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issue four . the kids who made it

From the Guild / 005 Features / 008 Fiction / 011 Interviews / 014 Reviews / 016


Editors Elizabeth Tucker Lucy Babbage Tim McGuire Art Director Andrew Suggit | andru.com.au Editorial Contributors Pat Herde Diane Lagarenne Mark Molenaar Coco Alcatraz Photographic Contributors www.direfromagemonde.tumblr.com/

Cover Shot www.direfromagemonde.tumblr.com

The QUT Student Guild acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land on which we work and study and recognises the significant contribution of Indigenous Australians. We embrace the spirit of Reconciliation.

Page 4: Letter from Editors Page 5: President’s letter | Gemma Harvey Page 6: The Other Side of the Story | Pat Herde Page 13: Heard of the BMM? | Lucy Babbage Page 17: Xchange: Four students talk about studying abroad | Tim McGuire Page 22: Interview Miriam Hall | Elizabeth Tucker Page 26: Scene Francaise: 6 French bands to know | Diane Lagarenne Page 29: A Morning Chat | Mark Molenaar Page 34: Stars | Coco Alcatraz

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Editors Elizabeth Tucker Lucy Babbage Tim McGuire Art Director Andrew Suggit | andru.com.au Editorial Contributors Pat Herde Diane Lagarenne Mark Molenaar Coco Alcatraz Photographic Contributors www.direfromagemonde.tumblr.com/

Cover Shot www.direfromagemonde.tumblr.com

The QUT Student Guild acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land on which we work and study and recognises the significant contribution of Indigenous Australians. We embrace the spirit of Reconciliation.

Page 4: Letter from Editors Page 5: President’s letter | Gemma Harvey Page 6: The Other Side of the Story | Pat Herde Page 13: Heard of the BMM? | Lucy Babbage Page 17: Xchange: Four students talk about studying abroad | Tim McGuire Page 22: Interview Miriam Hall | Elizabeth Tucker Page 26: Scene Francaise: 6 French bands to know | Diane Lagarenne Page 29: A Morning Chat | Mark Molenaar Page 34: Stars | Coco Alcatraz

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR's

president’s letter | Gemma Harvey Elizabeth spoke with Miriam Hall, a past QUT student, radio reporter for the ABC, and worldly young woman who is now living in NYC. Read up on her life after study but be prepared for some serious career envy!

In the words of Andrea Bocelli and *busty sumptuous female opera singer*, it’s time to say goodbye We have had a truly joyful time being the editors of Qute Magazine for 2011, and Issue 4 has some great pieces in store for you.. To round things out nicely, we have a response to our first feature in Issue 1, Animal Cruelty in your Backyard, from Goondiwindi grazier Pat Herde who happened to get his mitts on our mag. We have some info on the latest version of the Brisbane Media Map, an ongoing project of QUT’s media and communications students. This update is particularly helpful to graduating CI students looking for jobs in Brisbane’s burgeoning media industry, so check it out! Tim profiled four QUT students who have taken their tertiary journey’s abroad and found out about their exciting adventures. Why didn’t we go on exchange???

4

We’ve got a piece of short fiction from Mark Molenaar, a graduating creative writing student; and last but not least, Coco Alcatraz gives us her final words of wisdom for the end of the year. This magazine has been a wonderful opportunity for the three of us to try our hand at creating a publication from scratch! The teething process took us a while, and we are sad that now we finally think we’ve got things figured out, our journey has come to an end. But as Ben Cousins’ tattoo says, “such is life”. Some people we would particularly like to thank are: Andrew Suggit – for his astonishingly beautiful design without which, this magazine would probably just be black words on white paper with a few images of teacup pigs copy and pasted in. Gemma Harvey – for her support throughout the year, and her flexibility with us. Dominic Fay – for his fabulously insightful pieces, his enthusiasm, and his speedy turn around. Keep your eye out for this kid, we think he’ll go far! Sian Campbell – we’ve loved her sass and wit! Watch this space, there’s a novel or ten on the horizon. Ella Jeffery – stop making us crush on you with your beautiful poetry. It is SIMPLY too heartbreaking watching you cross the quad… Martha Hockings – an amazingly talented writer with a big career ahead! Coco Alcatraz – for her up to date and modern view on astrology. She speaks the truth. Well that’s it from us! Keep it Qute this summer (we’ll keep it lame)! Love, Elizabeth, Lucy & Tim xoxo

Greetings for a final time!

–––– As some of you may be aware, each year at the beginning of December the QUT Student Guild says adios to its current administration and welcomes the newly elected team.

This year, the student elections were particularly brutal with

personal attacks, fake flyers & misleading information.

Activate couldn’t trump Epic this year and I hope the elected team run the organisation with more integrity than their campaign. ...On a brighter note, you as students have had your say and can look forward to a toga party at Riverstage in 2012!? That’s right, you voted for it!

Alongside the ending of Activate’s 3 year stint with the Guild, we sadly say goodbye to our wonderful QUTE mag editors. Liz, Tim & Lucy – thank you for the character, energy and professionalism you have brought to QUTE this year. I love what you have done with the mag and I hope you re-apply for another year! To other students out there keen to be an editor keep an eye on the notice boards for nomination info. As I’m graduating in December, it’s time for me to say goodbye as well. It has been an honour to serve as your President for the past year! I hope 2011 has been a good year for you as it has been for me!

Cheerio! Gem

5


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR's

president’s letter | Gemma Harvey Elizabeth spoke with Miriam Hall, a past QUT student, radio reporter for the ABC, and worldly young woman who is now living in NYC. Read up on her life after study but be prepared for some serious career envy!

In the words of Andrea Bocelli and *busty sumptuous female opera singer*, it’s time to say goodbye We have had a truly joyful time being the editors of Qute Magazine for 2011, and Issue 4 has some great pieces in store for you.. To round things out nicely, we have a response to our first feature in Issue 1, Animal Cruelty in your Backyard, from Goondiwindi grazier Pat Herde who happened to get his mitts on our mag. We have some info on the latest version of the Brisbane Media Map, an ongoing project of QUT’s media and communications students. This update is particularly helpful to graduating CI students looking for jobs in Brisbane’s burgeoning media industry, so check it out! Tim profiled four QUT students who have taken their tertiary journey’s abroad and found out about their exciting adventures. Why didn’t we go on exchange???

4

We’ve got a piece of short fiction from Mark Molenaar, a graduating creative writing student; and last but not least, Coco Alcatraz gives us her final words of wisdom for the end of the year. This magazine has been a wonderful opportunity for the three of us to try our hand at creating a publication from scratch! The teething process took us a while, and we are sad that now we finally think we’ve got things figured out, our journey has come to an end. But as Ben Cousins’ tattoo says, “such is life”. Some people we would particularly like to thank are: Andrew Suggit – for his astonishingly beautiful design without which, this magazine would probably just be black words on white paper with a few images of teacup pigs copy and pasted in. Gemma Harvey – for her support throughout the year, and her flexibility with us. Dominic Fay – for his fabulously insightful pieces, his enthusiasm, and his speedy turn around. Keep your eye out for this kid, we think he’ll go far! Sian Campbell – we’ve loved her sass and wit! Watch this space, there’s a novel or ten on the horizon. Ella Jeffery – stop making us crush on you with your beautiful poetry. It is SIMPLY too heartbreaking watching you cross the quad… Martha Hockings – an amazingly talented writer with a big career ahead! Coco Alcatraz – for her up to date and modern view on astrology. She speaks the truth. Well that’s it from us! Keep it Qute this summer (we’ll keep it lame)! Love, Elizabeth, Lucy & Tim xoxo

Greetings for a final time!

–––– As some of you may be aware, each year at the beginning of December the QUT Student Guild says adios to its current administration and welcomes the newly elected team.

This year, the student elections were particularly brutal with

personal attacks, fake flyers & misleading information.

Activate couldn’t trump Epic this year and I hope the elected team run the organisation with more integrity than their campaign. ...On a brighter note, you as students have had your say and can look forward to a toga party at Riverstage in 2012!? That’s right, you voted for it!

Alongside the ending of Activate’s 3 year stint with the Guild, we sadly say goodbye to our wonderful QUTE mag editors. Liz, Tim & Lucy – thank you for the character, energy and professionalism you have brought to QUTE this year. I love what you have done with the mag and I hope you re-apply for another year! To other students out there keen to be an editor keep an eye on the notice boards for nomination info. As I’m graduating in December, it’s time for me to say goodbye as well. It has been an honour to serve as your President for the past year! I hope 2011 has been a good year for you as it has been for me!

Cheerio! Gem

5


Words | Pat Herde an insight into a farmer’s perspective on the animal export issue.

Pat Herde is a farmer from Goondiwindi who just so happened to read our article from Issue One – Animal Cruelty in Your Backyard. After having a chat with Pat about his thoughts on the issue, we invited him to write a piece from the farmer’s perspective – one we feel is rarely represented within the urban environment that this magazine is published in, and would be of value to hear from. Here is what he has to say.

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Words | Pat Herde an insight into a farmer’s perspective on the animal export issue.

Pat Herde is a farmer from Goondiwindi who just so happened to read our article from Issue One – Animal Cruelty in Your Backyard. After having a chat with Pat about his thoughts on the issue, we invited him to write a piece from the farmer’s perspective – one we feel is rarely represented within the urban environment that this magazine is published in, and would be of value to hear from. Here is what he has to say.

6

7


As a farmer we have a knack for whinging. There is always something affecting our livelihoods such as the weather, market prices, or the dollar. I really do think we must come across as a pack of whingers, but in our defence that’s because we have a lot to whinge about. We endure all kinds of hardships and then just pick ourselves up and go again. The people of the bush would have to be one of the toughest kinds of people in the world. I can deal with droughts, floods, isolation … the list is endless. Of all of these obstacles however, there is one part of the job I cannot deal with – public opinion. This is the one element that has the ability to bring agriculture to its knees. At a point in time when part of the world is starving, Australia’s youth seem to be doing their best to make it hard for the people trying to feed the world. If the following comes across as a rant,

x

p

o

r

t

it is only because I’m sick of trying my hardest and being made out as one of the baddies by the media.

8

9


As a farmer we have a knack for whinging. There is always something affecting our livelihoods such as the weather, market prices, or the dollar. I really do think we must come across as a pack of whingers, but in our defence that’s because we have a lot to whinge about. We endure all kinds of hardships and then just pick ourselves up and go again. The people of the bush would have to be one of the toughest kinds of people in the world. I can deal with droughts, floods, isolation … the list is endless. Of all of these obstacles however, there is one part of the job I cannot deal with – public opinion. This is the one element that has the ability to bring agriculture to its knees. At a point in time when part of the world is starving, Australia’s youth seem to be doing their best to make it hard for the people trying to feed the world. If the following comes across as a rant,

x

p

o

r

t

it is only because I’m sick of trying my hardest and being made out as one of the baddies by the media.

