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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

S T Y L E SPRING ISSUE 2011 > $5.00

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Spring CLASSICS

Britt ekland photographed by slim aarons, 1969


Ralph Lauren Collection

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View the Runway Show and go behind the scenes with the Ralph Lauren application on your iPhone™ or visit R A LPHL AU R ENCOLLECT ION.COM


Begin your own tradition.

Something truly precious holds its beauty forever.

Nautilus Ref. 7010/1G, Nautilus rings.


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A Tradition of the Finest

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CONTENTS SPRING 2011

F E A T U R E S

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38 LIVING LEGEND “Living Legend” is back this issue with legendary gossip journalist Liz Smith recounting her many meetings with fellow native Texan, actress Renée Zellweger. Turns out she’s just as charming as you think. 46 falling forward The Q fashion team scoured the Fall Runways during Fashion Week. Everything you need to get ready for next season is right here! 52 milly’s moment Georgina Schaeffer profiles designer Michelle Smith, who celebrates the tenth year of her brand, Milly, and other major milestones this year.

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60 an eye for style Small in size, but big on fashion, Georgina Schaeffer reviews fashion maven Elizabeth Walker’s new book, Style Book: Fashionable Inspirations. 64 doing the charleston This little city is making a big splash on the fashion scene. Southern native Jessica Zaganczyk serves as our correspondent on all the action. 70 movers & shapers Daniel Cappello interviews three influential jewelry companies, House of the Lavande, DANNIJO, and Nicholas Liu to track the latest trends.

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76 america’s pastime Baseball is truely this country’s game. Georgina Schaeffer checks in with Q readers on their favorite memories watching this sport. 84 children first Maggie Cordish, Friends Committee member of New Yorkers for Children, reports on this organization founded to serve our city’s youth in foster care. 88 dressing the best Eight top designers illustrate evening dresses inspired by their favorite leading ladies.

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Film star Britt Ekland (Britt-Marie Eklund) photographed by Slim Aarons in Porto Ercole, Italy, on January 1st, 1969. (Getty Images)


S H O W YO U R S U M M E R S T R I P E S .

SHOP OUR SUMMER DRESS LINEUP IN N E W Y O R K C I T Y S T O R E S A N D AT J C R E W . C O M


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CONTENTS SPRING 2011

D E P A R T M E N T S

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21 Nostalgia Remembering our favorite pastimes this season. 24 Jewelry Whether your style is as wholesome as Doris Day or as Va-Va as Zsa-Zsa, these jewelry pieces sparkle. 28 swimsuits Who could ever forget sexy Bond girl Ursula Andress in her bikini? Now check out these show-stoppers. 30 bags Take notes from the House of Delvaux. When it comes to your handbag, classic is always in vogue.

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31 shoes With her toes peeping out of her shoes, Veronica Lake is a perfect pin-up. Here, we offer the modern take. 32 sunglasses Chic Audrey Hepburn in How to Steal a Million is the inspiration for these shades of style. 34 accessories Keep an eye on the details with these finishing touches for both men and women every season. 36 men’s apparel Follow Rock Hudson’s style this spring—he was one of the best dressed in Hollywood.

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96 q focus Behind the scenes of the hottest parties from coast to coast, and up and down the Eastern shoreline. 104 ask the expert An interview with leading plastic surgeon Dr. Robert Grant of New York-Presbyterian. 106 beauty Our latest roundup of the best beauty products on the market to keep you fresh-faced and beautiful. 108 evening looks Inspired by Kate Middleton’s wedding, we look to Eliza Doolittle for ladylike evening attire.

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110 shopping index Where to find the looks from these pages. 112 staff selections Our personal favorite summer shoe.


