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The Boneyard Project The Fatcap Chair Askew & Berst Phil Lumbang Graphic Fury Ruedi One Sat One Mad C Shoe


Credits Graphic Fury: Foto: Benoit Ollive Text: http://www.graphicfury.com & Benoit Ollive The Fatcap Chair: Foto: Sander Van Heukelom Text: Sander Van Heukelom Mad C: Foto: Bremen Exhibition Centre, Claudia Walde Text: http://artprimo.com/catalog/art_primo_ MadC_Interview Askew and Berst: Foto: Askew & Berst Text: http://graffuturism.com/2010/04/20/askewberst-tmd-a-conversation-about-style/ Sat One: Foto: Max Geuter Text: http://graffuturism.com/2012/01/19/sat-onesolo-show-chromolog-firstlines-gallery/ & www. ekosystem.org/0_ITW/satone/ Phil Lumbang: Foto: Danny Huges & Gallery 44 Text: http://www.facebook.com/pages/PhilipLumbang/137178421362?sk=info http://www.philiplumbang.com/about/index.htm Ruedi One: Foto: Ruediger Glatz Text: http://www.ruedione.com/ The Boneyard Project: Foto: Bill Word, Eric Firestone Text: Eric Firestone. Niels Shoe Shuman: Foto: http://ironlak.com/2012/01/niels-shoe-meulman-calligraffiti-upside-down-tour-2012/ Text: http://www.nielsshoemeulman.com/

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Word

Graffiti, tagging, art, call it what you like. In many of the urban artforms it is bits and pieces influensed by one of the most hated and loved cultures there is in modern times. This magazine shows you the products, influations and the amazing artists of this culture. Maby you get a deeper understanding about why they do what they do, learns to appreciate these lines coming from nowhere or just popping up in a gallery near you. Maybe you are a hater who hates the system, the mainstream artists and this magasine, and thinks your culure should be reserved the ÂŤrealÂť guys in the game. Hate it or love it, get inspired and insight. Also Known As presents artists who have done amazing things with their hands, cans, brushes, time and life... enjoy!

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Contents

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Word

Foreword/Introduction By Petter Bratland

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Graphic Fury

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The Fatcap Chair

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The work of Bennoit Ollive

Sander van Heukelom new use of fatcaps

Mad C

The queen of graffiti

Askew and Berst Style, progression, fatcaps and netch

Ruedi One

The king of visual documentation

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The boneyard project

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Niels Shoe Muelman

A new kind of canvas

Graffiti + Calligraphy = Caligraffiti Contents

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Graphic Fury Text by: Benoit Ollive & Petter Bratland Foto by: Benoit Ollive

Benoit Ollive is twenty-two years old and recently graduated with a Bachelor of Design from the Marseille School of Fine Arts, France. This is a guy who wants to get up in the industry, managing whatever he wants in the art of graffiti and graphic design.

Knuckle ice scraper By combining two sources of local inspiration, the interest was to create unsuspected objects that interact directly with specific spaces.

Bloody meal

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enoits determination to succeed in graphic design led him to move to London in January 2010. Benoit would like to gain international recognition in designmaking, extend his professional networks and work experience. His work is inspired by urban trends, social networks and the underlying concepts of alternative cultures. He would really enjoy the opportunity to contribute to a company for which he could use his creativity as an answer to client challenges. He have always pushed himself very hard to create work that is unique, explores mixed media, questions the principles of design and connects people through narrative. While creative-minded, he is also highly-motivated, practical, focussed on quality, conscientious and organised. These traits have given him the opportunity to work with designers, architects, film directors and art galleries in roles including graphic designer, assistant, art director and curator. http://www.graphicfury.com

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Graphic Fury

This plate is carved with the representation of the dangerous red areas of Peckham according to London Crime Map. When you put the meat on the plate, the blood runs into the veins.

(No) Body Knows Fanzine A collaborative fanzine about the stories behind your scars.


