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Methodology for Design Architects and planners play a crucial role in the potential to reduce global consumption of energy. As I continue to mature as a designer, it has become apparent that sustainability is as much about lifestyle and choices, as it is about architectural elements which are simply schemed into building design. In an effort to do my individual part to reduce our ecological footprint, I am drawn to a city like Portland where I can utilize mass transit, effortlessly recycle my waste, and travel safely by bicycle. As a recent resident, I hope to learn how Portland and similar cities have become successful in their endeavor to become more “Green”, and use this valuable environment as fodder for my current and future designs. One of the easiest steps toward a sustainable lifestyle is the reduction of our automobile dependency. With Europe as a model, we can see that a lifestyle less reliant on the automobile is quite possible. Since Americans have placed such high priority on the automobile, we have let this dependency dictate the growth patterns of our urban fabric, rendering it non-pedestrian and severely disconnected. While attending the University of Oregon, the projects I’ve thus completed have given me the opportunity to utilize and interact with light rail transit and this mode of transportation has developed into an important focus of mine. In my short exposure to Portland, it has become obvious the advantage light rail provides in both moving people and becoming a catalyst for urban activity. Creative urban planning solutions and the utilization of several varieties of public transportation are imperative if we hope to overcome our oil dependency and mitigate one of the largest contributors to global climate change. It is at the beginning of every project that aspects like organization, program, typology, and processes are questioned with the intent to explore better and more appropriate design solutions, fully understanding that everything is relative. There is this habit for designers to gravitate toward predisposed ideas and apply them without ever questioning their intentions. On the other hand, an inquisitive approach has the ability to uniquely develop a quality of architecture that is both stimulating and concerned with the advancement of the profession. We forget that although we are typically designing for a specific client, our biggest client, more often than not, is the general public. Urban architecture gets in-filled into a setting where it is forced to fit among a diverse context of edifices, as well as the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Every urban project has the potentiality to repair or enhance those places in which people spend their day-to-day lives. It is in this setting where its success is not only measured by it response to context, but its ability to interact with the people that support its function. A positive response from the public is key, which requires providing spaces that people want to use and be in. This has led me to believe that a dense city is one that’s healthy, active and sustainable. As my studies continue and culminate in a Masters degree of Architecture I am excited to learn more about the inner workings of the Urban Environment. My infatuation with Light Rail transit has fueled my independent research the last two quarters. My research thus far has examined the planning, design strategies, and implementation of Streetcars in North America. Once complete, my intentions are to present a proposed alignment to the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico, my hometown. My research will continue to peak as I seek the answer to my own million-dollar question: What makes a city, healthy, active, and sustainable? Success should not be measured by notoriety, as much as the satisfaction derived from knowing that our innovative designs are capable of alleviating our dependence on nonrenewable energies. These solutions need to function to serve many generations to come. Design aesthetics do not have to be compromised by climactic factors, and should be a visual representation of the harmony between form and function. Thank you for your time and consideration,

Matthew N. Byers


Matthew Nicholas Byers 2248 NW Glisan Ave. Portland, Oregon 97210 505-507-7308 nickmatt.byers@gmail.com EDUCATION Masters of Architecture Focus: Transit Oriented Development University of Oregon, Portland GPA: N/A

June 2011

Bachelors of Arts in Architecture University of New Mexico, Albuquerque GPA: 3.93 Summa Cum Laude High School Diploma St. Pius X High School, Albuquerque GPA: 3.80

May 2009

May 2005

HONORS/AWARDS Form Z Design Awards, Honorable Mention

October 2009

Mickey Kosanovich Endowed Memorial Scholarship, University of New Mexico •Prize granted within the School of Architecture and Planning to the first place finisher in the Kosanovich design competition. March 2009 2008 Western Mountain Region AIA Jury •1 of 5 students selected by UNM SA+P Dean to Juror the 2008 WMR AIA Competition

October 2008

New Mexico Solar Energy Association Housing Competition, 4th place •Awarded to designs that best demonstrate a knowledge of Sustainable design in Architecture, specifically paying attention to passive solar design. March 2008 AIAS T-Shirt Design Competition •Submitted design selected to go on the 2007/2008 AIAS T-shirt University of New Mexico Dean’s List •Maintain a GPA of 3.5 or higher and be enroller in a min. of 12 credit hours

