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Portfolio of undergraduate work

Rachel Forbes Leeds Metropolitan University


Specialist Design project

FLOWER STORIES

Strengths

A narrative of flowering spaces through Leeds

Disjointed, traffic, noise Connectivity Flood risk - Introduce traffic calming, shared space, prioritising pedestrians and improving connectivity. Use planting to unite spaces and create continuity and introduce ways of implementing sustainable urban drainage systems.

Opportunities

City Square

Bus Station

City Square

Main Shopping Centre Bus Station

Main Shopping Centre

Meadow Lane - open space dominated by fast traffic and car parking

Station

Leeds Station

Station

Residential areas

Residential areas Granary Wharf

River Aire

The context Leeds City Centre

Mixed

Commercial

Car parking

Hotel/restaurant

Residential

Hydrology Flood risk and direction of water flow Existing trees

Proposed movement

Connections, flow, diversity of green space, liveability - Create a more harmonious environment catering for the needs of the resident, working and visiting population - Add layers of planting - at ground level/on balconies/walls/roofs, - create comfortable spaces to sit, relax and socialise

Leeds Station

Threats

Clarence Docks and Armouries

Holbeck Urban VIllage

Underground culvert

Noise

Existing vehicle movement

Barriers

Existing pedestrian movement

Key entry points Landmark buildings 1:12000

Key routes and destinations

Meadow Lane

River Aire Proposed development Take-away

1:12000

Riverside

Granary Wharf

Clarence Docks and Armouries Tetley’s

New City Park

Sovereign Street

Weaknesses

Sovereign Street - predominantly car park

Holbeck Urban VIllage

Identifying key areas

Light, reflection, river, warm colours,attractive architecture, human scale - Maximise these qualities to create distinct, usable spaces and highlight the positive

Usage

Physical Features

Movement

Proposed vehicle movement Proposed pedestrian connections

Tetley’s

New City Park

Proposed development

Mixed

Commercial

Car parking

Take-away Hotel/restaurant

Residential

The river area - retain existing quirky features like the derelict arch

Cars and parking issues Economics and maintenance -Pedestrian-friendly routes encourage people to Noise Existing vehicle movement reduce carUnderground use culvert pedestrian -Create schemes for people to beBarriers able toExisting adopt movement and maintain planting areas

Hydrology Flood risk and direction of water flow Existing trees

Key entry points Landmark buildings

Proposed vehicle movement Proposed pedestrian connections


Arches - pedestrian route under railway to main shopping area and City Square

A 1

The Key Areas

KEY Timber tiered seating

Drainage channel takes rainwater from surrounding buildings to rain garden area

Existing tree

Proposed pine tree

Stepping stones through and to the edge of planting areas

1 2 3 4

4

2

The Arches and Sovereign Street

Planting beds

Multi-storey Car Park

B

Planting walls to screen temporary garden

3

New entrance to station Pine Groves Development plots/ Temporary gardens with grass and trees to echo pine grove area.

Proposed deciduous tree

5 6

Sovereign Street Square

7

Existing Arch

8 9

Grassy area outside pub

Street planting and swales

Meadow Lane shared space - roundabout focal point/gateway into city centre

5 Concordia Street

A series of pocket gardens and flowering squares provide an attractive route from the station to the riverside and Meadow Lane. These range from recreational pine groves with hammocks and table tennis to street planting and seating outside offices. An open public square provides space for events such as small markets. A rain garden in the sunniest part of Sovereign Street Square collects water from surrounding buildings.

6

Proposed development

Sovereign Street

C River Aire

9

Making the city more liveable The ‘spaces in-between’ Concordia Street - turning the streets into mini squares with street planting and places to sit. Planting also provides attractive views from inside buildings and encourages birds and insects.

Riverside

7

A

Riverside

8

B Meadow Lane

Temporary gardens on development land - informal grassy groves with pine and birch trees, table tennis, hammocks and rocks to sit on. Planting walls shield the area from the multi-storey car park.

Elevation AA

Removing barriers A more accessible space with terraces in the sun, which bring people closer to the river. A crossing to the Southbank. Spontaneous vegetation - alders and willows grow along the riverbanks.

Pedestrian walkway to riverside terraces Riverside - steps lead to terraced area

Sovereign Street shared space pedestrian priority and more street trees

Pedestrian walkway from Sovereign Street to riverside

Elevation BB

The Arches pedestrian route to city centre shopping areas

New development frontage /temporary extension of pine groves

Sovereign Street - one way, shared space

Proposed new development with terraces overlooking Sovereign Street Square Terrace overlooking Sovereign Street Square - proposed new development with active frontage

Sovereign Street Square

The pine groves - shady pocket gardens with hammocks, table tennis.

Pedestrian walkway to river terraces

Old arch and seating area

River terraces

Meadow Lane - Shared space with retention pond and timber decking seating areas. Crossing from Tetley site to new bridge and Sovereign Square.

River Crossing

Elevation CC

Masterplan 1:500

Meadow Lane

C

Entrance to station

Pine Groves - shady pocket groves with hammocks, table tennis. Pinus sylvestris with some Betula pendula and underplanting of woodland grasses and perennials.

Sovereign Street shared space with some parking and drop-off points

New entrance to station

Concordia Street Street becomes series of mini squares with planting to create more shelter - benches in sunnier parts of street outside offices

Open grassy area outside pub

Meadow Lane - shared space Gateway to city centre - roundabout becomes a feature Trees lining road planted in sunken, planted beds as part of sustainable drainage

Retention pond with Entry to new City planted terraces, Park decking and benches


A softer side

Floral imagery around Leeds

Random elements

Narrative - past pastures and meadows- to future flowering spaces of the city

People enjoy flowers

19th Century Historical context - the importance of the river to the life of Leeds Leeds in the landscape Historical elements Leeds bridge at night 21st century

Flower stories - the beauty of the flora of the Aire valley

Prunus avium ‘Plena’

Sovereign Street Square - detailed design 1:200 A public square, designed as a flexible space, providing direct routes to key destinations, and also quieter areas for visitors, residents and local workers to sit and relax, eat lunch, read or socialise. The use of gravel provides relief from hard surfaces and planting is designed for close contact. Timber seating is robust and comfortable. Low walls and stepped areas also provide opportunities for sitting.

PERENNIALS

The Design Process

Crataegus x lavallei

A informal grove of flowering trees, shrubs, perennials and grasses create several layers of foliage, colour and texture. Flowering interest in spring and summer gives way to rich leaf colour Choisya ‘Aztec Pearl’ in autumn. Shrubs like the winter flowering Hamamelis (witch hazel) and evergreen Choisya ensure year round interest. Berries on the hawthorn and cotoneaster attract birds and provide autumn colour. All the plants chosen are robust. Smaller creeping plants are allowed to spread between stepping stones to give the feeling of more naturalistic, spontaneous growth.

“ Hereaway, in the boundary dikes, grew the water violet, the serried ranks of its lovely blossoming stems piercing the clear dike water’s emerald and bronze counterpane of two sorts of duckweed...”