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The Fatcap Chair Text by: http://www.fatcapchair.com Photo: http://www.fatcapchair.com

The Original Fat Cap Chair is a design of the Dutch graphic designer Sander van Heukelom. He began experimenting with typographic design and graffiti as a teenager. The use of the spray can still characterizes many of his art creations. He developed the chair from his vision that beauty is to be found in small things – in this case in the cap of a spray can.

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n his current work he uses many other different materials, such as styrofoam, plexiglas, synthetic resin and wood. He draws his inspiration from his extensive travels. After five years spent travelling around the world and teaching kite surfing on several continents, Sander’s creativity has taken wing. He is now known especially for his three-dimensional typographic sculpture, paintings with spray can and resin and of course The Original Fat Cap Chair. In 2004 after years travelling and kite surfing, Sander van Heukelom expresses his creativity in different art forms apart from graffiti and street art. But cans are still his main tool. Suddenly, the fat cap he has lovingly been using all these years sparks an idea, The Fatcap Chair. In 2007 the design of the chair is molded out of styrofoam. It gets polished until it has the desired form, finishing it off with coating. The Original Fat Cap Chair breaks into the Amsterdam scene with a solo exhibit. This is followed by a

showing at an international interior design fair in Belgium, Interieur ’08. After many, many great responses to the design in 2010, The Original Fat Cap Chair is in production on a larger scale, and finaly in 2011, Available! In stores in Western Europe via the webshop. Collaborations and events. The Original Fat Cap Chair fuses creativity with today’s urban lifestyle. It is a blank canvas. The shape and simplicity of the design makes it an eye-catcher in any interior. It is made of tough materials and is easy to clean. The chair is suitable for both indoors and outdoors. Pure white or with your own design on it – give The Original Fat Cap Chair the look and feel to suit you and your in- or exterior!

The Fatcap Chair

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Also Known As

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Mad C


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Text by: http://artprimo.com Photo by: Bremen Exhibition Centre and Claudia Walde

MadC is one of the most talented graffiti artists in Germany. She spends five months in the year traveling to paint. In addition, she always paints with talented writers from around the world. MadC is an artist to look out for in the years to come.

Mad C

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Mad C


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«The outline always has to be the most important bit, no matter if it is a piece or a character»

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hat do you write and how long have you been writing? I write MadC, I started in 1998.

Do you represent any crews? What are they and how long have you been down? I am member of the Bandits crew (Germany, France, USA, Australia) since 2001 and the Wallnuts crew (USA, Germany) since 2007. Where do you call home? And how long have you lived there? Hard to say as I travel constantly and do live in different countries. However, I was born in Germany and that’s where my base is for sure.How would you describe your style of art?I mostly do semi-wildstyles but my aim is to gain control over all techniques and skills provided by can, cap and surface: styles (wild, bubble, simple...), tags, character (cartoon and photo realistic), backgrounds... I love details, keep the pieces clean, think about color combinations carefully and never leave a piece unfinished.

a technique but haven’t got the eye for proportion, which happens very often. The outline always has to be the most important bit, no matter if it is a piece or a character. How often do you travel to paint? Very often. In 2008 it was about 5 month of travelling in the whole. Have you had any close calls with authorities while painting? And can you tell us one of those stories? I was caught while painting a train once during my first 2 years as a writer. Ever since I was the faster runner.

What influences did you have when you first started? I got my influences from the very few books and magazines I got hold on back in the days. I was blown away by the works of Dare, Swet, Seen, Toast and Amok. They still do influence my work.

How do the authorities approach graffiti where you live? And do you feel that it helps clean the streets or encourages more vandalism? That is very different from place to place. Even within the same country, sometimes the same city. In some parts of the city it is much more tolerated than in others. Mostly that’s where no tourists go to. Overall they tightened the laws within Germany during the last 2 years and surveillance is more and more common. However, I haven’t seen much change in the streets. The people still go out to bomb and piece. Especially Berlin is amazing. You won’t see many cities in Europe with such a big vandal squad and it is still bombed like no other city.

