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Northern Illinois University

School of

Theatre

&Dance 2012 2013 performance schedule

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Table Contents of


Mainstage Season Schedule ......................................................................... 4 Studio Series Schedule ................................................................................. 5 Studio Series Production Summaries ........................................................... 6 Bartleby the Scrivener ................................................................................... 8 An Ideal Husband ......................................................................................... 10 Spanish Dance Concert ................................................................................ 12 A Bright Room Called Day ............................................................................ 14 Not about Nightingales ................................................................................. 16 Caucasian Chalk Circle ................................................................................. 18 Don Quixote Ballet ........................................................................................ 20 Subscription Options .................................................................................... 22


2012 2013 Mainstage Season November 27-30, October 3-7

Bartleby the Scrivener October 18-21, 25-28

An Ideal Husband November 15-18

Mosaic of Spanish Dance January 31-February 3, 6-10

A Bright Room Called Day February 28-March 3

Not about Nightingales April 4-7, 10-14

Caucasian Chalk Circle April 25-28

Evolution of Ballet Show times are 7:30 p.m. (weekdays and Saturdays) and 2:00 p.m. (Sundays). For more information about group events and rates, school matinees and high school nights, please contact the School of Theatre and Dance marketing office at 815.753.1337. For tickets, contact the Stevens Building Box Office at 815.753.1600. Season Subscriptions can be purchased until October 7, 2012 by contacting 915.753.1335.

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Studio Series Productions November 1-4

Waiting for Godot November 8 -11

Canterbury Tales November 29- December 2

Storytellers Theatre February 14-17

Hamlet Redux February 28- March 3

Burning Times April 18-21

Real Inspector Hound

Show times are 7:30 p.m. (weekdays and Saturdays) and 2:00 p.m. (Sundays). Studio Series productions are in the Corner Theatre in the Stevens Building. Non-package tickets are $5 and available only on performance nights.

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Studio Series Productions November 1-4

Waiting for Godot This absurdist tragi-comedy by Samuel Beckett is a story of two who men are merely waiting for someone named Godot to arrive. Vladimir and Estragon claim that Godot is an acquaintance, but admit they barely know him and would not recognize him if he were to appear. The play draws its roots from the Existential movement in philosophy, the foundation for what has been loosely termed the Theatre of the Absurd. It was declared the “most significant English language play of the 20th century,” by Normand Berlin in the Massachusetts Review in 1999.

November 8-11

Canterbury Tales This adaptation of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales is a retelling of three of the tales, intertwined with songs and dance from the period and biographical detail about Chaucer’s life and relationship with the courts of Richard II and Henry the IV. Presented as it was written in Middle English, The Canterbury Tales maintains the original spirit of the tales, which was to ironically and critically portray the turbulent England of the time, from politics to religion and from chivalry to baseness.

November 29 - December 2

Storytellers Theatre In a simpler time without radio, television, internet or other modern electronic conveniences, people told stories as a form of entertainment and as a way to hand down their history, culture and morals to succeeding generations. SoTD continues the ancient oral tradition of sharing and interpreting life’s common experiences. 6


Studio Series Productions February 14-17

Hamlet Redux Although the title may look somewhat familiar, this play is not quite the “whole Hamlet” everyone knows and loves. Usually a running time of five hours, the original Shakespearian tragedy has been pared down to two, and more clearly emphasizes the sense of Hamlet’s life flashing before his eyes. This redux play also has only twelve actors, rather than the original thirty-four. The smaller cast gets an acting workout, with nearly all performing multiple roles.

February 28-March 3

Burning Times

There are burning times in fictitious Wertzberg, Ohio. Written by playwright and NIU faculty member Luke Krueger, Burning Times is about the people of the Wertzberg school system and their single-minded crusade against androgynous rapper Jonas Satan (Shah-tan), while the school’s new superintendent, the former U.S. Secretary of Education, struggles to reform the failing school system. Although the plot seems serious, consider that the lead crusader’s name is Snoozy Slaughter.

