipta Prathito Andy Wisambodhi Reina Rivenska Dissa Studio Program Tutors Ahmad Rida Soemardi, Ir., M.Arch, MCP Albertus Sunliang Wang, Prof. Heru W. Poerbo, Ir., M.Arch., MURP, Dr.-ing. Ikaputra, Ir., M.Eng., Ph.D. Studio Reviewers Martin Gold (The director of Architecture School, University Florida) Daniel Haryono (The Director of Ulen Sentalu Museum) Widjaja Martokusumo, Ir., Dr.-ing. (Vice Dean for Academic Affairs, School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development) Host

Universitas Gadjah Mada, Department of Architecture INTRODUCTION


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INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION


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Dr.-Ing. Widjaja Martokusumo Vice Dean for Academic Affairs School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Developemnt ITB After having successful implementation of the 2012 Summer Camp Sawahlunto, the School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development, Institut Teknologi Bandung had jointly organized with the College of Design Construction and Planning University Florida the second Summer Camp 2013. The program of the Summer Camp 2013 was substantially combined and readjusted with the East Asia (EA) Program 2013. It took place from 28 May until 18 June 2013 in Yogyakarta. On this special occasion we keenly worked together with our local partner the Faculty of Engineering, Departement of Architecture and Planning, University Gadjah Mada, as we also did with the local municipality of Sawahlunto for the Summer Camp 2012. Unlike the previous Summer Camp of 2012, which was attended by a number of students from Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Historic Preservation and Urban Planning, the Summer Camp of 2013 were mostly dominated by the participants with their background of either Architecture or Urban Design. The Summer Camp will be yearly offered since 2012 to all students of SAPPD ITB to participate with. The activities of this event are mostly planningand design-based workshop, which is characterized by the involvement of multi-disciplines or backgrounds within the realm of Planning, Design and Policy. The collaborative workshop are planned to be praxis-oriented rather than theory-based classes. It should address specific issues on urban problems. In the second Summer Camp 2013, we had chosen Yogyakarta as our case study, in which three types of urban fabrics were meticulously analysed. With the topic “Theatre of Memory�, the collaborative design studio focused on new possible interventions in three different urban areas. These are nDalem Pudjokusuman (a former traditional historic Javanese noble residence, which constitutes the urban morphology of Jogjakarta), the historic area of Taman Sari (the former water castle of Yogyakarta) with its existing ruins, and the well-known pottery village Kasongan. INTRODUCTION


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In this project, the students investigated one of Asia’s most treasured cities, where the challenge between various efforts to preserve and the speed of change through heavy commercialization is not atypical for developing cities. Often, as one observes, the disagreement and agreement between the past and the present has never been properly resolved; this surely leaves the past remnants fading, and the present enthusiasms bewildered. The joint collaborative studio proposes to intersect the two; allowing the juxtaposition to open multifaceted possibilities in design, its uses, and socio-cultural interpretations. Under the supervising of the tutors, participants were asked to explore this intersection or interaction to stitch, allowing historical components to reach out and the contemporary components to infiltrate what was [and still is] revered, thus complementing each other. On behalf of the SAPPD ITB, we would like to express our gratitude to all the students and participants, who had patiently and intensively worked out the projects, to Prof. Albertus Wang, AIA and Martin Gold, AIA (DCP Univ. Florida), Prof. Dr. Bakti Setiawan, MURP (Head of the Architecture Department, Univ. Gadjah Mada), Dr.Eng. Ikaputra (Univ. Gadjah Mada), Dr.-Ing. Heru W. Poerbo (SAPPD ITB) and those who had devotedly and enthusiastically supported the yearly event, through lecturing, tutoring and supervising the students. We do really hope that we will be able to maintain the multi-culti academic engagement in the future. Last but not least, we cordially invite you to take a closer look of what our future generations underwent and experienced in the last Summer Camp 2013.

Bandung, 9 September 2013

INTRODUCTION


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INTRODUCTION

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TABLE OF CONTENT

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SCHEDULE

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TOPICS

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BRIEF DISCUSSION

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KASONGAN

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NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN

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TAMAN SARI I

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TAMAN SARI II

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DAILY JOURNAL

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DOCUMENTATION

CRAFTS BECOME A PLACE : WHERE MOMENTS WILL DISSIPITE, EXCHANGE IS NOW FATE

REVIVING THE FORGETABLE MEMORY THROUGH CONNECTED SPACE

ARCHITECTURE OF MEMORY : RE-DISCOVERING WATER WITHIN THE TAMAN SARI THE WATER CASTLE OF TAMAN SARI : RE-INTRODUCING VOID

TABLE OF CONTENT


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28/05 1/12

29/05 2/12

30/05 3/12

ORIENTATION WELCOMING DINNER

STUDIO BEGINS SITE VISIT

FIELD STUDIO EVENING THEATER

1/06 4/12

3/06 5/12

6/06 6/12

HISTORICAL SITE VISIT

LECTURE TIME ITB

LECTURE TIME UF

9/06 7/12

10/06 8/12

14/06 9/12

MID REVIEW PRESENTATION

HISTORICAL SITE VISIT

STUDIO SUBMISSION

15/06 10/12

17/08 11/12

18/06 12/12

FREE TIME

FINAL REVIEW PRESENTATION

DEPART FROM YOGYAKAVVRTA

SCHEDULE


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KASONGAN

NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN

BELLY MUNANDAR HENRY HADATHIA CARMEN CHAN MITCHEL CLARK AWANG EMANUEL AVEL RAINHARD LINTANG AYOMI MARINDA ADNIRAM

ALICIA T. BEANDDA REINA RIVENSKA D. BETHANY MAHYEW NAPOLEON ORDAZ ADITYA HARI DIMAS RAHMATULLAH TRI REKNONINGTYAS YOSITA HENDRA K.

TAMAN SARI I

TAMAN SARI II

NADYA CHAIRUNNISA R. AGUNG Y. AFAGH MMZ SASHA LEON ANANG IRAWAN ARINA ARINTA M. KHOLIFLIR M. SUBHANSYAH RATNA DWI

KANIA THEA P. PRATHITO ANDY W. ELENA CLARKE RACHEL CLOYD ADAM WISNUAJI ARDHIASA GUSMA DWI ELY W. JENI THERESIA

TOPICS


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BRIEF DISCUSSION BRIEF DISCUSSION


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012 OBJECTIVE Keyword: life between walls, life within walls, life without walls, fortification, demarcation, periphery, juxtaposition, intersection, interaction, interstitial, spatial joint, spatial extension, delayed space, transitional space, shadow space. In this project, you will investigate one of Asia’s treasured cities, Yogyakarta, where the challenge between the efforts to preserve and the rapid change through the everyday pragmatic demands and commercialization is not a typical for developing Asian cities. The dis|agreement between the past and the present is often unsettled, leaving the past remnants fading and the present enthusiasms bewildered. You will reevaluate to intersect the past|present; allowing the juxtaposition to open multifaceted possibilities in design, its uses, and its socio-cultural interpretations. The intersection between this past|present condition can be investigated from the contemporary significance|purpose|meaning of the city wall1, which was once intended to demarcate and to defend the palace and its supporting components within. As the monarch reduced its role in the modern republic, the wall marginalized itself to a fringe condition loosing its very authority. In fact the wall is not at all inconsequential; it could still have its active role to transform itself from once was a separator to becoming now a connector, stitching historical components to reach out and the contemporary components to infiltrate this demarcation line. By doing so, ‘the wall’ offers [a] new purpose[s] and defines the identit[ies] of the city, beyond a symbolic one. The intention is neither to reconstruct nor to abolish it, but rather to allow both sides of the wall to co-exist and to complement each other, giving [an] inimitable identit[ies] to the place. You are encouraged to stretch this notion to go beyond the literal subsistence of the wall. You are asked to test this in various scales. This project is a charette that demands comprehensive documentation, intelligent multi-scale exploration, and poetic architectural intervention|proposal. The charette will be conducted within a relatively short period of time; thus your seriousness, good working ethics and effective collaboration are mandatory. 1. Refer to Kafka’s description of the wall [the Greatwall of China]. Kafka, Franz. “The Great Wall of China: Stories and Reflections”. Schocken Books, 1975. 2 . Fringe [frinj]; Bing Dictionary: Decorative edging of strands: a decorative border of short parallel strands or raveled threads held closely together at one end by stitching and hanging loosely at the other end. Any border or edging: something that serves as or resembles a border. Outer limit: the outer edge, or something considered to be on the outer edge and not central to an activity, interest, or issue.

BRIEF DISCUSSION


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

013 SCALES : URBAN PERIPHERY | URBAN | ARCHITECTURE | ARCHITECTURE ELEMENT Your project will entail 4 different scales – urban periphery, urban, architecture and architectural element. The urban periphery suggests this very idea of the inbetween urban rural|urban urban|rural, expanding urbanism to a larger cultural understanding. Forthis, we will visit a ceramic village, Kasongan, on the outskirt of Yogyakarta. The urban scale of Yogyakarta be understood through urban components within, between and outside the wall that used to separate between the revered and the commoners. The components within the walls comprise of the City Walls,the Plengkung [the gateways], the Alun-alun [the north and south piazzas], the Keraton [the palace], the Ruin, Taman Sari [the bath house], the Old Mosque, and the Dalems [the noble compounds, which comprise the community living within the Dalems’ walls3.]; you will document, analyze, and speculate|propose, encouraging this fading remnants and the sprawling occupation a mutual symbiosis that defines it. There are 3 options on how you address the architecture scale: a theatrical space within the urban periphery [Kasongan], a theatrical space between or within the urban component in the walled--‐ city, or a theatrical space within the noble compound. Specifically for the selected noble compound, you will explore the relationship between Pendopo to the rest of the compound. The Pendopo, in some way, has the similar purpose with the Wall and Alun--‐Alun, defending itself and giving the host residents some time to get acquainted to the outsiders before allowing them to go further into the compound. It is a semi-public, transitional space where the insiders and the outsiders intersect and interact. All these rigorous investigation and process, in the end, must produce the spatial proposal and must craft the architectural elements that make proposed space[s].However, since our time islimited, each group will select a fragment of the element. This element should support the notion of the making of a theatrical space. It should also explore the notion of craft4. 3 . Diagram the notion of “walls within walls”, where the community living exists within Dalems. 4 . “Craft, insists Sennett, is as important in modern society as it ever was in the medieval guilds and it is not imply to be found in the work of such traditional craftspeople as silversmiths, carpenters and potters. It can Also be seen in the scientific laboratory [the equivalent of the old workshops] or in the work of software developers.” [Laurie Taylor interviews Richard Sennett | Rationalist Association. http://rationalist.org.uk/articles/1733/craft--‐works--‐laurie--‐taylor--‐ interviews--‐ richard--‐sennett and http://www.theplayethic.com/2008/05/play--‐and--‐craft.html.]