F. Arnold Lees, Leeds botanist 1847-1921

Ostrya carpinifolia

Luzula sylvatica

Luzula nivea

Hydrangea quercifolia Magnolia soulangea

Tulipa ‘Ronaldo’

Sesleria autumnalis

Planting Plan -

DF/PS

GM VM

SA

DP

SI

CAz

1 2 3 4 5

A pedestrian walkway leads from the arches, past the pine groves, into a more open public square Terraces in front of new building overlook the square A more social open space with potential for small events, markets.

PA

ML

6

An open channel also collects rainwater and transports its to rain garden. Timber platforms proved crossing points.

7

Situated in the sunniest part of the square the raingarden slows water run-off and provides an attractive planting area of perennials - moisture tolerant in the centre.

8

Tiered timber seating

PS

PB PB

AH

Root

Brks

Age

Girth

Form

425-600

RB

5

3x

16-18

CF

250-300

10l C

Extra She SSe

OC PA PP PSa SI

CK HI

CF

PS APH

BO

PS

CAz

VP DF

BBW VP

VP

HQ

CK

MS

DF

PP

PSa

HQ ML

MS VP VM

Betula pendula Cotoneaster frigidus ‘Cornubia’ Crataegus x Lavallei Ostrya carpinifolia Prunus avium ‘Plena’ Prunus padus Prunus sargentii Sorbus intermedia

350-425

RB

5

3x

RW

Clr stem

175-200 180

12-14

She

175-200

12-14

She

175-200

Extra SSe Extra She Extra She Extra She

Min 200

425-600

RB

5

3x

16-18

425-600

RB

5

3x

14-16

425-600

RB

5

3x

14-16

425-600

RB

5

3x

16-18

175-200 175-200 Min. 200

Maintenance/Notes

Quantity

Remove diseased or broken branches in late autumn/winter To be grown as small tree. Prune only to shape.

1

Remove diseased or broken branches in late autumn/winter Minimal maintenance required

1

Cut back diseased, damaged or crossing branches to healthy wood in summer Cut back diseased, damaged or crossing branches to healthy wood in summer Cut back diseased, damaged or crossing branches to healthy wood in summer Remove diseased or broken branches in late autumn/winter

1

PS

1

1

1 1 5

3 2 SI

SI

Breaks Maintenance

Quantity

40/60

Height

10l

Pot size

Bushy

Habit

7

3

80/100cm 80/100

10l 10l

Branched Branched

5

40/50

5l

branched

3

60-80

RB

Branched

3

60/80

10l

Branched

3

60/80

7l

Branched

3

20

2l

Groundcover

Prune after spring flowering if necessary. Remove frost damaged branches to base. Minimal pruning to shape Remove crossing or damaged branches in spring after flowering Remove dead flower heads in late spring – cut back to strong pair of buds Minimal pruning – remove damaged or crossing branches in summer

Cut back unwanted shoots in spring

100

Pot

Maintenance

AHP

450mm

2l

Random planting 450mm 450mm 700mm Random planting 300mm

2l 2l 1.5-2l 1l 2l

450mm

2l

Tidy dead leaves in March. Leave flower heads in autumn until unsightly Allow to self seed. Remove or relocate misplaced or unwanted plants Lift and divide congested clumps in winter Lift and divide congested clumps in winter Cut back old foliage when new fronds appear Allow to self-seed. Remove or relocate misplaced or unwanted plants Remove damaged or dead leaves in early spring before flowering Lift and divide large colonies in spring

1l 2l

Plant along paving edges and between paving stones Remove old flower stems after flowering

AV

Anemone hupehensis var. Japonica ‘Prinz Heinrich’ Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Altrosa’

BBW BO DF DP

Bergenia ‘Bressingham White’ Bergenia ‘Overture’ Dryopteris felix-mas Digitalis Purpurea

EP

Epimedium x perralchicum ‘Frohnleiten’ Geranium macrorrhizum ‘Ingwersen’s Variety’ Galium odoratum Geranium Phaeum ‘Lily Lovell’

GO GP

600mm

Random planting 600mm 300mm 300mm

2l

9cm

HA LM LMa

Hellebores argutifolius Liriope muscari Lamium maculatum ‘Beacon Silver’

LN LS PB

Luzula nivea Luzula sylvatica Persicaria bistorta ‘Superba’

300mm 300mm 500mm

2l 2l 2l

PS SA Ga

Polystichum setiferum Sesleria autumnalis Galanthus nivalis

750mm 450mm Random grouping

1.5-2l 2l 9cm

Tu

Tulipa ‘Ronaldo’

Random Bulbs grouping

3-4l 2l 2l

1 1

1

Spacing

Anemone x hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’

1 3

Minimal pruning – remove damaged or crossing branches in summer Minimal pruning – cut vertical shoots to point of origin to retain tiered habit

Botanical Name

GM

SI

Botanical Name

Choisya ‘Aztec pearl’ Cornus kousa Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Pallida’ Hydrangea quercifolia Magnolia x Loebneri ‘Leonard Messel’ Magnolia x soulangeana Viburnum plicatum ‘mariesii’ Vinca minor

Key AH

BO

CAz

Detailed view of central planting area 1:100

Height cm

CAz

HI

BO

A

Key Botanical name

Key BBW

PS

HI BBW

CL

A diversion from main routes through an informal area of flowering shrubs and perennials. Stone stepping stone paths meander through the planting and randomly placed rocks provide seating. Rainwater collected from surrounding buildings spills over local stone water feature into a covered water channel that feeds into the raingarden

DF

7

1

Anemone x hybrida

BO AH

CK

4

persicaria x bistorta

OC

PS

Current view of the Sovereign Street Area

Magnolia x loebneri

Bergenia ‘Bressingham White’ and ‘Overture’ Geranium macrorrhizum

CL

BP

DF

8

Cornus kousa

Liriope muscari

SI

LM

Hamamelis x intermedia

Vinca minor

AV

Viburnum plicatum

Polystichum setiferum

BP

LN

A

Sorbus intermedia

Helleborus argutifolia

GP

EP

LS

PS

6

Betula pendula

Geranium phaeum

SHRUBS

HA

5

Prunus padus

Planting specification

Central area - Sovereign Street Square

BO/ BBW

Cotoneaster x cornubiaPrunus sargentii

Planting Design

TREES

A pattern of squares

PERENNIALS

18th Century

TREES

Planting details

Flower ‘storeys’ the flowering layers

SHRUBS

Rediscovering the river Existing flora and fauna

Tidy dead leaves in March. Leave flower heads in autumn until unsightly

Cut back straggly leaves in spring Divide large clumps in autumn or early spring. Plant towards edge of planting area where there are gaps, in small groups of 3s or 5s Divide congested colonies after flowering Divide congested colonies after flowering Divide congested plants in winter Cut back old foliage when new fronds appear Cut back old foliage in spring Plant around bases of trees and larger shrubs. Plant while in full leaf (in the green). Divide clumps every three years if overcrowded by lifting plants after flowering.