8

9


do not happen. This organisation was not punished at all. Instead it’s the graziers who are out of pocket. I’ve heard some ill-informed and businessincompetent politicians say that we should just kill the cattle on Australian soil and export the meat frozen or chilled. If they had done any research they would know that Indonesia is a third world country and cannot afford refrigeration.

I will use the banning of the live export trade earlier in the year as an example. When Four Corners exposed the animal cruelty happening in some of the smaller abattoirs in Indonesia: Australians were shocked. Nobody was more shocked and distraught than the Australian graziers. I applaud Four Corners for bringing this cruelty to everyone’s attention even if it was a bit sensationalised. We cannot have that sort of thing happening in our industry. I believe we need some drastic changes to our industry but to ban it altogether is one of the stupidest ideas that I’ve ever heard. This is where protesters and demonstrators need to have a good think about what they are doing and make sure they are well-informed from all sides of the story before forming an opinion. The influence of the public through protesting and social media can make a huge difference in the outcome of political issues. I’m not having a go at demonstrators and protesters because in most cases I agree with their cause. I just think they are going about things the wrong way and aren’t getting the facts right before they end up potentially destroying entire industries. It’s almost as if people are choosing to protest simply because it’s fashionable, and for this reason end up fighting for something that won’t achieve anything good, and that they may not even wholly believe in. If we were to cease sending cattle to Indonesia altogether we would open the Indonesian cattle market up to countries such as India and South America, who couldn’t care less how their animals are treated. Australia has a great deal of control over how our animals are treated – we can continue sending our animals to Indonesian abattoirs that practice humane killing practices, and in the meantime educate and bring about change for those that that do not. If animal rights protestors achieve their live export ban, they will have the continuation of horrible and miserable deaths for cattle in Indonesia on their shoulders, and what’s more they 10

will be destroying the livelihood of many of their own countrymen. Protestors and demonstrators are good people and always have the best intentions. I would ask them in a year like this to perhaps work with farmers instead of against them. In a year like this when millions of people are dying of hunger in places like Somalia, they should direct their efforts to helping us feed the world instead of sending us broke. If farmers go broke nobody will be fed.

Out of all of the different career paths I could have chosen when leaving school I chose to work in the livestock industry for the simple reason that I love animals and the bush. I often go without food and sleep just to make sure my animals are happy and

the time to think about this. If vegetarians got their way and everyone in the world ate only vegetables, the energy required to produce this food would be detrimental to the environment and unsustainable. Tractors would run non-stop, burning millions of litres of diesel. Compare this to a livestock farm that often utilises horses for mustering stock. As I���ve already mentioned, I love animals but I also love the bush and nature, hence my chosen career. On farms, especially cattle farms, healthy ecosystems live in harmony with livestock. In fact on cattle properties the land is left in its most natural state and a huge range of species live happy and healthy lives.

Situation if the Australian live export trade remains open

Situation if the Australian live export trade is closed and Indian and South American trade is opened

Cattle will be happy and healthy from birth until death with state-of-the-art equipment throughout the whole supply chain

Foreign cattle will be mistreated from birth until death with no regulation on animal welfare

Australian jobs will be kept and the economy will remain strong

Disease such as foot and mouth will brought very close to Australian shores

Australia will have a huge influence on the way animals are treated on overseas soil

Thousands of Australian jobs will be lost

Poverty will be kept at bay with food prices remaining at a reasonable rate.

Australia’s north will be overgrazed and mismanaged, causing huge environmental damage

A big point I would like to add is the effect banning Australian live exports will have on our world’s rainforests. Australia has millions of hectares that are naturally perfect for cattle grazing without needing to destroy any natural flora or fauna. Indonesia has suggested that if Animals Australia get their way and ban Australian live exports they will become self-sufficient. This would involve destroying thousands of acres of Indonesian rainforest to make room for cattle grazing, and destroying the habitats of amazing animals such as orang-utans at the same time. This is also a problem if South America is to step in and fill Australia’s shoes. Brazil is already destroying drastic amounts of rainforest to create cattle grazing country, which will only increase if the Brazilians expand their market further by providing beef to Indonesia. Does Animals Australia really want this on their conscience?

healthy. Animals always come first on livestock properties. It is a tough job but that’s what it takes to keep animals happy and healthy. The media always talk about tough sportspeople ... I can guarantee that I could have any of these “tough” sportspeople in a physical wreck after a week of working with animals.

The government couldn’t have handled this situation any worse if they tried. Banning the trade was an absolute knee jerk reaction. They could have just banned the small percentage of abattoirs that had cruel practices and fixed the problem overnight. Instead they punished the innocent party, being the farmers, who are still feeling the effects months on and will continue to feel the effects for years to come. It is compulsory for graziers to pay a levy, which is a large amount of their profit, to an organisation that is meant to make sure things such as animal cruelty

Farmers and graziers are too busy to be representing themselves in the media and as a result we are terribly misrepresented. Some people who believe animals are treated poorly on farms choose to become vegetarians and or vegans. This is not a sustainable practice. If we all took this practice up, millions of hectares would have to be ploughed up to grow food and there would be no room for our natural species to roam around on. All of our natural grasses would become extinct. Vegans and vegetarians have good intentions but I don’t think they have taken

Thousands of hectares of rainforest will be destroyed in Brazil or Indonesia to make room for cattle grazing.

It’s hard to summarise all the points I’d like to discuss without writing a thesis, so I’ve tried to outline some facts in the above table. 11


do not happen. This organisation was not punished at all. Instead it’s the graziers who are out of pocket. I’ve heard some ill-informed and businessincompetent politicians say that we should just kill the cattle on Australian soil and export the meat frozen or chilled. If they had done any research they would know that Indonesia is a third world country and cannot afford refrigeration.

I will use the banning of the live export trade earlier in the year as an example. When Four Corners exposed the animal cruelty happening in some of the smaller abattoirs in Indonesia: Australians were shocked. Nobody was more shocked and distraught than the Australian graziers. I applaud Four Corners for bringing this cruelty to everyone’s attention even if it was a bit sensationalised. We cannot have that sort of thing happening in our industry. I believe we need some drastic changes to our industry but to ban it altogether is one of the stupidest ideas that I’ve ever heard. This is where protesters and demonstrators need to have a good think about what they are doing and make sure they are well-informed from all sides of the story before forming an opinion. The influence of the public through protesting and social media can make a huge difference in the outcome of political issues. I’m not having a go at demonstrators and protesters because in most cases I agree with their cause. I just think they are going about things the wrong way and aren’t getting the facts right before they end up potentially destroying entire industries. It’s almost as if people are choosing to protest simply because it’s fashionable, and for this reason end up fighting for something that won’t achieve anything good, and that they may not even wholly believe in. If we were to cease sending cattle to Indonesia altogether we would open the Indonesian cattle market up to countries such as India and South America, who couldn’t care less how their animals are treated. Australia has a great deal of control over how our animals are treated – we can continue sending our animals to Indonesian abattoirs that practice humane killing practices, and in the meantime educate and bring about change for those that that do not. If animal rights protestors achieve their live export ban, they will have the continuation of horrible and miserable deaths for cattle in Indonesia on their shoulders, and what’s more they 10

will be destroying the livelihood of many of their own countrymen. Protestors and demonstrators are good people and always have the best intentions. I would ask them in a year like this to perhaps work with farmers instead of against them. In a year like this when millions of people are dying of hunger in places like Somalia, they should direct their efforts to helping us feed the world instead of sending us broke. If farmers go broke nobody will be fed.

Out of all of the different career paths I could have chosen when leaving school I chose to work in the livestock industry for the simple reason that I love animals and the bush. I often go without food and sleep just to make sure my animals are happy and

the time to think about this. If vegetarians got their way and everyone in the world ate only vegetables, the energy required to produce this food would be detrimental to the environment and unsustainable. Tractors would run non-stop, burning millions of litres of diesel. Compare this to a livestock farm that often utilises horses for mustering stock. As I’ve already mentioned, I love animals but I also love the bush and nature, hence my chosen career. On farms, especially cattle farms, healthy ecosystems live in harmony with livestock. In fact on cattle properties the land is left in its most natural state and a huge range of species live happy and healthy lives.

Situation if the Australian live export trade remains open

Situation if the Australian live export trade is closed and Indian and South American trade is opened

Cattle will be happy and healthy from birth until death with state-of-the-art equipment throughout the whole supply chain

Foreign cattle will be mistreated from birth until death with no regulation on animal welfare

Australian jobs will be kept and the economy will remain strong

Disease such as foot and mouth will brought very close to Australian shores

Australia will have a huge influence on the way animals are treated on overseas soil

Thousands of Australian jobs will be lost

Poverty will be kept at bay with food prices remaining at a reasonable rate.

Australia’s north will be overgrazed and mismanaged, causing huge environmental damage

A big point I would like to add is the effect banning Australian live exports will have on our world’s rainforests. Australia has millions of hectares that are naturally perfect for cattle grazing without needing to destroy any natural flora or fauna. Indonesia has suggested that if Animals Australia get their way and ban Australian live exports they will become self-sufficient. This would involve destroying thousands of acres of Indonesian rainforest to make room for cattle grazing, and destroying the habitats of amazing animals such as orang-utans at the same time. This is also a problem if South America is to step in and fill Australia’s shoes. Brazil is already destroying drastic amounts of rainforest to create cattle grazing country, which will only increase if the Brazilians expand their market further by providing beef to Indonesia. Does Animals Australia really want this on their conscience?

healthy. Animals always come first on livestock properties. It is a tough job but that’s what it takes to keep animals happy and healthy. The media always talk about tough sportspeople ... I can guarantee that I could have any of these “tough” sportspeople in a physical wreck after a week of working with animals.

The government couldn’t have handled this situation any worse if they tried. Banning the trade was an absolute knee jerk reaction. They could have just banned the small percentage of abattoirs that had cruel practices and fixed the problem overnight. Instead they punished the innocent party, being the farmers, who are still feeling the effects months on and will continue to feel the effects for years to come. It is compulsory for graziers to pay a levy, which is a large amount of their profit, to an organisation that is meant to make sure things such as animal cruelty

Farmers and graziers are too busy to be representing themselves in the media and as a result we are terribly misrepresented. Some people who believe animals are treated poorly on farms choose to become vegetarians and or vegans. This is not a sustainable practice. If we all took this practice up, millions of hectares would have to be ploughed up to grow food and there would be no room for our natural species to roam around on. All of our natural grasses would become extinct. Vegans and vegetarians have good intentions but I don’t think they have taken

Thousands of hectares of rainforest will be destroyed in Brazil or Indonesia to make room for cattle grazing.

