Page 1

rachel ghindea

selected works


contents academic studio 1 FORMAL GENERATORS OF SPACE 11 TWENTY ONE DAY ARCHITECTURE 17 MONUMENT TO JESSE OWENS 23 CENTER OF PERFORMANCE

additional work 29 NOODLE SOUP 33 FASHION SCHAU 7: (DE)CONSTRUCT 37 EUROPEAN ARCHITECTURE STUDIES


FORMAL GENERATORS OF SPACE US EMBASSY IN MEXICO CITY FALL 2017 // KAREN LEWIS 1ST PLACE IN GUI COMPETITION

Given the current relationship between the US and Mexico, this project is an investigation of the border between two countries not as something that divides, but something that enables interaction. The expected function of the border is inverted into a wrapper that collects. However, this wrapper is not a tangible thing—the box that encases the collected objects is only read where it defines the limits of the building, and its cleaving of the objects leaves behind transparent glass faces. This is not only meant to recall the fact that most borders are not physical elements, but also to indicate the increasing obsolescence of borders. The objects collected by this wrapper are forced to intersect and overlap and ultimately create space. A series of formal studies investigating the creation of nested spaces led to the use of a pyramidal shape. This allows for more secure and private spaces to exist within public areas. Much like territories of one country existing within another (as the embassy is often considered) the walls and floors behave like borders between different offices and levels of security. By mapping a typical office diagram to the pyramidal forms, each plane of offices can remain intact and introduce opportunities for interaction between various levels.

2


DESIGN BY SECTION Like borders between countries, the walls and floors are not planar elements, but map themselves to the introduced geometry. The building transforms from a typical office section and the levels are offered multiple opportunities to interact with levels that are not adjacent to them.


4


ADDITION

SPACE OVERLOOK

DISTINCT SPACES

SUBTRACTION

ENTRY

SPACE HIGHLIGHTING

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

LENOX

PAVILIONIZATION/ SPACE HIGHLIGHTING

DIVISION

CASCADING SPACES

PATH AND DESTINATION

NESTED SPACE

NESTED SPACE


6


TERRITORIES The concept of creating territories existing within one another deployed in plan as well. Office suites that seem to hover over spaces below, with only a thin skywalk tethering them back to their region of origin.


8


SECTIONAL MODEL 1:100 This model highlights the complexity of the interactions between not only geometries but also office levels on the interior. It also highlights the exterior facade condition.

10


TWENTY ONE DAY ARCHITECTURE HONORS RESEARCH STUDIO SPRING 2018 // SANDHYA KOCHAR HONORS RESEARCH STUDIO IN COLLABORATION WITH: SARAH CRONIN & ALEX OETZEL

The contemporary architect is increasingly interested in a single architectural drawing or graphic image being used to represent a complex project, and we argue that these single images are contributing to the boredom plaguing the 21st century. By becoming image producers, architects are giving up their agency as space makers. Our project aims to reassert this agency that has been lost through generations of architectural education and practice. Boredom, or the formation of an experience into a habit, is developed after having the same experience for 21 days in a row. To provide relief from the monotony of habitual life, we are speculating about a new kind of architecture. A 21 Day “Thing” Architecture. An architecture comprised of a series of things which can be replaced periodically, suspending our expectations and disrupting our assumptions every 21 days. Similar to Hejduk’s Victims, 21 Day Architecture is a proposal which will manifest as a series of distinct characters (things) creating different spatial experiences. This architecture originates in drawings and images produced by contemporary architects. We consider these to be objects, or the easily replicable. We aim to turn these objects into things. Things are that which shed socially encoded values and become present to us in new ways through suspension of habit. An object can become a thing through careful and thoughtful design. Our investigation of 21 Day Thing Architecture begins with four flat projects; Pool Party by Bureau Spectacular, Archaeograph by Sam Jacob, Detroit Reassembly Plant by TEAM, and Flatbed Junk by NemeStudio. We evaluated each of the projects’ encoded values as they are presented in the original narratives, as well as the values that can be understood from a surface reading of the image. In each of the projects, we explore hybridizing program, creating new context, appropriating project techniques, questioning scale, and exaggerating/exploiting the original intentions of the projects as methods for making new things from found objects.