The characters, backgrounds and pieces that you’ve done are very well thought out and executed. What type of artistic background do you have and how has that helped you with graffiti? And what were you doing before you started painting graffiti? I studied design and animation and earn my living with it. Even as a child and before I started using spray cans I was painting and drawing a lot. I took a lot of life drawing classes over the last 10 years as I think it is horrible when people are proficient in

What makes you want to keep doing graffiti? My aim is to gain control over all techniques as I said before. That alone will keep me going for quite a while. Also I am a collector. I want to paint hundreds of different places and surfaces and want to try all possible color combinations and style variations. I simply don’t want to stand still. I want to develop and learn as much as I can as fast as I can. Pushing my own limits is like a drug. Hence, I will probably never stop. Mad C

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Mad Cs «the 700 wall» A 632m² big wall she painted over a period from April to December in 2010

Detail From the 700 wall

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Mad C


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Where do you believe the line is drawn between what is a paintable surface and what is off limits? For me private property is a no-go as well as historical buildings. Everything public or abandoned places are paintable without a bad conscience. What do you think about the current state of graffiti? And how has it changed since you first started? Because of the internet you don’t necessarily have local styles anymore. People get influenced by others living thousands of miles away. That is a pity somehow as it all starts to become one soup. On the other hand it pushed the quality regarding technique. People saw what the Maclaim crew or Daim did with spray cans and went crazy with photorealism. Also thanks to the development of spray paint just for our purpose, transparent colours and all kinds of caps, the possibilities became almost endless. Sometimes the letters are still the same as 10 years ago, but they look more professional because of fadings, shadows or the illusion of 3D. Regarding style I would say the letters got more flow over the years thanks to the influence of Dare, Swet, Smash 137, Seen’s Psycho pieces or Revok, Persue and Sever. I have no idea where it is going to. But there are a lot of talented and eager young writers out there who will make sure it will go on and develop further. Do you have any favorite colors or color combinations that you like to paint with? My favorite color combination is yellow and black. It always works and burns. I also love red - best combined with white. And pink, as it always kicks. The Ice Age wall that you did is very impressive. How long did that take you to complete? What made you want to do an Ice Age themed wall? I can’t really say as I stopped counting the hours. I never spent so much time on a wall before as it is not just very detailed but 115 foot long and 10,5 feet high. And for once I didn’t want to make any compromise. Counting the days, I worked on it about 2-3 weeks I think. I love movies and paint about 2-3 movie Mad C

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«Don’t hate, create!»

walls each year. Peter de Sve is one of the greatest character designers and illustrators and the Ice Age movie gave me a lot of ideas how to integrate my letters in the topic (like the piece on ice). Also it was my biggest challenge yet to create so many different fur textures with cans only and without using special caps or anything.

Do you have any pieces that you are especially proud of? If so, what are they? For now it is the Ice Age wall and its pieces. Otherwise there is always something I do and don’t like about a piece. But as long as it has something new to it, I am happy with it. What do you get more pleasure from, piecing or bombing? Both. For piecing, perfection and technique are more important and fun, for bombing it is the feeling and the energy of working fast. Also Known As

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Mad C

How would you describe the cultural differences towards graffiti where you live versus the rest of the world? In many ways graffiti is accepted as an art form in Germany. You have a lot of galleries showing writers and street artists. We provide the best paint which had a big influence on the rest of the world. Unfortunately regular German citizens are often narrow minded and influenced by tabloids when it comes to graffiti. They surely would call the police had they seen you bombing. Or even when you work on a commission. That didn’t happen to me in Spain, South Africa, not even Austria. Even the British police was more relaxed. Germany simply has too many laws and regulations I guess and property is something that is valued too highly. Do you have any last words or anything else you would like to say? Don’t hate, create!


