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Course Catalog 2014-2015

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Indiana Diploma Checklists Community Service & Service Log

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School Wide Learning Outcomes & Assessment

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Internship Senior Project

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Language Arts Offerings

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World Language Offerings Math Offerings

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Science Offerings Project Lead the Way Social Studies Offerings Physical Education Offerings

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Art Offerings Frequently Asked Questions

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We’re glad you chose CSA

Table of Contents

Mission, Vision, Core Beliefs, Agreements

In 2007, Columbus Signature Academy’s design team made a commitment to design a school that would prepare socially engaged citizens who excel in an information and technology-rich society. For that we needed a revolution. Instead of preparing our students for “someday,” we immerse our students in project based learning, so they’ll know what to expect when they arrive in the workforce. We use 21st Century Skills and technology as tools to equip our students for a dynamic future. We are glad you chose CSA and we welcome you to the revolution.


CSA Core Beliefs The following core beliefs drive our goal set- Habits of Mind ting and guide our decisions. We review them We believe school community members who regularly and revise them when necessary. practice critical thinking and socially engaged intelligence are using their minds well. Culture We believe in learning-centered communi- Community ties, in which all members are known, re- We believe community partnerships provide spected and valued, and in which differences learners with a sense of responsibility, inspirare honored and student voice is heard. We ing them to become immersed in the comcelebrate the successes of all learners. munity. Relationships We believe students thrive when they experience relationships with peers, staff and families that generate honest, respectful and trusting communication. Experiences We believe students learn by actively engaging in relevant, authentic and flexible project based instruction. Content for learning is immediately applicable and balanced with refl ection. Teachers guide learning in a technology-rich environment which emphasizes 21st century skills.

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Accountability We believe learners prioritize, plan and manage their work. Growth and achievement are assessed from many perspectives including performance of real tasks, self and peer critique, projects and portfolios. Decisions We believe procedural, curricular, cultural and fiscal decisions reflect the core beliefs and the voice of the people directly affected by the decisions. All educators are committed to the decision-making process and model participation in a democratic society.


Our Mission and Vision Statements Our vision is to be a revolutionary pathway for education. Student Voice Our mission is to prepare socially engaged citizens who excel in an information and technology rich society. Our students will: • Know themselves and their talents well, identify areas for personal growth and create and identify paths that will fulfill their own destinies. • Learn through collaboration with family, business, and community. • Possess a strong sense of civic responsibility. • Embrace and celebrate differences and appreciate individuality. • Think critically and practice 21st century skills. • Think creatively to solve authentic, real world problems. • Sustain healthy, trusting relationships that support a safe learning environment.

At CSA, we embrace and celebrate differences and appreciate individuality. Now in our fourth year, we welcome 400 unique students each fall. Our students have been instrumental in developing our culture from day one. Students participate in Student Voice, our student government, to help make academic and cultural changes. Through our advisory program, they help generate and support our school norms, which we call agreements, and they learn to hold each other accountable to living the “CSA way.”

Small School Culture We believe students have better opportunities to thrive in a small school culture. With only 100 students per grade level, no student is anonymous. Nobody falls through the cracks. Nobody goes unnoticed.

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(Minimum 47 credits) Course and Credit Requirements English/ Language Arts Mathematics

8 credits Including a balance of literature, composition and speech.

6 credits

6 credits 2 credits: Biology I 2 credits: Chemistry I or Physics I or Integrated Chemistry-Physics 2 credits: any Core 40 science course

6 credits 2 credits: 1 credit: 1 credit: 2 credits:

U.S. History U.S. Government Economics World History/Civilization or Geography/History of the World

Directed Electives

5 credits

Physical Education Health and Wellness Electives*

2 credits

the Indiana Core 40, the Academic Honors or the Technical Honors diStudents are awarded diplomas

Or complete Integrated Math I, II, and III for 6 credits. All students must complete a math or physics course in the junior or senior year.

Social Studies

For the

All CSA students are eligible for

ploma.

2 credits: Algebra I 2 credits: Geometry 2 credits: Algebra II

Science

Diploma Eligibility

World Languages Fine Arts Career-Technical

1 credit 6 credits (Career Academic Sequence Recommended)

40 Total State Credits Required

through their sending school— North or East. Additionally students receive a CSA New Tech seal if they complete all requirements. CSA New Tech Seal Requirements

•12 college credit hours •100 For thehours of community service •career-related internship senior year •senior project •4 years of science •4 years of math

Schools may have additional local graduation requirements that apply to all students

Students are required to earn 12 dual college credit hours to earn the New Tech Seal. • Students can travel to Ivy Tech or at IUPUC during their junior and senior years . •Qualified courses are offered on CSA’s campus. • A memorandum of understanding between Ivy Tech and CSA provides all 12 credits tuition free. •Students are responsible for purchasing their own textbooks and technology. •All courses students take are in the Indiana transfer library, which makes them transferable to any Indiana college. Many out of state universities accept the credits as well.