It’s hard to summarise all the points I’d like to discuss without writing a thesis, so I’ve tried to outline some facts in the above table. 11


There are many more points I would like to bring up about the environment and animal cruelty, but this is where my rant ends.

12

Young people have so much power in their views and opinions. All I ask is that before you click ‘like’ on a Facebook page, vote on a poll, or take up a cause against agriculture in Australia, please have a good think about what your actions will cause and try and learn both sides of the story before jumping to a conclusion. The Australian bush is doing its best for the Australian people, and it is a hard enough job without the Australian people doing its best to stop it.

Heard of the

Get your hands on the little black book of Brisbane’s media industry. Well have you? The Brisbane Media Map, or BMM as it is know by QUT’s Media and Communication students, is a subject offered to third year students in their final semester. The website, now in version 12 (V.12), has become an online hub for those seeking information on Brisbane’s rapidly growing media industry.

Words | Lucy Babbage

>

13


There are many more points I would like to bring up about the environment and animal cruelty, but this is where my rant ends.

12

Young people have so much power in their views and opinions. All I ask is that before you click ‘like’ on a Facebook page, vote on a poll, or take up a cause against agriculture in Australia, please have a good think about what your actions will cause and try and learn both sides of the story before jumping to a conclusion. The Australian bush is doing its best for the Australian people, and it is a hard enough job without the Australian people doing its best to stop it.

Heard of the

Get your hands on the little black book of Brisbane’s media industry. Well have you? The Brisbane Media Map, or BMM as it is know by QUT’s Media and Communication students, is a subject offered to third year students in their final semester. The website, now in version 12 (V.12), has become an online hub for those seeking information on Brisbane’s rapidly growing media industry.

Words | Lucy Babbage

>

13


This year, 55 students worked on V.12, helping to launch the BMM in a variety of ways – from redesign, to media listing updates, to a revolutionary new BMM mobile web app (the first of its kind to be developed at QUT). “Mobile web interfaces are one of the big developments in the media industry in the last few years, and this new feature highlights the fact the Brisbane Media Map really is at the cutting-edge,” said Dr Stephen Harrington, course coordinator of the BMM. The BMM mobile web app has been designed by QUT students in interface design alongside a technical support team. The app will look and act in a similar way to the website, allowing easy access to the media listings on the go. The BMM itself has undergone some significant changes in its latest iteration. Media and Communications team leader, Megan Tough, says that a new look and feel to the website was high on the priority list for this year’s project. “A lot of feedback was received from students suggesting the aesthetics and navigability of the site needed to be improved, so interface design have worked on creating a more visually appealing and user-friendly website.” “With each year, the Brisbane Media Map grows in size – there will be more companies listed as each student must add at least one new entry in addition to updating the current listings.” Running with the new tagline “The Little Black Book of Brisbane’s Media Industry”, this year’s students have given BMM V12 a huge advertising and marketing push. The campaign is geared towards graduating CI students, encouraging them to use the site as an employment resource. 14

Says Megan, “I wish I discovered the BMM earlier! It is basically a one-stop-shop for information on Brisbane’s media industry.” “It’s so useful for searching for businesses within different sectors of Brisbane’s media industry (which is very diverse) and it’s also a great way to get a feel for the industry by reading the profiles of media professionals. Particularly this year, with a focus on students, the profiles offer great advice to graduates about how to enter the media industry.” The BMM V12 marketing team has primarily utilised social networking to run its campaign. A wise choice made by CI students to reach out to their peers.

The page has been created to countdown to the launch where students who “like” the page will go into a draw to win 1 of 5 $100 Normanby vouchers once the new BMM website is launched on November 3rd.

“We wanted to tell a story of a media comms soonto-be graduate about to enter the workforce but who doesn’t have any contacts, and highlight how the BMM is a great place to start if looking to make connections in Brisbane’s Media Industry.”

The page is also used to host mini competitions in the lead up to the launch where people who “like” the page can participate by responding to a question on the BMM V.12 page wall. The media and communications team has also used this page to post updates on the progress of BMM V.12 and media-related news articles.

Megan says that working on the BMM project this year has been both challenging and rewarding. “I have really enjoyed that the BMM is a real world project that I can put the knowledge and skills I've gained throughout my degree into practice. It is essentially up to the students to control the outcome so you have the license to do with it what you want.”

It’s a valuable tool in marketing, particularly in reaching out to the Gen Y market. It really requires very little investment (money + time) on behalf of the marketer for a great return “It’s a valuable tool in marketing, particularly in reaching out to the Gen Y market. It really requires very little investment (money + time) on behalf of the marketer for a great return,” says Megan. “Our entire campaign has been centred around Facebook. Rather than simply creating a Brisbane Media Map Facebook page that is unlikely to attract followers and essentially become redundant after the end of the semester, we decided to create a campaign page purely for the purpose of promoting the launch of BMM V.12.”

In addition to Facebook, the BMM team used YouTube to showcase a funny promotional video – links to this video have then been shared via the BMM V.12 Facebook page as well as through individual shares on other people’s Facebook walls.

“I’ve loved being able to drive my own marketing campaign with the support of a great team and the whole BMM cohort. I think this project has really tested and improved my leadership and organisational skills.”

“The idea behind the promotional video was to create something that is entertaining and relevant to our target audience. The video is basically a spoof of Run DMC vs Jason Nevins “It’s like that” song but with lyrics relevant to the Brisbane Media Map (and an original backing to avoid copyright issues).”

“I have worked in a professional role for a few years but it has always been under the supervision/ direction of someone more senior. In this project, I've really been able to drive a project and lead a team throughout the entire semester on a project that is not dissimilar to managing a team in the real world.”

15


This year, 55 students worked on V.12, helping to launch the BMM in a variety of ways – from redesign, to media listing updates, to a revolutionary new BMM mobile web app (the first of its kind to be developed at QUT). “Mobile web interfaces are one of the big developments in the media industry in the last few years, and this new feature highlights the fact the Brisbane Media Map really is at the cutting-edge,” said Dr Stephen Harrington, course coordinator of the BMM. The BMM mobile web app has been designed by QUT students in interface design alongside a technical support team. The app will look and act in a similar way to the website, allowing easy access to the media listings on the go. The BMM itself has undergone some significant changes in its latest iteration. Media and Communications team leader, Megan Tough, says that a new look and feel to the website was high on the priority list for this year’s project. “A lot of feedback was received from students suggesting the aesthetics and navigability of the site needed to be improved, so interface design have worked on creating a more visually appealing and user-friendly website.” “With each year, the Brisbane Media Map grows in size – there will be more companies listed as each student must add at least one new entry in addition to updating the current listings.” Running with the new tagline “The Little Black Book of Brisbane’s Media Industry”, this year’s students have given BMM V12 a huge advertising and marketing push. The campaign is geared towards graduating CI students, encouraging them to use the site as an employment resource. 14

Says Megan, “I wish I discovered the BMM earlier! It is basically a one-stop-shop for information on Brisbane’s media industry.” “It’s so useful for searching for businesses within different sectors of Brisbane’s media industry (which is very diverse) and it’s also a great way to get a feel for the industry by reading the profiles of media professionals. Particularly this year, with a focus on students, the profiles offer great advice to graduates about how to enter the media industry.” The BMM V12 marketing team has primarily utilised social networking to run its campaign. A wise choice made by CI students to reach out to their peers.

The page has been created to countdown to the launch where students who “like” the page will go into a draw to win 1 of 5 $100 Normanby vouchers once the new BMM website is launched on November 3rd.

“We wanted to tell a story of a media comms soonto-be graduate about to enter the workforce but who doesn’t have any contacts, and highlight how the BMM is a great place to start if looking to make connections in Brisbane’s Media Industry.”

The page is also used to host mini competitions in the lead up to the launch where people who “like” the page can participate by responding to a question on the BMM V.12 page wall. The media and communications team has also used this page to post updates on the progress of BMM V.12 and media-related news articles.

Megan says that working on the BMM project this year has been both challenging and rewarding. “I have really enjoyed that the BMM is a real world project that I can put the knowledge and skills I've gained throughout my degree into practice. It is essentially up to the students to control the outcome so you have the license to do with it what you want.”

It’s a valuable tool in marketing, particularly in reaching out to the Gen Y market. It really requires very little investment (money + time) on behalf of the marketer for a great return “It’s a valuable tool in marketing, particularly in reaching out to the Gen Y market. It really requires very little investment (money + time) on behalf of the marketer for a great return,” says Megan. “Our entire campaign has been centred around Facebook. Rather than simply creating a Brisbane Media Map Facebook page that is unlikely to attract followers and essentially become redundant after the end of the semester, we decided to create a campaign page purely for the purpose of promoting the launch of BMM V.12.”

In addition to Facebook, the BMM team used YouTube to showcase a funny promotional video – links to this video have then been shared via the BMM V.12 Facebook page as well as through individual shares on other people’s Facebook walls.

“I’ve loved being able to drive my own marketing campaign with the support of a great team and the whole BMM cohort. I think this project has really tested and improved my leadership and organisational skills.”

“The idea behind the promotional video was to create something that is entertaining and relevant to our target audience. The video is basically a spoof of Run DMC vs Jason Nevins “It’s like that” song but with lyrics relevant to the Brisbane Media Map (and an original backing to avoid copyright issues).”

“I have worked in a professional role for a few years but it has always been under the supervision/ direction of someone more senior. In this project, I've really been able to drive a project and lead a team throughout the entire semester on a project that is not dissimilar to managing a team in the real world.”