12


POOL CON This iteration reimagines Pool Party as a plan drawing of a convention center. What was previously interpreted as a collection of loosely related objects now becomes the volumes and voids that make for a successful collection of programmatically unconventional convention spaces held under one (highly differentiated) roof.


DETROIT ARM CHAIR A proposal that we intend to pitch to IKEA, the Detrรถit Armchair ignores the scale cues in the original drawing in favor of the creation of a potentially uncomfortable but incredibly ornate armchair. Arriving to your doorstep in a mere 562 pieces, the chair pays homage to the Detroit Reassembly plant as a kit of parts to be assembled by the new owner.

14


CORNICE ( TOWER?) This thing suggests Archaeograph operates at two scales simultaneously. Cornice (Tower?) transforms the elements of London into something much smaller--objects become repeated and mirrored across a plane to create a thing that acts as a cornice. When rotated, the cornice can transform into a free standing tower. Altered context allows this iteration to function both as a small architectural element, and as an entire building on its own.


BLOCS O BLA Rejecting Flatbed Junk’s narrative of a continuous interior condition, this iteration instead creates broken and discontinuous spaces using only a series of surfaces. Additionally, this thing explores the idea of junkiness using First Office’s technique of intentionally poor construction. No volumes were harmed in the making of this thing.

16


MONUMENT TO JESSE OWENS RECREATION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY CENTER FALL 2016 // STEPHEN TURK

This project began by stacking programmatically assigned volumes logically, taking the negative of that form, quartering and rearranging to arrive at unusual relationships between program spaces. This form unrolled created a diagram that informs the way the quartered pieces are manipulated on the site to arrive at the final form. Drawing inspiration from Casa da Musica, I was interested in blurring the relationship between ground and building. In a series of moves far more aggressive than the precedent, the forms appear to forcefully push up out of the ground, like tectonic plates coming together to create a mountain. I wanted to contrast this feeling of solid mass from the exterior, with a completely different interior condition. Instead of hollowing out caves within the mountain, I created an open space, occupied by floating volumes of program. I wanted these contrasting understandings of the building to oscillate from the exterior. I achieved this with an etched glass faรงade, so, depending on the time of day, the building will appear either as an opaque mass, a shell filled with floating volumes or a mountain with caves.

18


20


RENDERED SECTION This section diagram features rendered representations of the spaces between lines of poche. It attempts to capture the experience of being in the building instead of a typical, more technical section.


22


CENTER OF PERFORMANCE DANCE AND PERFORMING ARTS CENTER SPRING 2016 // JUSTIN DILES

This building is meant to house a multitude of performances, but rather than conforming to the diverse needs of each, it demands to be accommodated for itself. The interesting spaces created by the faceted, zoomorphic form provide a dynamic stage for the equally dynamic performances that are to take place within. The form of the building resulted from a series of studies with an interest in creating a performing center that is, itself, performing. The building creates its own exterior stage, which the light well not only highlights but allows those within the building to view the performance taking place outside.

24


26


28


NOODLE SOUP

2018 RAGDALE RING WINNING COMPETITION ENTRY SPRING 2016 IN COLLABORATION WITH: OFFICE CA, THEO MORROW, CLARK SABULA, ALI SANDHU, CHRISTINA TEFEND, SADIE WEBB, DANIEL YONTZ