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composition

les provide time for many aged to complete a Career

Effective beginning with students who enter high school 2006-07

(Minimum 47 credits) with Academic Honors

(minimum 47 credits)

For the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma, students must: · Complete all requirements for Core 40. · Earn 2 additional Core 40 math credits · Earn 6-8 Core 40 world language credits (6 credits in one language or 4 credits each in two languages). · Earn 2 Core 40 fine arts credits. · Earn a grade of a “C” or better in courses that will count toward the diploma. · Have a grade point average of a “B” or better. · Complete one of the following: A. Complete AP courses (4 credits) and corresponding AP exams B. Complete IB courses (4 credits) and corresponding IB exams C. Earn a combined score of 1200 or higher on the SAT critical reading and mathematics D. Score a 26 or higher composite on the ACT E. Complete dual high school/college credit courses from an accredited postsecondary institution (6 transferable college credits) F. Complete a combination of an AP course (2 credits and corresponding exam) or an IB Standard Level course (2 credits and corresponding exam) and dual high school/college credit course(s) from an accredited postsecondary institution (3 transferable college credits)

with Technical Honors

(minimum 47 credits)

For the Core 40 with Technical Honors diploma, students must: Complete all requirements for Core 40. Complete a career-technical program (8 or more related credits) Earn a grade of “C” or better in courses that will count toward the diploma. Have a grade point average of a “B” or better. Recommended: Earn 2 additional credits in mathematics and 4-8 credits in World Languages for four year college admission. · Complete two of the following, one must be A or B: A. Score at or above the following levels on WorkKeys: Reading for Information Level 6; Applied Mathematics - Level 6; Locating Information - Level 5 B. Complete dual high school/college credit courses in a technical area (6 college credits) C. Complete a Professional Career Internship course or Cooperative Education course (2 credits) D. Complete an industry-based work experience as part of a two-year career-technical education program (minimum 140 hours) E. Earn a state-approved, industry-recognized certification

· · · · ·

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Community Service & Internship

Signature students serve the community • Students complete 100 hours of community service by Winter Break of their senior year. • Hours acquired between eighth grade and ninth grade can be used. • Students should keep track of their service and submit the form (see page 7) to their advisory facilitators when they are finished. Signature students interact with the community • Expand community programs and create new ones. • Get on-the-job experience learning and developing best practices in business and 21st century skills. • Make the community a better place through service learning. • Learn from the expertise of community members. • Utilize public services and business opportunities to improve their personal well-being and wellness.

Community CSA students learn through collaboration with family, business and community. We rely on community partners to provide authentic problems and projects to engage our students. We believe community partnerships provide learners with a sense of responsibility, inspiring them to become immersed in the community.

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COMMUNITY SERVICE LOG

Name________________________________________________________ You may photocopy or print this form to catalog all of your service in the space below. For each service you perform, respond to the reflection questions on separate sheets of paper. Attach this form to your reflections. Keep a copy for your records. Location

Date

# of Hours

Type of Service

Supervisor’s Signature

REFLECTION 1. List and describe three duties that you performed or new skills you learned. 2. Describe three ways this experience changed the way you see things. 3. Describe one experience that made an impression on you. 4. Which habits of mind were most useful to you during this experience. 5. Describe a specific instance in which you had an impact on someone else. 6. Which SWLOCs did you develop most as a result of this experience? (Don’t limit yourself to the four freshman and sophomore SWLOCs.) 7. Would you recommend this service to other students? Why or why not? 8. Record the contact information for your service.


The New Learner CSA students are included in the decision-making process as they think critically and practice 21st Century skills. Since we are preparing our students for jobs that don’t exist yet, we want to ensure they are ready for a diverse and changing world.

Agency Students are expected to attend class and arrive on time; complete all projects AND assignments by deadlines; maintain engagement in daily activities; follow written and oral instructions; seek constructive feedback from peers prior to the deadline.

Oral Communication Students learn to use speaking conventions; maintain appropriate eye contact, body language, facial expressions and posture; communicate with appropriate volume, tone speed, projection and intonation for setting; engage audience by demonstrating enthusiasm, authority and confidence; show evidence of rehearsal; Collaboration Students learn to offer constructive feedback aim for a paced and poised delivery; use approto all group members; fulfill role as indicated priate academic language avoiding filler words by group contract with help from all group and unnecessary comments; and use presentamembers; recognize personal strengths and tion tools in an engaging manner. weaknesses those of group members; identify conflict and take steps to mediate within the group.