15


Words | Tim McGuire

FOUR STUDENTS TALK ABOUT STUDYING ABROAD

Check out this little black book at

www.brisbanemediamap.com.au Or head to

www.facebook.com/BMMv12 to check out their campaign (and awesome competitions). 16

17


Words | Tim McGuire

FOUR STUDENTS TALK ABOUT STUDYING ABROAD

Check out this little black book at

www.brisbanemediamap.com.au Or head to

www.facebook.com/BMMv12 to check out their campaign (and awesome competitions). 16

17


United States of America

Netherlands

Ella Jeffery Degree Bachelor of Fine Arts

James Diamond Degree Bachelor of Business / Bachelor of Creative Industries

Which university did you do your exchange at? San Diego State University in southern California How long did you go for? Six months Why America? I’ve wanted to move to America since I was fourteen and heard Bruce Springsteen’s Born in the USA album for the first time. What did you forget to pack? A pillow and sheets. I turned up in my dorm room and slept on a mattress until I worked out where I could find the nearest Wal-Mart. What did America make of your accent? Americans seem to have a pretty hard time telling the difference between an Australian and an English accent, so most of the time the response was something like “Sweet accent, dude. Are you from, like, England or something?” What other travelling did you do while you were there? Heaps – because none of us had jobs we were able to travel almost every weekend. We visited Seattle, LA, Newport

18

Beach, San Francisco, Big Bear Lake and also spent a week in Vancouver, Canada. San Diego’s about half an hour from Tijuana, so it was an easy drive down to Mexico as well. After my semester ended I stayed in the US and backpacked for a month, and visited New York, Chicago, Boston, Washington DC, New Orleans, Niagara Falls and Orlando. What was the weirdest thing you ate? A beef burrito from street vendor on the Mexican border. I’m pretty sure the ‘beef’ was dog meat. What tips would you give a student planning their exchange? Think about the kind of place you’d want to live in, rather than what you’re going to study. A lot of universities offer similar classes, but living in California, for example, will be a completely different experience to living in New York. One means yearround sunshine and surfing, and the other means a white Christmas and skyscrapers.

Which university did you do your exchange at? Maastricht University. It’s in the south of The Netherlands, bordering Germany and Belgium. Great location for travelling! How long did you go for? My exchange is for one semester which has worked out to be around 4 months. From September to late December Why the Netherlands? To be honest, it wasn't my first choice. I originally picked England however due to availability and course substitution issues I ended up in The Netherlands. It was a blessing in disguise, because Holland is amazing! What did you forget to pack? Vegemite! I struggled for the first few weeks without my usual breakfast but luckily some Australians over here had some that I have was able to borrow! Who have you met? Who haven't I met? No, but in all honesty I met so many wonderful people from all over the world. The

guesthouse where I’m staying is filled with exchange students so it’s impossible not make friends. What do you miss most about Australia? The amazing Queensland weather and AFL Grand Final day. But I was so busy and enjoying myself that much I didn't have the time to be home sick. Skype is also a cure for homesickness! What’s it like to study in a foreign country? It’s been the most amazing experience of my life. Sure it takes some adapting to get used to the way of life in the Netherlands but once you become accustomed to the little things, it begins to feel like your new home. Particularly in the small uni town of Maastricht. The uni experience here is totally different from my experience at QUT - particularly living with students. What other travelling did you do while you were there? Maastricht tends to be a ghost town on weekends as everyone in travelling. I’ve been to London, Paris, Munich, Berlin and Brussels so far, with Barcelona, Glasgow and Budapest still to come. 19


United States of America

Netherlands

Ella Jeffery Degree Bachelor of Fine Arts

James Diamond Degree Bachelor of Business / Bachelor of Creative Industries

Which university did you do your exchange at? San Diego State University in southern California How long did you go for? Six months Why America? I’ve wanted to move to America since I was fourteen and heard Bruce Springsteen’s Born in the USA album for the first time. What did you forget to pack? A pillow and sheets. I turned up in my dorm room and slept on a mattress until I worked out where I could find the nearest Wal-Mart. What did America make of your accent? Americans seem to have a pretty hard time telling the difference between an Australian and an English accent, so most of the time the response was something like “Sweet accent, dude. Are you from, like, England or something?” What other travelling did you do while you were there? Heaps – because none of us had jobs we were able to travel almost every weekend. We visited Seattle, LA, Newport

18

Beach, San Francisco, Big Bear Lake and also spent a week in Vancouver, Canada. San Diego’s about half an hour from Tijuana, so it was an easy drive down to Mexico as well. After my semester ended I stayed in the US and backpacked for a month, and visited New York, Chicago, Boston, Washington DC, New Orleans, Niagara Falls and Orlando. What was the weirdest thing you ate? A beef burrito from street vendor on the Mexican border. I’m pretty sure the ‘beef’ was dog meat. What tips would you give a student planning their exchange? Think about the kind of place you’d want to live in, rather than what you’re going to study. A lot of universities offer similar classes, but living in California, for example, will be a completely different experience to living in New York. One means yearround sunshine and surfing, and the other means a white Christmas and skyscrapers.

Which university did you do your exchange at? Maastricht University. It’s in the south of The Netherlands, bordering Germany and Belgium. Great location for travelling! How long did you go for? My exchange is for one semester which has worked out to be around 4 months. From September to late December Why the Netherlands? To be honest, it wasn't my first choice. I originally picked England however due to availability and course substitution issues I ended up in The Netherlands. It was a blessing in disguise, because Holland is amazing! What did you forget to pack? Vegemite! I struggled for the first few weeks without my usual breakfast but luckily some Australians over here had some that I have was able to borrow! Who have you met? Who haven't I met? No, but in all honesty I met so many wonderful people from all over the world. The

guesthouse where I’m staying is filled with exchange students so it’s impossible not make friends. What do you miss most about Australia? The amazing Queensland weather and AFL Grand Final day. But I was so busy and enjoying myself that much I didn't have the time to be home sick. Skype is also a cure for homesickness! What’s it like to study in a foreign country? It’s been the most amazing experience of my life. Sure it takes some adapting to get used to the way of life in the Netherlands but once you become accustomed to the little things, it begins to feel like your new home. Particularly in the small uni town of Maastricht. The uni experience here is totally different from my experience at QUT - particularly living with students. What other travelling did you do while you were there? Maastricht tends to be a ghost town on weekends as everyone in travelling. I’ve been to London, Paris, Munich, Berlin and Brussels so far, with Barcelona, Glasgow and Budapest still to come. 19


GERMANY

AUSTRALIA

Michael Bergin Degree Bachelor of Engineering

Diane Lagarenne Degree Bachelor of Business

Which university did you do your exchange at? Technical University of Munich. How long did you go for? Six months (October – March) Why Germany? Since German engineering is recognised around the world, I felt it would best compliment my engineering degree. I also wanted to learn a language and German is widely spoken in Europe. I wanted a challenge/culture shock, I didn't just want to be put into an English speaking environment. What did you forget to pack? Only one thing - my apple mouse What’s surprised you about your exchange? It surprises me how much time I have without working, family and TV around. Also, life seems less automated than it was at home. Who have you met? For the first 2 months travelling, at least 100 different people. I spent a night Couchsurfing at a Mexican guys Studio Apartment and he had 13 other people staying that night. Twelve different nationalities. That was an interesting experience. Apart from that, 20

I made some really good friendships with about 10 people who would happily let me stay with them (Germans, an Italian, a Frenchman, a Suisse couple and a Spaniard). What’s it like studying in a foreign country? Living on Campus/Student Hall is what I envisaged university to be as a kid/at school. I was a little disappointed when university in Brisbane was similar to high school (minus the sport). Where else have you traveled while on exchange? London, Paris, Lisbon, Madrid, Morocco (Tangier), Valencia, Barcelona, Montpellier, Marseille, Nice, Cannes, Monaco, Florence, Rome, Cinque Terre, Milan, Verona and Zurich What festivals have you attended? La Tomatina (tomato festival), Milan Fashion Week, Zurich Film Festival and Oktoberfest How did you afford your exchange? Working double jobs during the summer What’s been the best experience? Being taken on surprise helicopter flight through the Swiss Alps, landing and getting out on a glacier at 9000ft in the air and then flying to a restaurant for lunch.

Which university did you do your exchange at? The Queensland University of Technology. Where are you from? I'm from Cahors, a small town in the south of France, near Toulouse. Why did you choose QUT? I chose a university in which I could attend business courses but also learn more about culture and music because I’m passionate about music and wanted to start specializing myself in that field. That's why I really enjoyed Sex Drugs and RocknRoll and Music & Sound Production. I wasn't used to studying in a university since I'm in a business school in Toulouse and found it a bit hard to adapt but in the end I passed all my units! What’s it like studying in a foreign country? Great! I loved going to the Powerhouse every weekend to see live bands playing for free, or catching Passenger performing at Queen St Mall! What did you miss about France? I missed mostly (good) cheese, French sweets and cakes, the Paris atmosphere, my friends and my family. Who

did you meet? I met a lot of great people during my exchange. My nine housemates (from Germany, Peru, Singapore, Japan, Malaysia and Norway), students at Global Café and at house parties . The QUT exchange staff was also extremely kind and helpful! What other travelling did you do while you were here? I travelled around in Australia with a campervan. My favourite spots were the Whitsundays and its amazing snorkelling spots, Coolangatta beach during sunset, Kakadu National Park.

21


GERMANY

AUSTRALIA

Michael Bergin Degree Bachelor of Engineering

Diane Lagarenne Degree Bachelor of Business

Which university did you do your exchange at? Technical University of Munich. How long did you go for? Six months (October – March) Why Germany? Since German engineering is recognised around the world, I felt it would best compliment my engineering degree. I also wanted to learn a language and German is widely spoken in Europe. I wanted a challenge/culture shock, I didn't just want to be put into an English speaking environment. What did you forget to pack? Only one thing - my apple mouse What’s surprised you about your exchange? It surprises me how much time I have without working, family and TV around. Also, life seems less automated than it was at home. Who have you met? For the first 2 months travelling, at least 100 different people. I spent a night Couchsurfing at a Mexican guys Studio Apartment and he had 13 other people staying that night. Twelve different nationalities. That was an interesting experience. Apart from that, 20

I made some really good friendships with about 10 people who would happily let me stay with them (Germans, an Italian, a Frenchman, a Suisse couple and a Spaniard). What’s it like studying in a foreign country? Living on Campus/Student Hall is what I envisaged university to be as a kid/at school. I was a little disappointed when university in Brisbane was similar to high school (minus the sport). Where else have you traveled while on exchange? London, Paris, Lisbon, Madrid, Morocco (Tangier), Valencia, Barcelona, Montpellier, Marseille, Nice, Cannes, Monaco, Florence, Rome, Cinque Terre, Milan, Verona and Zurich What festivals have you attended? La Tomatina (tomato festival), Milan Fashion Week, Zurich Film Festival and Oktoberfest How did you afford your exchange? Working double jobs during the summer What’s been the best experience? Being taken on surprise helicopter flight through the Swiss Alps, landing and getting out on a glacier at 9000ft in the air and then flying to a restaurant for lunch.

