R Magazine (ex-Teen'Art)_Issue 4 : Future

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Design: Amila Hrustic - Photo: Irfan Redzovic


« The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. » Eleanor Roosevelt

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In future, you will open an artistic drawer containing all the possible combinations t hat human beings gave to their art

Blacky Gyan TEEN’Art Magazine - Future



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Contents

ART

Body Marie Remrov

FASHION

Davis Lawrence Divamp Couture Amila Hrustic

MIAM ...

514 Foodies Collective

HAIR BEAUTY

Rob The Original

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By Myriam Annick Tchameni

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Accessories/Jewellery: Davis Lawrence Models: Victoria Rose Valentina Synthia Dabiri Christine House Darina May Kana Suzuki Blair Joelle Higgs Make up Artists: Melody Jefferson Keena Queen Sieva Floyd Chanda Boone Stylists: Davis Lawrence Blaire Leon Photographers: David Berman Norman Ding Steve Bennett Erwin Simbulan Hair Stylists: Perry Amati Simon Bechara Nicole Whalen

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“My debut into the industry was in 2008, when former business partner and aunt Sharon Swilling formed the label Boho Designs,” Davis said. “In 2014, I branched out more into the deep seas to refresh myself with my current self-titled label Davis Lawrence.” As described by its founder, Davis Lawrence is an emerging label that offers a flair: an array of exclusive neck pieces that would surely grab the fashion world attention, regardless of the occasion. “Within the label, I tend to challenge myself out to do my last creation,” he said. “Innovation is the key in the fashion industry. “Davis Lawrence Fashion Jewelry pushes to keep its consumers anticipating what's next from this emerging label. You can find exclusive eye-catching pieces here including neck pieces, necklaces, hair accessories, trinkets, earrings, bracelets and so much more.”

Davis Lawrence Neal Jr. is a 30-year-old ambitious man. After having studied jewelry making at the Maryland Institute College of Art, he developed his love for creativity, a love that finally led him into the fashion industry. Davis Lawrence designs pieces that speak to any and every one regardless of the age. “I design what fits within the market, like what's needed now.” Davis is deeply attached to what he does. “The reason I've chose my name Davis Lawrence for my label was due to the mere fact that I'm my label. Every pieces I create is Davis Lawrence, the way I see beauty.” Davis doesn’t want his pieces to be part of people’s lives for only one day, but for many years. “I'm thinking and creating on the lines of longevity, pieces that are considered a staple to one's wardrobe, something that can be passed down from generation to generation.”


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PLATO’S COLLECTION

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CREDITS :

Design: Amila Hrustic Photo: Irfan Redzovic Layout: Laura Bonnieu

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Credit: Marquis magazine Photo: Peter Czernich Model: Nina de Lianin MUA: Angi del Rey

Photo : Blackula Model Elena Vladi Personal

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By Myriam Annick Tchameni


Credit: Marquis magazine Photo: Peter Czernich Model: Nina de Lianin MUA: Angi del Rey

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At 44 years, Boyd Baten is designer at Divamp couture, a label that he has created himself. When he was younger, Baten used to paint, customise, and modify t-shirts for his friends by using his hands. As he said, he got the urge to create something with his hands from his father, who is sculpture artist and art teacher. “During my study in Holland,” Baten said. “I was already busy selling costumes to friends as well as to shops, this was my main focus. When I was at art school in Barcelona twenty years ago, I thought I knew better than the teachers themselves, so I dropped out soon.” Barcelona is the city where he actually works and lives with his Spanish wife and their three children. “I met Mina here in Barcelona, my first and only love.” Baten said. His wife is his biggest support and she helps him in everything. They are both shop owners of Goodtimes-Barcelona. “For this brick and mortar shop, I design the clothing. Spain is where my personality fits best.” The very first piece he ever made was a shirt made from baseball knickers. “I cut the legs off and put them as sleeves. This must be 22 years ago already.” Baten does not have a specific person which he admires and gets inspiration from. “My inspiration normally comes from things or from nature,” he said. “I am a strange designer. When I put my hand and mind onto making something, always a beautiful thing comes from it. I mean always!” He does not sketch or brainstorm or inspire himself on a particular thing or somebody’s work. “It just comes from itself, or does not come at all!” he said. What Baten loves most about designing is the fact that, as an impatient person, he can obtain fast results by building his clothes without anybody’s help. “I am a kind of loner in this aspect,” he said. For his costumes, he mainly uses PVC (Polyvinyl chloride). “For my other brands any other fabric is good.” So far, his work has been exhibited on the biggest shows in Spain: Cybele in Madrid and Gaudi in Barcelona. His main focus is now abroad. Baten hopes to become successful in the future. “Young people really love what I do and can connect to it. They write me about how I inspire them. This is a really big and motivating boost for me.” A friend sent him some pictures a while ago to show him things from art classes that were really inspired on his clothes. “I loved it! I think it’s nice to be a fountain of inspiration to younger people. It keeps me driving!” Apparently, the love of art is hereditary in Baten’s family. “My daughter surely has an eye for art, I know she has it in her, but she needs to find her turn herself,” he said. “I told her I could show her, but you know adolescent people, they don’t take things from their dad!”