BRIEF DISCUSSION


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

014 PRESERVATION | DESIGN ATTITUDES : - To preserve is not to restore to the assumed original condition[s]. - Topreserve is not taking things away and isolate them from the everyday life. - To preserve will be understood as to allow the past|present to co-exist, interact, intersect with the everyday living5. - To create atypical spaces that had never been created. - To make architecture that is unexpected, uplifting, communicative, raw, inexplicable, and remarkable. - To be expressive [not neutral], progressive [not conservative], evoking emotion [not unemotional|dry|cold], and inexplicable [not predictable]. - To reconsider craft and handmade, and to believe that craft is instinctively human that is inexplicable and surprising.

DESIGN APPROACH : - Urban Documentation, Urban Analysis, Figure|Ground Study, Mapping, Diagramming, Historical and Theoretical Research, Programmatic Research. - Urban Speculation|Proposal [Figure|Ground, Mapping, Study, Haiku 5-7-5 or other formula, Eidetic Images. Programmatic Proposal] - Urban|Architecture Relationship [i.e. wall vs. pendopo, and how wall is introduced into the inbetween space that separates pendopo and the main residence.] - Architectural Element [i.e. a fragment of the stage for a certain act, the screen for the shadow puppet show,the area of the puppeteer or ‘dalang’, or other elements – be innovative to propose, showing how culture defines architecture, and how architecture transforms culture].

5 Refer to Candi Kalasan and the temples at UII Campus.

BRIEF DISCUSSION


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

015 PROGRAM: THE THEATER OF MEMORY You will define the program(s) that centers on the idea of the Theater of Memory. The process of design|making contemplates the idea of “craft” that is inbuilt in the Javanese quotidian. You will be introduced to various cultural resources the shadow puppet performance, traditional| contemporary dances, gamelan, batik, ceramic making rituals that are historically significant and philosophically symbolic. You will work in groups, and thus collaboration becomes the key to succeed in your research and discussion in order to interpret the notion of the Theater of Memory, and its design indicator.

Existing programs to document:market place, mosques and musholas, axes, tombs bathhouse, streets as theaters, alleyways as meeting places, shared spaces, gateways and doors, porches and eaves,plazas and pendopos. David Trubridge’s AMP Bench A. Wang’s Bench

Figure 1. David Trubridge’s AMP Bench BRIEF DISCUSSION


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Figure 2. David Trubridge’s AMP Bench.

BRIEF DISCUSSION


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017 CRAFT : WAYANG, BATIK, DANCES, GAMELAN, CERAMICS, STONE CARVINGS You will beexposed to various cultural phenomena, which you should embrace in the design process, allowing how culture participates in making architecture, as well as how transforms culture. One example is about “Wayang”, the shadow puppet performance that traditionally consists of shadows cast on a cotton screen and a lighting source, an oil lamp. The cotton screen separates the audience from the performers, composed by a puppeteer who is highly regarded, the singers and the Gamelan musicians. With a complete traditional attire, the performers stay “behind the screen”; the audience on the other side of the screen has visual access only to the shadow on the cotton screen, but no visual access to the performance behind the screen. Theaters have always been stitched within the Indonesians daily life [both rural and urban]. The intention of the studio is not to replicate, but rather to reinvent the theater in terms of it spatial requirement, its acts, as well as its elements. This project requires students to explore the interaction between traditional crafts of making and of thinking, and how those two participate in making of theatrical places in the urban fabrics as well as within architecture.

Figure 3. Dalang, the puppeteer in The Javanese Shadow . Puppet Performance BRIEF DISCUSSION


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Figure 4. Sinden, The Singer

THEORETICAL THREAD The Thinking of Craft and the Craft of Thinking was discussed by Richard Sennett as a form of recollection the manifestation of memory in time and space, both in architecture and urban scales. In his book, The Craftsman, published in 2008, Richard Sennett offers to see memory as a craft. He discussed how creation was to be seen as a form of manifestation of memory in time and space. And in the process of creation, actions and tools [including visual/verbal tools] took important roles. These visual|verbal tools were used as media for making thoughts. “The art of memory” in making of this theater is associated with textual, visual, musical and physical compositions, and those who practice the craft use this notion to make paintings, poetries, musical compositions, and architecture.

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EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

019 REFERENCES: History/Literature/Humanity Abeyasekere, Susan. Jakarta, A History.Oxford University Press, 1987. Raffles, Thomas S.The History of Java.Cambridge University Press, 2010. Benamou, Marc. Rasa: Affect and Intuition in Javanese Musical Aesthetics.Oxford University Press,2010. Tamagawa, Kiyoshi. Echoes From the East: The Javanese Gamelan and Its Influence on the Music of Claude Debussy. D.M.A. Document. The University of Texas at Austin, 1988. Ananta Toer, Pramoedya. The Trilogy: Bumi Manusia (This Earth of Mankind). Hasta Mitra Publishing, 1980. Ananta Toer, Pramoedya. The Trilogy: Anak Semua Bangsa (The Child of All Nations). Penguin, 1980. Ananta Toer, Pramoedya. The Trilogy: Rumah Kaca (The Glass House). Hasta Mitra Publishing, 1980. Couperus, Louise. The Hidden Force. Quartet Books, New Edition, 1992. Winchester, Simon. Krakatoa, Harper Perennial. 2005.

Independent Indonesian Films: “Laskar Pelangi,” directed by Riri Riza (2008). “Pasir Berbisik” (Whispering Sands), directed by Nan Triveni Achnas (2001). “Opera Jawa,” directed by Garin Nugroho (2006). “Gie,” directed by Riri Riza (2005).

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kasongan CRAFTS BECOME A PLACE : WHERE MOMENTS WILL DISSIPITE, EXCHANGE IS NOW FATE

KASONGAN


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TEAM MEMBER Alicia T. Beandda Reina Rivenska D. Awang Emanuel Lintang Ayomi

Carmen Chan Mitchell Clarke Avel Rainhard Marinda Adniram

Kasongan Village is located at south-western Yogyakarta City. This place is famous for its pottery. Therefore almost all of them work as pottery craftsman. They work in their own house and sometimes work together with the others, usually in one of the phases of making the pottery. The history of Kasongan Village began with a death of a horse owned by a Dutch detective on a villager’s rice field. Because the farmer who owned the land was afraid of being punished by the Dutchmen, he and the other villagers gave up the ownership of their lands. With no fields to farm, the local people ended up becoming ceramics craftsman, making toys and kitchen sets until now. Professor Gustami revealed this in an interview with the local elders in 1980s.

Ffigure 1. Poetry as a local craftsmanship. KASONGAN


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023 For the past years, there is a decreasing rate of visitors to this village. People prefer buying the pottery in the shop next to the main road instead visiting the pottery craftsmen’s house. The locals create the pottery at their houses, which can’t be seen from the road. Their houses are located inside the village. Only the shops that is visible from the road so people hardly visit them. That’s why their existence is rarely heard nowadays.

Figure 2. Kasongan Village.

Figure 3. Map of Kasongan Village.

KASONGAN


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Figure 4. Location of Kasongan Village.

From the picture above, the big grey circle is the area where the Kasongan Village located. The main road is on the right side of the picture. There is a gap between this village and the main road. That’s where the shops are located. Because of that, people hardly visit the village. So, the purpose of this project is how to keep this village’s existence.


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Figure 5. River in Kasongan.

There is a lot of problems and potentials on each place in this village. First place to be analyzed was the river. From Figure 1, there is a blue line in the middle of the picture, which is the river. The view from the bridge that crosses the river is really beautiful. The locals use raft (getek) on the river to attract people using it. The route is from the bridge to a shop located on the corner of the village. The trip was so exciting but there was one problem in there. There was a lot of trashes on the side of the river. The local knew where all the trash comes from but they can’t do anything. Although the trash is a problem, this river is a big potential to improve the village. From the river, there are several places that have a great view. Those places can be points of interest of the village. There are already several facilities in those areas such as playground for kids, an abandoned hall, parks, etc. There is also a pathway alongside the river connecting those areas. These potencies had been developed but weren’t well designed so it got easily abandoned.

KASONGAN


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Figure 6. Potential attraction places in Kasongan.

On the land, there are some points that have potentials to attract people. Those places can be parking areas so that it will not be a problem if people want to bring their vehicles to here or can be a main area for the locals to show them how to make the pottery there. The blue spot in Figure 4 can be the main points of this village. The right one can be a welcome spot for the tourists. From here, they can take the raft trip that has already existed and know more about Kasongan Village. The left one is the end of the raft trip. This place is near the road. So the tourists who take the raft trip can easily access the road from here. This spot also can be used by the locals to do their daily activities or show the tourists what they do everyday. KASONGAN


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027 Precedent

Archipelago Cinema, Yao Noi, Thailand

Archipelago Cinema, Yao Noi, Thailand

The project is designed by Ole Scheeren. This design brings a new spatial experience through the use of another space. They use the quiet sea and rock towers as the imaginary boundaries for the auditorium wall. The design introduces the locality of materials and the unique technique of floating lobster farms from local fishermen. The intervention initiates a bond between the fishermen and visitors.

Archipelago Cinema, Yao Noi, Thailand KASONGAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

028 Kastrup Sea Bath, Kastrup, Denmark

Figure 8. The Sea Bath.

This project is designed by White arkitekter AB. It is located in Kastrup, Denmark. Its incorporation of various activities allows the gathering of tourists and locals to enjoy the open ocean. It can be related to Kasongan in the way of its local activities, such as washing, swimming, and fishing. It can be included as well possibly becoming a place for performances. KASONGAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

029 The Highline, New York City

Figure 9. Pedestrian Bridge, The Highline.

This project is designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. This abandoned elevated rail track in historic Chelsea neighborhood is transformed into urban park. The impact of this design within site are decreasing crime, increasing the neighborhood activities, and making financial stability for local businesses. It also acts as a catalyst for the site as the park becomes entrances for buildings and rail stations.

Figure 10. View of The Highline.

KASONGAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

030 Concept Design In the design concept that we propose, we brought some programs to Kasongan Village that can celebrate the history and improve the socio-economic quality of this village. The programs will support the village to be an integrated tourism village not only a village to be visited. With the aim to arise this village, the programs we designed are the development of two sites that exist between the river and the main road of Kasongan where become the main axis of this village. Each site being developed and designed for different users, they are divided for tourist and locals. The program also scopes the development of local’s homestay as a temporary shelter for tourist also as the requirement for tourism village. We also re-arrange the approaching circulation of each potential spot by developing the bike system transportation and bike shelter itself. The last element that we develop is the water transportation system that’s using the river as the main circulation. It potentially can be another recreational facility while enjoying the local’s activities further in this pottery village.