3

Quantity

11 +5 randomly planted 18 15 75 75 15 15 105 85 35 10 26 85 25 115 115 12 +5 randomly planted 15 50 150

100


FLOWER STORIES

Strengths

A narrative of flowering spaces through Leeds

Disjointed, traffic, noise Connectivity Flood risk - Introduce traffic calming, shared space, prioritising pedestrians and improving connectivity. Use planting to unite spaces and create continuity and introduce ways of implementing sustainable urban drainage systems.

Opportunities

City Square

Bus Station

City Square

Main Shopping Centre Bus Station

Main Shopping Centre

Meadow Lane - open space dominated by fast traffic and car parking

Station

Leeds Station

Station

Residential areas

Residential areas Granary Wharf

River Aire

The context Leeds City Centre

Riverside

Meadow Lane

Proposed movement

Connections, flow, diversity of green space, liveability - Create a more harmonious environment catering for the needs of the resident, working and visiting population - Add layers of planting - at ground level/on balconies/walls/roofs, - create comfortable spaces to sit, relax and socialise

Leeds Station

Granary Wharf

Threats

Clarence Docks and Armouries

River Aire

Tetley’s

New City Park

Proposed development

Mixed

Commercial

Car parking

Take-away Hotel/restaurant

1:12000

Residential

Hydrology Flood risk and direction of water flow Existing trees

Clarence Docks and Armouries

Holbeck Urban VIllage

Underground culvert

Noise

Existing vehicle movement

Barriers

Existing pedestrian movement

Proposed vehicle movement Proposed pedestrian connections

Key entry points Landmark buildings 1:12000

Physical Features

Usage

Key routes and destinations

Concrete wall - cast in-situ with sandblasted to expose aggregate and create images or text for example the name of the park ‘Sovereign Street Square’

Sovereign Street

Weaknesses

Sovereign Street - predominantly car park

Holbeck Urban VIllage

Identifying key areas

Light, reflection, river, warm colours,attractive architecture, human scale - Maximise these qualities to create distinct, usable spaces and highlight the positive

CEDEC Self-binding gravel CEDEC - crushed aggregate (6mm or smaller) 35-50mm layer over over a porous sub-base, which provides support and allows water to pass through to ground layer. 150mm depth suitable for pedestrian and light vehicle use.

Movement

Tetley’s

New City Park

Proposed development

Mixed

Commercial

Car parking

Take-away Hotel/restaurant

Residential

The river area - retain existing quirky features like the derelict arch

Cars and parking issues Economics and maintenance -Pedestrian-friendly routes encourage people to Noise Existing vehicle movement reduce carUnderground use culvert pedestrian -Create schemes for people to beBarriers able toExisting adopt movement and maintain planting areas

Hydrology Flood risk and direction of water flow Existing trees

Key entry points Landmark buildings

Proposed vehicle movement Proposed pedestrian connections

Materials Palette and Construction Details Paving detail in central planting area 1:100

Cropped granite cobbles in red, bronze and grey tones - larger areas random patterns 1:20

1:50

Existing reclaimed stone set into edge of planting acts as seating.

Decking/benches - FSC hardwood timber Joint elements: galvanised steel strip between timber and concrete base fixed with countersunk wood screws. Join timbers with galvanised threaded rod. Solid York stone steps with rustic finish

600mm 300mm

Planting in tiers with moisture tolerant plants on lower levels Mulch layer 75mm

Yorkstone paving Example - Marshall Scoutmoor diamond cut widths 300mm, 450mm, 600mm - random lengths

Coarse sand mortar mix 30mm with 150mm subbase consolidated in layers.

Trees in planting bed support with 2x 75mm dia. softwood FSC stakes approx. one third clear stem above ground.

Lighting in planted areas - recessed towards front of planting areas to provide some lighting to path edges and illuminate planting at night

Trees planted in gravel areas - Use underground guying system and structural soil in tree pits to avoid compaction

Large irregular yorkstone paving slabs with rough hewn surface act as stepping stone through planting areas and edge gravel path. Allow them to cross cobble strips and break formal pattern.

Bespoke cast iron cover for drainage channel

Growing medium min. 300mm depth over structural soil to avoid compaction

Overflow to main drains

Rain Garden: Sunken planting terraces receive rainwater run-off from surrounding buildings and surfaces slowing transit of water and enabling much it to be absorbed before entering main drainage system. In an open sunny spot planted with perennials and grasses with timber seating .

Elevation AA 1:50 Key hard landscaping elements


BACK 2 FRONT

“Every person needs to have a piece of garden, however small, to keep them in touch with the earth and therefore with something deeper in themselves...�

edible front gardens

Using the available space Flat roof below bedroom window and window sills for seedlings, flowers and herbs in containers.

Carl jung 1875-1961

Proposal for Sutherland Terrace

The garden at Sutherland Terrace is south-east facing, well-maintained with a flagged path and privet hedge. The ground is currently covered with shingle and surrounded by a rendered wall. The garden houses two wheelie bins, a washing line and a small table and chairs. The design proposal aims to create a simple, flexible, low-maintenance scheme that can be adapted to the clients needs, and uses existing structures. Most of the suggestions are simple to construct and can be made from recycled or reclaimed materials. The scheme could be built in stages and adjusted where necessary. It could also be used as a model for other gardens in the street.

Water Butt Recycled food storage container attached to down pipe with rain diverter kit. A tap fitted to the butt makes it easy to fill a watering can. Used buckets and plastic boxes as planters. Where possible these can be adapted to be as water efficient as possible.

Poached egg plant flowers for a long season attracting insects to the garden over a long period. These valuable insects help control pests like aphids which feed on vegetable plants.

Climbing fruit such as cultivated blackberries, tayberries or logan berries can be planted directly into the ground. They grow in long stems which can be woven around and tied to the wooden frame. Once they have fruited the stems are cut back and the new ones tied up to fruit the following year. Merton Thornless is a thornless variety of blacberry which produces large, delicious fruit from August to late September.

Nasturtium flowers are attractive and colourful, and are also completely edible so are a great addition to salads.

Kitchen Outside tap Porch

Living Room

Compost bin Water butt connected to gutter down pipe

Small planters Table and chairs Existing stone flagged path Existing hedge

Planter Wheelie bins Raised beds

Fruit tree

Planter

Existing shingle mulch Gate

Planting container

Fruit trained against the wall

Flowers and herbs mixed with salad planting attract beneficial insects to the garden. Aromatic herbs can also confuse and put off insect pests.

Frame/trellis attached to existing wall An alternative view without the hedge - a trellis structure runs along the boundary extending the area for climbing plants, and a timber frame disguises the bins slightly and provides support for a larger climber for example a kiwi.

Scale 1:20

Wormery/Compost Bin A wormery can be constructed using reclaimed plastic crates to provide an efficient composting system for organic household waste. This can be used on the growing beds.