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He has a good advice to anyone who would like to follow his path. “Don’t look too much at what someone else does; don’t try to copy and you will find your own way and personality.” Graphiste: Andréa Deloche


Credit: Marquis magazine Photo: Peter Czernich Model: Nina de Lianin MUA: Angi del Rey

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Photo: Studioivolution Model: Luna Alva MUA: Melissa Mari.

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photorealistic pencil artist TEEN’Art Magazine - Future

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M

« y name is Heidi Vormer, and my artist name is Remrov, my last name spelled backwards. When I was four years old I already wanted to draw every day. Now I specialize in very photorealistic pencil drawings of people, animals, houses, trees, and anything else I find interesting. Most of my drawings are in pencil, but every now and then I like to use my drawing pen. I have autism, and due to this I see the whole world in tiny little details. My drawings tend to be this way too, very precise and detailed. The world is a very chaotic place for me. When I am out in public I have to focus on so many things at the same time. Many tiny details of information come in all at once and they all compete for first place. This can be exhausting. When I am working on a drawing, I only have to focus on just one thing, the details of my drawing. This is one of the reasons why I love drawing so much. I especially love to make drawings of animals, and I also love to help animals with my art. Right now I have two special projects going on. One of them is for koalas. I make photorealistic pencil portraits and greetings cards of koalas and donate 25% of the proceeds of this work to the Koala Hospital in Port Macquarie, Australia. Koalas are threatened with extinction, and at the koala hospital they do great work to help wounded koalas and get them back into the wild again. My second project is for Chengeta Wildlife. This is an organization that fights against poaching of wildlife in Africa. I make photorealistic pencil drawings of elephants and other wild animals and donate 25% of this work to Chengeta Wildlife.

Besides very photorealistic drawings, I also enjoy creating cartoons and illustrations. I make illustrations for children’s books, and I’m also working on a comic book with my pet parrot as the main character, called Pilaf in Space, which I’d like to publish when it’s finished. I was born in the Netherlands and immigrated to Montreal, Canada in 2013 to be with my American boyfriend. I’m just in the process of getting my artwork off the ground here in my new home city. My goals are to keep creating the most detailed photorealistic drawings possible and to keep challenging myself until I can make a living with my art. If you want to see more of my artwork please visit my website: www.remrovsar twork .com»

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NEITHER NUDE, NOR DRESSED: THE BODY BECOMES A WORK OF ART » Marie-Michèle Gagnon is a fine arts teacher born in 1984, in Canada. During her elementary and secondary studies at the end of the day, Marie-Michèle becomes her alter ego Bodymarie, a multifaceted artist we met and would like you to discover. TO START, WE WILL GO BACK IN 19… YOU WERE FIFTEEN YEARS OLD. WHAT WERE YOUR DREAMS AT THAT TIME? DID YOU REALISE THEM? AND TODAY WHAT ARE YOUR DREAMS? In 1998-1999 I was 15. At that time, I dreamed of freedom. I played guitar for 2 years and I sang for 7 years and wanted to be a Rock Star. I went as often as possible to live concert and danced to the sound of my favorite bands, that was important to me at that time. Meanwhile, I was also passionate about my art classes in secondary school. I remember a teacher chose me to do a mural in the school hallway and I was proud to have the opportunity to write the word 'Freedom'. That same teacher introduced me to abstract art and made me discover Wassily Kandinsky, an artist who became later a great influence in the development of my creations. Over time, I became less interested in music and much more interested in visual arts. When the time came to make a career choice, I decided to continue my studies in visual arts. I earned a degree in visual and media arts at CEGEP Lévis-lauzon, a town on the south shore of Quebec. However, music remained a hobby. Today, my dreams are coming true. My creations are getting more and more visibility. I love what I do and I'm pretty versatile in this type of art. I participate in various events and exhibitions. A few months I created my website (www.bodymarie.com) and I am very proud of what I accomplished in the year 2013.

I think that I always had this desire to create, I like revealing what is hidden deep inside me.