May 2007

Spring 2006-May 2009

MEMBERSHIPS/ORGANIZATIONS •TAU SIGMA DELTA •GOLDEN KEY

Honor Society in Architecture and Allied Arts International Honour Society

TEACHING EXPERIENCE Architecture and Children •Taught Architectural concepts and skills to fourth grade children at Monte Vista Elementary. •The course was designed to use architecture as a creative means to implement other curriculum such as mathematics, science, history, and art. Spring 2008 Tutoring at Douglas Macarthur Elementary •After school program that allowed for one on one with students having difficulties in a wide range of subjects. LANGUAGES •Working knowledge of Spanish

Fall 2003-Spring 2005

EMPLOYMENT University of New Mexico’s Rodey Theater Scene Shop •Position, Scenic Carpenter: Crafted sets for performance being hosted by Rodey Theater. •Experience in welding, carpentry, set design, plasma cutting, and painting were refined. Fall 2007 MPedone Works •Position, Intern: Drafting, Code Analysis, 3D Modeling/Rendering, and Design •Works consisted mostly of small scale commercial and design competitions. •Experience gained in colabortation and working with clients. Summer/Winter 2008 INTRESTS •Art Making •Cycling •Traveling •Making Music •Collecting Guitars •New Urbanism


If we look at the correlations between film and architecture we begin to see paralleled projects that are concerned with spatial sequence, continuity, framing, and composition. The evolution of any building can start to become dynamic when we consider our role of architect as a director, concerned with the unrolling of plot to a viewer, in our case the user, and how they will become enveloped in it. To better familiarize ourselves with the art of filmmaking we were required to create short film explorations that were representative of the city. In the short film I produced it involved a transitional technique that involved fading from color to black and white to accentuate particular elements I wanted the viewer to focus on. After the filmmaking process we were asked to screen a film of our choosing. Cued from the black and white transition of my film exploration it seemed obvious to analyze ‘The Wizard of Oz’. The interpretation produced two objects one 2-D the other 3-D. These interpretations began to examine and demonstrate the external influence the built environment we interact with day-to-day plays on our subconscious. For Dorothy, her entire journey through Oz, although fictional, was completely constructed from elements and images of her reality, similar to our own dream process. The question then became, “How can architecture be representative of this process, and how could it possibly begin to make us appreciate the day-to-day experience we are apart of?” By isolating the most crucial part of a Film Center, that being its screening room, a place for critique, visual exploration, and presentation, I was able to reinforce its importance and exploit its existence by using the buildings secondary program to physically define it. In the case of this Film center its screen room is only composed of, or defined, by the wall the adjacent programs lend to separate their spaces. This volume is only capable of existing because the other program allows it.

NORTH WEST FILM CENTER 584 STUDIO: FALL 2010


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0.00 Min.

DOROTHY GALE TO-TO the DOG

AUNTIE M + UNCLE HENRY HUNK (SCARECROW)

HICKORY (TIM MAN) ZEKE (COWARDLY LION) MISS ALMIRA (WICKED WITCH) PROFESSOR M. (WIZARD of OZ) GLENDA THE GOOD WITCH

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‘THE WIZARD OF OZ’ 2-D Film Interpretation