Raised beds A system of raised beds constructed from timber creates a flexible set-up with alternative combinations. A cold frame structure provides somewhere to nurture young seedlings.

Redcurrant cordon. This can be planted in the ground or in a container. Cordons are fruit bushes or trees trained to grow and fruit on a singel stem so are ideal for small gardens.

View with existing hedge. This area will be shadier. A blackcurrent bush could be grown in the ground in the corner, or some potatoes planted in a container.

Making use of the existing wall for planters. Peas, runner beans and climbing french beans can be trained up poles or string from the planters to the frame. They can be grown in containers and underplanted with salad or herbs. Beans and peas are easy to grow and are most successful sown in pots under cover and transplanted once the seedlings are tough enough to survive being eaten by slugs or mice.

Space is allowed in the design to accommodate garden furniture. This will enable the householder to enjoy the garden and also provides work top space if neccessary. Existing privet hedge - could be removed at a later stage and replaced with fruit tree trained against wooden frame.

Soft fruit - raspberry canes planted close to the wall can be trained on wires attached to the wall. The archway over the gate provides extra support for tall climbers such as cultivated blackberries.

Timber Frame Fixed to the existing wall a framework made from recycled timber provides support for climbing vegetables , soft fruit and a fruit tree. Wires or sections of trellis can be added where neccessary.

Rachel Forbes ED 205 March 2010


BACK 2 FRONT Water Collection A water butt can be created using a recycled food storage container and joining it to the main down pipe from the guttering with an adaptor. A tap can be fitted for filling a watering can. Tap Food storage Rainwater diverter containers available to buy secondhand in different shapes and sizes

Growing in containers

in detail

6 Planting and training an espalier tree

Polystyrene punched with holes

Used plastic boxes and buckets can be used for growing vegetable plants such as beans and tomatoes. To make watering more effective a simple system can be constructed inside the container to hold the water in a resevoir water in a resevoir so water is not wasted.

www.craftinagreenworld.com (Article in Home & Garden 2009 Making your own earthbox

Apple Tree - Dwarf rootstock/ Self-fertile Make a framework of horizontal wires about 40cm apart. Most espaliers come with 2 tiers of branches but wires should be put in place to allow for 4. The planting hole should be at least 15cm from wall, wide enough for roots to spread out and deep enough for the soilmark on the stem to be at ground level. The tree should be watered thoroughly before planting. Tie side branches to support wires. A trained espalier tree costs £30+ so it is much cheaper to buy a younger tree and train it. Cordons are an alternative example of a trained tree suitable for small gardens.

Water plants through pipe. Water will come out of overflow when water reservoir is full

Fruit bushes

overflow hole

Central area is filled with water and each corner filled with a mix of compost and vermiculite which absorbs water and acts a a wick drawing the water up and distributing it evenly throughout the container. These boxes are sold commercially as Earthboxes, but are easy to make. They are popular on balconies and in roof gardens.

A range of soft fruits can be grown using the wall and timber frame as support. Blackberries, boysenberries and loganberries can be trained over arches, and an espalier apple tree can be planted against the sunniest wall.

2

1

Fruit canes tied to wires

4

A wormery composting bin can be constructed from 3 used plastic boxes or crates. Ideally the crates sit inside each other and a tap is fixed to the bottom crate to collect liquid produced which can be use as plant feed. Drill ventilation holes in the lid and along the sides of the boxes

Drill exit holes with a larger drill bit in the bottom of 2 of the boxes

Fit tap to the box without exit holes and place on bricks.

Raised beds are made from timber. Each unit is the same size so that they fit together and can be used in different combinations. A cold frame can be placed over a bed to protect seedlings. This can be removed later if the bed is required for something else. For potatoes layers can be added as potato shoots appear and more compost added. This system is designed to make gardening flexible. Redundant beds can be stored in the cellar, and the arrangement changed if desired. Beds could also be used to extend the growing area rather than being stacked.

Create some bedding for the wormery from torn strips of newspaper soaked in water and place in one of the boxes with exit holes. Add a handful of soil and grit.

150mm

600mm

Add worms (available from fishing shops) and place a sheet of damp card over them. Start adding kitchen waste, slowly at first until worms start to multiply. Once this box is full, start filling the top box. The worms will move upwards. Allow the bottom box to fully compost before removing and rotating boxes.

Timber thickness 22mm Posts approx. 50mm x 50mm

Empty worm juice from time to time to use as plant food.

Timber frame attached to existing wall Fence posts need to be secured to the wall with some sort of metal plate fixing costing approx £5.00 - £8.00 each (x5 £25+). To avoid this cost posts could be boted to the inside of the wall but would need to be longer. If the timber was reclaimed this might work out cheaper.

Annual Vegetable Planner showing sowing and planting times Jan

Wormery made from recycled crates www.squidoo.com/ coolrecycling

Costing

Using new tanalised timber from a sawmill in Bradford Cost for making 9 beds approx. £25 Perspex sheet - from used picture frame

Using recycled household materials Toilet rolls and egg boxes can be used for raising seedlings. When the seedlings are big enough they can be planted in the soil in the containers which will rot down. This prevents the roots being disturbed. Other household containers like plastic milk cartons and tetrapaks can be converted into pots for planting. Pictures from Gardeners’ World magazine May 2009

Planting Ideas

Continually sow salad leaves to fill spaces between slower growing plants. Salad leaves include rocket, mizuna and red mustard which have lots of flavour. They can be sown directly into the ground or in seed trays and then transplanted. They are sold as a single variety or mixed to avoid butying lots of separate seed packets. Sow Purple srpouting broccoli in spring and plant out in summer. It is hardy and will survive over winter to produce tender broccoli shoots in spring, when there is not much else to harvest.

6

5

Raised Beds

Composting and Wormery

Pictures show the stages in training an espalier tree from a single stem to multi branch. This takes about four years.

3

Feb

Mar

April May

June July

Aug

Sept Oct

Nov

Dec

Runner Beans French Beans Beetroot Broccoli Cabbage (summer) Chard Courgette Leeks Lettuce Peas Potatoes Onions Radish Salad leaves Spinach Tomato Winter Squash Sow indoors or in cold frame Sow outside directly into soil Plant seedlings Plant as tubers or sets (potatoes and onions) Harvest

Planting directly into the ground

Sharing seeds with neighbours would reduce the cost and enable people to grow many different varieties of vegetables.

Spinach beet has a long season, is easy to grow and looks good.

Courgette plant and flower

Thinning seedlings

Transplanting seedlings grown under cover

Summer squash A single plant will produce regular squash which can be eaten raw or used in cooked dishes. The flowers are delicious too. Sow seeds in cardboard tubes in spring and protect under cover until the risk of frost is over, before planting outside.

Rachel Rachel Forbes Forbes EDED 205 205 March March 2010 2010


BACK 2 FRONT

growing as a community Examples of possible street plots. Areas occupy one or two parking spaces and can be arranged in different ways.