B O U TIQ U E d e G R ISO G O N O 824 M A D ISO N AV E N U E - 2 1 2 4 3 9 4 2 2 0

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Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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David Patrick Columbia

Elizabeth Meigher

editor-in-Chief

Editor

james stoffel Creative director

Georgina Schaeffer executive editor

rachel corbett senior editor

elizabeth brown a ssociate editor

Daniel Cappello fa shion editor

valeria fox A ssociate Art Director

hilary geary societ y Editor

GRACE WHITNEY INTERN

Joanna Baker co-founding editor

Quest Media, LLC. S. Christopher Meigher III Chairman and C.E.O.

kathleen sheridan a ssi stant to the c.e.o.

arlene lefkoe accounting manager Board of Advisors

Brucie Boalt Edward Lee Cave Barbara CORCORAN JED H. GARFIELD CLARK HALSTEAD howard lorber pamela liebman Elizabeth Stribling Roger W. Tuckerman peter turino William Lie Zeckendorf lisa rosenberg 917.576.8951 greenwich

Bina Gupta 852.2868.1555 Hong Kong

Contributing Editors

Barbara Bancroft AMANDA MEIGHER Liz smith Taki Theodoracopulos michael thomas Contributing photographers

lucien Capehart jeanne chisholm jack deutsch Chris Eastland Patrick McMullan LINDA LANE SOPER 612.308.4159 PA L M BEACH

Emilio Zerboni 011.39.031.267.797 Milan

Š QUEST MEDIA, LLC 2010. All rights reserved. Vol. 6, No. 2. Q-Quintessential Style is published quarterly, 4 times a year. Yearly subscription rate $24.00. Q, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. 646.840.3404 fax 646.840.3408. For address changes, please call: 646.840.3404. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Q-Quintessential Style, 420 Madison Avenue, Penthouse, 16th floor, New York, NY 10017. subscription Inquiries

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George Nemethy WA L LY F I N D L AY G A L L E R I E S PA L M B E A C H • N E W Y O R K • B A R C E L O N A T: ( 2 1 2 ) 4 2 1 5 3 9 0 • w w w. w a l l y f i n d l a y. c o m

EST. 1870

ART WALLY FINDLAY


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Don’t you just love those unbelievably unique moments when worlds collide, stars align, angels weep, and somehow you are afforded an incredible break? I’m not talking about getting 30% off your latest purchase; I’m referring to those times when you’ve had a particularly bad day and suddenly something happens that changes everything. You thought you screwed up so royally at work that you’d be fired, but then you learn your idea was genius and your boss promotes you; you’ve been lonely and, out of the blue, a long-lost love comes back into the picture; you get the job!; the skinny jeans you saved “just because” finally fit; the pregnancy test reads “+” at last (or maybe you were hoping for a “-”—whichever makes your day!). It’s been proven that there’s great power in positive thinking. The argument is that a positive mind anticipates happiness, joy, health, and a successful outcome in every situation, and whatever the mind expects, it finds. I know this is easier said than done, but I bring the idea to light because, while springtime is one of rebirth and renewal, this spring happens to be a particularly momentous one. After a long, hard recession, the economy seems to be slowly swinging back (right?); Osama bin Laden, hunted as the mastermind behind the worst-ever terrorist attack on U.S. soil, has been killed; and the first “commoner” to wed a prince is transformed into a princess overnight (although aside from Kate’s pretty wedding dress, the derrière of her younger sister Pippa—dubbed “Society Singleton” by Tatler—seemed to be the most talked about part of the day, perhaps making it Pippa’s stars-aligning moment!). Do you suppose that as Kate walked down the runway years ago in that ugly, mesh slip she imagined that one day she would marry her prince? Well, she believed in herself and in the man she loved, and she stuck to her guns (and, in the end, the ugly slip sold for $125,000). So, here’s to Kate, to the power of positive thinking, and to a phenomenal spring for all. This spring, we offer some exciting new developments in Q, beginning with our comprehensive runway report, in which we reveal the smart, swish looks from the fall 2011 runways. Everything from warm winter whites, black leather pick-meups, sexy sheers, retro prints—it’s all there for your viewing delight. In more new Q news, Jessica Zaganczyk presents a first-hand account of Charleston Fashion Week, the “dream that became a reality.” With a panel of top-notch judges, led by the Grande Dame of Fashion Week herself, Fern Mallis, the event’s hit the big time. Elsewhere in the issue, Maggie Cordish writes a poignant, edifying look at New Yorkers For Children. Although widely known for its glamorous “Fool’s Fête” and frequent white-glove cocktail parties, the organization that was founded back in 1996 has made miraculous strides in its mission to help children. Q fashion editor Daniel Cappello brings his style savvy to a profile of three renowned and diverse costume jewelry houses. Meanwhile, Georgina Schaeffer writes about the exciting new collections springing forth from Milly, the youthful label begun by Michelle Smith in 2001. And our in-house beauty guru Rachel Corbett provides a thorough guide to the best beauty buys Clockwise from top left: On location at the Quest May cover of the season, as well as a one-on-one with New York-Presbyterian shoot; Kate Middleton with her Prince and sexy sister Pippa; plastic surgeon Robert Grant. This will be Rachel’s last issue and, vintage earrings from House of Lavande; a woman in a tennis boy, will we miss her! outfit, 1947; a fall look from Max Mara illustrates the latest beige Lastly, we are excited to introduce Renée Zellweger as this fashion craze; Audrey Hepburn in How to Steal a Million is our spring’s “Living Legend.” Liz Smith shares a lovely account of the sunglass icon of the season; Brigitte Bardot wears a bikini from Oscar winner, famous for her bare vulnerability in Jerry Maguire Style Book; Q contributor Maggie Cordish; Naeem Khan’s fashion and sympathetic candor as Bridget Jones. illustration for Linda Fargo; “Living Legend” Renée Zellweger. Hope you have a delightful season and enjoy our spring issue! u