KASONGAN

Figyre 11. Site plan A.

Figure 12. Elevation plan 1 and 2.


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

031 This is the first site that we designed, it exists exactly where the road crosses the river and this spot becomes the physical second gate for this village. This site becomes the place for tourists to start to explore the pottery making process, we utilize the burning process as the attraction in this location, the smoke that’s blown could be seen from far distance and shows pottery making process is happening there. This eastern site is also provided with amphitheater and rafting deck where tourists can start the journey along the river of this village.

Figure 13. Elevation plan 3 and 4.

Figure 14. Site plan B.

KASONGAN


Figure 15. Bike Shelter Perspective.

KASONGAN


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KASONGAN


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Figure 16. Public Bath.

Second site is in the west side of the village. This site is designed and developed to support all the local activity without losing their tradition. Fishing, river bathing and rafting are some program that we implanted to this site. This site is right across the bike shelter, it makes the tourist easier to move from one point to another and explore the village, using the bike, not only rafting. We also designed the bike shelter as the supporting system of transportation. It facilitates the tourists to explore the village. The bike shelter uses local material, the same as what we use for western and eastern site, lava rock and steel for the structures. Across the western site, there is the rafting deck. The deck and the bike shelter make the transportation becomes easier for tourists. Figure 17 . Bike racks system. KASONGAN


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Figure 18. Site Overview Diagram. (by Belly Munandar)


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Figure 19. Site Overview Diagrams. (by Mitch Clarke) KASONGAN


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Figure 19. Site Overview Diagram. (by Belly Munandar) KASONGAN


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NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN REVIVING THE FORGETABLE MEMORY THROUGH CONNECTED SPACE

NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


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TEAM MEMBER Alicia T. Beandda Reina Rivenska D. Aditya Hari Rr. Tri Reknoningtyas

Carmen Chan Mitchell Clarke Dimas Rahmatullah Yosita Hendra Kumala

nDalem Pujokusuman is one of Jogjakarta’s districts that have a high historical value. The place that once used as the headquarters of the guerrilla forces against the Dutch, “Pasukan Hantu Maut , nowadays has changed into a place for the traditional dancer gathered, not only for Jogjakarta dancer, but also for Javanese dancer. Ndalem Pujokusuman consists of areas that divided into some parts by each functions. This place has much kind of functions, such as school, public market, public residences, pendhopo, and the private house for the owner. Ndalem itself is surrounded by thick walls that made from bricks. The walls were a symbol of the teritority. The changes in function of nDalem Pujokusuman were raising Pendhopo as a gathering place for the Javanese dancer indeed, but not for nDalem Pujokusuman itself. Ndalem Pujokusuman is a very potential tourism place to be visited. Yet in fact, not all of domestic and non-domestic tourists know the existence of this place. This place actually has an interesting issue in exclusivity and inclusivity which grown by its elements and its functions. We can look it from the elements which separated it from the existing, whereas this place belongs to public purposes. Inside this public area, there is a private house for Romo Ibnu and his family as its owner.

Figure 1. Site Overview Diagram. (by Napoleon Ordaz) NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


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Figure 2. nDalem Pujokusuman historical timeline.

Learning the history and the uniqueness of this place is very interesting. So many kinds of the elements grow issues. Our group layered the aspects, elaborated it into eidetic diagram, and then unified it to saw what kind of design proposes which can solve the issue. All of students in our team involved preparing all of design stages. Started from the analysis of urban scale view, issues, facts through narrower view until the big concept and the designs. We analyzed from urban scale were to know how is the interaction between Ndalem Pujokusuman with the existing and the role and how it located in Jogjakarta. We needed to know it so that the design that we would proposed can solve the problem not only just on the surface but also widespread. Whereas the ‘zoom out’ view analysis was done by layered the aspects and the elements which were exist on that location. These ways were needed to know deeper the forming aspects of this place. nDalem Pujokusuman can be the Jogjakarta’s incredible treasure if we could manage it well and concerned all of the forming aspects which become its uniqueness. The dance tradition had to be functioned optimally. So we shouldn’t forget about the historical and culture elements that we had to keep it and collaborate it with the contemporary design proposes as well. NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

042

Figure 3. nDalem Pujokusuman Si.te Analysis

NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

043 A city-like noble residence, nDalem Pujokusuman is configured from several functions inside its wall. Besides the residential function for Dalem Pujo and his followers or renters, the functions also include the public amenities, like school or market. The figure ground technique helps differentiate the public and private area. First figure ground shows us Romo Ibnu’s family’s area and the public amenities, defines clearly the “restricted” zone or the private zone in the noble residence area. The second one shows us the open space in the noble residence. It shows that the “backyard” of Romo’s house is a potential spot to gather people inside (and outside) the gate. And the last figure ground shows us the buildings inside the wall. It clearly shows that the other houses around the Dalem Pujo’s houses define the wall of nDalem Pujokusuman and blend with the actual wall that was built since the beginning. From the figure grounds nDalem Pujokusuman is arranged by cultural functions, public functions, residential functions, and private residential. The cultural function of nDalem Pujokusuman is as the center of Javanese traditional dances. The public functions consist of schools and market that are used by the community inside the wall of nDalem Pujokusuman and the outside the wall. The private area are included the house of Romo Pujokusumo’s family and the rental houses. The rental houses inside the wall of nDalem Pujokusuman used to be Romo Pujokusumo’s follower in the war era. The houses were the payment for them so they did not need to pay the rent. As the time goes by, the houses inside the wall - beside the residence of Romo Pujokusumo’s family - are growing and they are not only the followers now living inside the wall, but also ordinary people who are renting the houses to Romo Pujo’s family.  

Figure 4. Site figure ground. NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

044

Figure 5. Outside the wall.

Figure 6. Site linkage and functions. NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

045 The center of Javanese traditional dances inside the nDalem Pujokusuman’s wall is the heart of the public activity, not only for the community inside the wall but also for the outside the wall; it happens because nDalem Pujokusuman is the central of traditional dances for Yogyakarta and they are showing some dance performances regularly. For some Romo Pujokusumo’s family’s special occasions, nDalem Pujokusuman also showing wayang (shadow puppets) for the family and public.

Figure 7. Inside the wall land-used.

Even though the school located inside the wall and the market included into nDalem Pujokusuman area, the users

of both facilities are coming from the community near the nDalem Pujokusuman area and nDalem Brontokusuman because the market used to be located inside the nDalem Brontokusuman area that is why the users are coming from both the nDalem. The functions that connect inside and outside the wall are the potentials to revive nDalem Pujokusuman by gaining the interaction between the communities within the wall with the outside the wall.

Figure 8. Inside the wall land-used diagram. NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

046 The Gate and The Wall nDalems in Yogyakarta have their own uniqueness in its typology. Every nDalems have similarity in space hierarchy. The main mark of the nDalem is the gate, as the mark of the nDalem boundary. Then, to go inside of the nDalem, there is a corridor called gledegan as the main road of the nDalem’s complex. Sides of the corridor also filled by the follower of the owner, and nowadays are the renters. At the end of gledegan, people are welcomed by another gate called gandok. The walls surround the main area of the residential complex to create the boundary between inside and outside the nDalem main area. Beside the wall that cover the entire area of the complex nDalem Pujokusuman, there are walls that are covering the main house of the owner – in this case is Romo Pujo’s family – with the houses of the followers and renters. These walls divide the main area into 2; there are the public and private areas of the main house. The public area consists of the pendopo and the houses, while the private area consists of the omah or house of Romo Pujo’s family. Uniqueness in hierarchy of the complex space can be found only in the noble residences typology like nDalem and keraton itself. The walls and the gates are creating the space experience in the nDalem complex area, that experience is the potential that should be expanded and enjoyed not only by the user in the complex but also the tourist that are willing to learn the dances and the culture of life in the noble residences.

Figure 9. Inside nDalem Overview Diagram (by Napoleon Ordaz) NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

047

Figure 11. The Gates Diagram. (by Alicia Beandda ) Figure 10. The Main Gate.

The original walls of the ndalem have maintained as elements that define spatial boundaries. They separate the space inside the ndalem from the outside and also separate Romo’s residence from the public spaces within the compound. The meaning of the gates in the Dalem Pujokusuman compound for the inside are as signage, enterance, and as magnets, while for the outside area the gates are as symbol of filter, identity, and separated the functions. The walls meaning are as filter, connector, and separator for the inside. The meaning of the walls for the outside are as boundary of the site and communicating with outside. NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

048 Design Concept In this project, the concept is bringing back the forgettable memory by reviving the area with new systems that connecting the spaces. By directing the progression through a system of functions, boundaries and thresholds, spaces for interaction between the owner, community, and public define. Concept of dividing space of nDalem Pujokusuman area itself is adapted from the wayang or traditional shadow puppet. The patterns of wayang are taken form the connection between mind, heart, and nature. We adapted that concept because nDalem Pujokusuman is similar to it.

Figure 12. Connection diagrams of design concept. NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


049

Figure 13. Design concept perspective and elements

The heart of the dalem consists of the original pendopo and the residence of Romo Pujo’s family. This space becomes the central core of the site. The surrounding community inside the dalem Pujokusuman area represents nature; the daily lives and activities of the visitors sustains the life of the dalem and its owner. The mine of the site is a place where three different layers of systems intersect and create a new community space. The space around the new pendopo is carefully delineated, but open to all by means of several points of access. A new system of walls has been designed to both connect the public spaces and filter the view to the more private spaces. They start form the market and end at the new pendopo, functioning as a bike rack, seating, overhead, or vertical dividers. These walls form a type of screen, giving a veiled impression of what is beyond. Each wall is constructed from a succession of woodien elements anchored to the ground and interlocked with one another. The overhead condition is supported by a system of cables. NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


Figure 14. Design Concept Perspective.

NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

051

NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

052 The new pendopo is functioned as another visitor attraction, the eatery area that offer Javanese food, especially from Yogyakarta. The concept of the building is originally from the pendopo itself. The roof of the pendopo is modified so as not to overpower the main pendopo, and the roof was given a glass material in order to get direct sunlight. The beauty of the roof of the pendopo roof section was adapted into eatery. Referring to the concept of four elements are represented in the puppet earth, water, soil, air, and fire. Fire is represented by the kitchen is the heart of a traditional Javanese house. Water is represented by a small trench in the building which is the channel of a rain water harvesting system that is adapted to the new pendopo roof. Soil and air is an element that houses the pendopo.

Figure 15. Design Concept Perspective. NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

053

Figure 16. Design concept details and sections.

NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

054

Figure 17. Four Elements Diagram (by Alicia Beandda) NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


055

Figure 18. The Water Castle. (by Reina Rivenska D.) NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

057

TAMAN SARI I ARCHITECTURE OF MEMORY : RE-DISCOVERING WATER WITHIN THE TAMAN SARI

TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

058

TEAM MEMBER Nadya Chairunnisa Afagh Mmz R. Agung Yogaswara Sasha Leon Anang Irawan Arina Arinta M. Kholiflir M. Subhansyah Ratna Dwi

Taman Sari also known as Taman Sari Water Castle is a site of a former royal garden of the Sultanate of Yogyakarta. Built in mid-18th century, the Taman Sari had multiple functions, such as a resting area, a workshop, a meditation area, a defense area, and a hiding place. Tamansari located inside of the kraton wall and divided into two big areas. The first area is the artificial lake Segaran located in the west and bathing complex called the Umbul Binangun bathing complex. The second area, now completely gone, is the Pasarean Ledok Sari and Garjitawati Pooland and the east side of the first and second area, which extend far to the east and to the southeast complex of Magangan. The area are chosen to be our site is the first area which is segaran lake and Umbul Binangun bathing complex. Figure 1. Taman Sari current condition. (by Nadya Chairunnisa)

TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

059 Physical conditions and functions of the Taman Sari have changed over time to create a unique palimpsest of history and culture. The morphology changed during this last century from a garden into residential when Sultan Hamengkubuwono 7th hold the throne, he allowed a royal servant to build a house in this area and it exist until now. This time there’s some other functional building in tamansari such as cultural center, archeological, religious building, commercial building, and any other places. The present setting of the Taman Sari is also a part of its ongoing morphology. Architecture that celebrates the unique present circumstance can preserve the spirit of place throughout its future changes.

Figure 2. Site analysis. TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

060 The most highlight issue is the presence of the water in Tamansari Water Castle are completely gone. The water that once engulfed the beauty of the Taman Sari now exists in memory. Meanwhile the significance of water is embedded in Javanese tradition, craft, and culture.

Figure 3. Taman Sari historical timeline.

In 1900’s the residence in this area mostly were the royal servant’s family of the kraton. But it have been 3 generation ago. Now generation, they did not have to be a royal servant to have a house here because as a generation pass, the family of the original royal servant wasn’t move yet even they have different job from outside kraton. This situation makes a people unaware with their live habbit. They are living with one of the most important historical site but they didn’t have a sense of belonging over this historical place. Tamansari’s residential was created as an organic system. There are no strict rules or good systems that keep it well ordered. When people walk along the street they have to see one or more higher landmark so they wouldn’t get lost because the street in this area doesn’t well-organized like any other residence inside Kraton wall. Sometimes this unorganized street makes some people confused how to get the right way but also it was an interesting part of Tamansari, it’s like a maze, and always have a surprised at the end of the way. TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

061

Figure 4. Taman Sari surrounding objects. (by Afagh M.)

As the time going, the government have redevelop Tamansari from ruin into a good shape and advertise it into one of the historical site destination in Yogyakarta. This condition makes a lot of people in tamansari produced a craftsmanship such as batik and wayang to attract visitor and have the other job. This people opened a small gallery in front of their house so people can come to see the art craft. But many of the craftman are still hard to sell their things because most of the visitor there didn’t aware of their presence. The sunlight in tamansari are not really disturbing because the proportion of street and a house are 1:1/2 so people can walk in the shade of the houses. Some street has a good paving but the other are bad and need some replacement. They also have different landmark for each neighborhood such as kampong cyber, kampong batik, and many more.

Figure 5. Water Story Diagram. (by Nadya Chairunnisa)

TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

062 Design Proposal Architecture can redefine the role of water as an original identity within the Taman Sari to create a meaningful space and a fluid connection to its past. This project proposes a meaningful mediation between the local - transient, memory - the present, preservation - celebration. Other important things related to the presence of water is rain. Rain is a natural way to collect the water and it is a frequent occurrence in the Taman Sari. It hovers, pours, and collects. Through the first stage of design process that is explored ways in which water can interact with architectural elements to create multi-faceted experience specific and meaningful to the Taman Sari. The other things that interesting is the presence of the craftsmanship there. Wayang Puppets process and designs products in the process of changing angles between the artist’s hand, the carving tool, and the hammer created a different sound. Water plays an important role in this process. Humid rainy weather softens the leather, easing the work for the puppeteer. Through the sound of wayang puppets crafting, it can be the illustration of design elements.

Figure 6. Melody of Gamelan Diagram. (by R. Agung Yogaswara)

Figure 7. Batik Making Process Diagram. (by R. Agung Yogaswara)

TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

063 The design must be use local material. In this case the bamboo suit perfectly because it can create a sound through water and it easy to find in Indonesia. The other material that will be used is concrete and perforated metal to create some elements in design. Images below show the perspectual diagram from The group. It represent the idea from each member. It shows many different perspective in different angle from the urban scale until the detail scale. From this diagram, the design can be formed.

Figure 8. Materials. Figure 9. Taman Sari Overview Diagram. (by Sasha Nicole)

TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

064 Architecture that suggests rather than prescribes how a space is used allows for a more dynamic + flexible engagement and development of a place. The space is activated by the users. Time-based design creates a meaningful connection between the place + daily lives of users. Houses next to each other makes the empty space created in this area are very few. The lack of space in this ‘kampung’ makes the design should be as efficient as possible. The idea come from other works

Figure 10. Taman Sari Design Plan Diagram. (by Sasha Nicole) TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

065 Figure 11. Taman Sari Design Section. (by Sasha Nicole)

TAMAN SARI I


Figure 12. Taman Sari Alley Perspective.


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

067

TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

068 Gallery Design Propose The gallery is multifunctional facade that will be placed in front of the craftmans’s house in Taman Sari. This galery built up by modular panel that has many different way to works. It can be open up and down, being a table or hanged, a door or window. Users can customize the form of their gallery according to their needs. Material for this galeri is perforated metal and bamboo as the frame. The combination of these two materials create a modern atmosphere but also natural.

Figure 14. Installation details.

Figure 13. Gallery Installation


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

069 Figure 15. Gallery installation-used.

TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

070 Sound Installation Design Purpose To recalled the presence of water in the Taman Sari Water Castle which is no longer exists. We try create a new story, from history through a memory. A memory of water is represented in the alley from entrance to the ruins, in the small bamboo installation. So people could hear and feel the memory from past when water was a main elements of Taman Sari. With the large amount of rainfall in Taman Sari, water can be easily found and this installation can be work during sunny day or rainy day.

Figure 15. Water Installation

TTAAMMAANN SSAARRII III


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

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Figure 16. Water Installation Diagram

TAMAN SARI I


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Figure 17. Water Installation Diagram. (by R. Agung Yogaswara)


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Figure 18. The Tunnel’s Towers. (by Nadya Chairunnisa) TAMAN SARI I


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

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TAMAN SARI II THE WATER CASTLE OF TAMAN SARI : RE-INTRODUCING VOID

TAMAN SARI Ii


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

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TEAM MEMBER Kania Thea Pradipta Prathito Andy W. Adam Wisnuaji Dwi Ely Wardani

Elena Clarke Rachel Cloyd Ardhiasa Gusma Jeni Theresia

Our site location was the Water Castle of Taman Sari. It is located in the center of the city of Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta (DIY). The Water Castle was built under the regime of Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono I in 1758. He built the place to be used as a relaxation place for the noble family as well as a residency for them. The Castle was surrounded by beautiful artificial lakes and also had pools for bath. The King used to let his concubines bath in those pools as he watched them from an upper tower. It was an honor when the King threw a flower to his bathing concubines and then whoever got the flower had this chance of accompanying the King in his private room. There was also an underground mosque built beneath the castle called the Sumur Gemuling. This place used to be a sanctuary for the noble family. At the northern area, there was built a particular castle called Pulo Kenanga. There happened to be some traditional musical performances in Pulo Kenanga. A hideous earthquake occurred in 1867 and caused a fatal damage to the Water Castle. The castle was trembling down and became nothing but ruins with obsolete walls, bricks crumble and debris. Then a world organization concerned about heritage building preservation did some renovation for the Castle. Unfortunately another earthquake shook the city of DIY once more in 2006 and gave more damages to the Castle.

Figure 1. Taman Sari Section Diagram (by Kania Thea ) TAMAN SARI II


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Figure 2. The Old Pulo Kenongo.

Figure 3. The Old Water Castle.

TAMAN SARI II


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

078 A responsive precaution was conducted afterward. The Water Castle had been renovated all over again and exposed a new look of it. The Castle, which once was gloomy and dark, became a more fresh building with the touch of crème color upon its walls and the water, which filled the bathing pools once more. The Water Castle does not look like a castle or a sanctuary anymore. It looks more like ruins in the middle of dwellings. As time goes by, the informal settlements surrounding the castle utterly grow even bigger. Even though the Castle has new color compared to its predecessor condition, the physical condition of the Castle itself can’t be considered as well preserved. The walls are obsoleted, the paints are already peeled off and you can find dust in every little corner of the Castle. The Castle is blended with the dwellings totally. The people who live in those dwellings have varied occupations such as batik makers, painters, artists, vendors, drivers or even tour guides. The batik makers, painters and artists use their verandas or front porches as ‘mini art exhibitions’. They lay their works of art on ground or just put everything together on one spot. The vendors work in a traditional market called Pasar Ngasem located in the northern area of Taman Sari. The alleyways in Taman Sari become really public; people park their motorcycles at the side of the road, they hang their clothes over one’s roof to another and children always play along the road without any boundaries. They run back and forth in the Castle’s plazas, they climb the Castle’s roofs and many other things that they could do in and around the Castle.

Figure 4. Taman Sari current condition figure ground. TAMAN SARI II


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Figure 5. Taman Sari area.

The Water Castle of Taman Sari stands more like ordinary ruins in the middle of dwellings than a well-preserved historical site of DIY. But the local say that it is not a problem since they enjoy and are happy living in the area and they still take care and maintain the Water Castle. The number of visitors is quite exquisite as well. The real problem is how we could bring back the splendid identity of the Water Castle. First, we had to define what the Water Castle’s identity really is. We had to wholly understand the place, figure out the elements which form the old Castle and reform the new one, what the substances which lost, still exist, replaced, extracted or subtracted are. We did some observations over the place and made some eidetic imagery approaches. We found some interesting details and potentials from our experiences observing the place: TAMAN SARI II


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

080 1. The process conducted by the batik makers. We learnt that in making batik, there are repetitions of patterns, which consists of some objects and empty spaces. The diagram shows how the objects and the empty spaces are colliding and creating other spaces. We realized it happened as well in the Taman Sari area where the ruins and the settlements collides each other and ‘opens’ or clarifies some distinctive pathways. Figure 6. Keraton Diagram. (by Elena Clarke)

Figure 7. Taman Sari Through Ages Diagrams

Figure 8. Taman Sari Pathway. (by Prathito Andy W.) TAMAN SARI II

2. The historical sequences of the Water Castle. We studied over the Taman Sari’s map through the ages and discovered some objects, which still exist or even replaced by another object. Some important objects evidently still exist such as the underground mosque, Pulo Kenanga, Pulo Panembung, the bathing pools, the King’s bed and many more. Some other is replaced by the growing informal settlements. The diagram traces what the present condition is like and what are used to be there. 3. The interactive pathways. Pathways in Taman Sari have many usages in common such as circulation, playing space for children, drying cloth and batik, raising chicken, parking, and gathering space. This may happen because of the lack of open space in the village. However, this is the uniqueness and sense of warmth of the community. The diagrams show how the pathways could create such interactive spaces.


