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RACHEL

C H I C H EST E R

P O R T FOLIO SELECTED WORKS OF ARCHITECTURE AND

Design

FROM 2009-2011


Senses Restored 2011

FIFTH YEAR THESIS PROJECT SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA This thesis is an exploration into the sensuality of space, phenomenology in architecture, secular spirituality, sustainability, and place based architecture. I set out to explore what instills in us a sense of place, or a feeling of belonging. I am striving to create a phenomenological experience of the spirit through manipulation of the occupants’ sensory awareness in space. I believe that spirituality should be present in more than just religious architecture and that sensuality can be found in light, shadows, and materiality. Fort Point, known as the fort that never fired a shot out of anger, has a long and storied history. The fort has sat unoccupied for more time than it has ever held soldiers in its barracks. As our nation strives to reduce our oil consumption I feel it is important that this project contributes by facilitating ease of walking and biking to the fort via connections between the fort, bridge, and the Marina. As I embark on this adaptive reuse project I will take two hands, one of a surgeon, and one of a builder. Working with the almost sacred space of the fort I will take a surgeons hand. My moves will be deliberate and precise. Most of the existing fort will be transformed into a museum, although art won’t necessarily hang on the walls. It will be an installation museum, where artists are called to create within the confines of bricked arches. Two pieces of new construction will compliment the new museum, a lighthouse tower and a theater.


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SITE PLAN


MODEL PHOTOS


THE TOWER The tower is a conceptual representation of the traditional lighthouse, it rises up nearly 200 feet to connect with the pedestrian access of the Golden Gate Bridge and offer another spectacular vista. The tower is an extension of the museum similar in function to the Herzog de Meuron tower on the De Young Museum also in San Francisco. The connection to the Golden Gate Bridge increases museum visibility and encourages exploration.

Renderings of Tower and the Fort


A historical piece of architecture, the Fort currently opens its large iron doors for touring a limited two days a week. This project seeks to utilize this amazing piece of history by turning the Fort into San Francisco’s first installation and sculpture museum. The natural aging that the Fort has endured has made the open bricked rooms highly unique spaces for artists to enact their own visions through installations. This typology will have little physical impact on the Fort, but we’ll leave a lasting cultural impression upon the city.

La Voûte de LeFevre Installation

THE FORT & THE SCULPTURE GARDEN The Sculpture Garden pictured below presents visitors with paths through the large courtyard leading to the tower, the theater, and the most important points of the Fort. The stone space between the paths holds the sculptures able to withstand the elements. As the day winds down and the museum nears closing, a thin layer of water is slowly pumped over the stone sculpture slices of the garden. Patrons that attend evening shows at the theater are treated to the reflections of the Tower, Fort, and sculptures on their walk to the Theater.

Installation by SOFTlab

Voussoir Cloud, an installation by firm IwamotoScott

Bird’s eye view of Tower and Sculpture Garden


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View from walking path out to the theater

THEATER ELEVATIONS


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Theater lobby

2ND FLOOR PLAN

View from inside theater

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The theater is a true spectacle, floating a few hundred feet away from the fort in the bay; it is connected by an underground tunnel that begins at the fort. The journey of the theater is a true sensual experience. After traversing through the darkened tunnel one emerges back into the light in the theater lobby with amazing 360 degree views. One can experience the sun, or the unique quality of fog from the position in the bay. One inside the theater, where performances live, experiences the contrast between the warmth in materiality and soft acoustic reflection, and the cold glassy ocean outside.


Ingleside Public Library SPRING 2010 San Franscisco, CA This library is designed based on the premise that the library’s role has shifted, critically, to providing free access to new technologies as well as printed materials. Meeting rooms for neighborhood use, exhibits, and lectures, not just for library functions were also included in the program. The creative and economic investment in new innovative libraries attempts to bring the community together to enhance its livability. The library acts as a gathering spot for the community, by providing accessible spaces which stimulate the mind, leading people to read and learn, thereby linking them to knowledge.