April 18-21

Real Inspector Hound Written by Tom Stoppard, this one-act play-within-a-play parodies stereotypical parlor mysteries, such as Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap. The farcical plot follows two theatre critics, Moon and Birdboot, who are watching an absurd setup of a “whodunit” murder mystery. By chance or twist of fate, they become involved in the action, causing a series of events that parallel the play. 7


Bartleby Scrivener

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September 27-30, October 3-7

Bartleby the Scrivener, based on the short story by Herman Melville (Moby Dick), is an eponymous play about a strangely apathetic clerk, or scribe, whose boss cannot seem to make him work. Although when first hired, Bartleby works efficiently, he soon inexplicably begins refusing to do tasks. Instead, he simply responds, “I would prefer not to.� The play is set in Wall Street in the 1850s. The narrator of the story is a successful lawyer who runs his own business assisting the wealthy with mortgages, deeds and bonds. It was he who hired Bartleby and who now finds himself in a very difficult position. Under pressure to continue the success of his company and the contentment of his other employees running thin, the narrator struggles to get rid of Bartleby, to the point of moving his entire business in order to leave Bartleby behind. In this production, the boss is played by three actors, two of which are clowns, the multiplicity of actors showing his inner conflict as he questions why Bartleby will not work and why he himself cannot force him to. The story was adapted for the stage in 2007 by Alexander Gelman and Organic Theatre Company in Chicago. 9


Ideal Husband

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October 18-21, 25-28

Written by Oscar Wilde in 1895, An Ideal Husband is a comedic stage play which follows the complicated romantic and political lives of London’s social elite who are driven by need to protect their public and private honor, often through less-than-honorable means. The entire play takes place in a twenty-four hour period, beginning at a dinner party at the home of Sir Robert Chiltern, a well-known member of the House of Commons. However, when one of the lady guests tries to blackmail Sir Robert into supporting a fraudulent scheme to build a canal in Argentina, the various social relationships between the guests become increasingly chaotic. In true Wilde style, the decadent and dandified characters, serving their own best interests, ultimately untangle the multiple and twisted sub-plots into reaffirmations of undying love, loyalty, forgiveness and the proverbial happy ending. Considered scandalous during the waning years of the Victorian era, Wilde’s plays of this period relentlessly mocked and satirized the rigid mores and behaviors of English :”upper crust.” An Ideal Husband has been described “as close as English high comedy has ever come to perfection” --Charles Spencer, The Telegraph. 11


Mosaic Spanish Dance of

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November 15-18

The highlight of the Mosaic of Spanish Dance will be choreography by world-renowned Spanish dance performer and choreographer, Luis Montero of Bolero with music by Maurice Ravel. Within this performance lies the ambiance of escuela bolero, a classical technique used to broaden the traditional Spanish dance, and utilizes the talents of the classically trained dancers to capture the drama, emotion and theatricality which the music demands. Also featured in the dance is Flamenco, known for its stomps, hand claps, and energy, as well as elements of classical ballet. Mosaic of Spanish Dance also features the renewed collaboration of Luis and NIU SoTD dance faculty member, Paula Frasz, in telling the story of the classic Spanish play, The House of Bernarda Alba, by Garcia-Lorca, through the linear structure of dance. With Montero’s help, Frasz’s dance company, Dansz Loop Chicago, premiered the dance adaptation of The House of Bernarda Alba in 2007. Montero’s choreographic work includes classical, modern, and postmodern dance. He has performed with and created choreography for the New York City Opera, Nashville Ballet, Yamada Tokyo Ballet, and many more.

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A Bright Room

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January 31-February 3, February 6-10

Based on a play written by Bertolt Brecht and first performed 1938, Tony Kushner’s A Bright Room Called Day is a contemporary and unique look over our shoulders, and behind ourselves, that is embodied by two plots: that of a German middle aged actress and her friends in the early 1930s who fearfully witness the fall of the socialist Weimar Republic and the rise of Adolph Hitler, and the story of Zillah, a 1990s New Yorker who believes that President Ronald Reagan is becoming too much like Hitler. Kushner’s unique blending of plots occurs with Zillah’s interruptions of the 1930s scenes, by which she offers her observations of the past from her contemporary perspective. However, to escape the worst-case scenario in America that Reagan represents, Zillah flees to Germany, where Hitler is now supposed to be nothing but squelched memory. Instead, past and present intertwine and blur the line between them. Although densely filled with social and political commentary about one of the most devastating periods in human history, A Bright Room Called Day nevertheless remains a deeply personal exploration of how the past is inseparable from the present. 15


Nightingal s

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February 21 - 24, 28- March 3

Written in 1938, Williams’ fourth play had remained unpublished for nearly sixty years when actress Vanessa Redgrave read William’s own reference to it in a foreword to another of his plays. Intrigued by his description, she asked the William’s estate to find a copy of the manuscript, and subsequently produced the play as a collaboration of her own theatre company, Moving Theatre, with England’s Royal National Theatre, in 1998. Based on real life events that rocked the nation in the 1930s, this three act play recounts what at the time was described as one of the worst prison horrors in American history. Prison inmates staged a hunger strike, protesting their poor conditions, spoiled food and general mistreatment. As punishment, twenty-five ringleaders were crowded into a steam heated shed and locked in with windows closed and access to water cut off–the next morning four prisoners had scalded to death. Williams said in 1982 he had “never written anything since then that could compete with it in violence and horror…” Although an early Williams work, the play has humor, tenderness, and a passionate social conscience justice that never lets you look away.