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...away! Come on, Toto! Oh, what'll I do? If we go home, they'll send you to the Sheriff. And if we don't, Aunt Em may -well, she may die! I know what I'll do 'll give you to Hunk. He'll watch out for Please, can't weGoodbye, go along with you? you.Professor, But we've why got to hurry. He's perfectly welcome. As one dog to Professor Marvel and thanks a--lot! Nobody careshuh? about me--at home. They wouldn't nosee now don't tell me. They -- they another, Here now --No, let's where even miss me. Toto, darling! Professor Oh, I got Marvel you back! never You guesses he knows!you at home. They don't don't -understand were we? “IT’S A LUCKY THING WASNT YOUR HEAD” in Let's see -- IT you're you're travelling came back! Now, Oh, I'm why soare glad! youToto! running Oh, away? appreciate you.-- You want to see other lands disguise. that's not right. I ----you're they'll be coming back for you in a minute. -- big No, cities -- big mountains big Well, that's forto the Sheriff toWe've decide. you're going visit. No, I'm wrong. “YOU WICKED OLD WITCH! Please, Aunt Em, didn't meanon to.aHe We've got get away! got Toto to--run oceans Oh, no, no! I won't let you take him! You Here's his order allowing me to take him. That's...You're -running away. HENRY, LET EM TAKE didn'tAUNTIE know heEM wasDON”T doing anything wrong.TOTO!” awayUNCLE -- quick! go away, you....! Oooh, I'll bite you myself! Unless you want to I'm go against the one the thatlaw ought to be punished. I Don'tNo, bother usnow now,don't honey -- this They old incubator's gone bad, and we're likely to lose a lot of our chicks no -tell they letme. him go in -her garden. You can send me I'll wish upon a star ALL” Oh, you“HAVE can't!..Someday AYou LITTLE COURAGE THAT’S don'tDestroyed? understand Toto? you at They don't to home. bed without supper And wake mustn't!you. Auntie Uncle You won'tup where the clouds are far behind me. appreciate YouEm! want toAIN”T seeHenry! other lands WELL YOUR HEAD MADE OFtroubles STRAWmelt YOUlike KNOW” Where lemon bedt drops, Hunk ground finger caught wagon her, -will you? that's for the Sheriff to decide. Well, well,on well -- house guests, huh? Andunder Well, -- bigletcities big mountains big -- gets Away ABOUT above the chimney tops, CARES Here's his order allowing me to take him. who might you be? Oh, No, no tellAT HOME, Oh -- oh, the poor little“NOBODY things. but-- now don'tME oceans That's EVEN where MISS you'll find me. Oh! Oh, it feels like myTHEY joints are rusted. ME”Unless you want to go against the law me. Gulch Aunt Em, Miss hit TotoWOULDN’T right over the Somewhere, over the rainbow, bluebirds fly. Listen, Dorothy, don't let Hunk kid you back with a rake just because sheDo says hesuppose there is such a place, Toto? you fly over the rainbow, “DESTROYED? TOTO? YOU CAN’T!” about Miss Gulch. She's just a poorBirds gets in her garden and chases herThere nastymust old notcan't a place oh,It's why I? you can sour-faced old maid that -- she ain'tWhy got then --be. cat every day. Nobody cares about me at home. They wouldn't Please, Professor, why can't we goHUH?” with “OH YES, YOU WANT TO GOget to by aalong boatbluebirds or a you? train. IfHOME happy little fly It's far, far no heart left. You know, you should have a Dorothy, please! We're trying Fifty-eigh ..Someday I'll wish upontoacount! star even away -- behind the what moon -- beyond the rainmiss -- me. Beyond theZeke, rainbow more heart Miss yourself, and pity She.... Justittle listen to what Gulch didhave to Toto! And wake up where the clouds are far behind me. am I going to do about Miss Why, Zeke oh, why can't I? on her. Gulch? Justholding because Toto chases her old Now lookit, Dorothy, youmelt ain'tlike using your and Hickory wagon bed Where troubles lemon “WELL GEE, I’lldrops, TRY AND HAVE A HEART” Don'tMiss bother us now, honey -this old incubator's gone bad, and we're likely to lose a lot of our chicks cat head about Gulch. Think you didn't Away above the chimney She isn't coming yet, Toto.tops, Did sheWell, hurt why don't you use them? When you come have any brains at all.you'll That's where find home, don't go by Miss Gulch's place. Then you? She tried to, she? Come on -“I HAVE SOdidn't GOTme. BRAINS” Somewhere, overHenry the rainbow, bluebirds fly. get in her garden, and you won't Toto won't we'll go tell Uncle and Auntie Em. Oh! Oh, it feels like my jointsOh, are but rusted. Oh -- oh, the poor little things. “DO YOU SUPPOSE THERE IS SUCH A PLACE BirdsOh, fly over the rainbow, get in trouble. See? TOTO?” but he doesn't do itAunt every day --no just Come on, Toto. Listen, Dorothy, don't Hunk youthe Em, Miss Gulch hitlet Toto rightkid over Whyonce then or -- oh, why can't I? twice a week. And he can't catch about Gulch. She's justshe a poor back withMiss a rake just because says he If happy little bluebirds fly Oh, no, no! I won't let you take him! You her old cat, anyway. And now she garden says sour-faced old she's maid -- she gotold gets in her and that chases herain't nasty Beyond the rainbow Poor little orphan, and her Miss Gulch go away, you....! Oooh, I'll no bite you myself! gonna get the sheriff, and heart left. You know, you should have a Oh, no, no! I won't let you take him! You every day. Why, oh, why can't I? Goshcat troubles. all hemlock - you know, she heart yourself, and have pity go away, you....! Oooh, I'll ittle bite more you myself! ought to have somebody to play with. on her.