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How did you get to painting? and why body painting? I discovered acrylic paint while studying at CEGEP. Since then I did some paintings. When I was in university, I began to explore the manufacture of prostheses and photomontage. Body painting did not really come to my mind. I discovered the art of body painting in 2009 through a friend. My passion grew in 2010 when I met a body painting model who told me about the Backstage Studio. I started going there once a month to practice this ephemeral art. What are your current artistic inspirations and influences? Wassily Kandinsky, Vincent Vangog, Salvador Dali, Picasso, Matthiew Barney ... are some of the artists whose style have inspired me in my creative process. My current influences remain the same artists but I also get inspired by what's around me, by the people I meet, by life and everything that is offered to me in the moment. How would you define your art and your method of WORKING? what techniques do you use when you paint? I love to improvise when I do body painting. I use the present moment to change the setting. For symposia and competitions, I start thinking about my concept 2-3 months in advance. I often do preparatory sketches to have a vision of my work. I create different shade of colors, I make my stencils and my accessories and I create hairstyles on site. I always make sure to have time for contingencies like details to be added in order to finish the work. I use brushes, air brush, cardboard stencil, fabrics and different materials to make my props and costumes. What use does body painting have? What are your clients’ objectives? And yours? Body painting is an art form just like painting. It is primarily used to entertain the public as a live performance at various shows. It can also be used to make video and photographic projects; it all depends on the idea of creation. It is an ephemeral art. It is difficult to reproduce the same makeup and the art form is constantly evolving. This fascinates me because I have a human body as a canvass and I have to adapt to that body. This allows me to make some interesting encounters and know the specific needs of the models according to their request while keeping in mind that everyone deserves respect. Freedom for each and every one is important. Body painting is used to demonstrate to the public that art can be made on any medium; Art can be made everywhere.


What can you tell us about the typical day of a body painter in Quebec? Daily practice is very important. With the experience, we get to know what kind of makeup products to use to get to this or that result. I love meeting other artists to share my knowledge and expand my network of contacts. You have to be positive and do not be afraid to go ahead and produce to be seen. I'm constantly looking for inspiration; I persevere to grow my network of contacts and my visibility; I learn every day.

According to André Brasilier « painting is trying to go beyond life’s emotions and sharing them through a plastic translation » What do you think of this QUOTE? I think André Brasilier’s quote clearly represents what I think of my art. This is what I want to share with people who appreciate my art because the only way to do good work is to love what you do and it must come from the heart. Each artist is unique and that's what makes the beauty of their talent.

By Ayayi Senam D’Almeida

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Graphiste: AndrĂŠa Deloche




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On February 20th, 2012, French musician Philippe Manoury received the Victory of the best classical music composer, for his opera The Night of Gutenberg. Of course, he owes the award to his talent, but also to a musician like no other: the Antescofo software, designed by the Institute for Research and Acoustic Coordination / Music (IRCAM). Indeed, this computer program is able to play a musical score via the sound card of a computer and change according to what other performers are playing, like a musician in a set. The connection between the interactive listening and responsive support system is the main idea behind the project Antescofo in which the computer plays the role of a musician and reacts in real time, according to what the instrumentalist is playing . Synthetic and virtual are now matching reality, which makes us ask this fundamental question about the future of musicians. Will they be able to coexist with a technology that, day after day, learns to replace them? With the rise of computer-aided music and home studios, all you need is just a smartphone, tablet or computer to have an orchestra. Despite the fact that this is a virtual orchestra the music it produces is real. Tens of kilograms of instruments contained in a few bytes... Since the forties, anconnection between art, science and technology was denoted with concepts such as "concrete music" which used recorded sounds that were modified and assembled in the studio. The sixties will be the years of the "studios" in terms of experimentation and ingenuity, marked by the birth of computer music in 1969, thanks to the program created by Mathews, which allowed the user to build an instrument from programming blocks. In the seventies, researches on real time composition lead to development of the first digital synthesizer by composer and researcher John Chowning. However, the metamorphosis of the musical genre was confirmed in the mid-eighties, with the arrival of synthesizers. New wave was implanted, as well as hip hop, house, garage ... With the development of computers’ power and computer technology in particular, the nineties offered to musicians the possibility to directly record multi-tracks on a computer. Throughout the years, computer-aided music experienced an exponential growth since it offers a way of controlling control costs and a quality that is almost identical to traditional instruments’ quality, and became a standard in terms of production and musical performances. In 2007, Italian composer Marco Stroppa challenged a musician to interact on stage with a computer, as if it was a human, during a concert. A very forward-thinking project emerged from that.