We could probably say with confidence that the arts at the end of the 20th century were radically changed with the emergence of digital technologies. But technology didn’t simply change how we make and consume art, it also democratized artistic practice as a whole. Today, individuals are performers, they share their work constantly, and they have access to a vast landscape of artistic mediums. Following this train of thought, our proposal for the 2018 Ragdale Ring seeks to empower the individual’s artistic agency as well as blend whimsy, playfulness, and interaction into a transformable constructed landscape. Our design investigates a dialogue between the natural and the artificial. First, we take ideal forms and blend them with the existing terrain. Next, we take natural figures and scatter them throughout the landscape. The result is a weaving of hard and soft, artificial and natural, reminiscent of Arts and Crafts imagery, but with a contemporary twist. We call it Noodle Soup. It features a set of fixed structures around which are soft, linear, pliable pieces of furniture. The soft elements can interact with the hard structures to serve functional purposes such as seating, but they can also act as oversized toys, freely configurable in a variety of ways. To enhance the interactive component, the environment will be accompanied by a small web-based app called “Ragdale’s Noodle Soup Cookbook,” which will provide visitors with possible arrangements for the landscape. Noodle Soup will be an interactive play-scape, flexible enough for a range of performances, and picturesque enough for it to seamlessly integrate into the scenery of Lake Forest.

30


THE NOODLES The noodles are pliable, linear, waterproof bean bags arranged throughout the composition in various lengths. They are made primarily of PVC coated polyester mesh fabric (which provides weatherproofing for extended exterior use) filled with a mixture of recycled foam peanuts and recycled rubber fill. The fill is carefully balanced so as to give the noodle enough weight to withstand wind, but light enough so individual users can reposition them as they wish. Noodles can be looped, knotted, slumped over, and piled up. They can interact with the walls in various ways, by threading them through openings or simply laying them on the steps. The different lengths cater to different uses. For example, looped ones can be used for small about noodle soup gatherings, long ones can be coiled in an S-shape for stage seating, and short ones can be knotted to form a recliner. If necessary, noodles can be hooked onto walls for added security.


THE WALLS Made of traditional wood framing, the walls and the stage are the only fixed element in the composition. They are conceived as having been “peeled� up from the ground on one side and sculpted into seating on the other. This contrast between natural and artificial is further articulated by having the concave side clad in a green shade of AstroTurf, blending it into the ground. The convex side is clad in a neon shade of AstroTurf so as to reinforce its artificial qualities. As the viewer makes their way around the composition, some walls recede into the greenery of the landscape, while others emerge to the foreground as geometric objects in a picturesque forest.

32


(DE)CONSTRUCT FASHION SCHAU 7

FEBRUARY 2018 // SERVITECTURE EVENT 1ST PLACE & PEOPLES CHOICE

We were inspired by the theme “[De]Construct� to use materials that we had gathered over a year ago - pieces of destroyed bridges from the final Structures assignment. We aimed to take the pieces of the deconstructed bridges and reconstruct them in our garments. In keeping with this structural idea, we chose to weave rope through the bridge pieces, almost as if they are tensile cables holding together the broken trusses to make them structural once again. We wanted to contrast this hard, structural aesthetic with something softer. What looks like tulle in our garments is made up of produce bags. We manipulated each bag to make them appear pleated, and chose to layer them to highlight their ability to appear translucent alone, but an opaque shade of lavender when overlaid. The creation of two outfits allowed us to explore the versatility of these materials. The first outfit began with the construction of a hoop skirt, from hula hoops and latticed string, to support the tiers of manufactured tulle. A similar method is used in the top of the second look. The first top and the skirt of the second look feature undergarments made of rope, and an overlaying structural pieces constructed from the deconstructed pieces of bridges. Rope is also used to tether the pieces of balsa together, in a method reminiscent of trusses, and to secure it to the model by means of corseting.

34


36


EUROPEAN ARCHITECTURE STUDIES STUDY ABROAD TRIP MAY 2017 // JACKIE GARGUS CZECH REPUBLIC, GERMANY, SWITZERLAND, FRANCE, ITALY, AUSTRIA

38


40


42


Rachel Ghindea Architecture Portfolio  
Rachel Ghindea Architecture Portfolio  
Advertisement