Composting area with roof collecting water to fill water butt Street

Sutherland Road (access to Sutherland terrace)

Climbing fruit and vegetables such as beans, squash and blackberries

Sutherland Terrace

Pavement

Sutherland Terrace is a quiet side street flanked by a major road at one end. It is sunny and open and even the shadier side of the street gets some sun in the afternoon and evening. Views extend to the supermarket one way and a factory building the other. There are opportunities to extend food growing from individual backyards onto the street, giving people more space and flexibility and the chance to get involved with varying degrees of commitment.

Large raised beds for vegetable growing

Crossing area - changing the road surface encourages cars to slow down.

Fruit Trees with perennial underplanting

Frontyard Community Garden project in Melbourne - Wooden crates are lined with black plastic. www.studioincite.com From growing vegetables in individual back gardens the next stage would be to make use of the street to create communal areas for growing, composting and recycling. Neighbours could share seeds, seedlings and produce. At the moment this is a wide sunny street with a few parked cars. Demographic figures show that car ownership is relatively low. Fruit trees could be planted at intervals along the street, and plots about the size of a parking space could be developed for communal use. These areas could simply consist of a couple of raised beds and a composting bin. A flexible system could be developed with raised beds being built as required, which could be moved or altered in the future. Plan view of street

Being resourceful Simple raised growing areas can be created using recycled materials for example old bath tubs and builders bags. Photo: from Bradford University’s Growing Grub On Campus Facebook site.

Creating seating for neighbours to chat and share ideas

Proposals for community food growing Sutherland Terace, Harehills, Leeds 1 Planting fruit trees at intervals along the street Would provide blossom in spring and fruit in summer/autumn as well as foliage in the street. A mix of trees would also mean that they would act as pollinators to other trees in individual backyards. 2 Creating communal growing spaces Simple raised beds could be shared by residents to grow more bulky vegetable crops. Growing vegetables alongside neighbours may give people confidence and enables them to share knowledge and resources. 3 Community Composting Green spaces along the street could house compost bins. These could be surrounding by trellis or fence supporting climbing fruit or vegetables. 4 Community Seating Benches give residents somewhere to sit when taking a break from gardening, to socialize and share ideas.

Involving the wider community The scheme could involve the whole community including schools and local groups. Children could sow seeds at school and seedlings could then be passed on to members of the community to plant in their gardens. Older school children could be involved in building raised beds, wormeries etc. encouraging them to develop new skills.

The Advantages of working together as a community - Growing food collectively helps reduce the community’s carbon footprint.

-

ardening is good exercise and good for general wellbeing, as well as providing fresh food. Increased vegetation creates biodiversity and encourages wildlife. Integrates community - draws people together from different ethnic/age groups. Community gardens have a positive effect on the neighbourhood even for those not directly involved. It is uplifting to see new growth and colour, and green spaces improve the visual quality of the area. - Community gardens help give areas a sense of identity. - Gardening provides opportunities for people to learn new skills.

Rachel Forbes ED 205 March 2010


Back to Front Project Elective Module Encouraging people to grow food in their front gardens using permaculture prinicples


CONISTON WATER VISITOR CENTRE - MASTERPLAN Scale 1:2500

KEY

Coniston

View Point Meadow Grass/grazing land

AIMS

LOOKING AT THE OPTIONS

Existing deciduous woodland OPTION 1 Emphasis on woodland setting with visitor centre located to edge of established woodland Pros:- Shortest car route from main road - Established trees mean that car parks are hidden from beginning - Easy access across field to water and Cumbrian Way - Views from visitor centre of lake - Centre close to possible railway stop - Sheltered location for visitor centre Cons:- Limited experience for less mobile visitors - Disturbance to existing popular campsite - may make this site less appealing for campers - Forest style similar to Grizedale experience

OPTION 2 Emphasis waterside/recreation with visitor centre located on Coniston Water with views of the lake Pros:- direct views of Coniston Water - Immediate access to shore and main footpath along lake - Use of existing vehicle access Cons:- Longest route for cars - one way route limited experience for car drivers - Visitors may be less inclined to explore, no surprises - Similar focus to Coniston Launch - Aspect, could be cold on balcony if strong winds coming off lake

Proposed new woodland or coppice

OPTION 3 Emphasis on creating diversity, broader outdoor experience, woodland creation. Visitor centre is located to the edge of exsting woodland with glimpses of lake through trees. Pros:- more central location of centre on site encouraging people to explore and discover - easy access to lake shore but more sheltered position - Use of existing vehicle access and campsite tracks to create circular system easing traffic flow/ extended vehicle access enables commercial vehicles to access different areas of site for woodland management - Little disturbance to campsite area Cons:- long route for cars - more disturbance initially - fairly long walk from railway stop

10

Conifer plantation Vehicle circulation

14 PLAY TRAIL

12 CONIFER PLANTATION

Existing larch and spruce plantation is to be retained with some regeneration to create a more varied age structure. New trees are to be planted along the edges of the plantation and around the car park.

The dismantled railway is to be reinstated to offer a car free connection from Coniston. The train will stop at park Coppice and a path will lead through the woods to the visitor centre. A path will run alongside the railway for cyclists and walkers to create a circular route around the site.

11 13 1

8 9

1 VISITOR CENTRE

The visitor centre, clad in larch with a green roof, is located centrally, nestling into an area of established decidous woodland and conifer plantation. A level area surrounds the centre to provide easy access from car parks to all facilities. Views from the centre include meadow with scattered trees and glimpses of Lake Coniston. Paths radiate out from the centre leading to woodland and shoreline walks, and the jetty. A circular route uses the existing track from the main road leading car drivers to the visitor centre car park. The car park is surrounded by larch and spruce to create shade and to maintain attractive views. An exit road will lead over a bridge to an overflow car park located in a clearing in the woodland behind the centre. This road will take drivers through the woods back to the main road. Disabled parking is located closest to the centre and a road for service runs behind the building. The route provides an attractive and varied ride for car drivers with views to woodland glades, and also enables vehicle access for woodland operations.

A children’s play area designed for creative play including logs to balance on, climbing ropes, small clearings in the trees to build dens, stepping stones, piles of sticks etc.

11 RAILWAY

OPTION 3 WAS CHOSEN TO MEET THE ABOVE AIMS

2 CAR PARKS

A wooden jetty leads to a covered viewing platform with views of Coniston Water - a diversion for walkers and a focal point.

Footpath

5

To provide visitors with - a rich and varied outdoor experience and an escape from urban life To create - a series of diverse natural habitats and an attractive and functional areas of new woodland To promote - a love of the outdoors and of the countryside and an understanding of the cultural history of the Coniston area

13 VIEWING PLATFORM

Suitable for cycles

Park Coppice

Making the most of the view

9 SHORELINE 10

12

3

Hoathwaite Beck

3 COVERED PICNIC AREA AND BOAT HIRE

A covered shelter provides a protected outdoor picnic area with bbq facilites, and also a focal point for water related activities - boat and canoe hire, raft building.

Paths link from the centre to an existing lakeside track, which also connects to the Cumbrian way. This path is suitable for cyclists.