Written Communication Students learn to communicate with clarity and precision; adhere to rules of mechanics and usage (spelling, grammar, word choice, etc.); target intended audience; support and cite claims using APA style; and develop a writer’s voice.

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Assessment Group and individual assessments provide a more complete picture of student performance. Projects include preparation for end of course assessments (Core 40) required of all Indiana students.

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Senior Project Overview The Senior Project at CSA is an interdisciplinary, collaborative and experience that allows students to showcase both their passions and their learing. A detailed explanation of the expectations, processes and assessments can be found in the Senior Project handbook.

Proposal Phase Late in the junior year, students pitch senior project ideas and align themselves with a group of no more than 6 students. Students form groups and write group contracts, determine benchmarks and expenses. When seniors return in the fall, they reaffirm their commitment to the team and then write a data-driven research proposal that defends the rationale for the project, identifies their role in the project, and establishes benchmarks. Seniors select a Critical Friends Group (CFG), which includes mentor(s), their advisory facilitator and underclassmen. Senior Project groups will the be placed in a “cohort” advisory according to both their internship assignment and their project work time needs.

Project Phase Most seniors will work on their projects during the quarter they are assigned to Senior Project advisory. As groups progress through their project, they will receive feedback from their CFG, track their hours and document their progress. All project work should be completed by Spring Break of the senior year unless permission is granted.

Reflection Phase As seniors enter their final quarter at CSA, they begin to assemble the materials they will use to present their Senior Projects. Teams will present in early May to a panel comprised of their CFG group and additional community “experts.”

Projects should fall in one of the following CATEGORIES Service to School Service to Community Service to Humanity Service to Culture Service to Professionalism Senior Projects must be: Collaborative (Groups of 2-6) Aligned with the SWLOC’s Doable by May of Senior Year Memorable Revolutionary

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ENGLISH COURSES Project Showcase

All Indiana diplomas require 8 semesters of English.

Global Science Perspectives: CSA

Culture

(Speak), Green Audit, Culture Stew (Culture Novels),The Nationalist Anthem (Anthem), Social Justice: Making a Living (Nickel and Dimed); Poetry Out Loud; Buddy Walk, Congress Shall Make No Law (Fahrenheit 451). American Heritage: Nefarious Deeds (Corruption in America); The Power of One; The Last Generation (documentary about WW 2). English 12: This I Believe (Personal Narratives); Lord of the Flies Graphic Novels. Media Analysis: Living Museum (integration with art); Violence is Golden (influence of pop culture); Pressure Cooker (media influence on self image); Awards Show. Genres: What Heroes Are Made of; The Battle of the Prince and Princess (gender stereotypes). Biolit: Into the Wild (overnight survival); Smoothies Satisfy; Disease Detectives (Fever 1793).

English 9 via integrated course Global & Social Perspectives (GSP) English 9, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 9 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 9 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. English 10 via integrated course Societal Analysis English 10, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 10 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring universal themes across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to litera-

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ture, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. English 11 via integrated course American Heritage English 11, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/ Language Arts in Grade 11 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring characterization across universal themes and a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 11 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write fictional narratives, short stories, responses to literature, reflective compositions, historical investigation reports, resumes, and technical documents incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, and tables. Students write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

English 12 English 12, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts for Grade 12 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing on an exploration of point of view or perspective across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance for Grade 12 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write fictional narratives, short stories, responses to literature, reflective compositions, historical investigation reports, resumes and technical documents incorporating visual information in the form of pictures, graphs, and tables. Students

write and deliver grade-appropriate multimedia presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information ENGLISH ELECTIVES Publications-1 sem (not offered every semester) This course is the continuation of the study of journalism; therefore, students must have previously taken journalism or photojournalism in order to take Publications. Students demonstrate their ability to do journalistic writing and design for high school publications, including school newspapers and yearbooks, and a variety of media formats. Students follow the ethical principles and legal boundaries that guide scholastic journalism. Students express themselves publicly with meaning and clarity for the purpose of informing, entertaining, or persuading. Genres of Literature-1 sem (not offered every semester) This course is for students who love to read or students who want to improve their reading skills. Students will study various types of literature— including poetry, drama, novels, short stories, biographies, journals, diaries, essays, etc. Students analyze how each genre impacts our culture. Film Analysis-1 sem (not offered every semester) This course is a study of how literature is adapted for film or media and includes role playing as film directors for selected screen scenes. Students read about the history of film, the reflection or influence of film on the culture, and issues of interpretation, production and adaptation. Students examine the visual interpretation of literary techniques and auditory language in film and the limitations or special capacities of film versus text to present a literary work. Students analyze how films portray the human condition and the roles of men and women and the various ethnic or cultural minorities in the past and present. Creative Writing-1 sem (not offered every semester) This course is a study and application of writing strategies for prose and poetry. Using the writ-