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

081 4. Taman Sari has scattered distinctive fragments. The diagram shows the abundance of Taman Sari’s fragments, which actually could be put together as one substance. 5. The escalation of emotions responded to the Taman Sari’s physical condition. At the northern area of Taman Sari there is a traditional market called Pasar Ngasem. If you walk straight across, you’d find an amphitheater made of beautiful temple stones, and if you continue you’d get a direct pathway to Pulo Kenanga where many historical ruins located. So it’s like a journey where at first you experience a denser area in the market then you move forward to the open and empty amphitheater space, then in sequenced movement you’d feel the atmosphere of the historical ruins. The diagram shows how the emotions are played alongside with the change of historical area. 6. The peculiar experience through the tunnel. The tunnel’s entrance is a low door with half-circle edge. The shape forces us to lower our body or bow when we enter the tunnel. The tunnel is dark and we’d get some kind of pressure when we walk through it. But at some spots we could find openings where the light could burst into and the prior pressure seemed gone.

Figure 9. Unique spaces.

Figure 10. Fragments Diagram. (by Prathito Andy W.)

Figure 11. Taman Sari Tunnel Diagram. TAMAN SARI II


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

082

Figure 12. Design concept ideas.

Eventually we combine all of the diagrams and discover the real potentials of Taman Sari which are the beauty elements and intriguing historical experience that we had to embrace and re-introduce. From the daily life in the village we saw that people already have lived in harmony and have many unique activities along the narrow pathways such as gathering, playing, drying batik fabrics, displaying works of art and many more. We realized that those are exceptional potentials, which we could combine with the ruins’ history and experiences. TAMAN SARI II


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

083 Reintroducing The Void Our main aim is to reintroduce the void. Keeping the height of the spatial experience, the Pulo Kenanga ruins intact. The high number of visitors visiting Tamansari attracts the people inhabiting that dwell in the complex to open home business, selling batik, artworks, and crafts. In order to escalate the existence of the little shops without destroying the ruins, we strengthen the edges condition by defining the path with our design intervention. Series of installations guiding tourists. Exploring the alleyway, sipping a taste of the local life, acquiring the community crafts. Forming an undulating wave seen from above, the installations infiltrate the of the house porches from the narrow alleyways.

Figure 13 Shadow Puppets. TAMAN SARI II


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

084 Bamboos poking out. Local materials are used because of not only its sustainability but also its lightness, contrasting to the heaviness of the ruins.

Interlocking The Fences Interweaving with the fences of the houses. The bamboos go back and forth from private porches to the alleyways, blurring the dichotomy making it more inviting for people to visit the shops. Pulley system to ease the community. A lot of local activities make use of higher environment, these pulleys are going to help the community to facilitates the local activities.

Figure 14. Bamboo installation. TAMAN SARI II


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Figure 15. Bamboo installation functions. TAMAN SARI II


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Figure 15. Photoscape of Taman Sari alley.

Figure 16. Taman Sari site plan.

TAMAN SARI II


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Figure 17. Design Concept Plan

TAMAN SARI II


Figure 19. Design Perspective.

TAMAN SARI II


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TAMAN SARI II


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Figure 20. Elevation Plan.

Figure 21. Design Perspective.

TAMAN SARI II


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

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Figure 22. Bamboo Installation Perspective.

TAMAN SARI II


092

Figure 23. Density Diagram. (by Kania Thea P.) TAMAN SARI II


Figure 23. Accessibility Diagram. (by Kania Thea P.)

093


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

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DAILY journal DAILY JOURNAL


EAST ASIA 2013 DEPARTEMENT OF ARCHITECTURE INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG

096 BELLY MUNANDAR

Departement of Architecture School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development ITB bellymunandar@gmail.com

The EA2013 Program started at the end of May 2013. The program conjoined three universities Institut Teknologi Bandung, Universitas Gadjah Mada and University of Florida. It gave an opportunity for us, architecture students, to learn any new perspectives of architecture for three weeks. The program opened for eight undergraduate architecture students from each of the participating universities and 16 graduate students from UGM, all of us were challenged to share each different perspectives to answer any issues that related with architectural discipline. The program highlighted some urban issues that come from around Yogyakarta City. The first meeting of three universities was held in Architecture Dept. of UGM’s Building. We were introduced to our schedule for the next three weeks collaboration program, and also site locations and issues that we had to lift up. This introduction also explained us about how we will work together as a team and solve the 4 given issues. On the first day, I already imagined that working in a team from different backgrounds, cultures, and countries from three universities that already had their own way to design architecture would be a challenge, full of lessons, and new point of view. First week was the exploration week, this is the time to get to know each other, the time to explore the cultures and how Yogyakartan locals run their daily life. We walked, analyzed, and saw each site that would be our project. We also sorted what we have to highlight for each site. We were also taught us how the policies work to develop the city. It was needed because almost all foreign students didn’t know how the culture runs. The week helped us to know each other’s culture and the way we work. It gave us confidence that we can collaborate for 3 weeks even we come from different backgrounds. By the time the project started, we were divided into four groups with three different site locations. My group visited our site in Kasongan Village, well known as the village of pottery. We met some stakeholders to dig, learn and analyze all the things that would be necessary for our design project. After we have analyzed and collected the data needed, we gathered as a team and shared each other’s methods usually used to produce design solutions. On this stage, the most interesting part was when we introduced by UF students to diaDAILY JOURNAL


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097 grammatic studies as another way to analyze problems and potentials of the site and transform them to a design solution. It’s such a new fun and interesting method to determine and sort what attracts us the most in the site. Everyone has their ideas and deliver it in each different ways. Diagrammatic method was much used on the stage of site analysis to determine the problems and potential issues. The most interesting from the project was urban planning issues that I have never known before as an undergraduate student from ITB. Many challenges and lessons on how the design developed not only in our site, but also the connection among each potential spots and their unity to liven up the village of Kasongan. Design solution that we offered was delivered from analytic diagrams that we made. Designing something that has to be approved by eight heads became another challenging issue in a team. We already had our ego and sometimes there is a conflict about wrapping all the different things into one. But that is the art of team working, when the role of team leader is the most important to decide on a final execution. Final stage was the presentation that was delivered in front of all the lecturers and the dean of UF Architecture Department. We presented all the design process for the whole three weeks as a team. Learning process became the most interesting experience I got, learning the design methods, working as a team, exchanging cultures and interesting stuffs from my overseas friends, would be a once in a lifetime experience. Furthermore, I think the new friendship bond is the most important and precious gift from the program. Quoted from one of the lecturers I admire the most, Prof. Albertus Wang “As long as you do the best, do not worry. Everything will be fine”. I will always remember and do everything In the best way possible.

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100 HENRY HADATHIA

Departement of Architecture School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development ITB henryhadathia@yahoo.com

I knew the information about EA 2013 program from a facebook group. When I saw it for the first time, I feel excited to join the program. I registered and then I was accepted. It was amazing. So, I went to Yogyakarta with my friends. They are Belly, Alicia, Reina, Agung, Nadya, Thea, and Thito. We were collaborating with 16 UGM (Universitas Gajah Mada) students and 8 UF (University of Florida) students. On the first day we, the ITB students, arrived at Yogyakarta, we moved to a home stay near UGM campus. Mr. Widjaja and Mr. Heru, our professors, told us that the UF students would arrive tonight. So, at that night we came to their home stay that’s near ours, then we all had a dinner together. The next day, we all went to UGM campus to attend the first meeting of this event. That time was the first time we met the UGM students. There were a lot of them so I couldn’t remember all. This meeting was a briefing for us to know about our project. The UGM professor, Mr. Ika Putra, explained what already happened to our site. There were three sites that were explained, Taman Sari, Ndalem Pangeran, and Kasongan Village. I got the Kasongan village my team members were Belly, Mitch, Carmen, Lintang, Avel, Marin, and Awang. The next two days, we visited all of the three sites. Mr. Ika Putra was the one who guided us. The most exciting moment was when in Kasongan village, we used a raft on the river. There was an accident that was really funny. One of the rafts sunk because there were too many people on there. We laughed a lot at that time. There were three design reviews in this program. We did it once a week. It was really a short time to design but it was challenging. What we did first was to visit the Kasongan village once more to clarify what was actually in there. There are a lot of potential and really interesting things. The locals created potteries and we could see the process of making those potteries. At the first week, we discussed what we can do to the village and what we could design here. We agreed to design something near the bridge and the river, so it could attract people to visit the village. Everyday, we worked at campus until about 6 PM and then we went home. There was one really interesting thing that made me curious. It was diagrammatic studies. DAILY JOURNAL


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101 The UF students sketched what they felt on the site. It was abstract yet understandable. From the sketches, we could see what we would design. So, we tried to use this method and used them in the Design Review 1. After Design Review 1, we went to Solo. We went to ISI (Institut Seni Indonesia) Solo to watch dances. There were two dances. It was really impressive and quite mystical. It had a story in it. In the end, we could ask something about the dancing and they would likely to explain it. In the second week, we all got to design more but we were stuck. We couldn’t think more. We’re just out of any idea. So we decided to go to Mr. Wang’s – the professor from UF - home stay. He is actually Indonesian. What surprised me more was that he could speak Indonesian so it was easier for me to communicate to him. After we talked to him, we know what we have to do and we all worked harder because it was one day left before the Design Review 2. So we sketched our design, scanned them, and presented them in the Design Review. Thanks to all of us, we could make it. Before we worked for the Design Review 3, we went to Borobudur Temple, the biggest temple in the world. We, the ITB and UGM students, had already been there unlike the UF students. It was their first time. They said it was amazing. The relief on the wall amazed them. After Borobudur, we went to a very luxurious hotel nearby. Then we went to Mendut Temple. On that day, we were really exhausted. So we worked again at night but for a short time. In the third or the last week, we had to produce the final drawings that really needed much time. Actually there was a problem in my group. But after we talked calmly with cold heads, we could solve the problem and then we worked really hard together. We stayed at UF students’ home stay. We didn’t sleep well. With those hard works, we could make it.