8 WETLAND PLANTING AND BOARD WALK

6 7

4 HOATHEWAITE BECK AND WATERFALL

Hoathwaite Beck is a major feature with meandering paths and small bridges or stepping stones making these routes interesting and fun. Woodland planting along the stream varies from towering larch to more open deciduous glades, creating a contrasting experience and sense of adventure. This area is a key wildlife corridor through the site.

14

2

4

Lake Coniston

Torver Common Wood

An existing boggy area is to be turned into an area of wetland planting with access created by a boardwalk.

10 CAMPING

Park Coppice is to be retained as a camping area. This is established woodland and is a popular site with open glades. Shrub planting and stone walls will separate the visitor centre exit road from camping areas.

Hoathwaite Farm

Torver

5 MEADOW

Grazing will be restricted in the open areas around the visitor centre to encourage the growth of wild flowers, and more diverse vegetation. The large field adjacent to the lake will also be kept as open meadow, taking advantage of views towards the fells. Small groupings of trees create sheltered, more intimate picnic areas.

6 COPPICE

Coppice areas will be created as areas of working woodland, with the aim of encouraging farmers to diversify. Planted with single species groupings of hazel and ash, these areas will produce wood for products such as fencing, and will also serve as an educational tool for learning woodland and agricultural skills - hurdles, charcoal-making, hedge laying etc. Small camping huts will be located in the coppice areas built from local wood, to be used by hikers or for bushcraft style activites.

7 NATIVE DECIDUOUS WOODLAND/GLADES

Areas of new woodland follow the course of the beck and along the main route into the site. Small glades offer sheltered sunny areas with more open views. There has been a long tradition of hill-farming in Cumbria and working closely with local farmers is important to allow trees to establish and for a rich understorey to develop. Native trees will include mainly oak and birch with some hawthorn, ash, rowan, and alder in wetter areas. A group selection process will be used alongside a shelterwood system where there are existing mature trees. The aim will be to create a diverse woodland. In some areas grazing will help to control more vigorous vegetation.

Rachel Forbes 208


Coniston Water Visitor Centre 1:500

Visitor Centre

The visitor centre is surrounded by grey gravel paths and a low dry slate wall. Flat stone coping will make it possible to use the wall for seating. Beyond the centre is a woodland meadow area with small groupings of trees such as wild cherry, rowan and hazel. Paths radiate out from the centre. The path from the car park to the main entrance slopes downwards and is lined by retaining slate walls on either side. Vegetation on the banks is mainly shrub planting - hawthorn - with grassy areas and bulbs such as wild daffodils. A wider area at the front of the centre provides room for picnic benches. A network of french drains leads water down the natural slope towards the wetland area.

Streamside walk

A meandering path from the centre follow Hoathwaite stream. Different crossing points give access to the meadow beyond.

Footpath to Park Coppice train stop

50m

Logs sunk into stream bed create crossing The approach to the centre from the car park

Existing oak Grassy areas allow visitors to meander between mainly oak and birch trees down to the waterfront

Groupings

of smaller native trees - Sorbus aucuparia, Prunus avium, Corylus avellana Service Yard

Visitor Centre Front of the visitor centre across the meadow area.

Boardwalk

+50 Seating area with benches

Disabled parking

Entrance area

Wetland area

Slate walls surround the centre. Entrance paving.

Track to jetty Occasional vehicle access

+52

Main car park

Wetland area with boardwalk

+55

An area of naturally wet ground is converted into a wetland area with the aim of attracting wildlife and butterflies, and providing an interesting diversion. This area is to be surrounded by meadow.

+54

+56

Boardwalk through wetland area. Main path is built up slightly where ground is boggy.

+48

drainage direction

Play Trail

+59

Covered shelter

jetty

Coppice area

A timber frame shelter with green roof similar to the viewing platform will be built on the site of the former Priestley Centre. This will act as a covered picnic/bbq area and also as a base for boat hire and water based activities, for example raft building. The shelter also serves as an outdoor classroom for schools visiting the site and for youth and community groups organising outdoor activities.

Lake Viewing Platform

A simple timber jetty provides an interesting diversion for walkers with impressive views of the lake, and acts as a focal point from the visitor centre. The jetty has a covered shelter with a green roof, similar to that of the visitor centre demonstrating to the visitor different ways of creating ecological habitats.

60m +53

50m

Covered picnic area

Module 208 Rachel Forbes


ILKLEY LANDSCAPE CHARACTER QUALITY EVALUATION A

B

1

1

1

2

2

2

A

3 4

3 4

B

5

A

A

3 4

B

5

Score Landscape Character Area Value Score Low 1 Moderate 2 3 High 4 Very high 5

5

B

Map overlay D

C

D

C

C

C D

D A

B C D

E

E

A

LANDSCAPE CHARACTER TYPES

F

E

B

G C D

A

E

SCALE: 1:10000

1 Score 1 2 3 4 5

2

3

4

5

Areas measured on a scale of 1-5 with darkest shading representing the highest value

Period of Development

< 10 years 10 - 50 years 50 - 100 years 100 - 200 years >200 years

Score Rarity Many similar communities in 1 2 3 4 5

area, the nearest equivalent less than 500 m away Several similar communities in area, the nearest equivalent 500-1000m away several similar communities in area, the nearest equivalent 1000-2000m away only 1-4 similar communities in the area no similar communities in area

Score 1 2 3 4 5

Ecology

Visual

History/cultural

Overall value

Area in Hectares < 1 ha 1 - <10 ha 10 - <25 ha 25 - 50 ha >50 ha

Score Habitat structure exclusively grass or 1 2 3 4 5

trodden-area communities uniform vegetation type but not 1 +2 different vegetation types +3 different vegetation types +4 different vegeation types

Score 1 2 3 4 5

F

G

Features or areas of historical and cultural interest

Period of Development

Mainly 20th Century 1900 - 1950 1800-1900 >200 + <400 >400 years

Score 1 2 3 4 5

Visual unity Poor Moderate Good Very good Excellent

Score Cultural Importance None 1 Minor 2 3 Major local importance 4 Major national importance 5

Score 1 2 3 4 5

Scenic beauty

Score

Score Ecological/Historical designation None 1 Local 3 National 5

Visual Distinctiveness

1 2 3 4 5

Poor Moderate Good Very good Excellent

Unattractive Non-descript Pleasant Very scenic Outstanding

F

F

B

C D

G

A B

E

VISUAL EVALUATION

G

HISTORICAL EVALUATION

F

ECOLOGICAL EVALUATION

F

KEY

SCORING TABLES

E

E

G

The ecological evaluation was divided into 4 main areas and then extra weighting was given to certain areas if the area had a national or local designation for example the river and woodland areas have a SEGI (Site of Ecological or Geological Importance) and the moor has Some Landscape Character Areas have been sub-divided to be able to measure certain qualities more accurately. Average scores have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Historical value is measured in terms of age and cultural importance. Areas score a higher value if they have a cultural appeal outside the region for example Ilkley Moor. Designations are used to give weighting for example the detached residential area is part of the Ilkley conservation area and still has some of the original Victorian Hydropathic establishments. The visual qualities of the areas were measured relate to each other), scenic beauty (how attractive the area is), and distinctivenes ie. whether the area is distinctive to Ilkley. The rocky moorland edge scores highest on distinctiveness as features like the Cow and Calf rocks are unique to Ilkley.