Which university did you do your exchange at? The Queensland University of Technology. Where are you from? I'm from Cahors, a small town in the south of France, near Toulouse. Why did you choose QUT? I chose a university in which I could attend business courses but also learn more about culture and music because I’m passionate about music and wanted to start specializing myself in that field. That's why I really enjoyed Sex Drugs and RocknRoll and Music & Sound Production. I wasn't used to studying in a university since I'm in a business school in Toulouse and found it a bit hard to adapt but in the end I passed all my units! What’s it like studying in a foreign country? Great! I loved going to the Powerhouse every weekend to see live bands playing for free, or catching Passenger performing at Queen St Mall! What did you miss about France? I missed mostly (good) cheese, French sweets and cakes, the Paris atmosphere, my friends and my family. Who

did you meet? I met a lot of great people during my exchange. My nine housemates (from Germany, Peru, Singapore, Japan, Malaysia and Norway), students at Global Café and at house parties . The QUT exchange staff was also extremely kind and helpful! What other travelling did you do while you were here? I travelled around in Australia with a campervan. My favourite spots were the Whitsundays and its amazing snorkelling spots, Coolangatta beach during sunset, Kakadu National Park.

21


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E - Tell me about some of the places you have lived and how they have influenced your life so far? M - I don’t know if each place has made an individual impact on me, but I think each place I’ve lived has added something different to my life. I’ve gathered ideas, experiences, memories and friends from every place I’ve lived. Overall, because I’ve lived in different towns, studied overseas, I think I’ve learnt to quickly make friends, and to adjust to new places.

Words | Elizabeth Tucker

I really loved having the chance to push myself, academically and creatively. It’s a big step to go from undergraduate to honours, because you have to learn to research, write and manage time for nearly a year. It was a lot of fun, and while I was doing my thesis I also co-wrote a short play. My honours year was a big turning point for me, because I’d never focused on a large project before. In retrospect, I think writing a thesis and a play that year gave me a really good foundation for the work that I have done since.

who has travelled the country and the globe building a foundation of knowledge, experiences, and friendships. With childhood experiences in Brisbane, Charleville, and Toowoomba; tertiary studies in France and Western Australia (and of course QUT!); the start of her career in Mackay and Townsville; and currently, some career development time in New York City, Miriam has a lifetime of experiences– and she’s only just beginning. E - When you were young, what did you want to be when you grew up? M - I wanted to be a writer/actor/performer or journalist. I always knew I wanted a job where I could be entertaining and informing people. I love working in media because every day is about creating something for an audience. E - You started your studies at QUT studying Drama and French, and completed your Honours in 2007. Tell me about some of your successes during this time. M - After I finished my undergraduate degree in 2006, I wasn’t ready to leave university. I wanted to learn to research, and I wanted to do some creative writing. I did a “creative practice lead thesis” about female comedians called “Can girls be funny?” and performed a short comedy show as part of my research. It was a pretty challenging year, but 22

E - After your study at QUT, you then went on to study broadcasting at WAAPA in Perth. What influenced the change from drama to broadcasting? M - I love watching and listening to radio and television, and I wanted a job where I could balance creativity and research. I chose to study at WAAPA because I needed to learn some practical skills, and the course gave me very rigorous training. For me, drama and broadcasting go very well together. Speaking on the radio has an element of performance, and journalism has a large element of story telling. E - You have been working as a rural reporter for ABC radio for the past couple of years, I imagine you have met some unique characters in that role, any that are particularly memorable/notable? M - Working for ABC Rural is very fun and I meet fantastic people all the time. I think my favourite


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E - Tell me about some of the places you have lived and how they have influenced your life so far? M - I don’t know if each place has made an individual impact on me, but I think each place I’ve lived has added something different to my life. I’ve gathered ideas, experiences, memories and friends from every place I’ve lived. Overall, because I’ve lived in different towns, studied overseas, I think I’ve learnt to quickly make friends, and to adjust to new places.

Words | Elizabeth Tucker

I really loved having the chance to push myself, academically and creatively. It’s a big step to go from undergraduate to honours, because you have to learn to research, write and manage time for nearly a year. It was a lot of fun, and while I was doing my thesis I also co-wrote a short play. My honours year was a big turning point for me, because I’d never focused on a large project before. In retrospect, I think writing a thesis and a play that year gave me a really good foundation for the work that I have done since.

who has travelled the country and the globe building a foundation of knowledge, experiences, and friendships. With childhood experiences in Brisbane, Charleville, and Toowoomba; tertiary studies in France and Western Australia (and of course QUT!); the start of her career in Mackay and Townsville; and currently, some career development time in New York City, Miriam has a lifetime of experiences– and she’s only just beginning. E - When you were young, what did you want to be when you grew up? M - I wanted to be a writer/actor/performer or journalist. I always knew I wanted a job where I could be entertaining and informing people. I love working in media because every day is about creating something for an audience. E - You started your studies at QUT studying Drama and French, and completed your Honours in 2007. Tell me about some of your successes during this time. M - After I finished my undergraduate degree in 2006, I wasn’t ready to leave university. I wanted to learn to research, and I wanted to do some creative writing. I did a “creative practice lead thesis” about female comedians called “Can girls be funny?” and performed a short comedy show as part of my research. It was a pretty challenging year, but 22

E - After your study at QUT, you then went on to study broadcasting at WAAPA in Perth. What influenced the change from drama to broadcasting? M - I love watching and listening to radio and television, and I wanted a job where I could balance creativity and research. I chose to study at WAAPA because I needed to learn some practical skills, and the course gave me very rigorous training. For me, drama and broadcasting go very well together. Speaking on the radio has an element of performance, and journalism has a large element of story telling. E - You have been working as a rural reporter for ABC radio for the past couple of years, I imagine you have met some unique characters in that role, any that are particularly memorable/notable? M - Working for ABC Rural is very fun and I meet fantastic people all the time. I think my favourite


E - The weather up there is always fairly tumultuous, did you have any scary experiences with cyclones? character so far has been a farmer I met who has a pet crocodile in a pen in his backyard. But I meet wonderful and interesting people all the time, who have great stories to tell. E - I also believe that you hosted the “whistling game” as part of one of your shows, it sounded like a real success!?... M - It certainly was a left of field quiz, but I got really attached to it. At first it was just ABC theme tunes that I would whistle, and listeners would ring in and guess the song. But then I branched into pop music. It could be pretty tricky. Whistling Queen’s “Bicycle Song” was by far the worst. It has high notes that anyone would struggle with. I got quite into the whistling, and, I’m embarrassed to admit, pretty protective about my role in the quiz. One day I was away and someone had to step in and whistle the songs, and I was ridiculously worried I’d be replaced. I wasn’t. E - How have you enjoyed life in North Queensland compared with larger cities like Brisbane? Did you feel a stronger sense of community? M - I’ve always been a city person, and I’d never thought of living in a regional area. It was quite a change for me to move away from the capital cities. I didn’t think it would be so fun. Living in a rural area means you experience a different way of life. Most of all, I’ve met lots of different people, and made some great friends. I don’t know if there is a greater sense of community in country towns, but in some ways, it can be easier to be a part of the community in the regions. If you don’t know anyone you’ll make an effort to take advantage of what the town has to offer. I’ve been involved in local theatre and musicals. I’ve tried to get to know the place, find out what happens, and really experience the town by getting out and meeting people. I’d like to say I was involved in local sporting teams, but that would be a lie.

M - In North Queensland, people are pretty used to cyclones, but earlier in the year Cyclone Yasi really scared everyone. I wasn’t there for the cyclone itself, I was sent back to Brisbane the day before to work from the main office. I spent a lot time working doing stories in the damaged areas in the months afterwards. Straight after the cyclone, I had to sleep in an evacuation centre for a few nights when I was reporting from one the small towns. It’s hard to believe the cyclone was nine months ago, and there would be people in North Queensland who are still recovering.

E - What are your plans when you return to Australia, if you return? M - I’m heading back to work at the ABC in November. I love being in New York, and studying at the film academy, but I’m sure I’ll be happy to be home and working again. E - In my eyes, you have had a very exciting life with many successes and life is only just beginning for you. What advice can you give to current students, trying to chase a dream?

E - What is the best advice you have received? M - Life is not just about doing, it’s about being. E - Where might Miriam Hall be in 20 years time? M - vHopefully working at creating something that is worthwhile and that I find satisfying, whatever that may be in 2031. Or maybe I’ll be lying on a couch, dashing out watercolour paintings and taking turns about the room. Either way, I hope I’ll be doing something productive, and enjoyable.

E - Would you say that you are a lucky person? M - I’ve never won a raffle, found money on the street, or met a celebrity, but yes, I’m pretty lucky. I have a job that I like and I’m healthy. I think that’s fairly fortunate. E - What are you currently doing in New York? M-Right now I’m writing this in my shoebox of an apartment. My view is of a brick wall and a couple of pigeons, and I live behind a laundry, which adds to the atmosphere. But it’s great. I’m doing an eight week digital journalism course at the New York Film Academy. I’m learning about television, and really enjoying myself. I’m spending plenty of time with a video camera filming on the streets of New York. I’m also spending an equal amount of time in Chelsea rooftop bars, strolling famous art galleries, and having picnics in Central Park. E - If a genie popped out of a New York hot dog stand, and told you it would grant you 3 wishes, what would you wish for? M - World peace, obviously. A never ending packet of Tim Tams, obviously. And finally for a lifetime free of looking for my phone, keys or wallet. Misplacing those small but essential items drives me crazy. But apart from those minor issues, I’m pretty satisfied.

I’m heading back to work at the ABC in November. I love being in New York, and studying at the film academy, but I’m sure I’ll be happy to be home and working again. M - I am very inexperienced and still starting out, but I’ve been lucky enough to have a fantastic job, that gives me opportunities, allows me to be creative and to be part of the fun world of radio. I always knew what I wanted to study at QUT, but occasionally when I was a student, I felt like it wasn’t all falling into place. In fact, sometimes I still think that. But challenges and set backs are all part of the journey. My advice is pretty standard: pick what you like to do, work hard, and to have a plan. Get back on the wagon after set backs and disappointments. Most of all try and enjoy it, and have fun. Remember, it’s not rocket science. Unless you are studying astrophysics, in which case, it is. 25


E - The weather up there is always fairly tumultuous, did you have any scary experiences with cyclones? character so far has been a farmer I met who has a pet crocodile in a pen in his backyard. But I meet wonderful and interesting people all the time, who have great stories to tell. E - I also believe that you hosted the “whistling game” as part of one of your shows, it sounded like a real success!?... M - It certainly was a left of field quiz, but I got really attached to it. At first it was just ABC theme tunes that I would whistle, and listeners would ring in and guess the song. But then I branched into pop music. It could be pretty tricky. Whistling Queen’s “Bicycle Song” was by far the worst. It has high notes that anyone would struggle with. I got quite into the whistling, and, I’m embarrassed to admit, pretty protective about my role in the quiz. One day I was away and someone had to step in and whistle the songs, and I was ridiculously worried I’d be replaced. I wasn’t. E - How have you enjoyed life in North Queensland compared with larger cities like Brisbane? Did you feel a stronger sense of community? M - I’ve always been a city person, and I’d never thought of living in a regional area. It was quite a change for me to move away from the capital cities. I didn’t think it would be so fun. Living in a rural area means you experience a different way of life. Most of all, I’ve met lots of different people, and made some great friends. I don’t know if there is a greater sense of community in country towns, but in some ways, it can be easier to be a part of the community in the regions. If you don’t know anyone you’ll make an effort to take advantage of what the town has to offer. I’ve been involved in local theatre and musicals. I’ve tried to get to know the place, find out what happens, and really experience the town by getting out and meeting people. I’d like to say I was involved in local sporting teams, but that would be a lie.