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Chalk Circle

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April 4-7, 10-14

Written in 1944 by German modernist playwright Bertolt Brecht, but partially based on an ancient Chinese play, Caucasian Chalk Circle explores political injustice and personal courage. The plot contains a play within a play. It opens on a post-World War II Europe, in which two rural villages disagree over how to best restore their land after the devastating conflict. After some initial conflict, they come to an agreement, and a singer performs a play to celebrate the harmony, ushering in the second plot. A thousand years earlier, a peasant woman, Grusha, rescues a royal baby, saving him from the chaos of a revolution and war and becomes the epitome of what a good mother should be. After a long journey filled with self-sacrifice, Grusha and the baby’s birth mother face each other before a judge in a fight for the child’s custody. In a Solomon-like test, the judge draws a circle with chalk to determine the child’s true mother. John Cigar, from the New York Theatre review says that, as the audience, you must “remember Brecht doesn’t want you to identify with the characters or plot or actors; he felt it was indecent…He wanted his audience to think, not feel or ‘connect.’”

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Evolution Ballet of

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April 25-28

The spring dance concert features both the classical and the contemporary ballet training of Northern Illinois University’s School of Theatre and Dance performance program, with its restaging of the ballet, Esmeralda. In this restaged production, the dancers will be performing a collaboration of classical ballet, contemporary pointe ballet, as well as contemporary ballet without pointe. In this unique combination of techniques, this performance highlights how contemporary choreography is firmly rooted in classical ballet, but more importantly emphasizes how that cultivation can be integrated with contemporary dance. Evolution of Ballet will uniquely display the versatility of dance performance and the trends that advance the world of dance.

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Mainstage Series Package - $65 Choose your seat for the season! One

admission to each of the seven Mainstage productions for just $65* ($75 after August 1). That’s almost a 40% savings from our regular ticket price. Student rate is $42.

Mainstage Flex Package - $70 See all the shows, or take some friends to a favorite. A coupon book good for seven admissions to Mainstage Series productions for just $70* ($80 after August 1). Big savings AND flexibility. Student rate is $45.

Mainstage Triple Play Package - $35 Pick any thee of the seven fabulous shows in our 2012-2013 season and select the actual performance dates for each show individually ($39 after August 1). You pick the shows you want and the performance dates and times that fit your schedule! Student rate is $21.

Studio Series Package- $20

A LOT of theatre for NOT alot of money! All six Studio Series productions for just $20. Early Bird deadline is August 1 Final Deadline is October 7

Mail order form to: NIU School of Theatre and Dance Box Office, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois, 60115 Fax order form to: 815.753.8415 Call NIU SoTD at: 815.753.1335 (through August 10) 815.753.1600 (starting August 23) 22


Step One

Step Two

Are you a new subscriber?

yes

no

______________________________________________

Mainstage Series Package (all seven shows) $65 ($75 after Aug. 1) x ______ # of packages = $ ______ $42 (student rate)

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Select One: Thurs. 7:30 Fri. 7:30 Sat. 7:30 Sun. 2:00 Seating Preference: __________________________________ Mainstage Flex Package (seven tickets to any show) $70 ($80 after Aug. 1) x ______ # of packages = $ ______ $45 (student rate)

x ______ # of packages = $ ______

Mainstage Triple Play Package (any three shows)

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$35 ($39 after Aug. 1) x ______ # of packages = $ ______ Method of Payment Visa

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$21 (student rate) Discover

Studio Series Package (all six shows)

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$20

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Mail tickets to my home (one-time $5 fee) Mail tickets to my campus address Hold tickets at box office Total

= $ ______ = $ 0 = $ 0 = $ _______ 23


NONPROFIT U.S. POSTAGE PAID NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

Northern Illinois University DeKalb, Illinois 60115-2554

For more information, visit our website:

www.niu.edu/theatre

Northern Illinois University is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Institution. Printed by authority of the State of Illinois. www.niu.edu

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Northern Illinois University's School of Theatre & Dance Presents...  

2012-2013 production schedule for Northern Illinois University's School of Theatre & Dance. Copyright Quinn Ryan 2012