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ing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, the nuances of language and vocabulary, English language conventions, an awareness of the audience, the purposes for writing, and the style of their own writing. Creative Writing Project: Students complete a project, such as a short story, a narrative or epic poem, a persuasive speech or letter, a book review, a script or short play, or other creative compositions, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and writing progress. Critical Friends Group -1 sem (not offered every semester) This course is designed to teach students how to work collaboratively as they analyze and reect upon their individual, group and school work. This course allows students to learn techniques for discussion which promote a reective and improved outcome based upon successes or dilemmas the learner may be facing. Mass Media via integrated course Media Analysis (not offered every semester) Mass Media, an integrated course based on the High School Journalism Standards and the Mass Media and Media Literacy Standards, is the study of the importance of mass media as pervasive in modern life at the local, national, and global levels. It includes a study of the impact of

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constant and immediate news, entertainment, and persuasive messages on everyday life. Students use course content to become knowledgeable consumers of mass media in preparation for their roles as informed citizens in a democratic society. MASS MEDIA PROJECT for the second credit: Students complete a project, such as a media convergence special report using multiple formats that compare different aspects of a topic of interest or concern. The project demonstrates knowledge, application, and progress in Mass Media course content. English Seminar-1 sem (students may only enroll in this course with permission) Students who opt to take this course have the opportunity to improve their writing and reading skills. Some students will be assigned to this course.


WORLD LANGUAGE

Spanish 1, 2, 3, 4 All levels of Spanish are courses based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages and instruct students in Spanish language learning and to various aspects of Spanish-speaking culture. These courses encourage interpersonal communication through speaking and writing and emphasize the development of reading and listening comprehension skills. Each level is a year-long, 2 credit course that fulďŹ lls a World Language requirement for the Core 40 with Academic Honors diploma or counts as a Directed Elective or Elective for any diploma. Students must earn credits for one level before progressing to the next level. Spanish 4 for Ivy Tech dual credit SPAN 101 (3 credits)/SPAN 102 (3 credits)

Project Showcase

6 credits in same language required for Academic Honors Diploma; or 8 in two different languages.

Spanish I: Community Heroes; Dia de los Muertos, Visit Our Town. Spanish II: Casas de Munecas (Dollhouses); El Libro de Ninas; El Show de Mis Amigos. Spanish III: .El Cafe CSA; Memorias del Pasado; Consejos. Spanish IV: Una Revista; Para los Jovenes;Winter Season;Winter Season.

Language Lab Only students who have taken one or two years of Rosetta Stone may enroll in this course.

Relationships At CSA, we understad the importance of providing a rigorous curriculum; however, we also know it is important to sustain helthy, trusting relationships that support a save learning environment. students and teachers work to build relationships both through our advisory program and through all our projects.

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Project Showcase

MATH COURSES All Indiana diplomas require 8 semesters of math beginning with the class 0f 2016.

Algebra I: Math Magazine (explaining systems of equations to others); The Story of X (writing a math story to explain near inequalities, equations, and the order of operations); Fund raiser for CSA;, Geometry: Post-It Note Animation (using stop motion video to connect geometry to art); . Geo/IED: Sweet Tessellations; CSA Crime Solving (using trig, similarity and CAD to prove angles at crime scenes); Putt Putt Design; Fun House Design; Ferris Wheel. Algebra II: Parabolic Art; Not So Fast; Even Distribution. Advanced Modeling/Pre Calculus: Trig Triangles (creating real-world models); Technology in Trig (using dynamic math software). Calculus: Cruise Control (using robotics to increase safety); Filling a Vase.

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Algebra I Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relations and Functions; Linear Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Nonlinear Equations; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; and Polynomial Expressions. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Geometry OR Geometry/Introduction to Engineering via integrated course GeoIED Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Congruency and Similarity; Measurement; Analytic Geometry; Circles; and Polyhedra. Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school CCSS. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject


that makes use of their ability to make sense designed for students who expect math to be a major component of their future college and of problem situations. career experiences, and as such it is designed * If you are ready for geometry, based on your to provide students with strong foundations for teacher’s recommendation, you may take ge- calculus and other higher-level math courses. ometry by itself or integrated with introduction to engineering (IED, a Project Lead the Way Calculus C4 course). To take geometry by itself, select Calculus AB, Advanced Placement is a course “Geometry (H)” (both semesters). To take the based on content established by the College integrated course, select “Geometry-Deductive Board. Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the App” (both semesters). concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course Algebra II Algebra II builds on work with linear, quadratic, emphasizes a multi representational approach and exponential functions and allows for stu- to calculus, with concepts, results, and probdents to extend their repertoire of functions to lems being expressed graphically, numericalinclude polynomial, rational, and radical func- ly, analytically, and verbally. The connections tions. Students work closely with the expres- among these representations also are imporsions that define the functions, and continue to tant. Topics include: (1) functions, graphs, and expand and hone their abilities to model situa- limits; (2) derivatives; and (3) integrals. Techtions and to solve equations, including solving nology should be used regularly by students quadratic equations over the set of complex and teachers to reinforce the relationships numbers and solving exponential equations among the multiple representations of funcusing the properties of logarithms. The Math- tions, to confirm written work, to implement ematical Practice Standards apply throughout experimentation, and to assist in interpreting each course and, together with the content results. standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical Probability and Statistics via integrated subject that makes use of their ability to make course Societal Analysis-2 sem sense of problem situations. Probability and Statistics includes the concepts and skills needed to apply statistical techAdvanced Modeling Trigonometry niques in the decision-making process. TopPre-Calculus/Trigonometry is a two-credit ics include: (1) descriptive statistics, (2) probcourse that combines the material from Trig- ability, and (3) statistical inference. Practical onometry and Pre-Calculus into one course. examples based on real experimental data are The foundations of algebra and functions de- used throughout. Students plan and conduct veloped in previous courses will be extended experiments or surveys and analyze the resultto new functions, including exponential and ing data. The use of graphing calculators and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level se- computer programs is encouraged. quences and series. The course provides students with the skills and understandings that Math Seminar -1 sem (not offered every seare necessary for advanced manipulation of mester) angles and measurement. Students will also Students who opt to take this course have the advance their understanding of imaginary opportunity to improve their math skills. Some numbers through an investigation of complex students will be assigned to this course. numbers and polar coordinates. The course is

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phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by The Core 40 diploma requires 6 credits in sci- theory and by evaluating and communicating ence; to earn the New Tech Seal, students the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures. must take science all four years.

SCIENCE COURSES

Biology Biology is a course based on the following core topics: cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity; genetics and evolution. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

Physics Physics I is a full-year course that maintains a technology focus. Students will learn and apply the physics concepts of mechanics, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear to their collaborative tasks in a Project Based Learning environment. Each project is designed with laboratory exploration and inquiry in mind; additionally, community partners and resources will provide the motivation and real-life connections that allow students to see the imperative of understanding physics in the modern world. This course will emphasize conceptual physics.

Advanced Physics II Advanced Physics II is a full-year course that maintains a technology focus. Students will learn and apply the physics concepts of mechanics, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear to their collaborative tasks in a Project Based Learning environment. Students will study topics in depth focusing on preparation for college physics. This course will have a greater emphasis on the math and trigonometry used as the language for physics, than 1st year physics. Each project is designed with laboratory exploration and inquiry in mind; additionally, community partners and resources will provide the motivation and real-life connections that allow students to see the imperaChemistry Honors dual credit Ivy Tech tive of understanding physics in the modern world. Chem 101 Chemistry I is a course based on the following core topics: properties and states of mat- Environmental Science ter; atomic structure; bonding; chemical reac- This course is an interdisciplinary course that tions; solution chemistry; behavior of gases, integrates biology, Earth science, chemistry, and organic chemistry. Students enrolled in and other disciplines. Students enrolled in this Chemistry I compare, contrast, and synthesize course conduct in-depth scientific studies of useful models of the structure and properties ecosystems, population dynamics, resource of matter and the mechanisms of its interac- management, and environmental consequenctions. Instruction should focus on developing es of natural and anthropogenic processes. student understanding that scientific knowl- Students formulate, design, and carry out labedge is gained from observation of natural oratory and field investigations as an essential Integrated Chemistry and Physics (ICP) Integrated Chemistry-Physics is a course focused on the following core topics: motion and energy of macroscopic objects; chemical, electrical, mechanical and nuclear energy; properties of matter; transport of energy; magnetism; energy production and its relationship to the environment and economy. Instruction focuses on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

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Biolit (not offered every semester) This is an interdisciplinary course that integrates biology and English 9 or 10. Students should sign up for this class if they need to recover credit in those classes or who need help passing the end of course assessments. Students investigate life systems in a laboratory setting.

Project Showcase

course component. Students completing Environmental Science, acquire the essential tools for understanding the complexities of national and global environmental systems.

Biology: CSA Tin Chef Salad Dressing; Builda-Bug; Up the Creek; Catch Me if You Can (invasive species). ICP: Fireworks (what makes them work?); Recycling Factory. Chemistry: Ready, Set, Reaction; Element Speed Dating; Bradbury’s Watering Hole (fireplace enhancement products); Petroleum Politics; Galactic Gasses. Physics: Let’s Get Wired (electricity); Power to the People (wind energy). Environmental Science: Bayou Bound: The Grand Isle Adventure; Beta Data (CSA’s green practices).