M - In North Queensland, people are pretty used to cyclones, but earlier in the year Cyclone Yasi really scared everyone. I wasn’t there for the cyclone itself, I was sent back to Brisbane the day before to work from the main office. I spent a lot time working doing stories in the damaged areas in the months afterwards. Straight after the cyclone, I had to sleep in an evacuation centre for a few nights when I was reporting from one the small towns. It’s hard to believe the cyclone was nine months ago, and there would be people in North Queensland who are still recovering.

E - What are your plans when you return to Australia, if you return? M - I’m heading back to work at the ABC in November. I love being in New York, and studying at the film academy, but I’m sure I’ll be happy to be home and working again. E - In my eyes, you have had a very exciting life with many successes and life is only just beginning for you. What advice can you give to current students, trying to chase a dream?

E - What is the best advice you have received? M - Life is not just about doing, it’s about being. E - Where might Miriam Hall be in 20 years time? M - vHopefully working at creating something that is worthwhile and that I find satisfying, whatever that may be in 2031. Or maybe I’ll be lying on a couch, dashing out watercolour paintings and taking turns about the room. Either way, I hope I’ll be doing something productive, and enjoyable.

E - Would you say that you are a lucky person? M - I’ve never won a raffle, found money on the street, or met a celebrity, but yes, I’m pretty lucky. I have a job that I like and I’m healthy. I think that’s fairly fortunate. E - What are you currently doing in New York? M-Right now I’m writing this in my shoebox of an apartment. My view is of a brick wall and a couple of pigeons, and I live behind a laundry, which adds to the atmosphere. But it’s great. I’m doing an eight week digital journalism course at the New York Film Academy. I’m learning about television, and really enjoying myself. I’m spending plenty of time with a video camera filming on the streets of New York. I’m also spending an equal amount of time in Chelsea rooftop bars, strolling famous art galleries, and having picnics in Central Park. E - If a genie popped out of a New York hot dog stand, and told you it would grant you 3 wishes, what would you wish for? M - World peace, obviously. A never ending packet of Tim Tams, obviously. And finally for a lifetime free of looking for my phone, keys or wallet. Misplacing those small but essential items drives me crazy. But apart from those minor issues, I’m pretty satisfied.

I’m heading back to work at the ABC in November. I love being in New York, and studying at the film academy, but I’m sure I’ll be happy to be home and working again. M - I am very inexperienced and still starting out, but I’ve been lucky enough to have a fantastic job, that gives me opportunities, allows me to be creative and to be part of the fun world of radio. I always knew what I wanted to study at QUT, but occasionally when I was a student, I felt like it wasn’t all falling into place. In fact, sometimes I still think that. But challenges and set backs are all part of the journey. My advice is pretty standard: pick what you like to do, work hard, and to have a plan. Get back on the wagon after set backs and disappointments. Most of all try and enjoy it, and have fun. Remember, it’s not rocket science. Unless you are studying astrophysics, in which case, it is. 25


26

s

v

e

r

f

f

e

27

Listen to: Bang Bang, Live Good, Get Love, Just Another Day

the

Prick

Soul

Best cover: Seven Nation Army (White Stripes)

Listen to: Petite Soeur

Benjamin Duterde aka Ben the Soul Uncle has indeed an amazing soulful voice. Its songs which include a brass section are sunny and funny. In 2009, Ben recorded an EP called Soul Wash featuring covers of songs by Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pink Martini, Gnarls Barckley... His first self-titled album was released last year.

Ben L'oncle (FR/EN) – soul/funk

Listen to: Down The Drain, This is a love song

Hard Times by Empires (US) – dark rock

Strings by Young The Giant (US) – sensitive pop/rock

Relax My Beloved by Alex Clare (UK) – soulful vocals with creeping electronic sounds

l OTHERS:

Beaters This hilarious yet talented band composed of two French and an American singer knows how to make you smile with their music full of surprises. Their first album is called Wallace.

Naive New (EN) – rap/electro/rock

Listen to: Minouche, Sous Ton Aile, A tout moment la Rue, Rien n'est pour de vrai, Tandoori

They have been playing for quite a long time now, but Romain Humeau's rasping vocals are still effective. I like how he plays with words and sees them more like sounds. Their lyrics are quite dark and committed.

E i (FR) - rock

Best cover: Helplessly Hoping (Crosby, Still, Nash, Young), which is fantastic live. You can find videos on Youtube.

Listen to: Get Around Town, Leave Me Alone, Luke Mike and John, You Drove Me Home

A cello and two guitars, sometimes keys. And beautiful vocal harmonies.

R e v o l (EN) – "chamber pop"

Listen to: Let's Burn Again, Dance On, My Favourite Song, You Really Got Style, Jealousy

and

Simple lyrics, but catchy feminine vocals. This Parisian duo released its first album Invincible Friends in 2010.

h Lilly Wood (EN) - pop

Four brothers and cousins, four voices (did you just say Beatles?), four complementary personalities which all include never ending good mood and lots of energy. You can really feel this unity in their songs with a funny and varied bass line. Their live performances are totally crazy: all of them are extremely talented musicians, who know how to improvise and play with the audience to make each show a unique experience. They released their first album Everybody's God in 2010,

G u (EN) – pop/rock

BANDS

TO

WORDS | Diane Lagarenne

FRENCH

KNOW


26

s

v

e

r

f

f

e

27

Listen to: Bang Bang, Live Good, Get Love, Just Another Day

the

Prick

Soul

Best cover: Seven Nation Army (White Stripes)

Listen to: Petite Soeur

Benjamin Duterde aka Ben the Soul Uncle has indeed an amazing soulful voice. Its songs which include a brass section are sunny and funny. In 2009, Ben recorded an EP called Soul Wash featuring covers of songs by Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pink Martini, Gnarls Barckley... His first self-titled album was released last year.

Ben L'oncle (FR/EN) – soul/funk

Listen to: Down The Drain, This is a love song

Hard Times by Empires (US) – dark rock

Strings by Young The Giant (US) – sensitive pop/rock

Relax My Beloved by Alex Clare (UK) – soulful vocals with creeping electronic sounds

l OTHERS:

Beaters This hilarious yet talented band composed of two French and an American singer knows how to make you smile with their music full of surprises. Their first album is called Wallace.

Naive New (EN) – rap/electro/rock

Listen to: Minouche, Sous Ton Aile, A tout moment la Rue, Rien n'est pour de vrai, Tandoori

They have been playing for quite a long time now, but Romain Humeau's rasping vocals are still effective. I like how he plays with words and sees them more like sounds. Their lyrics are quite dark and committed.

E i (FR) - rock

Best cover: Helplessly Hoping (Crosby, Still, Nash, Young), which is fantastic live. You can find videos on Youtube.

Listen to: Get Around Town, Leave Me Alone, Luke Mike and John, You Drove Me Home

A cello and two guitars, sometimes keys. And beautiful vocal harmonies.

R e v o l (EN) – "chamber pop"

Listen to: Let's Burn Again, Dance On, My Favourite Song, You Really Got Style, Jealousy

and

Simple lyrics, but catchy feminine vocals. This Parisian duo released its first album Invincible Friends in 2010.

h Lilly Wood (EN) - pop

Four brothers and cousins, four voices (did you just say Beatles?), four complementary personalities which all include never ending good mood and lots of energy. You can really feel this unity in their songs with a funny and varied bass line. Their live performances are totally crazy: all of them are extremely talented musicians, who know how to improvise and play with the audience to make each show a unique experience. They released their first album Everybody's God in 2010,

G u (EN) – pop/rock

BANDS

TO

WORDS | Diane Lagarenne

FRENCH

KNOW


www.printanddigital.tumblr.com/

Print/Digital was created as a student run initiative, to provide a resource for staff and students to foster a new sense of culture and collaboration within the QUT design community. By promoting dialogue and communication across the various disciplines of design, inclusive of the BFA fashion course, it is hoped that Print/ Digital can support a fresh and re-energised design culture to emerge from the amalgamation between Creative Industries and the School of Design when they merge in early 2012.

A bulletin board of sorts, the blog will feature details of upcoming student exhibitions, notice of design events happening around town and abroad and additional content relative to the practice and study of design in all its forms.

Launching the initiative prior to the merger was a calculated exercise, attempting to establish an identity for Print/Digital, raising the profile of the blog and getting it out there before the end of year break.

We need to feed the blog to keep it alive, so we are super keen to receive design related content.

image: eggofcolumbus.tumblr.com 28

Although submissions will be moderated, we really want the blog to be for and by the students, so the idea is that contributions will reflect what they want to see on Print/Digital, as it is ultimately their resource.

If you have something you would like to share with the QUT design community please send it to us at printanddigitalblog@gmail.com or contribute through the submit portal on the Print/Digital page.

Words | Mark Molenaar


www.printanddigital.tumblr.com/

Print/Digital was created as a student run initiative, to provide a resource for staff and students to foster a new sense of culture and collaboration within the QUT design community. By promoting dialogue and communication across the various disciplines of design, inclusive of the BFA fashion course, it is hoped that Print/ Digital can support a fresh and re-energised design culture to emerge from the amalgamation between Creative Industries and the School of Design when they merge in early 2012.

A bulletin board of sorts, the blog will feature details of upcoming student exhibitions, notice of design events happening around town and abroad and additional content relative to the practice and study of design in all its forms.

Launching the initiative prior to the merger was a calculated exercise, attempting to establish an identity for Print/Digital, raising the profile of the blog and getting it out there before the end of year break.

We need to feed the blog to keep it alive, so we are super keen to receive design related content.

image: eggofcolumbus.tumblr.com 28

Although submissions will be moderated, we really want the blog to be for and by the students, so the idea is that contributions will reflect what they want to see on Print/Digital, as it is ultimately their resource.