ELIZABETH MEIGHER EDITOR

J ul i e Sk ar rat t ( Qu e st s h oo t)

EDITOR’S LETTER


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CONTRIBUTORS

Liz Smith > Sixty years ago, Liz brought her Texan wit, verve, and nerve to New York. Liz’s latest passion, WOWOWOW.com, offers sophisticated daily content for women over forty. In her early career, she held a variety of jobs: proofreader at Newsweek, editor for Modern Screen, typist for Blue Cross. She later became entertainment editor for Cosmopolitan and a contract writer for Sports Illustrated. In 1976, she launched a column for the Daily News known simply as “Page 6.” She is the author of several books, including Natural Blonde and Dishing.

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Jessica Zaganczyk > A graduate of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and Virginia native, this Southern belle began her decade-long career in fashion under the helm of Fern Mallis at New York Fashion Week. She later spent five years working in special events at Hermès before departing in the fall of 2010, joining Italian luxury jeweler Bulgari soon thereafter. In this issue, she writes about her recent trip down south for Charleston Fashion Week and the current transformation of her favorite city from small-town gem to formidable fashion force.

84 Rachel Corbett > Originally hailing from the midwest, Rachel attended the University of Iowa before coming to New York City in 2005 to attend graduate school at Columbia University. The now Brooklyn-based writer has contributed to a number of publications, including the New York Times, The Nation, the New York Observer, New York, ARTnews, and others. She has been the senior editor of Quest and Q magazines for more than three years, and is sad to say that this will be her last issue. She hopes, however, to have her picture on this contributor’s page again soon.

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38 < Georgina Schaeffer is the executive editor of Quest and Q. She began working for interior design publications at Victoria, part of the Hearst Corporation. She went on to represent interior designers with Stacy McLaughlin Public Relations. She also served as the managing editor of Absolute and New York Home magazines. She contributes three articles to this issue: a profile of designer Michelle Smith, whose fashion line Milly is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year, the Q Sport section dedicated to baseball, and a review of Style Book: Fashionable Inspirations, by Elizabeth Walker.

64 < Maggie Cordish Maggie began her writing career at Condé Nast. She has worked for several publications, including Details, House & Garden, and HomeStyle. She majored in English at the University of Pennsylvania and has an MBA from Columbia University. She is currently enrolled with special status as a student in the Johns Hopkins University MFA program in writing, and will apply for degree status next year. She is currently writing her first novel and lives in Baltimore with her husband, Reed, who is committed to editing every single page.

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MONTBLANC. THE TIMEWRITERS.

In 1821, Nicolas Rieussec changed watchmaking forever with the invention of the first chronograph. Since “chronograph” literally means “writing time”, the Montblanc Nicolas Rieussec Chronograph rewrites timepiece history. Crafted in the Montblanc Manufacture in Le Locle, Switzerland, this masterpiece is a worthy tribute to its visionary namesake. Monopusher chronograph, self-winding manufacture movement. 30 min. and 60 sec. rotating disc counters fixed on the counter bridge.