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104 ALICIA TIFFANY BEANDDA

Departement of Architecture School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development ITB aliciabeandda@ymail.com

Visiting Jogjakarta is usual for some people. But attending an architectural studio and meeting new friends from Florida and Jogjakarta here is surely unusual. My seven friends from ITB and I had this chance. We knew so many things could be learned from the EA 2013 program and didn’t want this chance to end up in smoke. The program is called “The Theater of Memory – the craft of thinking and thinking of craft”. It had four projects for 4 groups. We were challenged to work together with students from different backgrounds and ways of thinking. Thus, collaboration became the key to make the research and discussion being successful. The joint studio program began on Wednesday, 29th May 2013. The delegates from ITB and University of Florida met for the first time in UF’s homestay. With the awkwardness, we acquainted with the eight students from Florida and their professor. On that day, we still didn’t know what would happen in the following three weeks, but my head kept telling me that everything is going to be alright. First day was such an interesting day. UGM had promised to lend bicycles to us, but we didn’t get it yet. So we, ITB students, picked up the UF students then walked together to UGM architecture building. The road was so busy with pedicab, motorcycle, car, taxi, and food stalls. It was interesting because UF students saw nothing on their first night here. But on the morning they saw so many little things about our country. In UGM, we were introduced to the three sites –Taman Sari, Kasongan, and Ndalem Pujokusuman. They made me so excited! Every site had its own amazing cases. Reina and I chose Ndalem Pujokusuman site with Bethany and Leon from UF, Yosi, Hari, Eno, and Dimas from UGM. On the first week, we visited the three sites. We had to know more about them, especially about our chosen site. On the weekend, we visited ISI-Solo to watch dance performances and to have a discussion about it. We watched two kinds of Javanese dance; Serimpi Anglir Mendung dance and Bramastra dance. The dances had two different styles and meanings. The Serimpi dance was performed by four women. It told us about the King’s dream of balancing the four universal elements, which are fire, water, air, and earth. Meanwhile, the Bramastra dance’s performed DAILY JOURNAL


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105 by a man. The main difference between Serimpi dance and Bramastra dance is the latter did not tell a story, yet it is an interpretation of the warmth of a fire arrow. We had a great discussion there with the professor of ISI. EIDETIC DIAGRAM. We spent the rest of the week brainstorming and preparing for the first final review, which would take place on the next Tuesday. We started to find some difficulties in communication, yet it is not a big deal. We tried to make it better every day. While having discussion, Bethany and Leon showed us their eidetic diagram method, which they usually use in designing everything. I did not understand about the line or smoke they’d drawn on the diagram, but it looked totally nice! Then they told us about what it means. From seeing their and the other UF students diagram, I found that eidetic diagram is a designing method that combines and layers the aspects analyzed. The first and second time I tried to make the diagrams, Carmen commented that it is fragmented. Therefore I tried harder. Actually it was pretty hard to translate our analysis into an abstract diagram, which could evolve subsequently to a design. One of my UF friend said that it’s OK that we’re not used to their way to make an eidetic diagram yet, because they had learnt it for more than 2 years. FOOD The thing I loved most when I went to hangouts with my UF friends is acquainting the traditional food. The Indonesian students and I made Bethany and Leon to try so many kind of Indonesian food, such as lotek, Javanese fried rice, goat satay, gudeg, ayam penyet, soto, etc. The surprising moment was when Leon put soy sauce on every food he had. He put extra soy sauce on his fried rice and even on his cheese bread! He said it tasted like chocolate! One morning I caught him having a plate of rice only with soy sauce. I asked him did it work, and he said not at all. Absolutely. My group’s principle on working this project is “everything goes from stomach into mind then into heart”. Therefore we couldn’t have the task done when we’re hungry. Thus every morning, Yosi, or Eno, or I always brought food, whatever it was, while the other groups were starving. FINAL REVIEW Two days before first final review, Mr. Wang caught me not paying attention to his lecture. He asked me a thing and I didn’t pay attention to what his question DAILY JOURNAL


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106 was. So I just kept blabbering, then I knew he was not asking about the things I answered about. Poor me. Our first final review was terrible. The professor said we have not done anything except closing the second gate and not letting the car go inside on the site. We still had not got the point of the issues, the analysis and the big idea. Everything is still shattered. The UF students were too focused on the design without went deep into the issue and the big idea. Some of the UGM and ITB students were the opposite. Yet we couldn’t discuss and combine it well. We separated the design proposes into many parts. Each person got one part to be designed, but we had no time to combine it and discuss more about it, so it was going to be too fragmented. One fatal thing we forgot to discuss was the urban scale aspect. We forgot what Ndalem Pujokusuman‘s role is in Jogjakarta and the surrounding. I felt completely down. Near the second final review time, all we did was discussing the issue, meeting the professor and talking about what design we are proposing. We started to face communication problem. In many discussions, the Indonesian students use Bahasa instead of English. For some of us, it is because of the limited English skill. Bethany and Leon let us speak Bahasa, but we knew if it was important to be discussed together, we had is so important. ROMO Ndalem Pujokusuman has a deep history that attracted me to know deeper. First time we visited the site, we met the landowner. We called him Romo. The 4th Sultan to use English. For that reason, having the good ability to speak in foreign language Hamengkubuwono gave his father the land. He lives in a private place beside the Pendhopo. I was amazed when he let us to get into the back room. I saw so many royal things that were from the Sultan, such as pictures, mirror, cupboard, and bedstead. Everything was made from high quality wood. We had to visit the site for two to three times. On the site visit, we talked so many things with Romo. Although it was a little hard for him to talk, he was still on fire to tell us everything about Ndalem. It was a pleasure to talk to him. One night when we chatted with him, his wife served us a glass of hot Javanese beer. That was so awesome! We all liked it. LAST FINAL REVIEW According to the evaluations of the first and second final review, I made the storythe pendhopo, so we thought it contrasted with the existing too much. There DAILY JOURNAL


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107 was no fault to contrast, but in this case it would give bad impact to the existing. After a long debate, I made a decision to make something without traditional roof as long as we don’t use flat roof because it’d be totally hard for maintenance. We all agreed about of the campus. Maybe the photos were not just because of the better presentation, but because we would part in a few days. After we presented, my group went to a German restaurant and had so much fun there. We left other groups who were still waiting for their turns. Actually we had to be there, but we had things that were more important. Fulfilling our tummies. AT THE END Learning very many things through a nice journey is a big present from God for me. I met new friends who have big spirit to be architects. I enjoyed every little thing that I had done there. The thing I remember most is Mr. Wang telling me that whatever the situation is, I have to make a decision. I know I will keep EA 2013 as good memories. Even though there were bad things that happened there, but it will never ruin the good things. I love YogYakarta, I love EA 2013 !

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110 REINA RIVENSKA DISSA

Departement of Architecture School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development ITB reina.rivenska@gmail.com

Around March - April 2013, our school opened a registration to join an architecture studio program in Yogyakarta with University of Florida and Universitas Gadjah Mada. Heard that news, then I submitted my registration, I was really hoping that I was chosen as one of the participant, lucky for me, I was shortlisted and I had to come to the interview. Couple days after the interview, our professors spread the news via Facebook that me and my 7 other friends were chosen to join the program and had to fly to Yogyakarta on late May 2013. On May 27, 2013, Nadya and I flew to Yogyakarta to catch up the others, but we use different airplane. After my plane had landed, I waited Nadya’s plane to go to the Bachiro where our other friends stayed before the program started. May 28, 2013 we moved from Bachiro to our homestay near UGM, that night, our professors told us to come to the UF students’s homestay to meet them and the UF participants. They looked tired, but we were still going to have dinner together, getting to know each other before the program. After dinner, we got back to the homestay to have some rest before we had to face the 3 weeks program. WEEK 1st On first day, we were gathered at architecture building of Universitas Gadjah Mada. We were having first brief about the program and the project itself. Participants would be divided into 4 groups, there were a group for Kasongan Village projects,1 group would do the nDalem Pujokusuman projects, and two groups for Taman Sari. After the initial briefing, we went to Taman Sari, having our initial site visit to help us decide which project we wanted to be involved in. Actually, for some of us, visiting Taman Sari was a very common because it’s one of the main tourism spots in Yogyakarta, but what new for us was architect’s perspective to Taman Sari, based on the initial brief we had before. At night after we had visited Taman Sari, UGM held a welcome dinner for all the participants and professor at the gazebo joglo in the Architecture Building’s inner court. The next day, we went to nDalem Pujokusuman and Kasongan Village, our next site visit. At nDalem Pujokusuman, we were ‘welcomed’ by kindegarden students; some of them said “ono bule! (There are foreigners!)” or said “hello, mister! Hello, mister!” Before we were walking around the nDalem, we met the owner of the DAILY JOURNAL


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111 house, Romo Ibnu, son of Pujokusuma. He told us a lot of stories about his house, the dance pratices, and sometimes he told us his family history. Then, after nDalem Pujokusuman, we were off to Kasongan. Kasongan is a village; it is a central of home production potteries in Yogyakarta. Beside being shown of some shops in the Kasongan Village, we were offered by the local artist and owner of a shop to ride a getek; boating along the river that divided Kasongan into two parts. To ride getek, we had to divide our group into two because of the insufficient number of getek. While the first group was boating along the river, the second group gathered in the cafeteria, eating some snacks and talking about schedule or some information with our professors. On the journey of second group, the guys of UGM flipped a getek because of overload; they insisted to board five people on a getek while the capacity was only for 4 people. Finished from boating getek, we had lunch at a small restaurant inside the Kasongan village; we ate local fried chicken there. I thought the chicken itself was hybrid between chicken, turkey, and duck because the size of the chicken was almost as big as turkey and the taste of the meat was like duck. We headed back to the city after we finished lunch, and we could get some rest at our homestays. To enrich our knowledge about Javanese culture, we went to Institut Seni Indonesia Solo (ISI Solo) on the next day. We were shown 2 different traditional dances, the Srimpi Anglir Mendung dance and Bramastra dance. Srimpi Anglir Mendung dance is originally shown in the Kraton Ngayogyakarta, the word “Srimpi” itself means King’s Dream and the words “Anglir Mendung” means cloudiness. Srimpi Anglir Mendung dance is telling us about the Javanese cosmology. 4 dancers are the symbolization for the elements or power with 1 center. There is an imaginary dancer in the middle as the center of the 4 elements. The meaning of interaction between the elements and the center is all about the harmony. The next dance was Bramastra, means fire arrow. Bramastra is not in the narrative form, but more as symbolization. The concept of Bramastra is generated from the cold war issue; the dance is as interpretation of weapon’s characteristics. In the part of Bramastra dance, there is a move called Sembahan Laras, which the movement shows how human controlling dualism in life and how they praise the God. The essence of Bramastra dance for architecture is not always about narrative, but it is all about meaning. Both the Srimpi Anglir Mendung and Bramastra movements are formed from ideas crystallization, and the integration of the dance’s concept; same like architecture, the shape of architecture’s product is following the concept that is used and all the components and elements of architecture is part of the integration of the projects. After we had finished watching the traditional dances, we went to Kampung Batik Laweyan. The professors gave us plenty of time to spend our money there, to buy DAILY JOURNAL