If you have something you would like to share with the QUT design community please send it to us at printanddigitalblog@gmail.com or contribute through the submit portal on the Print/Digital page.

Words | Mark Molenaar


'Numbers,' said God, 'That's what it always seems to come back to for you lot.' 'How do you mean?' replied the Tramp. 'Think about it, there's such an emphasis placed on the fact that I apparently created the world in seven days. Everyone's quite adamant about the number seven. And the Holy Trinity. Apparently there's three of me.' The Tramp considered this. It was not every day that he was involved in philosophical discussions with omniscient beings. But here today, in this inner city park, here he was, discussing numerology with the absolute Lord and Master of the universe. He regarded this being as it spoke to him. Not what he expected. Far from the flowing white robes and beard, he was addressing an attractive, dark haired young lady wearing a tweed jacket and a bowler hat. The only thing that distinguished Her from any other unusually dressed young lady, was the jade chain he could see hanging from Her jacket pocket. 'So there's only one of you then?' he asked. 'One is just a number,' She replied, 'And that is exactly the point that I'm making to you.' 'I see,' he replied, feeling somewhat confused. 'No you don't,' She said, with a warm smile, 'But that's okay, it's difficult to comprehend.' 'So why are you telling me this then?' She shrugged at this, 'Felt like having a conversation, we can talk about something else if you'd prefer?' 'No, no,' he said quickly, (fearing he had caused offence), 'I just meant that there must be someone more important than me you could be talking to.' 30

Her gaze drifted away from his face to observe the other people around the park. It was early enough in the morning to be full of people making their way from the train station on one side, and the office blocks on the other. Smartly dressed men and women rushed through the green park, barely acknowledging one another. 'You see most of these people every day, don't you?' 'Well, yes, it's not as if I have much else to do.' 'Then you know that these people pay absolutely no attention to what's going on around them. As if they're going to have time for a strangely dressed girl who just wants to have a conversation,' as She said this, She was fidgeting with whatever was on the end of that chain in Her pocket. 'But you're God!' he exclaimed, 'How could they possibly ignore you?' She smiled wanly at that, 'Numbers,' She replied. The Tramp was even more confused now. God laughed lightly when She saw the look of confusion on his face, 'Okay, I'll explain it to you. See that man over there?' The man in question She was pointing at was smartly dressed in an expensive suit, carrying a leather briefcase. He was walking at a quite brisk pace, with a very serious expression on his face. 'He's so busy worrying about if he's going to be late for his morning meeting that he can't even see that woman there.' The Tramp was about to ask what woman, but at that point, the brisk man walked quite briskly into a small woman pacing across the park. She was holding a large coffee cup, the contents of which were now all

over the front of the self-important man, staining his expensive white shirt. A quite abusive conversation ensued as each accused the other of being blind, as well as raising issues of parentage and sexual orientation. The Tramp glanced back at God, who was depositing the item on the chain back into Her pocket. He thought about asking what it was, but then said; 'So what about her then? Surely she would've seen him?' 'She's busy worrying if she can really afford the calories in the muffin she ate just before,' She replied. 'Okay, so they were both a bit distracted, but I knew you were God straight away. How could they not notice that?' 'Numbers are a symbol of the times. Those two were both too busy concentrating on the numbers in their life, rather than what was actually going on. They couldn't see each other because they were blinded by numbers. Just as that same blindness would prevent them from seeing who I really was.' The Tramp reflected on this. It felt as if he was struggling with a subject that was too advanced for him. And it probably was. He wasn't exactly well equipped to deal with matters of theology and spirituality. His training had been in literary theory. 'So you're saying that we shouldn't use numbers?' 'Of course not,' She replied, 'It would be a little tricky for your world to function without numbers, don't you think?' 'Yes,' he replied, feeling a little foolish, 'I suppose so.' 'No, all I'm saying is that to see the truth, you have to look beyond the reality.'

'I'm never going to understand this, am I?' 'Probably not, at least not for a while yet.' He was silent for a while. With no idea of what She was talking about, he had no way to contribute further to this conversation. He knew he should feel privileged to be sitting here talking to God, but to tell the truth, he was more frustrated than anything. How could She possibly be getting anything out of talking to someone who has no idea what She's on about? he thought to himself, Surely She has a universe to run. 'Don't think like that,' She said absently, 'I don't like people thinking that they're not good enough to talk to me.' 'I'm sorry,' the Tramp said contritely, 'But in my position, I don't think you can really blame me for thinking that.' 'No, I guess I can't,' She mused, then Her face brightened, 'Can I show you something?' 'Of course.' She reached into Her jacket pocket, and withdrew the object She had been fidgeting with. The long green chain came slinking out of Her pocket, until the flat, round green object on the end was revealed. Sitting neatly in the palm of Her hand, it looked almost perfect in its simplicity. A single piece of jade that looked as if it had been lovingly shaped by centuries of caressing hands, it was the most beautiful thing he had ever seen. His eyes widened, and his breath caught in his throat at the sight of it. 'What do you think of it?' She asked him. The Tramp snapped out of his reverie, 'You know what I think of that,' he said with a smile. 31


'Numbers,' said God, 'That's what it always seems to come back to for you lot.' 'How do you mean?' replied the Tramp. 'Think about it, there's such an emphasis placed on the fact that I apparently created the world in seven days. Everyone's quite adamant about the number seven. And the Holy Trinity. Apparently there's three of me.' The Tramp considered this. It was not every day that he was involved in philosophical discussions with omniscient beings. But here today, in this inner city park, here he was, discussing numerology with the absolute Lord and Master of the universe. He regarded this being as it spoke to him. Not what he expected. Far from the flowing white robes and beard, he was addressing an attractive, dark haired young lady wearing a tweed jacket and a bowler hat. The only thing that distinguished Her from any other unusually dressed young lady, was the jade chain he could see hanging from Her jacket pocket. 'So there's only one of you then?' he asked. 'One is just a number,' She replied, 'And that is exactly the point that I'm making to you.' 'I see,' he replied, feeling somewhat confused. 'No you don't,' She said, with a warm smile, 'But that's okay, it's difficult to comprehend.' 'So why are you telling me this then?' She shrugged at this, 'Felt like having a conversation, we can talk about something else if you'd prefer?' 'No, no,' he said quickly, (fearing he had caused offence), 'I just meant that there must be someone more important than me you could be talking to.' 30

Her gaze drifted away from his face to observe the other people around the park. It was early enough in the morning to be full of people making their way from the train station on one side, and the office blocks on the other. Smartly dressed men and women rushed through the green park, barely acknowledging one another. 'You see most of these people every day, don't you?' 'Well, yes, it's not as if I have much else to do.' 'Then you know that these people pay absolutely no attention to what's going on around them. As if they're going to have time for a strangely dressed girl who just wants to have a conversation,' as She said this, She was fidgeting with whatever was on the end of that chain in Her pocket. 'But you're God!' he exclaimed, 'How could they possibly ignore you?' She smiled wanly at that, 'Numbers,' She replied. The Tramp was even more confused now. God laughed lightly when She saw the look of confusion on his face, 'Okay, I'll explain it to you. See that man over there?' The man in question She was pointing at was smartly dressed in an expensive suit, carrying a leather briefcase. He was walking at a quite brisk pace, with a very serious expression on his face. 'He's so busy worrying about if he's going to be late for his morning meeting that he can't even see that woman there.' The Tramp was about to ask what woman, but at that point, the brisk man walked quite briskly into a small woman pacing across the park. She was holding a large coffee cup, the contents of which were now all

over the front of the self-important man, staining his expensive white shirt. A quite abusive conversation ensued as each accused the other of being blind, as well as raising issues of parentage and sexual orientation. The Tramp glanced back at God, who was depositing the item on the chain back into Her pocket. He thought about asking what it was, but then said; 'So what about her then? Surely she would've seen him?' 'She's busy worrying if she can really afford the calories in the muffin she ate just before,' She replied. 'Okay, so they were both a bit distracted, but I knew you were God straight away. How could they not notice that?' 'Numbers are a symbol of the times. Those two were both too busy concentrating on the numbers in their life, rather than what was actually going on. They couldn't see each other because they were blinded by numbers. Just as that same blindness would prevent them from seeing who I really was.' The Tramp reflected on this. It felt as if he was struggling with a subject that was too advanced for him. And it probably was. He wasn't exactly well equipped to deal with matters of theology and spirituality. His training had been in literary theory. 'So you're saying that we shouldn't use numbers?' 'Of course not,' She replied, 'It would be a little tricky for your world to function without numbers, don't you think?' 'Yes,' he replied, feeling a little foolish, 'I suppose so.' 'No, all I'm saying is that to see the truth, you have to look beyond the reality.'

'I'm never going to understand this, am I?' 'Probably not, at least not for a while yet.' He was silent for a while. With no idea of what She was talking about, he had no way to contribute further to this conversation. He knew he should feel privileged to be sitting here talking to God, but to tell the truth, he was more frustrated than anything. How could She possibly be getting anything out of talking to someone who has no idea what She's on about? he thought to himself, Surely She has a universe to run. 'Don't think like that,' She said absently, 'I don't like people thinking that they're not good enough to talk to me.' 'I'm sorry,' the Tramp said contritely, 'But in my position, I don't think you can really blame me for thinking that.' 'No, I guess I can't,' She mused, then Her face brightened, 'Can I show you something?' 'Of course.' She reached into Her jacket pocket, and withdrew the object She had been fidgeting with. The long green chain came slinking out of Her pocket, until the flat, round green object on the end was revealed. Sitting neatly in the palm of Her hand, it looked almost perfect in its simplicity. A single piece of jade that looked as if it had been lovingly shaped by centuries of caressing hands, it was the most beautiful thing he had ever seen. His eyes widened, and his breath caught in his throat at the sight of it. 'What do you think of it?' She asked him. The Tramp snapped out of his reverie, 'You know what I think of that,' he said with a smile. 31


She laughed a trilling little laugh, 'Yes, I suppose I do. But maybe I want to hear it in your own words.'

'No it isn't,' She insisted, 'You're an intelligent man.' 'Thank you,' he replied with genuine gratitude.

The Tramp considered his response, 'I'd say that it brings to mind the greatest jewels, bestowed upon the most beautiful queen, and yet beside this, they would look no more alluring than common pebbles.'

'You're welcome,' the words came with a warm smile, 'Unfortunately though, I have to be going now.'

God grinned in delight at this, 'Thank you!' and She hugged him impulsively, 'That's the nicest thing I've ever heard.'

'Cheer up, I'm going to give you a present before I go.'