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S P R IN G AC T IVI T I E S A Fourth of July tableau, 1919.

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This page: 1. The Washington Baths, between Surf Avenue and the Boardwalk in Coney Island, New York; 2. Puck magazine celebrates Easter, on March 26, 1902; 3. Actress Ava Gardner takes a break to go sailing, circa 1940s; 4. The Massachussets Institute of Technology sailing team in their wooden dinghies “Beaver” and “Engineer,” 1950s; 5. In the Winner’s Circle: spring show jumping competition, circa 1940s. > Opposite page: 1. Ross’s Pavilion and beach, Orange Grove, New Jersey, circa 1905; 2. Daredevils Gladys Roy and Ivan Unger play tennis on the wings of a plane with Frank Tomac as the pilot, 3,000 miles above Los Angeles, California, October 25, 1925; 3. The United States Olympic Rowing Team (men’s coxless four), 1948; 4. The 1954 Tennis Premiers; 5. A 1940s Jaguar.

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2 “I’ve never hated a man enough to give his diamonds back,” the daring, darling Zsa Zsa Gabor once quipped. Gabor might be best remembered for her many marriages (nine in total) and her repeated gushes of, “Dahling!,” but she was also the epitome of “celebrity,” even in the most modern of senses. Her abundant jewelry didn’t hurt her image as a true celeb. You, too, can look the part of the celebrity by dressing up with your diamonds and gemstones. For spring, think about slipping on a little Van Cleef & Arpels or something from Miriam Haskell, or stacking up with Wempe rings.

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1. van cleef & arpels “Zip Art Deco” worn as a necklace, from the new high-jewelry “Zip” Collection, featuring multi-colored sapphires, diamonds, and sapphire beads set in 18-kt. white gold; $980,000. 2. ruby kobo Gold plated and rubber cuff bracelet, with twisted pink gold curves; $450. 3. wempe Collection of 18-kt. white gold and diamond rings in ruby, sapphire, and tsavorite; $1,255-$1,425. 4. miriam haskell Get wrapped up in Miriam Haskell’s silver coil bracelet with glass beads; $380. 5. lee angel Seed bead chandelier earrings in blue; $70. 6. david yurman Cushion on point necklaces in blue topaz ($1,850), prasiolite ($1,450), and amethyst ($1,850).


Charlotte Kellogg for the Palm Beach Lifestyle

Jewelry by Helga Wagner

256 Worth Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Gucci Courtyard â&#x20AC;˘ Palm Beach (561) 820-2407 charlottekellogg@aol.com


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5 2 1 4 3 “I call him Ernie, because he is certainly no Rock,” the legendary Doris Day once said of her 1959 co-star in Pillow Talk, Rock Hudson. Hudson, it is said, nicknamed the pretty actress “Eunice” because it made him laugh. But these rocks are no laughing matter. Take, for instance, the pavé diamonds from Ralph Lauren’s double stirrup pendant, or the decorative diamonds on Tiffany rings or Blair Husain’s roman numeral pendants. Golds and soft colors for spring are at home in Asprey’s citrine cocktail ring and Bulgari’s enchanting earrings.

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1. ralph lauren Double stirrup pendant in white gold and pavé diamonds ($47,000) on a fully pavéd diamond necklace ($159,000). 2. ivanka trump fine jewelry Lace pattern gold and diamond earrings from the NOOR Collection; $5,200. 3. tiffany & co. Paloma Picasso’s Zellige diamond and caenelian ring; price upon request. 4. camilla dietz bergeron, ltd. 18-kt. yellow gold nail bracelet, Aldo Cipullo, 1972; $32,500. 5. bulgari SASSI earrings in gold, corals, peridots, and diamonds; $15,100. 6. asprey Windsor cocktail ring in citrine; $7,100. 7. blair husain Birthday Roman Numeral pendant in 18-kt. gold rope chain with pavé and ruby birthstone; price upon request.