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Mad C

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Sat One

Detail images from the exhibition in Munich

Text by: www.graffuturism.com & www.ekosystem.org Photo By: Max Geuter

Sat One recently exhibited new work for his recent solo show titled “Chromolog” at Firstlines Gallery in Munich Germany. Sat One has established himself aas a premier muralist. He takes time away from painting walls and focuses his attention on canvas

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at One was born in 1977 in Venezuela and grew up in Munich. A trained graphic designer discovered early his interest in graffiti, but steadily developed a style that denies remote historically evolved forms and imagery, the supposedly superficial beauty. Sat One designed with its non-Euclidean geometric abstractions and futuristic-looking forms a formal but not tangible world, a world in which the spatial effect exists but is not predetermined by classical laws of physics in severity. Sat One tightrope walk between clarity and futuristic constructivist rejection of classical ideas recites defined geometry, microscopic forms, visualizes bold visionary unphysical or ban, in the style of classic science fiction, fantasy and reality to hyperspace on canvas. Sat One appears with its cvvvzomplexity and its precision as an architect of a parallel existing reality, in which the physical form of their building materials, away from earthly gravity, manifesting only in their combination. «People often tell me that they are impressed by the cleanliness you can see in my work. I use it more like a necessary ingredient to support the graphical-look and to get a clear, vis-

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Sat One

ible reduction of my ideas. Around 2000 i finished graphic-design school and it took a great influence on my later work. The time before, i used to paint “illustrative”, using much more details, fadings and also a bigger range of colours. WON (Abc) had a big influence back then. From time to time i`m also doing fotorealistic

stuff for commission works - People wouldn`t believe it`s also done by me. At the moment i like to experiment alot and to search through old drawers to refresh some ideas from the past and connect it with actual stuff.»


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Phil Lumbang Text by: www.philliplumbang.com and Giant Robot Photo by: verynearlyalmost.com and Gallery 44

Phil lives in Los Angeles, as a child he was obsesed and inspired by cartoons. His illistrations of bears, coined «awesome bears» by fans, spread a message of happiness and understanding.

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fter working in the production department of Shepard Fairey’s Studio Number One for several years, 23-year-old Philip Lumbang recently and abruptly left the company to pursue his own artistic career. It wasn’t a bad time to do it, since the Sacramento–bred artist’s street work is already a hit among commuters and art bloggers in Southern California. In person, Lumbang is as humble and idealistic as the polite bears that he paints on public walls seem to be. Here is some pictures form his latest exhibition «New Arrival» at Unit44 in Newcastle.

Some of the works from his latest exhibition in Newcastle

«I’m just trying to sprinkle some smiles around the neighborhood.»

Phil Lumbang

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Askew And Berst


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A Conversation About Style Text by: www.graffuturism.com Photo by: Askew

Style, progression, netch, fatcaps, they’re pushing it to the limit, as well as redefining so many techniques and styles. Their work is amazing, a true respect and foundation in letters yet with a painterly hand abstract in texture. To be able to use a can as they do, they will restructure how many of the next generation of writers approach a wall.

Askew And Berst

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Also Known As

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Askew And Berst


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«if i go so far that I’m not called a writer anymore then thats just peoples opinions which doesn’t really bother me» Berst

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recently watched an Interview from You Askew about the Urban Development Outdoor Gallery Project. The beginning of that interview where you talk about finding yourself as a painter, and not just a graffiti artist is one that has been paralleled by many artists. I think the more the world see’s and hears from other artists that are finding there painterly style and pushing boundaries thinking outside of the box, and evolving we can really push forward into another level of Graffiti.So that’s what brings me to you and Berst as i have been watching you guys for awhile now and you both seem to be pushing limits piece by piece. Talk to me about your current style and how exactly you got her. Askew: To be honest, there’s no quick answer for how we got

to where we are at right now. I think as artists, things are always a matter of trial and error and the gradual determination of what works for you and doesn’t over the course of your life. You develop your tastes, define parameters based on what you like from other peoples work or what sits well with your own principals or ideologies. Sometimes though, you build partnerships with other artists and the ingredients are right. The perfect balance between mutual respect and healthy competition. Berst and I have one of those friendships. We definitely share the same mentality about where graffiti needs to go but at the same time we both feel strongly about foundation and good structure behind everything else. Usually there’s a lot of discussion,