Her sudden display of affection took him aback somewhat. 'You're welcome,' he managed to stammer out, 'What is it?' he asked, partly out of curiosity, partly to hide his discomfort. 'This,' She replied, 'Is the answer to any question you could possibly have. In it lies both the beginning and the ending, the right and the left, the up and the down.' 'That makes even less sense than what you were talking about before,' he said plaintively. 'I know, that's the problem with being God sometimes, you have a bit of trouble relating information in terms that humans understand.'

'Oh,' the Tramp said with a note of disappointment.

'Really?' 'Yes,' and with that, She unclasped the chain that connected the green stone to Her jacket. She beckoned him to hold out his hand, then deposited the stone into it. 'I can't accept this,' he said, 'This is far too important for you to give away.'

'I must say though, it has been nice talking to an intelligent human.' 'Me? Intelligent?' he said incredulously, 'You do know that I'm homeless, right?'

'I really do have to go now, it's been wonderful talking to you,' She said finally.

'Since when has a measure of one’s intelligence correlated to how they live? Technically I'm homeless too, does that make me an idiot?'

'It's been wonderful talking to you,' the Tramp echoed Her sentiments.

'Of course not, but it's a bit different with you.' 32

Later that night, while huddled under his blankets in a secluded corner of the park, the Tramp heard a faint clicking noise. Startled, he sat bolt upright, for the sound had come from the stone that God had given him. Worried that he may have laid on it and broken it, he fished it out of his pocket. As he watched, the stone split further in two, until it lay in his hand, held together by some kind of hinge mechanism. A soft green glow radiated off the device, and his eyes widened as he stared at it. A few moments, he grasped the significance of what he was looking at, and then burst out laughing. Here was God's answer to everything, the meaning of life, all of mankind's questions, and it lay in his hand. And it was a clock.

God laughed at this, 'What do I need it for? I already know everything, I created it all, in seven days, if I'm not mistaken,' She said this last with a twinkle in Her eye and a wink. The Tramp was about to raise the objection that he was not important enough to have it, but then thought better of it, considering the discussion they had just had. He thanked Her profusely instead, thanks which She waved away in Her enigmatic matter.

'Is that so?' the Tramp said with a fond smile.

She grinned back at him impishly, 'You're an intelligent man, you'll work it out,' then a sudden gust swept through the park, and she was gone.

As She began to walk off into the crowd, a thought suddenly occurred to him, 'Hey!' he shouted after Her, 'How do I use it?' 33


She laughed a trilling little laugh, 'Yes, I suppose I do. But maybe I want to hear it in your own words.'

'No it isn't,' She insisted, 'You're an intelligent man.' 'Thank you,' he replied with genuine gratitude.

The Tramp considered his response, 'I'd say that it brings to mind the greatest jewels, bestowed upon the most beautiful queen, and yet beside this, they would look no more alluring than common pebbles.'

'You're welcome,' the words came with a warm smile, 'Unfortunately though, I have to be going now.'

God grinned in delight at this, 'Thank you!' and She hugged him impulsively, 'That's the nicest thing I've ever heard.'

'Cheer up, I'm going to give you a present before I go.'

Her sudden display of affection took him aback somewhat. 'You're welcome,' he managed to stammer out, 'What is it?' he asked, partly out of curiosity, partly to hide his discomfort. 'This,' She replied, 'Is the answer to any question you could possibly have. In it lies both the beginning and the ending, the right and the left, the up and the down.' 'That makes even less sense than what you were talking about before,' he said plaintively. 'I know, that's the problem with being God sometimes, you have a bit of trouble relating information in terms that humans understand.'

'Oh,' the Tramp said with a note of disappointment.

'Really?' 'Yes,' and with that, She unclasped the chain that connected the green stone to Her jacket. She beckoned him to hold out his hand, then deposited the stone into it. 'I can't accept this,' he said, 'This is far too important for you to give away.'

'I must say though, it has been nice talking to an intelligent human.' 'Me? Intelligent?' he said incredulously, 'You do know that I'm homeless, right?'

'I really do have to go now, it's been wonderful talking to you,' She said finally.

'Since when has a measure of one’s intelligence correlated to how they live? Technically I'm homeless too, does that make me an idiot?'

'It's been wonderful talking to you,' the Tramp echoed Her sentiments.

'Of course not, but it's a bit different with you.' 32

Later that night, while huddled under his blankets in a secluded corner of the park, the Tramp heard a faint clicking noise. Startled, he sat bolt upright, for the sound had come from the stone that God had given him. Worried that he may have laid on it and broken it, he fished it out of his pocket. As he watched, the stone split further in two, until it lay in his hand, held together by some kind of hinge mechanism. A soft green glow radiated off the device, and his eyes widened as he stared at it. A few moments, he grasped the significance of what he was looking at, and then burst out laughing. Here was God's answer to everything, the meaning of life, all of mankind's questions, and it lay in his hand. And it was a clock.

God laughed at this, 'What do I need it for? I already know everything, I created it all, in seven days, if I'm not mistaken,' She said this last with a twinkle in Her eye and a wink. The Tramp was about to raise the objection that he was not important enough to have it, but then thought better of it, considering the discussion they had just had. He thanked Her profusely instead, thanks which She waved away in Her enigmatic matter.

'Is that so?' the Tramp said with a fond smile.

She grinned back at him impishly, 'You're an intelligent man, you'll work it out,' then a sudden gust swept through the park, and she was gone.

As She began to walk off into the crowd, a thought suddenly occurred to him, 'Hey!' he shouted after Her, 'How do I use it?' 33


WORDS | Coco Alcatraz

Ari

Start packing your backpack with the essentials as you are in for an adventure this summer. Don’t forget your zip-off trouser-shorts.

Tau

The summer break will bring you the relaxation that you’ve been wanting. But beware, as relaxation may turn into pure laziness. Make sure you still get your 30 minutes a day. I suggest water sports.

Gem

Get jet setting before it’s that time of year again when you’re 11 o’clock sleep-in ritual turns into a 6:30am wake up call to get to that 8am lecture on time. Qantas* currently have a cheap deal to DALLAS. *not a sponsor.

Can

Your summer holiday will you bring you that summer romance you’ve always dreamed about since watching the Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants. Dayum!!!! – that Blake Lively is such a hottie.

Leo

Since when did you want to work at McDonalds over the summer holidays? Pull your head in and go for that job you’ve been stalking on Seek.com.

Vir

You’re a sweater. No doubt about it. And I bet you are dreading the forthcoming hot months. Resort to your breathable soccer jerseys boys… And girls – well, if you are sweating that’s just downright gross. Stock up on the deo.

Lib

You will have something amazing happen to you between Christmas Day and New Year's Eve. It might be getting a bargain at the Boxing Day sales… or it might be finding out you are pregnant with triplets. I didn’t say you were going to be pleased. And boys… well what’s going on there if you’re pregnant?

Sco

She Sells Sea Shells By The Sea Shore… la la la la la… you are walking to a tune of your own this summer. But its working for you. So keep to it!

Sag

Jaws might have been the scariest movie you have seen, unless you’re a die-hard thriller gal/guy. If you are getting anxious about beach weather, sharks or the fact that a big white whale will be lying on the beach, then do something about it. Hit the gym or stay out of the water. But then it’s a catch 22 because whales need water….

Cap

If adult dancing classes are what you’re after – then you’ve come to the right person. And I don’t mean ‘saucy’ pole dancing ‘fitness’ classes. I mean TAP! JAZZ! BALLET! Get yourself out there and push yourself out of your comfort zone. I’m sensing this might relate to another area in your life at the moment too, not just you’re passion for groovin’.

Aqu

Grab the fishing line, some bait and get going! There’s a big fish out in the sea for you this summer. Or if you’ve just stepped back onto the boat, then you might be looking for a few fish… ;)

Pis

Hi sexy men! My name is… Oh sorry you just caught me writing my bio for about 10 dating sites. But don’t mind me. Get cracking on your own, have you seen how many single attractive* people are waiting for you. Who knows, this summer might be your time to shine. *Beauty is in the eye of the beer-holder.

image: parkmatenaude.tumblr.com 34

35


WORDS | Coco Alcatraz

Ari

Start packing your backpack with the essentials as you are in for an adventure this summer. Don’t forget your zip-off trouser-shorts.

Tau

The summer break will bring you the relaxation that you’ve been wanting. But beware, as relaxation may turn into pure laziness. Make sure you still get your 30 minutes a day. I suggest water sports.

Gem

Get jet setting before it’s that time of year again when you’re 11 o’clock sleep-in ritual turns into a 6:30am wake up call to get to that 8am lecture on time. Qantas* currently have a cheap deal to DALLAS. *not a sponsor.

Can

Your summer holiday will you bring you that summer romance you’ve always dreamed about since watching the Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants. Dayum!!!! – that Blake Lively is such a hottie.

Leo

Since when did you want to work at McDonalds over the summer holidays? Pull your head in and go for that job you’ve been stalking on Seek.com.

Vir

You’re a sweater. No doubt about it. And I bet you are dreading the forthcoming hot months. Resort to your breathable soccer jerseys boys… And girls – well, if you are sweating that’s just downright gross. Stock up on the deo.

Lib

You will have something amazing happen to you between Christmas Day and New Year's Eve. It might be getting a bargain at the Boxing Day sales… or it might be finding out you are pregnant with triplets. I didn’t say you were going to be pleased. And boys… well what’s going on there if you’re pregnant?

Sco

She Sells Sea Shells By The Sea Shore… la la la la la… you are walking to a tune of your own this summer. But its working for you. So keep to it!

Sag

Jaws might have been the scariest movie you have seen, unless you’re a die-hard thriller gal/guy. If you are getting anxious about beach weather, sharks or the fact that a big white whale will be lying on the beach, then do something about it. Hit the gym or stay out of the water. But then it’s a catch 22 because whales need water….

Cap

If adult dancing classes are what you’re after – then you’ve come to the right person. And I don’t mean ‘saucy’ pole dancing ‘fitness’ classes. I mean TAP! JAZZ! BALLET! Get yourself out there and push yourself out of your comfort zone. I’m sensing this might relate to another area in your life at the moment too, not just you’re passion for groovin’.

Aqu

Grab the fishing line, some bait and get going! There’s a big fish out in the sea for you this summer. Or if you’ve just stepped back onto the boat, then you might be looking for a few fish… ;)

Pis

Hi sexy men! My name is… Oh sorry you just caught me writing my bio for about 10 dating sites. But don’t mind me. Get cracking on your own, have you seen how many single attractive* people are waiting for you. Who knows, this summer might be your time to shine. *Beauty is in the eye of the beer-holder.

image: parkmatenaude.tumblr.com 34

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have a great break.

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andru.com.au


Qute magazine 2011 - issue 4