‘DOROTHY’S SUBCONSCIOUS’ 3-D Interpretation (acrylic+yarn)


NWFC PROPOSAL BOARD 1 + 2


NWFC PROPOSAL BOARD 3 + 4


The North Park Block Transit shelter is more than just an object denoting a stop, it has the opportunity to denote place. This project proposes not only a transit shelter but also the renovation of the area immediate to the shelter as well as the traffic calming for Burnside Street. The Shelter The Transit form acts as a gateway welcoming and denoting ones arrival to the North Park Blocks. The Space frame structure is reminiscent of the many bridges that Portland possesses. The Street To help make crossing from the South side of Burnside to the North Park blocks, replacing the asphalt with cobble stones will create a zone that is more pedestrian friendly. This change in paving surfaces will also help slow down traffic and make th them more alert to pedestrian priority in this area. Environment The immediate area is turned into a place that can become a gathering space, providing a range of surfaces and elements for people to choose from. Hard surfaces allow for activities like skating, dancing, and playing. While the softer grassy land scaped areas provide a cozy place for picnicking and rest. An assortment of seating is provided in both areas for those more concerned with people watching than participating. Sustainability Developing the whole site allows opportunity to deal with storm water management. Burnsides natural slope adjacent to the transit stop allows for storm water to be redirected onto the site and managed through a bioswale. Photovoltaics impregnated glass provides the necessary energy required for operating the transit time monitor as well as safety lighting.

N. PARK BLOCKS

Transit Shelter Context of the Profession


NEW CONC. SURFACE

PLAZA 40’-3”

3’-0”

60’-0” SEAT WALL

BIO-SWALE 12’-0”

8’-0”

3’-0”

18’-0”

6’-0”

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STRUCTURE AB

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CONCRETE MAST

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SEATING AREA

TRANSIT MONITOR SIDE WALK 10’-0” CANOPY ABOVE

CABLE MOUNTS

MOUNTING BRACKETS

GRATE

1’-6”

T.O. MAST 22’-0” GUTTER TO BIOSWALE

44’-6”

15’-0” 2’-1”

24’-3”

18’-0”

2’- 0”

6’-0”

3’-0”

10’-0”

MOUNTING BRACKETS

14’-0”

16’-0”

T.O. TRUSS 13’-0”

1’- 5”

B.O. TRUSS 10’-6”

3’- 4”

SPACE FRAME CORD BUSHING

10’-0”

2’-0”

STEEL GUSSET EMBED

8’-0” 4’-0”

T.O. SEATING 2’-6” T.O. SEAT WALL 1’-6”

252’-6” R

FRICTION PILES

255’- 0” R

STEM WALL (SEATING ATTACHES TO)

GRADE 0’- 0”


T.O. MAST 22’-0” 1’-6”

SS CABLE 1” D

1’-6” 1’-6”

4’x8’ BIPV GLAZING

7W22 x 7’ BEAMS

T.O. TRUSS 13’-0”

B.O. TRUSS 10’-6” 22’-0”

WOOD SEATING 16’- 0”

C-I-P CONC. MAST

37’-3”

6’-0”

3’- 0”

1’-6” 8’-0”

T.O. SEATING 3’-0” T.O. SEAT WALL 1’-6” GRADE 0’- 0” 14’-0” 8’-0”

CL

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8’-0” SS CABLE GUSSETS

T.O. MAST 22’-0” 1’-6”

SS CABLE 1” D

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CL

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1’-6” 14’-0”

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4’x8’ BIPV GLAZING

7W22 x 7’ BEAMS

1’-10”

T.O. TRUSS 13’-0”

T.O. MAST 22’-0”

B.O. TRUSS 10’-6” 9’-0”

9.1deg.