VIEW OF LIBRARY FROM THE CORNER OF OCEAN AVE


SITE ANALYSIS Site analysis was performed on to determine the visual impact the library would have in the neighborhood, the quality and frequency of daylight, and the best visual and nodal corridors.

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CIRCULATION

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6:54 19:33 SPRING/ FALL WEST

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7:21 16:54 WINTER

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VIE BL W M FU OCKE AYB TU D E RE IN

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NODAL CORRIDOR

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MAIN VISUAL CORRIDOR

NO DA LC OR RID OR


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CUSTOM CHILDRENS STORY TIME BOOKSHELF

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COURTYARD

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CHILDREN’S LIBRARY 5’ 0

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VIEW OF FRONT ROOM COMPUTERS AND SEATING

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VIEW LOOKING AT CHILDREN’S LIBRARY AND COURTYARD


LIBRARY READING ROOM


PERFORATION DEVELOPMENT The perforated screen on the most visible corner of the library was developed to be the icon of the building. Although abstract, the square perforations are patterned to look like the branches and leaves of a tree, particularly the “tree of knowledge.” Three different sized perforated squares were punched through blackened steel to create the screen.

SKETCHES & INSPIRTATION

GRID

PERFORATION LAYOUT

PERFORATED SCREEN


Neurobiological Research Center DEC 2010 Portland, OR This Portland Neurobiological Research Center is situated between a developing downtown residential riverfront district to the north, and Oregon’s Health and Science University (OHSU) to the south. Neurobiology is concerned with the central nervous system and the interaction between organism and environment. To this end, Neurobiological Research Center is situated on an expansive brownfield site that will be restored as water retention / wetlands. This “site� is not only about the picturesque, including extensive walking and biking trails, but is itself a kind of passive filter of the urban water run-off surrounding the area before it enters into the Willamette River.Over 80% of the site will be used as a restorative landscape and will not have major architectural interventions on it. As a laboratory research facility, research is conducted on the interaction between biological systems and how the environment affects and is affected by these systems. As a public conference center, conferences and demonstration laboratories are conducted that focus on ecological issues. The building focuses on the human interaction between scientist to scientist in their separate research clusters, and the interaction between the public and the research laboratories, and, importantly, the integration of the architecture with the restorative landscape.


The building is split into two spines, one for the public interaction of the center, and the other for the private scientific research. Both spines of the building wrap around a large open courtyard which lets in natural light and helps ventilate the center. The conference areas are to the left, and the private research wings branch off of the spine to the right in the rendering shown below.


SPLINES USED FOR SITE GENERATION

SITE GESTURE

FINAL TOPOGRAPHY

SITE PLAN

CNC SITE MODEL Developed from epigenetic landscapes, the site came to life through analog models which were digitized, and then finished in Rhino. Ecologically, this site is designed to act as a restorative landscape, emphasizing water retention and the return of native ecologies that it supports. The building was developed around an attractive break in topography which allowed for the two spines of the building to branch off around a communal courtyard.


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The roof was designed to mimic the curves of the landscape and to provide shading and rain catchment. Since the roof overhangs equally on the North and South sides, it is clad with photovoltaic panels on the South, and uses a translucent insulated panel on the North. The catchment capability of the roof should provide the building with re usable gray water for the toilets and landscaping.

ROOF SECTIONS


This section below illustrates that the mechanical systems are distributed through the substantial interstitial spaces between each floor of the lab spaces shown on the right. In addition to needing the most mechanical equipment the lab spaces also need to be the most environmentally controlled. Therefore they branch out from the scientist office corridor which gives them access to day light on three sides with great views and gathering spaces.


Stair Project JAN 2010

ARCHITECTURE BUILDING SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA This staircase was designed to fulfill a much needed connection from the architecture building on the Cal Poly campus to the much used pathway near the education building. Since Many students pass through this small yet busy artery of campus every day my design goal was to create an interesting gathering space while further enhancing the flow in this junction to the previously inaccessible Architecture building and lower lawn. The structure of the stairs is a system of folded steel plates which create support for seating, an upper deck, and fold to become the hand and guard rail. In order to maximize the amount of daylight received through the stairs steel pieces are angled towards the opening. The staircase has sculptural quality that changes in appearance as one passes by.