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phones and tablets and work collaboratively on a Students can enroll in C4 courses not offered at culminating capstone project. It’s STEM education CSA. See C4 course offerings: http://www.bcsc. and it’s at the heart of today’s high-tech, high-skill k12.in.us/Domain/1451. Students take dual credit global economy. Project Lead The Way courses have dual credit options with several universities courses offered at CSA tuition free. across the country. Students can earn 3 dual college credits for each course via multiple universities. Most require an IED: Introduction to Engineering Design 85% or higher in the class and a 70% or higher on (Project Lead The Way) the final, and some require a fee. Grades earned The major focus of IED is the design process and its in dual credit courses will remain on the student’s application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their transcript. work. Students use industry standard 3D modelProject Lead The Way: A Pre-Engineering ing software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an Program The PLTW Pathway To Engineering (PTE) program engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions is a sequence of courses, which follows a proven to peers and members of the professional comhands-on, real-world problem-solving approach to munity. This course offers 3 dual college credits learning. Throughout PTE, students learn and ap- with a B course average. ply the design process, acquire strong teamwork and communication proficiency and develop orga- Geometry/Introduction to Engineering Denizational, critical-thinking, and problem-solving sign skills. They discover the answers to questions like Students can opt to take Intro to Engineering Dehow are things made and what processes go into sign as a course integrated with geometry. creating products? Students use the same industry-leading 3D design software used by compa- Principles of Engineering (Project Lead The nies like Intel, Lockheed Martin and Pixar. They Way) explore aerodynamics, astronautics and space life This broad based survey course exposes students sciences. Hello, NASA. Students apply biological to major concepts they’ll encounter in a postand engineering concepts related to biomechan- secondary engineering course of study. Topics inics – think robotics. They design, test and actu- clude mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and ally construct circuits and devices such as smart kinematics. They develop problem-solving skills

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

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Civil Engineering and Architecture (Project Lead the Way) (CEA) Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Students communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects. This course offers 3 dual college credits with a B course average. solutions to peers and members of the professional community. This course offers 3 dual college credits with a B course average.

Project Showcase

and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions. Students learn how engineers address concerns about the social and political consequences of technological change. This course offers 3 dual college credits with a B course average. Prerequisite(s): GEOMETRY (recommended) Co-requisite: Co-enrollment in Physics

PROJECT SHOWCASE Intro to Engineering Design: Toy Puzzles, Art & Engineering (Cardboard Chairs), Reverse Engineering. Geometry/Intro to Engineering Design: Sweet Tessellations (Gingerbread Houses); Snow Day (Snowake Kites/Reverse Engineering); Geometry is Puzzling (Puzzle Cubes) Civil Engineering and Architecture: Playhouse, Residential, and Public Building Design (teen center design in the past); Soil Testing & Surveying.

STEM At CSA, we understad the importance of providing a rigorous curriculum; however, we also know it is important to sustain helthy, trusting relationships that support a save learning environment. students and teachers work to build relationships both through our advisory program and through all our projects.

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REQUIRED SOCIAL STUDIES CLASSES

Project Showcase

All Indiana diplomas require 6 credits in social studies.

Global & Social Perspectives: City scaping; Give Peace a Chance (global conflict); Culture Stew (immigration). Social Justice: Making a Living (Nickel and Dimed); Poetry Out Loud; Buddy Walk, Congress Shall Make No Law (Farenheit 451). American Heritage: The Last Generation WWII documentary); Roaring to Depression; Awesome 80s; Facebook Progressives; A Slice of Pie. Government: for Xlandia (proposing a democratic system); The Constitution Contest; The Campaign Trail. Economics: International Relations: So You’ve Got an Island (choosing the best form of government); Occupy CSA; 9/11 Changed Everything; Current Events for Dummies; Symphony of War.

Geography and History of the World via integrated course Global Science Perspectives Geography and History of the World is designed to enable students to use geographical skills and historical concepts to deepen their understanding of major global themes including the origin and spread of world religions; exploration; conquest, and imperialism; urbanization; and innovations and revolutions. Geographical and historical skills include forming research questions, acquiring information by investigating a variety of primary and secondary sources, organizing information by creating graphic representations, analyzing information to determine and explain patterns and trends, and presenting and documenting findings orally and/or in writing. The historical geography concepts used to explore the global themes include change over time, origin, diffusion, physical systems, cultural landscapes, and spatial distribution and interaction. Using these skills, concepts and the processes associated with them, students are able to analyze, evaluate, and make predictions about major global developments. This course is designed to nurture perceptive, responsible citizenship, encourage and support the development of critical thinking skills and lifelong learning, and to help prepare Indiana students for the 21st Century. Current problems, issues, and US History via American Heritage United States History builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of U.S. History. Students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the inter-

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action of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S.. History. They will develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time.

interacts with other nations and the government’s role in world affairs will be examined. Using primary and secondary resources, students will articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues. As a result, they will be able to explain the role of individuals and groups in government, politic, and civic activities and the need for civic and political engagement of citizens in the United States.