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112 some souvenirs for family and ourself. Since our friends from UF couldn’t understand Bahasa, so the ITB participants accompanied and helped them to shop and bargain the things that they wanted to buy. Finished shopping time, we got back to the Yogyakarta and we had Pizza Night at the UF’s homestay to gather all the participants and to welcome the rough and tough weeks we would face, On June 1st, Sunday morning, we started our studio. We met our project team – Leon Ordaz and Bethany Mayhew from UF and Enno, Yosita, Dimas, and Hari from UGM – we decided to revisit nDalem Pujokusuman and gathered some information we needed for the project. First thing we did after we got there was discussing at the pendopo then we were walking around the nDalem. After we walked around the complex, we are gathered at the pendopo once more before we headed back to our studio, but somehow Romo Ibnu approached us and asked us to come into his house. He told us many stories about his earlier life and we asked him questioned that related to the nDalem, after long talks we had, Romo Ibnu told us to come back the night after that day to take a pictures of the original plan of the nDalem. The next day, we were planning to see Wayang performance at the Keraton Yogyakarta. But we came on the wrong day, fortunately traditional dance Tari Bedoyo and a theatrical performance; battle between Buto and one of Pandawa. Before we saw the performances, we walked around and found a kampong that produces wayangs. At the kampong, we learnt about the basic principle of wayang and the elements in the wayang. We were told that wayang is divided into three elements: nature, heart, and mind. Nature consists of the 4th element; fire, air, water, and earth. The nature elements turning into a nature figure like flower, then the flowers become one with the body as energy and ‘move’ up to the heart. From heart the energy goes up to the head and formed as a crown. The crown is a symbolic to responsibility. The nature, heart, and mind principles also applied to the other type of wayang, the gunungan. From the making of wayang gunungan, we also learned that the hands of positive characters of wayang have harmony form. From our trip to Solo and visited Keraton, we found an idea to harmonize the dualism in our site; the inclusion – exclusion between inside and outside the wall. To enrich our knowledge more about culture and wayang, we went to Museum Sonobudoyo after we took pictures of nDalem Pujokusuman old map. Many foreigners were there to enjoy the wayang show, included Bethany and Leon. We learnt how dalang plays with his wayangs, the gamelan, and the whole set. Unfortunately for us, we couldn’t understand the formal Javanese language they were using in the performance so we didn’t understand the story they told us.

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113 WEEK 2nd The second week was our first review week. That week we tried to deepen our concept and issues we were going to solve and also we tried to propose what were going to design and create for the project. On early of the 2nd week, we were pretty busy and kind of losing our pace because the UF participants had to move to Kaliurang for three days. By that way, even though we were losing our pace, we kept trying to make some progress every day. On June 5th, we were having our first review. Our team – the nDalem Pujokusuman – was supposed to be the second team to present, but we were not ready at all; we had not finished our slide yet. After we had finished our slides, the 2nd team was still presenting their Taman Sari project, so were waiting on the corridor. Alicia, Leon, and me talked about “Nyan Cat” , we were laughing so hard, but then Bethany told us to think about our project than talk about “Nyan Cat”, so we stopped talking for awhile, then I was so silent; I was not thinking for anything, but I was so blank and just looking at the tile until we decided to go in to the room. After we presented the proposal, we were asked so much questions, which lead to the conclusion that our design did nothing for the site. Out from the room, we were having fun before starting all over from the start again. WEEK 3rd Our 2nd review was worse than the first one, we did not make any storyboard, we did not present the background study and the analysis that we did for the design, and the professors confused with what we did. From the 2nd review, we were really crushed into pieces, and finally we did evaluate of what had happened to our project and us. The crushed moment was the important momentum for our team to work not only as a team but also as a friend, so we did professionally but still cover each other’s. I am feeling really grateful until now to be in a team like that, more like family than professional working group. With that pace and the feeling we had, we done our project beautifully with beautiful process and we were really proud of what we did and we were almost crying in happiness after the last review because we had positive comments and yet with good critics we got. But that was my first time feeling so bad and empty after we had done it. I knew that feeling came because we would be separated for halfaround of earth, and we don’t know when we will meet again, complete as our little family in East Asia 2013. One thing that I have learned from our entire journey is DO IT ALL WITH HEART, MIND, and SOUL, IT MUST BE LEAD TO SOMETHING GREAT. DAILY JOURNAL


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116 NADYA CHAIRUNNISA

Departement of Architecture School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development ITB nadya.chairunnisa@gmail.com

The first time I heard that I was accepted as participants of EA 2013 program, I was very excited. I have never imagined that it would be a tiring and exhausting. Yet it was one of the most wonderful moments in my life. The studio began at Wednesday March 29th 2013, the first half-day we came to a gathering in UGM and introduced our self to other participants. Then they gave us some lectures about the place that would be our site for this project. The big concept is “Theater of Memory - The Thinking of Craft and Craft of Thinking”. The brief is to feel the soul of a place and experience the space uniqueness, history, present condition or the future lead by design that we will suggest. The presentation technique that we were going to use is eidetic imagery. Each group will analyze different problem in a different scale (urban, architecture or detail). The other half-day we went to the first site, Taman Sari. The next day we visited the two other sites: Ndalem and Kasongan village. At night we had a welcoming dinner to get to know the other participants and decide which site. When we’re done deciding, we had to recruit the other students to our group. My group’s site was Tamansari, we had 2 ITB students (Me and Agung), 2 UF students (Sasha and Afi) and 5 UGM students (Ristya, Aan, Ovi, Anang and Nana). When the studio began, we decided to go to the site one more time to collect more data and after that we gather again to discuss what we had got. The UF students told us to make some ‘diagram’ of our visit, but at that time I didn’t know what ‘diagram’ meant or how to make it. So I just did it the way I’m used to: collecting data then analyze it. The next day after site visit we met again to discuss our discoveries from the diagram. This is when the first problem showed up, the Indonesian students (including me) were shy to speak English. It and the difference of methods made the communication in my group hard. In a couple of days, things got worst. On Monday 3rd June 2013 we had a group meeting to prepare the first presentation for the next day. Before we began our work, we had a discussion about how we should work in a group and the problem we’re facing. At first, all the Indonesian students were afraid to tell their problems but because our UF friends supported the others to talk, we all spoke up. After the conversation, we began to work and we came up with more and more ideas.

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117 For the first Presentation on 4th June 2013 we came up with several concepts. The lecturers told us that we had a good work and they were proud of us because it seemed that all of the group members participated in this presentation. I was happy with it. They advised us about access and to focus on one big idea. For several days, we worked in the studio, came back to the site to collect more data and I also learnt about that ‘diagram’. I made some of it, and it surprised me that I could do it. My first diagram is about the water in Tamansari. Afi told me the important tips to make a diagram. First divide the information you get into several layers, then draw it one by one, and combine it in the end. I made my diagram from a map. I traced the map and make some symbols in sacred places that contained water in the past. I also made a boundary of the water. After that I made another layer, the second layer was about the present condition. Some of the old places were gone but some still stood. Then I added another layer that contained the things that replaced the water. That is how I made my first diagram. I must confess, making this diagram was exhausting and confusing but the good thing was it is really fun. After a long week of studio we had the second presentation in June 11th, we already had a big idea about water sound installation and we also made a model of it. Everyone in my group had a portion in this project, like me, I did a diagram while some of us did research and the rest did the presentation. We did not really make a big difference in this presentation, but I really liked the idea that we came up with. We chose to take water element as a memory of Tamansari and the sound element as a theater. We were really concerned about the main concept of this East Asia Program, which was not to solve the problem with basic solution but with other solution that no one but architects can easily do. With this solution we tried to regain a soul of this place, not that we had to make things exactly like in the past but how we accept the current condition and add something that could strengthen the soul of the history (memory) of this place. On 12th June we visited Borobudur temple and Amanjiwo Resort. I was really lucky, if I didn’t join EA2013 maybe I will never visit Amanjiwo resort because they don’t accept visitors except their guest. The next day studio started again therefore we should’ve began to produce some drawing and design for the final presentation. I did diagrams about the movement of the screen gallery and after I’d finished I did a rendering job. Some tips from me, we should not be afraid to tell our group members about the skill that we have because if you hide it the other members may never know and maybe you would get a job that doesn’t match your skill or preference. The Final Presentation was on 17th June 2013. We had the last turn. I watched other group’s presentations, they had their own uniqueness and they were all good. DvAILY JOURNAL


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118 When my turn came, some of us were already tired of waiting but still we had the spirit to go on. The lecturer said that they liked our ideas, I was happy to hear that. We had a little technical thing missing but because this EA program’s just a design charette, I think it’s okay. I’m proud of myself because we were all able to go through all of this together. Living with your friends for 21 days was not really easy. They have their own habits including me, but how you can tolerate with the others is the best lesson. Getting along for 21 days with strangers from across the world, talking in foreign language, facing misunderstandings, were not easy. But when you became friends with them it’s beautiful. Even though the process was full of conflicts, dramas, and problems, we faced it together until the end. It’s so nice to know you all and I’m going to miss you guys! Thanks for EA 2013 program <3

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121 RADEN AGUNG YOGASWARA

Departement of Architecture School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development ITB r.agung.y26@gmail.com

EA 2013 is a thing that I will never forget, a stepping-stone in my architecture life. I learned something new and it was something that I have wanted to know from a long time ago. The design approach method was abstract diagram like an abstract painting, so artistic. Because I am not good in foreign language, this program is a challenge for me. The program has international students and professors as participant. The competition was not something that I was afraid of, but it was the communication. I understood what people were saying, but I could not say what I want to say. For a while I thought the language barrier would be a huge disadvantage, but I believed that I could do the best with my own way. A small maroon pocket book was my companion. I poured everything I saw, listened, said, and felt in Yogyakarta on it. The contents were notes from lectures, site surveys, other people objects, sketches, and ideas. Not only this notebook, I have another bigger book for sketching with hard black cover. I‘ve never used this book before Yogyakarta. I drew diagrams, creative mapping, an a girl in other city, far from Yogyakarta. FIRST WEEK Opening ceremony was a lecture from professor Ika Putra. Then continued by other delegations from each institution. Later on, everybody gave their own words including me. “This is very exciting, I think it is not only for me, but I am, sure, everybody is very enthusiastic for this collaboration. I hope I can learn more than I expect. And I hope we can get to know each other. Enjoy this studio, enjoy Jogja, and enjoy our friendship from now!”, I was going to say that, but my lips said something shorter instead. “I hope we can enjoy!” In the first week, our activities were lectures about this project, site introduction, site survey, and we began to know each other. ITB and UGM students were introduced to new approach, eidetic imagery. I’ve never heard about it before. The method was like drawing an apple without the apple in the drawing. I thought it was confusing for people when we heard it for the first time. The images were so abstract yet very artistic like an abstract painting, only black and white in color. DvAILY JOURNAL