a lot of honesty and heaps of genuine collaboration going on with our walls. Although we are still ego driven in the sense that we paint our names, there’s some detachment required to fully attain the «NETCH». Berst: My thoughts are definitely what askew has already spoken about. It is, it has been, and always will be a process of trial and error and after eight years of spraying you will ultimately go through stages, phases and styles. The result of what we have ultimately been creating is definitely through a level of experimental painting and reflection of the work. Personally, when i was first drawn to piecing i was always interested in west coast wildstyle pieces. They involved a certain level of complexity and illegibility of the letters which made me really curious but at the same time i was also interested in traditional new york blockier letter shapes. My personal goal was to be the most intricate and complex and paint the largest and most colorful. After collaborating with Askew and several other artists within the last year, we have all created something that we simply could not have imagined. It is easy to do safe graffiti but i guess we’ve just had an idea of thinking outside the box and breaking traditional rules of graffiti. I have spent the last eight years working on five letters to perfect my name and if i go so far that I’m not called a writer anymore then thats just peoples opinions which doesn’t really bother me. I think the sooner people grasp the idea that there really are no restrictions and limitations to graffiti then we are all going to start seeing some crazy things. Askew And Berst

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When i look at the intense paintings of both your guys work I really can sit and spend forever just finding small nuances that I know might have been on accident but were made on purpose. That is the truest example of form in my opinion and you guys are really mastering this subtlety. I was taking a cab ride home with Rime from a Wall in Barcelona in 2007 and we had just got done finishing a wall he was the last to leave. He gave me some advice as I hadn’t painted in a couple years and I was really rusty and it showed. He told me to start with painting with a fatcap until I felt comfortable again. To me that seemed like the most backward advice cause I wasn’t ready to control a fatcap especially for a piece, but now I see 3 years later what he was talking about. Both of your guys use of the fatcap in your current style is masterful, and really lets me see deep into your line intentions. How integral is this into your style? Askew: To be honest, the use of fatcaps, particularly the Astro came about through a series of circumstances and subsequent thinking. When I made the transition into painting far more traditional pieces around 2003, I was tending to contrive my line work a lot. By this I mean I was building lines up from fat to skinny with Banana caps and cutting things back to get a sharp, graphic result. I was motivated in a lot of ways to focus on traditional letters by my crew mates Can2 and Atom. Also when I was looking over my photo collection I felt unhappy with the walls I was doing, especially alongside a lot of more traditional painters because their work had more immediate impact than mine. I got the book ‘Writing: Urban Calligraphy and Beyond’ as a gift from Atom and was blown away by how the Berlin writers (Poet, Phos4, Amok, Tagnoe to name a few) worked within the confines of foundational graffiti yet managed to bend and twist the letters so they had the sense Also Known As

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Askew And Berst

of dancing in space. I started trying to achieve that but when you are contriving the lines and painting with a type of ‘vector’ approach it limits what you can achieve in way of attaching a certain movement or sense of gesture to the lines in a piece. I saw a lot of people like Rime, Revok etc using pretty large caps, like at least an NY. Also Smash was using the odd level 5 gold cap line on his pieces although never to the extent we started to, he was still very refined in his approach. I think I just started gravitating towards fatter caps because of the flexibility of them. You can do blown out lines with tubular effects. You can get that fat to skinny result without cutting back. You can do half pressure or spitty effects that can be used to create both pencil thin line work or a dusty/spitty effect that I use a lot to give my work a real ‘sprayed’ feeling. Also consider the astro can be used to achieve so much 3D effect as far as positioning it in space. This adds so much life and tension to a piece. I’ve said it before, the closer it feels like doing a tag or a throw up to me the better it turns out. That’s nothing to do with the time expended, just a statement about how much I love to feel each line I spray. Berst: That too is also an interesting concept to gage with whether people that spend this long painting a piece trying to set new benchmarks ultimately lead to creating a different future for the next generation of writers coming up. personally I do think that there has been a decline in tagging in Auckland, New Zealand and kids are getting into throw-ups and pieces earlier. people that I was surrounded by in my earlier days, it was all about tagging and getting up and I’m sure it will always be an under pinning motivator for graffiti which is great but for people like Askew that have been painting for nearly twenty years I think it is only natural for him to have grown this far and broken so many barriers. in this day and age, if your pieces aren’t getting dissed and your work is going to stay up then why not spend that extra effort and do something that much better.