Economics-1 semester Economics examines the allocation of resources and their uses for satisfying human needs and wants. The course analyzes economic reasoning used by consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, and government in making decisions. Key elements of the course include study of scarcity and economic reasoning, supply and demand, market structures, role of government, national income determination, the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Students will explain that because resources are limited, people must make choices and understand the role that supply, demand, prices, and profits play in a market economy. The functions of government in a market economy and market structures will be examined. Students will understand economic performance, money, stabilization policies, and trade of the United States. The behavior of people, societies and institutions and economic thinking is integral to this course.

International Relations-1 sem (not offered every semester) International Relations provides a survey of the formal relations among sovereign states in the international system, emphasizing the operation of diplomacy. The procedures for settlement of disputes and various methods of international conflict resolution are included. This course examines power, interdependence, global development, and international organizations.

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

Government -1 semester United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States. Responsible and effective participation of citizens is stressed. Students will understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and governments and understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens and how these are part of local, state, and national government. Students will examine how the United States Constitution protects rights and provides the structure and functions of various levels of government. How the United States

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performance-based skill evaluation. Individual assessments may be modified for individuals with disabilities, in addition to those with IEP’s and 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary All Indiana diplomas require 2 PE credits and 1 injuries, obesity, etc.). Health credit. Physical Education Team-1 sem (required Health-1 sem (required for graduation) for graduation) Health education should contribute directly to a Team Physical Education I focuses on instrucstudent’s ability to successfully practice behav- tional strategies through a planned, sequential, iors that protect and promote health and avoid and comprehensive physical education curricuor reduce health risks. Through a variety of lum which provide students with opportunities instructional strategies, students practice the to actively participate in at least four of the foldevelopment of functional health information lowing: team sports; dual sport activities; indi(essential concepts); determine personal values vidual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; selfthat support health behaviors; develop group defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; norms that value a healthy lifestyle; develop and dance, all which are within the framework the essential skills necessary to adopt, practice, of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Ongoand maintain health-enhancing behaviors. This ing assessment includes both written and percourse includes the application of priority areas formance-based skill evaluation. Individual asin a planned, sequential, comprehensive health sessments may be modified for individuals with education curriculum. Priority areas include: disabilities, in addition to those with IEP’s and promoting personal health and wellness, physi- 504 plans (e.g., chronic illnesses, temporary incal activity, healthy eating, promoting safety and juries, obesity, etc.). preventing unintentional injury and violence, promoting mental and emotional health, a tobacco-free lifestyle and an alcohol- and other MUSIC drug-free lifestyle and promoting human development and family health. This course provides Students seeking music credit may enroll in banstudents with the knowledge and skills of health or choir at North or East. and wellness core concepts, analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal com- Rock Band-1 sem (no credit) munication, decision-making and goal-setting Audition required. skills, health-enhancing behaviors, and health Students write, record and perform original music. and wellness advocacy skills.

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Physical Education Individual-1 sem (required for graduation) Individual Physical Education I focuses on instructional strategies through a planned, sequential, and comprehensive physical education curriculum which provide students with opportunities to actively participate in at least four of the following: team sports; dual sport activities; individual physical activities; outdoor pursuits; self-defense and martial arts; aquatics; gymnastics; and dance, all which are within the framework of lifetime physical activities and fitness. Ongoing assessment includes both written and

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FINE ARTS Intro to 2D Art-1 sem (not offered every semester) Students taking this course engage in learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes, and revise their work; relate art


3D Art-1 sem (not offered every semester) Any student can take this course since it is an Intro to Sculpture (3D Art and Design). Using materials such as wire, clay, paper, and cardboard, students create portfolio quality works. Students at this level produce works for their portfolios that demonstrate a sincere desire to explore a variety of ideas and problems. They create realistic and abstract sculptures utilizing subtractive and additive processes of carving, modeling, construction, and assembling.

Project Showcase

to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources.