340 Royal Poinciana Way, Suite 332, Palm Beach | 561 802 3737 | www.HOUSEofLAVANDE.com


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SWIMSUITS

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4 1. majestic swim It doesn’t have to be Independence Day to get your stripes on: Majestic Swim’s triangle string bikini top in red stripes ($68) and bottom ($68). 2. Minnie mortimer You’ll have the world on a string with Minnie Mortimer’s Stevie string bikini in navy and white

All Stars & Stripes Ursula Andress, the Swiss actress and sex symbol of the 1960s, is probably best remembered for her roles as Bond girl Honey Ryder in Dr. No, for which she won a Golden Globe, and as Vesper Lynd in the 1967 James Bond parody Casino Royale. Andress was born in Switzerland, the daughter of Anna, who was Swiss, and Rolf Andress, a German diplomat who was expelled from Switzerland for political reasons. This summer, keep yourself from getting expelled from beach clubs by sporting patriotic numbers like Majestic Swim’s red stripes bikini, or Minnie Mortimer’s star-spangled swim suit (it won’t hurt if you’re toting Louis Vuitton’s starry towel, either). Shoshanna, J.Crew, and Irwin & Jordan are all-stars all their own, in colorful tops and bottoms.

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stars; $88. 3. louis vuitton Lie down with some country pride on the Monogram stars beach towel; approx. $555. 4. shoshanna Peach novelty stripe two-piece: tie bra top ($119) and ruched brief ($77). 5. irwin & jordan Irish eyes will be checking out the Danny Boy bikini in flame, from British hit Irwin & Jordan. 6. J.Crew Get away to the Caribbean, or just slip into J.Crew’s Barbados underwire top ($60) and side-tie bikini ($54).

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The fruits of your labors.

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HANDBAGS

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Clutch It Maison Delvaux, the Belgian luxury leather goods company, was founded in 1829 by the trunk maker Charles Delvaux, who added a shop window to his leather goods studio on the Rue de l’Empereur, in Brussels. Today, the company—the oldest fine leather goods house in the world—is admired for the high quality of its iconic luggage and handbags (like the one in this 1961 promotional campaign photograph). As the seasoned Delvaux shopper knows, classic bags will carry you far in life, so go ahead and invest in one of these exquisite totes or clutches.

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1. jack rogers The Marseilles Square Jute Tote in cognac is the epitome of ladylike style—elegant but not stuffy, prim but not prissy; $225. 2. ralph lauren Ralph Lauren’s Canvas Bucket Hobo comes in a crisp khaki cotton canvas with a supple calfskin strap—perfect as your on-the-go bag this season; $450. 3. anya hindmarch Walk with style and sheen with the Valorie woven metallic nappa clutch in multi; $395. 4. asprey A classic: the Mayfair Square in nude python; $3,350. 5. kotur ltd. Fiona Kotur Marin brings an otherworldly chic to everything; the Hong Kong-based designer tours the world for the most inspiring fabrics, prints, and designs, which culminate in bags like the Breen Tweed minaudière; $450. 6. j.crew A simple, elegant, and airy choice for summer is J.Crew’s satin Keepsake clutch; $118.

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S T Y L E SHOES

Walk This Way

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Veronica Lake, the American film actress and pin-up model, was born in 1922 as Constance Frances Marie Ockelman. The Brooklyn-born baby would eventually change her name and move to Hollywood, where she received both popular and critical acclaim, most notably for her portrayal as a young, failed actress in Sullivan’s Travels and for her femme fatale roles in film-noir movies of the 1940s. Lake cultivated a come-hither coyness with her peek-a-boo hairstyle and open-toed shoes. This summer, you can cultivate your own style with a selection of open-toed shoes, in both heels and flats. Lilly Pulitzer offers a seasonal standby—the espadrille, in natural canvas—while Ralph Lauren and Manolo Blahnik serve up sexy heels.

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1. lilly pulitzer Every woman loves an espadrille in summer, so why not pick up some height this season by picking up the Lilly Pulitzer Picture Perfect Espadrille, in natural?; $198. 2. ralph lauren Accessories from Ralph Lauren Collection are increasingly irresistible with every season, and the Dakota python sandal, a stacked stiletto in Ralph Lauren tan, is no exception; $895. 3. manolo blahnik Extend the look of your legs by strapping in to Manolo Blahnik’s “Hard” heel, in brown leather; $965. 4. j.crew The Merkato platform heels from J.Crew, in sand dune, are simply inviting; $275. 5. kate spade Say “aloha” in Kate Spade’s Hula Too sandals, with pineapple embellishment and t-strap in shiny patent (flo pink or old gold); $225.