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« I’ve said it before, the closer it feels like doing a tag or a throw up to me the better it turns out.» Askew

Askew And Berst

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Netch and its explanation of the term blew me away, great concept I guess the universal mind is strong lately as one of the reasons i started this site it was an attempt to explain the next level of everything graf related whether it be a style an idea, a movement, a step in different direction whatever it may be. We have both been painting Graf for so long and I’m sure we have seen so many styles fads come and go I think this new movement is different, in a way it is like a wave that has been building over the last decade. Now with social media, and self publishing as Futura put it in the interview I just did with him the reality of a global movement and the viral ability of the movement will lead to next level Netch or graffuturism as I call it. I don’t think anyone can stop it not dogmatic thinking writers that want there piece of history to last forever, or all the haters out there that cant fathom change. I might be too old to make a huge impact as a writer but I hope to help the movement and progression through this site, listening, engaging, and featuring artists that might be on the path to what is next. Askew: To be honest I think Netch is like a branch off the Graffuturism family tree more than them being individual of each other. Where ever you see a re-ordering of the approach to painting or a total deviation from the predictable course it seems to fit well under the graffuturism banner. In our case, when all the colors and detail is removed you often find a very simple and almost classic letter shape underneath. The point for us was to tick all the boxes rather than one or the other. When people draw separations between style and technique I get really angry because most of the time they are reciting a cliche rather than speaking from any real basis. It annoys me because when you alter the approach and attack a letter with a different technique it can alter the end result so dramatically that it creates a new style. Process is always so greatly overlooked and sometimes we go to exhaustive measures during our process that people never see. It’s rewarding in the end though because it feels like painting rather than an extreme sport. Also Known As

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Askew And Berst

«when all the colors and det almost classic letter shape un


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tails are removed you often find a very simple and nderneathÂť Askew

Askew And Berst

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Ruedi One


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Text by: Ruediger Glatz Photo By: Ruediger Glatz

For years ruedione was an active graffitiwriter himself and the documentation of his works led him to photography. He says that passion, obsession and even addiction connects him to the medium these days and by now he exclusivel uses the camera for his works.

Ruedi One

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Ruedi One


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Ruedi One

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Ruedi One


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Ruedi One

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Ruedi One


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ÂŤHis intention is to visualize and preserve the moments that kept him writing his name on a lot of surfaces for years, in a way that shows rather the emotions than the places and personsÂť ruedione.com

Ruedi One

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The boneyard project Text by: Eric Firestones press release: return trip Photo by: Bill Word, Eric Firestone

The boneyard project is an ambitious project involving numerous international contemporary artists and disused Military airplanes include artists Andrew Schoultz, How & Nosm, Nunca, Retna, and Faile who all have painted their own individual airplanes at the Pima Air & Space museum.

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he first part of the Bone Yard Project, Nose Job, made its debut in the summer of 2011 with an exhibition of nose cones taken from military airplanes and given to artists to use as eccentric-shaped “canvases� at Eric Firestone Gallery in East Hampton, Long Island. Including more than two-dozen artists, Nose Job enjoyed critical success as the work tapped into both the broader cultural resonance of this history, and the very personal ways one relates to such a narrative. Some artists investigated the streamlined symmetry of the forms themselves, producing eloquent, elegant and even whimsical hybrids of sculpture and painting. Other artists addressed the positive and negative associations we each carry towards the difficult history of war, and many spoke more directly to their own individual relationships to this material including memories of parents who were air force or civilian pilots. The second installment in this series: Round Trip: Selections from The Bone Yard Project, will include selections from the previous Nose Also Known As