Rock On. OCT 2010

VELLUM FURNITURE COMPETITON SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA Rock on was born out of the desire for a stimulating chair. It rocks back and forth, yes, but tap your hand on the hand cut Mahogany sides and you’ll hear the deep tones of an idiophonic tongue drum emanating out of the chair. Built by laminating twenty eight CNC cut plywood profiles with one solid profile in the center, the chair has one drum chamber on either side of the center laminate. The drum faces are made of solid African mahogany so that each tongue of the drum resonates with a pleasant tone. Sitting in Rock on is an experience in creativity, one that has therapeutic value. Even children whose arms may not reach the drums can play using the mallets. The accompanying ottoman is made from the scrap CNC cut pieces of the chair. By cutting each piece of the ottoman before lamination I created a hollow interior so the ottoman could be used for storage. A small hand turned piece of aspen wood keeps the wooden side covering the storage in place and holds the drumming mallets.


DESIGN.

CUT.

LAMINATE.


Architecture Design and Discourse 2010-2011

CAL POLY’S STUDENT PUBLICATION SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA The eleventh annual ADD Publication looks at the best work of Cal Poly’s architecture students from all years of study, highlighting the study abroad programs of the department. Worked on by a small group of students throughout the year, I was highly involved in this publication from inception to distribution. I worked on collecting work to publish as well as layout designs. I was also the primary point of contact with the printer, and prepared the document for print with final editing.


Abstract & Vellum 7 2010-2011

ARCHITECTURE PUBLICATIONS SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA Abstract is the collection of fifth year architecture student's thesis abstracts. I was involved in the editing of this publication in preperation for printing. Pictured below is my individual abstract from my thesis project. Vellum 7, shown at right, highlights seven Years of the best projects entered into the Vellum furniture competition held annually in San Luis Obispo. I was a participant in the Fall 2010 competition and also the editor in chief of the publication released in Summer 2011.


CT721 Designer: Valentin Pelayo

3” x 1/4” flat stock steel 2” cypress wood

Materials: Glass, Wood (Poplar, Red Oak, Redwood, Aged Pine), and Steel

U-Bolt assembly

Description: The idea behind the table is a simple hierarchy of material and tectonics. Its form plays on structural acrobatics, producing something straight-forward yet somewhat incomprehensible. Its material character comes mainly from its wooden portion. The different types of wood making this portion were originally left over scraps from other Vellum projects. The table now belongs to Kreuzberg CA in downtown S.L.O.

fabricated axle assembly

leaf-spring suspension inspiration

DONE DIRT Y Designer: Aaron Hales and Marcel Mercado Dimensions: 90” L x 55” W x 35” D (self weight) Materials: Cypress Lumber, 1/4” Flat stock Steel, Steel Tubing, Re-used Pick-up Truck Leaf Springs

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Description: Inspiration for this bench comes directly from the found leaf springs. The flexibility of the springs encouraged us to design public seating responsive to the people sitting on it. Steel straps were fabricated in multiple pieces, each bend using a hydraulic press and welded together. A central axle is mounted to the springs using a custom clamp assembly and U-bolts.

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CHAIRS

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GARFIELD VANOVERR AN CHAIR Designer: Adam Monkaba Materials: Walnut, Steel Description: GARFIELD VANOVERRAN is a retired professor. He lives in Alaska. He’s a widow and a woodworker. He whistles on hikes and loves coffee. Every morning he gets up and reads the newspaper by the window, in this chair. To whom it may concern, I am looking for a chair to sit in and call home. To run may hands over its arm rests and feel how it came to be

BOT TLED UP

And how it is comeing to be. And want it to creak and mone for me Flex like a deep breath

Designer: Ashley Tyra

And hug me like a mother It should warm with my presence

Dimensions: 22” L x 24” W x 18” D

Take my heat It should have a home for my arms.