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122 I thought I would really love it. At the end of the first week we had a review. It was our team’s first presentation. I had butterflies in my stomach. I thought “Oh God, I will be presenting, I’m so nervous.” The diagram that I made was just understood by me. It seemed so ugly, but Sasha and Afi convinced me that it was so good. Yeah, Sasha and Afi always think positively. SECOND WEEK Oh, like a movie, we had our own drama in the summer course. It was so funny. I just had to take it positively. Everybody has their own character, and each person is different from the others. In the second week, we focused to develop our ideas, and my team proposed to reclaim the water that used to be in Taman Sari. “Memory of Water” we called it. We wanted to bring back the characteristics of Taman Sari, and elements like batik, leather puppets, dances, and gamelan music. We made many diagrams about the ideas because it was more understandable that way. Three weeks were too short to learn how to make a good diagram, but it was enough for the basic of diagramming. Second review means second presentation. There were not any differences from the first presentation. I thought that I do not need to explain about my diagram again. We had design alternatives, but the professors told us to have one design proposal in the end. We could have been more progressive, because I think that the design should not be forced to come up from everyone. I had understood if my design ideas did not take much part in the final product. Because when we work in a team, we have to eliminate selfishness. THIRD WEEK Until the 3rd week, I thought the last week would be very hectic, but our team worked with the same pattern we are used to. My group had never worked together after studio, unlike other groups who often gathered after hours. I was more inclined to work on my own according to the division of tasks and responsibilities that have been given and agreed on. I was always in my room, sitting on a chair staring at the Internet connected laptop, with music and a cup of coffee. Or while working on the diagram or drawing a person. The good thing was that we got a bike that can be used to go to campus from home stay vice versa. Though the bike should have been available from the first week. I was grateful that I did not need to walk more every day while carrying a heavy bags. DAILY JOURNAL


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123 As usual, my job was to make the charts. I made a creative mapping that seems abstract like eidetic images but can be made with more colors. I combined the pieces, floor plans, and elevations all at once to make the creative map. It would communicate a lot of information. We can use photoshop to make creative maps, such as to montage photos of the buildings, adding materials and patterns etc. On the final review we had a design of two installations. There were water and portable panel installation. This was a result of three weeks of funny long discussion, the diagrams that we had made, and the new approach that we had learned. The rest of the activities during the three weeks were culinary activities, walk through Yogyakarta city with cool friends from ITB, the seniors from UGM and “bule gila” from UF. I was very happy because I gained weight in just a few weeks, I should’ve continued to stay in Jogja for this. The most important thing that I got for this work is how we should truly understand the space that we will intervene, deep meanings, interpretations, and sensitivity to everything that is in the space as well. Not only the physical aspect that is important but also the cultural, social, behavioral and natural aspects. The spirit of a place is what we should protect, not the brick, the roof, nor the wall. I want to be able to apply this approach in the studio in ITB. Not to be used as the only approach, but to be combined with other methods as well. Thanks to Professor Wang who has given so much knowledge. Professor Widjaja and Professor Heru who has guided and accompanied us in Yogyakarta and given me the chance to learn through the studio collaboration. Professor Ika Putra who has been a good host. Professor Tata Soemardi who has spent time to come to Yogyakarta. Last but not least, my team members, my partner Nadya, my mentors Afi and Sasha, Mas Anang, Mas Ofi, Mbak Ristya, Mas Aan, and Mbak Nana.

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126 KANIA THEA PRADIPTA

Departement of Architecture School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development ITB kania.pradipta@yahoo.com

The program started on 29th of May 2013. I was already at Jogjakarta because I took a short vacation first there. I really had no idea what the join studio program was all about. I only knew that the theme was “the theater of memory” and we (ITB students) were going to collaborate with UGM (University of Gadjah Mada) and UF (University of Florida) students on our upcoming studio projects. I was pretty much excited to meet new people, share each other’s experiences and hear stuffs we’ve never heard of from people who live in different places even countries. I only put a little interest on the city of Jogjakarta itself even though it would be our project’s site. On our first meetings we were introduced to other delegates from other schools; the UF and UGM students. It was interesting when we first met the eight UF students. They were different; their language, their appearances, their figures, everything. They welcomed us really well and it turned out that their professor was also an Indonesian. His name is Mr. Wang, he had once lived in Garut, West Java, before he started living abroad and finally made it to Harvard. It was quite exceptional. Then we had a class where the lecturers from the UGM gave presentations about the city of Yogyakarta. Yogyakarta has a rich historical identity. The city has an axis, which connects three crucial objects; the Indian Ocean, the Noble Palace and the Merapi Mountain. Indian Ocean represents the South, the Palace represents the center and the Mountain represents the North. It is just a glimpse of the abundance of Yogyakarta’s histories. Furthermore, we were told about our project’s site locations. They were the Water Castle of Tamansari, Kasongan Village and the Noble Residence. Each place has its own uniqueness and particular amazing details. We also did a little discussion about each site’s issues. My interest grew quite much back then. Jogjakarta is truly one of a kind. After we had been given the presentations, we visited the site locations. We had to really understand about the locations; how it was build, what stories they have, what materials can be found there, how the people were over there, and what the real issues are. We had to feel and see them ourselves. We had to communicate and interact with the environment ourselves. Unless we did that, we would not be able to make such a real and distinctive design, which could solve the issues, happened in each site. DAILY JOURNAL


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127 Then we had to split up into 4 groups. Each group consisted of 2 ITB students, 2 UF students and 4 UGM students. My group chose the Water Castle of Tamansari. The problem was the Castle had blended in too much with the surrounding dwellings and it had lost its originality. The Castle was once really splendid and pretentious, surrounded by huge beautiful lakes. The Kings and Noblemen used to bath and rest there, and also considered the place as a sanctuary. When we looked over the place it was just an ordinary old building with ruins all over it in the middle of informal settlements area. We found out that to return the castle’s originality we shouldn’t have to omit things slightly looked ugly or improper. We should embrace what’s been already there and try to re-introduce the originality from little details we found in the area. We were planned to do 2 reviews and 1 final review. In our 2 first reviews, we had some difficulties since we spent most of the times in discussing how to start the design process. Our UF mates taught us how to apply an eidetic diagram on our design. Eidetic diagram is an abstract drawing telling about our understanding, feeling and experiences of a particular place. It is like how expressive and creative you can be at drawing an apple without drawing the shape of the apple itself. Actually that could really help us understand and comprehend a place or an object. Our design will be very unique and have many touches of feelings. Despite of that, the technique itself is quite abstract and intangible. Not everybody could take it easily, especially Indonesian students who are used to design with exact and technical phases and steps. Fortunately we could overcome that problem so we could move to the next step. We decided to split the jobs since the deadline was drawing really near so we had to work more effectively and efficiently. The UGM students did the design model out of bamboo sticks, the ITB and UF students made the 3D models, the renderings, and the presentation’s materials. The final review turned out quite well, we explained how our combined eidetic diagrams could be our design base, how we decided to add some pulley system into the design, how we manage to make a historical path along the dwellings’ alleys and how we re-modeled the peak of the ruins into a little playground with interactive levels, shallow lake and play of lights. I got many experiences from this program. I learned new techniques of designing architectural matters, to appreciate my own country’s legacy and culture, broaden my insights about approaching our surrounding issues, trying to solve problems in communities, and work in a team where communication, understanding each other, open minded and eagerness to learn are really important. It was such a pleasure working with my team; Prathito from ITB, Elena Clarke and Rachel Cloyd from UF, Adam, Jeni, Gusma and Ely from UGM. DAILY JOURNAL


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130 PRATHITO ANDY WISAMBODHI

Departement of Architecture School of Architecture, Planning and Policy Development ITB prathitoandyw@gmail.com

I always believe the best part of traveling is the journey and the people you meet along the way. Reaching the destination is merely a bonus ripening from the voyage. It is much like the three weeks I had in Yogyakarta. EA 2013 is a journey that taught me about beauty. I discovered “new factor” in a design process, the intangible factor, that’s even as important as the tangible one. There were times I thought intangible aspects were nothing much of hindrance for a practical and useful design. In EA 2013 I had to learn to interpret unseen beauty into something seen like an abstract diagram. In my project, we had to design an intervention to the Tamansari ruins. It was not easy to absorb the beauty of a handful of bricks and rubbles that embody a lot of memory. Abstract diagram or eidetic imagery’s a technique that could make this possible. Every scribble, every dot, and even every stroke of emptiness means something in this diagram. Then it could generate ideas, concepts, and to a greater extent, a design. Therefore the design product would not be something that comes out of nowhere, but it’d be a reenactment of the beauty that is already there before, and it would heighten up the existing atmosphere. Therefore I learned that intangible factors are not obstacles to be prevented, it should be embraced because that what gives meaning, story, and life to a product Architecture students should be the ones who are aware of spatial beauty the most. Without beauty, a space would be very boring. Without space, life could not continue. Even in the most chaotic of a condition, we have to be very optimistic so we could identify even the littlest beauty, as Professor Wang once told me. I learned that beauty’s not skin deep, it’s what beyond the physical qualities instead. Like a gracefully aging woman, every wrinkle tells a story that makes her beautiful. In my case, every fragments of Tamansari had been through magnificent and devastating stories over the years and that what makes it beautiful. As this was a team project, working with people from different backgrounds was not effortless. Having arguments, little quarrels, and even more misunderstandings, were not perfectly ideal. But it’s not an excuse to make an exceptional product with good teamwork. A good teamwork is not without conflicts and arguments. But it is when you are able to deal with the difficulty. A solution that’s best for everybody’s interest while aiming for the same goal, similar to a journey. DAILY JOURNAL


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131 EA 2013 was Yogyakarta at its most beautiful. New friends from UF, UGM, and new knowledge are a priceless story worth telling. I found out that life is in fact a journey full of little journeys. Every little journey has different experiences, stories, and people to learn from. Whether it be a good or a so-so journey, when you make the best out of it good things will wait for you.

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KASONGAN

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NDALEM PUJOKUSUMAN

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TEMPLE TRIP

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TAMAN SARI

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ITB EA 2013

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The Theater of Memory  

"A Collection of Student Projects from East Asia Program at Yogyakarta". Report Book of SAPPD of Institut Teknology Bandung Student Team.

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