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The Boneyard Project

Job exhibition along with more than a dozen cones interpreted by artists new to this project. It will feature five monumental works created on military planes by a dynamic selection of popular graffiti and street artists from around the world. The curatorial team includes Med Sobio, an independent curator and consultant on graffiti artz, and Lesley Oliver of the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, a longstanding figure on the Arizona art scene. For Firestone and McCormick, the Pima show has a special relevance, for not only is it one of the largest aerospace museums


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Nunca How & Nosm | Andrew Schoultz | Bast

in America, but it was in the desert surrounding Pima where they both first discovered the “bone yards� housing these once mighty metal giants of the United States Air Force. More than 30 artists have participated in Round Trip including DC Super 3 planes painted by graffiti artists How & Nosm, Nunca, and Retna, and a C97 cockpit by Saner, and C45 planes by Faile and Andrew Schoultz. Additionally, Nose Job artists Aiko, Peter Dayton, Shepard Fairey, Futura, How and Nosm, Mare, Tara McPherson, Richard Prince, Lee Quinones, Saner, Kenny Scharf, and JJ Veronis will

be on display, along with new nose cones by artists Colin Chillag, Crash, Daze, Daniel Marin Diaz, Tristan Eaton, Jameson Ellis, Ron English, Faile, Eric Foss, Mark Kostabi, Lisa Lebofsky, El Mac, Alex Markwith, Walter Robinson, Hector Ruiz, Randy Slack, Ryan Wallace, and Eric White, among others. The Pima Air & Space Museum is the largest non-government funded aviation museum in the United States, and one of the largest in the world. It maintains a collection of more than 300 aircraft and spacecraft from around the globe and more than 125,000 artifacts. The Boneyard Project

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Niels Shoe Meulman Text By: www.nielsshoemeulman.com Photo By: www.Irionlak.com

Born in Amsterdam in 1967, Niels Meulman is an internationally known artist, designer, and art director. Meulman began tagging in 1979 and became a graffiti legend by the time he was 18.

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nown as ‘Shoe’ within the graffiti community, his work evolved into a business for lettering and he furthered his technique by apprenticing under the Dutch graphic design master, Anthon Beeke. In the nineties Meulman ran his own design company, Caulfield & Tensing, before joining the international advertising network BBDO. In recent years, he has been a Creative Director for MTV Europe, while also freelancing in typographic design. Meulman revolutionized the art of writing with Calligraffiti, an art form that fuses calligraphy and graffiti. He launched this movement in 2007 with a successful solo exhibition in Amsterdam, with contributions from graffiti pioneer and graphic artist Eric Haze and sneaker retailer Patta. Meulman has also teamed up with international record label Rush Hour, to mount a Calligraffiti exhibition entitled Different Strokes. He is currently working on exhibitions in Paris, Berlin and New York. Widely acclaimed, Meul-

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Niels Shoe Meulman

man’s designs and artwork are in the permanent collections of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Amongst his essential works are a signature shoe design for the British sports brand, Umbro; the re-styling of the Dutch television channel, TMF; calligraphy for the new Bols Genever bottle; the Christel Palace logo that was awarded by the Art Directors Club New York and line of luxury silk scarves for his label Unruly.


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«In recent years, he has been a Creative Director for MTV Europe»

Niels Shoe Meulman

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Thanks to Alf for the loan of the extra blitz, softbox, and camera! Ruediger for picking out some og his great photos and matching them to the layout. Feedbacks and guidance from the teachers, pupils, Georg, and Vera. Mom & dad for the printing money!

Contact Petter Bratland

Markveien 23b, 0554 Oslo 95928948 rableridesign@ gmail.com www.rableri.no


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two NR1 Thousand

Andtwelve

Tema

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Also Known As  

Informational graffiti mag.

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