2D Art: Watercolor Quotes; Pen & Ink Interior Room Study; Monochromatic Celebrity Portraits; Painting from a Fragment; Black & White Surrealism 3D Art: CSA New Tech Virtual Art Fair; Exploring Sculptures; Passion for Art (pursuing artistic passions). Advanced 3D Art: Living Museum (based on famous paintings throughout art history).

Advanced 3D Art-1 sem (not offered every semester) Pre-requisite: 3D art or Facilitator approval. Students who have successfully completed 3D Art can take this course since it assumes students have base-level skills. Using materials such as wire, clay, paper, and cardboard, students create portfolio quality works. Students create realistic and abstract sculptures utilizing subtractive and additive processes of carving, modeling, construction, and assembling.

ACADEMIC LAB Students are encouraged to enroll in an academic lab, which provides time for students to work on and get help with their projects.

ADVISORY All students are enrolled in advisory, which offers students a dual credit opportunity IVT 120 New Student Seminar. During advisory, students work on study skills, explore career and college options and improve school culture.

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Need to Knows Frequently Asked Questions Can CSA students access AP Courses or C4 Courses at North or East? Yes, all CSA students are eligible to take courses at their sending school, C4 or McDowell.

Will students eat at CSA? Yes, we have a full service kitchen. Since well being is one of our SWLOCs, we enhance our nutritional offerings to include a daily salad bar option and healthier lunch choices.

How many college credits must CSA students earn? Can students take Health and PE at To earn the New Tech Seal, students must CSA? complete at least 12 college credit hours. Yes, we provide Health and PE courses on site. Our students are also eligible for the What is a magnet school? BCSC PE waiver. As a magnet school, we “attract” students from within BCSC. Because we are a path- Does CSA follow BCSC’s calendar? way within BCSC, our students are eligible Yes, CSA is a BCSC high school; therefore, to participate in athletics and extracurricu- we follow the same calendar and have the lar activities at North or East. CSA students same holidays, delays and cancellations. receive a North or East transcript and diploma. Will my child be able to take all of his or her electives at CSA? If my child attends CSA, do we have Though students may travel to North or to pay extra fees? East to take courses we don’t offer, we do No, CSA students incur no extra costs. You offer electives students need to earn their can expect to pay typical book rental fees. diplomas. Most of our students stay on our Students who are eligible for textbook as- campus all day. sistance in other BCSC schools are also eligible at CSA. What will a CSA diploma look like? Students receive diplomas from North or How are students transported to East, but receive a New Tech Seal if they CSA? complete CSA’s additional requirements, Students ride their regular buses to North which include 100 hours of community seror East and then ride a shuttle to andn from vice, a professional internship, and 12 colCSA. lege credits. What are SWLOCs? At CSA, we assess students on our School Wide Learning Outcomes in addition to content. 30

How will my child be assessed? Facilitators use individual and group assessments that stem from both content and SWLOCs.


Will my child take End of Course Assessments? Yes, CSA students must pass the Core 40 in Algebra I and English 10 in order to graduate.

whereas dual credit courses provide students with actual college credits. All dual classes CSA students take are in the Indiana transfer library.

How is class rank determined? Do CSA students complete a senior Since CSA students receive a North or East diploma, they are included in their sendproject? Yes, As a BCSC high school, CSA students ing school’s class rank. CSA does not have are required to complete a senior project. a class ranking. What is the computer policy? CSA has a 1:1 student-computer ratio. Freshmen are assigned a computer that will stay with them all four years. Once they have met the requirements for taking the computer home as set forth by Student Voice (our student government), they may take their computers home. How much do students use their computers? At CSA we use technology as a tool. Students engage with group members, community members, and facilitators as much as they use their computers. However, students carry their computers with them each day in order to access Echo, which is the New Tech online learning system. Why is PBL the method of instruction at CSA? Project Based Learning allows students to find answers and solutions to problems using critical thinking. Projects are steeped in authenticity and are designed around the materials students need to know. What is the advantage of dual credit courses over AP? AP courses provide students with the opportunity to “test out” of college courses,

How do colleges perceive CSA? With over 20 New Tech schools in Indiana and 86 nationwide, colleges are becoming very familiar with New Tech schools. Colleges recognize the additional commitment students undertake to earn a New Tech Seal. Additionally nearly 90% of New Tech student pursue postsecondary education. How do the internships work? During one quarter of senior year, students are placed in a professional internship. Students are assigned a mentor and complete a project through their internship. When students work collaboratively, how are grade-conscious students penalized because of teammates’ low work ethic or how are they prevented from doing most of the work? Unlike traditional group work, students at CSA are taught how to work collaboratively. We coach them throughout their projects to function as a team. We provide them with tools to hold teammates accountable and mechanisms for dismissing students who don’t contribute. Projects are usually subject to team grades, but we also provide many opportunities for individual assessment. 31


Online spinder 2015