TYPE Sub Area

1 2

3 4 5 6 7

F

C D

G

A B E

C

F

D G

E

G

F

G

ECOLOGY

1 2

A

3 4 B

5

FINAL ANALYSIS - VALUE MAP FOR LANDSCAPE CHARACTER AREAS

TYPE A WOOED VALLEY SIDE TYPE B RIVER FLOODPLAIN TYPE C INDUSTRIAL HISTORIC URBAN FRINGE TYPE D SUBURBAN VALLEY SPREAD TYPE E RESIDENTIAL MOORLAND EDGE TYPE F ROCKY MOORLAND TYPE G MOORLAND PLATEAU

HISTORY

C

D

E

F

G

VISUAL

TOTAL

Woodland Farmland River Fields Cemetery Sewage Works

Age Area Rar- Hab Des. Total Mean Final Age Cult Des. Total Mean Final Uni- Sce- Dis Total Mean Final Mean value ity str. Score Impo Score ty nic score score for area 5 4 5 5 3 22 4 4 3 12 4 5 4 14 5 4 5 3 5 4 4 4 3 3 4 1 15 3 4 1 1 6 2 4 3 3 10 3 5 2 5 5 2 19 4 4 3 12 4 5 4 13 4 3 5 3 4 3 3 4 3 2 4 1 14 3 3 2 1 6 2 3 4 3 10 3 3 2 3 3 1 12 2 3 3 5 11 4 3 3 3 9 3 3 2 2 2 1 10 2 2 1 1 4 1 3 1 1 5 2

Industrial

1

2

1

1

1

6

1

2 2 2 Detached residential 3

3 4 2 4

1 1 1 1

1 3 3 3

1 1 1 1

8 11 9 12

1 2 2 2

Rocky moorland

5

5

3

5

5

23

5

Moorland plateau

5

4

3

5

5

22

5

Terraces Residential

1 2 2 5 5

1

1

1

3

1

3 1 1 2

2 1 1 3

1 1 1 3

6 3 3 8

2 1 1 3

5

5

1

11

4

5

5

1

11

4

2 1 3 4 4

1

1

1

3

1

2 2 2 3

1 2 2 3

2 1 1 3

6 5 5 9

2 2 2 3

4

5

5

14

5

5

4

4

13

4

1

1

2

2

3 5 4

3 5 4

CONCLUSIONS

Overall the rocky moorland edge scores highest. Development in this area would have to be very sensitive taking into account the views and the visibility of the area from the vallley bottom. The most likely development for this area would be improved facilities for visitors for example visitor information, toilets etc. to enhance the area as a visitor attraction. However too much interference would destroy the character of the area and reduce its value. The Industrial area scores lowest, particularly for visual and ecological quality. Appropriate development in this area would include small commercial developments or light industry. The area is close to the town centre and major roads, and is already very mixed.

Rachel Forbes, Andrea Ku and Jo Letcher LD 207


Beckfoot School Design and Community Sketches commissioned by school to make postcards for 60 year anniversary


Portland Gateway Gardens - Planting Design â&#x20AC;&#x153;What gives gardens their potency is that they represent idealized natural spaces whose living components, while retaining individual qualities and spirits, sum into a greater whole. Recognizing that we belong to this living kingdom remains one of the few moments of transcendence left in modern life reminding us of our place in natureâ&#x20AC;?.

1:200

Scott Ogden and Lauren Springer Ogden - Plant Driven Design

Planting Design Concept The concept behind the planting design was to create a quality green space for students and staff, and the general public - somewhere to relax and socialise. The circular layout responds to surrounding architecture while accomodating the continual movement of people. The site is part of a major route between Leeds city centre and the universities, so it was important to create attractive walkways. The planting is key to the visitor experience and plants chosen offer a variety of sensuous qualities including texture, scent and movement. Rich, warm, earthy colours contrast with the cool green and blues of the Rose Bowl building. Soft textures react against the cut stone and stainless steel of surrounding buildings. Climbers on the pergola structure create a feeling of enclosure and intimacy, allowing the visitor to come into close contact with the plants. The garden offers a retreat from busy city life, an escape from stuffy offices and noisy traffic, an uplifting experience as part of a journey to work.

Dogwoods (cornus) blend with grasses, Autumn flowering perennials with long seasonal interest

+61

Many perennials retain their form through the winter, and some have attractive seedheads Portland Way

7

+60.5

4 The Pergola

The shape of the pergola echoes the circular rose bowl design of the front of the building, and the layout outside Civic Hall, but is intended to give visitors and pedestrians simply passing through, a more interactive, intimate experience with the plants. Draped in climbers such as fragrant honeysuckle and virginia creeper with its vibrant autumn colour turning an almost translucent red in the autumn sunlight.

1 Building Entrance

Planting for the shady area directly in front of the building is simple with evenly spaced trees and beds containing mainly glossy evergreens. The trees chosen for this area should have vibrant autumn colour - rich reds and oranges to contrast with the glass behind. Shrubs need to be shade tolerant and look good all year round. A grass is chosen to provide a asense of unity with other planting areas.

6

4

5

2

2

+60.6

+60

4

Pachysandra terminalis, Anemanthele lessonianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, Viburnum davidii, Sarcococca confusa , Dryopteris erythronium

3

A

3

1

+59.2

1

View 1 The pergola

View 2

View through pergola to trees in front of building entrance

8

+58.6

2 Perennial and mixed Borders

Leeds Met Rose Bowl

These beds are predominantly planted with late flowering perennials and grasses with some shrubs to provide year round structure and colour. Planting patterns are repeated to create a harmonious feel and match the scale of the surrounding buildings. Winter interest shrubs such as coloured stemmed cornus provide a backbone, blending with perennials and grasses. Perennials of different forms - spires, plumes, daisies create an undulating effect and grasses like Stipa gigantea provide tansparent screens giving a feeling of enclosure but also glimpse to other areas. Under planting cornus with winter bulbs such as snowdrops offers signs of hope during the winter months when most plants are dormant.

A

Cross-sectional elevation AA View 4

The seating area with hedge behind

+59

Portland Crescent

3 The Pool Area

This bed repeats much of the planting of the perennial beds but also includes specimen shrubs and some evergreens to provide a feeling of enclosure. A simple line of trees is reflected in the still water.