22’-0” STEEL SPACE FRAME 1’- 8”

WOOD SEATING

T.O. TRUSS 13’-0”

16’- 0”

2’-6”

C-I-P CONC. MAST

37’-3”

6’-0”

3’- 0”

1’-6”

B.O. TRUSS 10’-6”

8’-0”

T.O. SEATING 3’-0” 15 deg. 7.3 deg.

T.O. SEAT WALL 1’-6”

LED LIGHT FIXTURES TRANSIT MONITOR

GRADE 0’- 0”

8’-0”

CNC WOOD SEATING

2’-0”

SEAT WALL 16’- 0”

4’-0”

T.O. SEATING 2’-6”

1’-0”

T.O. SEAT WALL 1’-6”

1’-6”

8’-0”

CL

GRADE 0’- 0”

18’-0”

6’-0”

7’-0”

10’-0”

16’-0”

14’-0”

8’-0” 3’-3” 1’-10”

T.O. MAST 22’-0”


C-I-P MAST SURFACE ALUMINUM FLASHING BIPV 1/2” STRUCTURAL GLAZING 3/8” ANCHOR BOLT 3/8” NUT WITH LOCK WASHER GLAZING BOLT ASSEMBLY 1/2” RUBBER BUSHING SS GUSSET PLATE

C-I-P MAST SURFACE 1/2” ANCHOR BOLT 1/2” NUT WITH LOCK WASHER SS HANGER

2.5”

0’-5”

0’-9”

0’-4”

HANGER ASSEMBLY BOLT 2”R TUBE SECTION 2’1/2” TUBE SECTION (UPPER CORD)

SS MOUNTING BRACKET 2”X4” P.T. FURRING SEAT WALL CNC WOODEN RIB (A-52 SHOWN) 1”X1”SS CHANNEL 3/8” ANCHOR BOLT COREDRILLED

1’-0”

2”

1/2” HOMOSOTE 4” CONCRETE SLAB

1.5”

0’- 7”

0’- 5” 7.3 deg.

2’-10”

1’-10”

1’-4”

SS GUSSET PLATE 7W22x7’ MEMBER WELD 3”R TUBE STEEL SECTION (BOTTOM CHORD) 3/8” BOLT ASSEMBLY LIGHT FIXTURE (BEYOND)

0’- 3”R


URBAN REPAIRS + ADDITIONS

MARKET/PLAYGOUND (NEIGHBORHOOD FOCUS)

SCHOOL QUAD (PSU STUDENT FOCUS)

SUSTAINABILITY CENTER (ECO-DISTRIC FOCUS)


LIBERATE DEAD PARK

WATERFRONT SHOPS/LIVING (COMMERCIAL FOCUS)

WATERFRONT SQUARE (PEDESTRIAN FOCUS)

URBAN VISION Re-route Streetcar into Montgomery/Harrison Couplet


INTERIOR RENDERINGS (ENTRY + LOBBY)


DAYLIGHT MODEL chip board, basswood, plex, foamcore + museum board (scale: 1/2” = 1’-0”)

DAYLIGHTING MODEL (GALLERIES)


1. 3.

INK TRAVEL SKETCHES 1. Klee Museum, Bern Sum. 2009 2. Segrada Familia, Barcelona Sum.2009 3. Cathedral of the Angels, L.A. Fall 2008 4. Villa Rotonda, Vicenza Sum. 2009

4. 2.


5.

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WATER COLOR TRAVEL SKETCHES 5. Notre-Dame,Ronchamp Sum. 2009 6. Church (untitled), Barcelona Sum. 2009 7. Castelgrande, Bellinzona Sum. 2009 8. Morcote Tessin, Vico Sum. 2009

React Rethink Refine: 2011  

An assemblage of works ranging from technical drawings, renderings, sketches, and models.

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