Materials: 1/2” Glass panels, Wine corks, White glass bottles, Cut green glass bottles, Resin cast onto a used artist’s palette with oil paint

My lumbar and if I feel like it a place to kick my leg over. And if my daughter wants to join me id like that to be ok It will be part of my day

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Description: Made up of all “pre-loved” materials, my inspiration was sustainably driven. The main concept comes from the idea of making a reusable palette. Since glass allows for multiple uses as a palette, a central material theme developed: glass and re-used materials. The piece was made by breaking whole bottles in half to create a new use for the green bottles: paint and brush storage. The clear bottles remain whole to signify the structure of the piece. There are two panes of glass used as the table top in order to make it easier to clean off paint from.

It will wait for me like a dog and smile when I walk though the door I will spill things on it and it will stain Ill put dents in it And it will remind me it was once a walnut tree In the sun. Waiting

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Designer: Bianca Clayton Dimensions: 22-27”W x 17”H x 59”L

Materials: Baltic birch plywood, African mahogany

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Description: Rock on was born out of the desire for a stimulating chair. It rocks back and forth, yes, but tap your hand on the hand cut Mahogany sides and you’ll hear the deep tones of an idiophonic tongue drum emanating out of the chair. Built by laminating twenty eight CNC cut plywood profiles with one solid profile in the center, the chair has one drum chamber on either side of the center laminate. The drum faces are made of solid African mahogany so that each tongue of the drum resonates with a pleasant tone. Sitting in Rock on is an experience in creativity, one that has therapeutic value. Even children whose arms may not reach the drums can play using the mallets. The accompanying ottoman is made from the scrap CNC cut pieces of the chair. By cutting each piece of the ottoman before lamination I created a hollow interior so the ottoman could be used for storage. A small hand turned piece of aspen wood keeps the wooden side covering the storage in place and holds the drumming mallets.

CHAIRS

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TSUBO -NIWA 坪坪 ‘POCKE T GARDEN”

rock on Designer: Rachel Chichester

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Materials: Reclaimed Local Sycamore, Concrete, Hot-rolled Steel, Various Succulents Description: Steel, concrete, and wood have created a setting for a miniature garden in this coffee table/bench. Tsubo-niwa, Japanese for “pocket garden”, is a tiny landscape (typically in an urban setting) for gazing at and admiring, rather than walking in. The essence of tsubo-niwa is captured by bringing the outdoors into this indoor furniture ideal for apartment living. The organic curves of the slab contrasts with the crisp, sharp lines of the steel and concrete. Colorful succulents add depth and intrigue, evoking contemplation. The slab of wood, with its brilliant red and blond grain, is locally reclaimed Sycamore. The shelf in the wood is occupied by a concrete tray that slides out with ease, convenient for watering and replanting. The tray can effortlessly be transformed to a rock garden, setting for candles, or taken out completely as used as a spot for books.

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Art & Photography A sampling of my paintings, sketches, abstractions, and photography. Above- This watercolor was inspired by the motion of my Vellum Furniture Competition entry ‘Rock On’ pictured previously in the portfolio.

PHOTOGRAPHY


POETRY I am here to protect the city Bricks comprise my rise to the top I watch the sea I watch the city I watch the island with the un-free I watched the steel erect over me and stretch across the bay Brushes soaked in red work each day The road that leads to me became less traveled over time But still I watch People bleed into the city with the rise I am mindful of the flow I feel the energy build and then drift back into the slow At night’s persuasion my tower will light I am here to protect the city

The abstract sculpture above was designed for my thesis design project. The slice of walnut with natural edge represents the shoreline of my site and the red thread spanning accross the wood represents the iconic appeal of the Golden Gate Bridge.

SKETCHES AND DRAWINGS


Landscape Intervention DEC 2010 Montano De Oro, CA Inspired by the artist Andy Goldsworthy this landscape intervention was done in partnership with Alyssa Redding, Allison Pell, and Ashley Tyra. Constructed at the beach in Monta単a de Oro this installation is made out of the beautiful seaweed and stones spread across the sand.



Portfolio