Inspiration

5, 6, 7 and 8 Hedging and Screening trees View 3 - Using the planting to frame attractive views Curving beds shield the underground car park entrance and draw the eye towards Millenium Square and a key focal point - Leeds Town Hall

Rich autumn colour of liquidambar tree

Stipa gigantea - Trentham Gardens designed by Tom Stuart-Smith - the softening transparent effect of grasses

Contemporary materials and colours, Drifts of naturalistic planting at Broughton reflective surfaces, contrasting green Hall, designed by Dan pearson foliage - Appeltern, Holland

Climbers on pergola structures at Appeltern, Holland - adding a 3-dimension feel to planting

MFO Park Zurich, Switzerland - Autumn colour

Still pool reflecting tree foliage

The site is north east facing and is at present very exposed. Hedging will provide immediate shelter for seating areas in front of it, but the trees planted behind the hedge will provide more effective protection from cold winds. Screening trees will also act as a buffer between the site and noisy traffic, and large trees will hide ugly views while framing desirable ones. As a gateway to Leeds greening the boundary of the site will make a more attractive entry to Leeds city centre.

203 Rachel Forbes


Portland Gateway - Planting Details Cornus alba ‘Sibirica’, Anemone x hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’, Heuchera Micanthra var. Diversifolia ‘Palace purple, Bergenia ’Overture’, Stipa Gigantea, Sedum ‘Matrona’, Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’, Salvia verticillata ‘Purple Rain’

BA

9 no. Bergenia ‘Silberlicht’ Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Lonicera japonica ‘Halls Prolific’

BA

1:20

BA

BA BA

Planting Area A

9 no. heuchera ‘Palace Purple’

5 no. Cornus ‘Midwinter Fire’ 5 no. Sedum ‘Matrona’

Planting area A

3 no. Cornus ‘Sibirica’

Betula albosinensis ‘Fascination’ (Barcham Trees)

SG 7 no. Anemanthele lessoniana Position of climbers - random mix Lonicera/Parthenocissus

8 no. Lonicera ‘Halls Prolific’ 8 no. Parthenocissus quinquefolia

SG

Key

Galanthus nivalis Common snowdrop

BA

Botanical Name

Common Quantity Girth Name cm Betula albo sinenesis Chinese Red 5 12-14 ‘Fascination Birch

Height Form cm 350 SHe

Pot size

Root

Maintenance

RB

Prune dead wood where necessary Water regulalry until established

Perennials 9 no. Sedum ‘Matrona’

SG

Code

Botanical Name

AL

Anemanthele Lessoniana Anemone x hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’

An

9 no Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’

Care is to be taken handling root-balled trees. Do not disturb or break up the rootbal during handling or planting. Tree pits to be at least 1 cubic metre. Break up base of planting pit to improve drainage. 2 no. stakes 75mm dia. softwood FSC. Fix synthetic ties to stakes using galvanised staples. Stakes should be installed before planting, at least 0.6m below the base of the planting pit. Stake according to diagram, and align to dominating wind direction. Irrigation pipe - perforated, corrugated pipe 60mm dia. Install around rootball during backfilling. Attach irrigation inlet pipe to irrigation pipe with T-junction. Mulch around tree pit base 75mm depth bark mulch to a radius 500mm around tree. Water at a rate of 30l per tree or to full depth of planting pit.

Shrubs and perennials Water all plants thouroughly before planting. Shrub and perennial pits should be 150mm wider than rootball. Plant at same level that plant was growing in the nursedry, and take care not to damage root system. Backfill with two thirds topsoil and one third peat-free compost. Water in after planting and cover beds with 750mm layer ornamental medium coarse grade bark mulch. Planted areas are to be kept weed and litter free and plants should be water regulalry in the first year.

6 no. Heuchera ‘Palace Purple’

Root Maintenance Comb out dead foliage in spring

9

30-40

500

3l

C

Tidy dead leaves in march. Lift and divide large clumps if neces-

18

10-15

350mm

2l

C

Heuchera Micanthra ‘palace Purple’ Salvia verticillata Lilac sage ‘Purple Rain’ Sedum telephium Stone Crop ‘Matrona’

14

20

400mm

2l

C

10

30-40

450mm

2l

C

14

30-40

450mm

2l

C

SG

Stipa gigantea

3

2l

C

Bulbs Ga

Galanthus nivalis Snowdrops 35

Snowdrops

Trees

C

Heu

Topsoil should be at least 1m deep for trees and 500mm for shrubs. Topsoil should be fertile loam, free from perennial weeds, weed seeds and contamination (rubble, roots, wire).

Elephants Ears Silver Light Coral Bells

Quantity Height Spacing Pot cm mm Size 50 750mm 2l

12

Bergenia ‘Silberlicht’

SMa

10 no. Salvia ‘Purple Rain’

Common Name Pheasant’s Tail Grass Japanese anemone

Ber

Sal

All plants to comply with the relevant British Standards.

Planting areas are to be forked over or rotovated before planting to break up compcted soil and improve drainage. All planting is to be carried out during the appropriate season and in suitable weather conditions. Plants should be healthy, vigorous and well-rooted.

1:100

PLANT SPECIFICATIONS Trees

5 no. Anemanthele lessoniana

Planting Specification - notes

5 no. Betula albosinensis ‘Fascination’

Giant Feather Grass

Code Botanical Name CSi Cornus alba ‘Sibirica’ CSa

LJ

PQ

Cornus sanguinea ‘Midwinter Fire’ Lonicera jap- Japanese 8 nonica ‘Hall honeysuckle Parthenocis- Virginia 8 sus creeper

Habit B - Branched SSh - Several Shoots

-

winter.

structure. Cut back in february/ March and mulch around base of plant. Cut down 30% established plants at end of May to prevent becoming too leggy. Comb through plant in spring to remove dead foliage.

9cm

Common Quantity Height Name cm Red3 60-80 barked dogwood ‘Blood5 40-60 twig’ dogwood

Root C - Container RB - Rootballed

interest. Cut off damaged foliage in spring. Lift and divide large clumps where necessary. In autumn remove untidy foliage. Lift and divide if necessary.

Plant while in full leaf (in the green). Divide clumps every 3 years if overcrowded by lifting

Shrubs 8 no. Bergenia ‘Silberlicht’

KEY Form SHe - Heavy Standard

Spacing Age Pot Habit Root size 1m 0+1 3l B C

Breaks Maintenance

800mm

4

3l

B

C

3

60-80

3l

SSh

C

3

60-80

3l

SSh

C

3

To maintain stem colour cut back new growth hard to within 5-7cm from the ground in March To maintain stem colour cut back new growth hard to within 5-7cm from the ground in March

spring. Training required - tie in young shoots until established. Prune in early winter once established.

2 no. synthetic ties

2 no. stakes 2500mm 1300mm above ground, knocked approx. 1200mm into ground until secure

irrigation in let with cap Irrigation pipe wrapped around rootball

topsoil Subgrade

Planting Detail for Betula albosinensis ‘Fascination’

203 Rachel Forbes


Developing skills - photoshop rendering


Visiting Landscape Projects

Study of the Thames Barrier Park October 2011 Developing sketching styles


Garden Design Project



Landscape Architecture Portfolio - Rachel Forbes