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It is striking that the very heart of musical activity has been largely neglected. Things are happening as if real-musicians were absent when digital music was being analysed (Philippe Le Guern, Professor of Communication Sciences) We also desperately need new instruments ... musicians, with the help of specialized engineers, must address this issue with the utmost seriousness, (Edgard Varese, American composer) Computers, this is crap. All you need do is buy guitars! (Noel Gallagher, Oasis) In each instrument, are combined the ideal of beauty and inventiveness of the time. (Irish singer Björk) Today you can make music with computers, but the computer has always existed in the minds of composers. (Milan Kundera - The Art of the Novel) Computers and new technologies radicalized creation attitudes, challenge compositional habits ... The composer must develop new skills, have scientific knowledge. (Marie-Noëlle Heinrich, research professor in information science and communication) Our idea was to build a black box that would be the range of the composer at home. This would be their studio. The idea was to design it so that it's like an analog computer. It was not a musical instrument but it would modulations ... (Subotnick, 1962)

By Ayayi Senam D’Almeida

Graphiste: Andréa Deloche / Traduction: Anne Solange Diene


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The 514 Foodies Collective

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Raky Hanne Ly’s secrets

self through my dedicated work of bringing a feast to and the table. My purpose useof of events with the was maintogoal sharing a meal with friends «The 514 Foodies Collective has food as a connector, as an imperfect and «Thea 514 Collective has been a building stronger friendships and family at different occasion have been dreamFoodies of mine for many authentic way to celebrate our relationship dream of mine for many years and I do within that the sha514FC always reminded me that others, the most to relationships years and I do believe that it all with let them know believequite thatearly it allwhen started quiteimportant early when Community, through a shared meal in thing in life was the started I was I was reflecting on my purpose on earth. ring this meal means something that goes love and passion. The in my case reflecting on my purposetoonmy earth. beyond theitsolecooked act ofwith nourishing oneself. From my toddler adulthuman life, experience. I have And Fast forward in time, after spending 8 years was the human From my toddler my adultand life, Ipassionate always had a tostrong rela-experience through 514FC is a large family that ceases to Montreal, Foodies tionship with food.andI passiolove tasting newgathering di- inpeople growcreated through the the 514 melting pot of food and aroundI have have always had a strong Collective that has been since 2012 curating shes to discover the flavors, the textures, people houses that ‘’une bonne table’’. a series of eventscultures, nate relationship with food. I love with the mainand goal of builthe smells and to travel through these marveallows creating the most special This was my purpose, to cook for tasting new dishes discover the lous ‘’mets’’. I was lucky to always be sur- ding stronger friendships and relationships gatherings. At the 514FC gatherings, people, them an unforgettable flavors, the textures, the smells and within the 514FC Community, through a rounded by different cultures, at angive early shared meal cooked with love and passion. you will be able to discover what it experience from my heart to theirs travel through thesefirst marvelous age. In fact, my encounters with eth514FCselfis a means large to family ceases to nic food were with my friends fromshow school, share that a meal the Seneand them The my inner ‘’mets’’. I was lucky to always be grow through the melting pot of cultures, when they invited cultures, me at attheirthrough house galese way, Ethiopian way, the my and dedicated work ofand brin- houses surrounded by different people thattheallows creating we would share a delicious meal cooked Moroccan way, the French way (‘’ à ging a feast to the table. My purpose an early age. In fact, my first encounby their moms with love and perfection. the most special gatherings. At the 514FC la bonne franquette’’), the Italian way was use food asgatherings, a connector, as ters ethnic food were my you will be able to discover what Mywith environment, mywith friends, my to acquainit means to share a meal the Senegalese way, just to name a few and this is what an have imperfect and authentic way to friends school, when theystory tances,from my travels and my given the Ethiopian theit Moroccan the me tremendous amount celebrate with our relationship with way, makes a beauty. Youway, will tasting invited me at their house and of weexperiences French way (‘’ à la bonne franquette’’), the food. My for food meal and allothers, the superb dishes made with the to let them know would sharelove a delicious Italian waythat just toauthentic name a few and this is what memories that I had when sharing athismeal passion for food that our mothers sharing meal means something cooked by their moms with love and with friends and family at different occasion makes it a beauty. You will tasting authentic andthe grandmothers havefood always had that the goes most beyond dishes the sole made act of with perfection. My environment, my that passion for that have always reminded me our mothers and grandmothers have always when preparing a meal for their oneself. friends, my acquaintances, important in thing my in travels life wasnourishing the human had preparing meal foraround theirthe family experience. And case it Fast wasForward the hufamily aand this all globe. in time, afterwhen spending and my story have giveninmemy tremenand this all around the globe. The 514FC man experience through food and gatheThe 514FC and member community dous amount of experiences with 8 years in Montreal,events I have and created community giveevents to each ring Mypeople around ‘’une bonne table’’. Collective that the 514 Foodies has give to each member of this large food. love for food and all the This was my purpose, to cook for people, of this large family a sense of belonging.» family a sense of belonging.» been sincefrom 2012 curating a series superb memories that I had whenexperience give them an unforgettable Compiled by Blacky Gyan my heart to theirs and show them my inner


The 514 Foodies Collective

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www.514fc.com Graphiste: AndrĂŠa Deloche


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