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Bright Eyed Audrey Hepburn plays Nicole Bonnet, the daughter of genius art fraud Charles Bonnet, in William Wyler’s 1966 romantic comedy How To Steal A Million. She stars opposite Peter O’Toole, in the role of Simon Dermott, who’s caught by Hepburn’s character sneaking through her house clutching a forged painting. The film is fraught with theft; Hepburn, in turn, must steal a statue from a Paris museum to help conceal her father’s art forgeries, which means prancing about Paris in an array of hats, masks, and sunglasses. This summer, don’t duck around and conceal yourself from the crowd behind your shades. Instead, earn notice and embrace big and bold frames, like these trendy picks.

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1. christian dior Warm weather calls for hot pink, like Dior’s Mohotani/S in fuchsia and hot pink; $295. 2. bottega venetta Bottega Venetta’s 157/S sunglasses are as light as summer lavender; $395. 3. marc jacobs The classic aviator takes flight with a modern flair in Marc Jacobs’ 316/S sunglasses, in a rich red with gold accents; $325. 4. balenciaga Balenciaga

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makes a nod to mod with these white and blue plastic 0106/S frames with cool blue lenses; $325. 5. valentino Nothing’s cooler than all white, like Valentino’s 5746/S shades; $275. 6. gucci Color your days purple and blue Gucci’s 3191/S; $275. 7. alexander mcQueen Long live McQueen with the cool 4178/S lenses; $325. 8. prada Go for baroque: Prada’s Baroque Deluxe lenses are sure to make a statement; $380.

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ACCESSORIES MEN’S

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The Boys Are Back Boyish and clean-cut style was all the rage for the men of Hollywood during its Golden Age in the 1940s. Here, American film actor John Payne, best known for his leading role as Fred Gailey in Miracle on 34th Street, sports classic spring attire. Part of the 20th Century Fox stable of actors, Payne had an affair with screen siren Jane Russell after separating from his first wife, Anne Shirley. Whether you’re playing the field yourself, or simply packing for a weekend getaway, find inspiration in Payne’s sporty look that doesn’t go out of style. Or pick up some fashion cues from these trendsetting designers—and don’t forget to accessorize.

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1. david yurman The exotic stone Curb Chain bracelet in malachite; $2,100. 2. ralph lauren Go retro chic with these keyhole sunglasses by Ralph Lauren Purple Label; $375. 3. theory A good trench makes a great accessory, like Theory’s Decker trench in seed; $495. 4. jimmy choo Now men, too, can discover the joy of Jimmy Choo; these Cavendish sneakers in turquoise are part of the brand’s debut men’s line; $660. 5. louis vuitton Pack up this summer with this nylon damier duffle bag; $1,070. 6. etro From prints to paisleys, no one has more fun with swimsuits than Etro: printed nylon swim trunks; $250. 7. havaianas Summer wouldn’t be complete without a pair of Havaianas sandals, like the Top Mix; $22.

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A C C E S S O R I E S W omen ’ s

Girls Are Talking Silent film star Bessie Love was known for her small frame and delicate features. Sitting under this beach umbrella by the sea, she looks every bit the innocent young girl she played in her first roles on screen. One of the few stars who transitioned from silent film to the “talkies,” she received an Academy Award nomination for The Broadway Melody in 1929. She moved to England in 1935, but continued to entertain audiences, notably the troops during World War II. Whether you’re the quiet kind or a more garrulous girl, one thing’s for sure—your accessories speak volumes for you, so be selective with some standout seasonal pieces.

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4 2 1. ralph lauren Saddle up your style with Ralph Lauren’s leather studded rodeo belt; $1,695. 2. j.crew J.Crew’s Slubby scarf in seashore sand is so soft; $45. 3. irwin & jordan Hats are back, and not just at royal weddings; try on this sophisticated Serafine lace wide brim Trilby hat by British sensation Irwin & Jordan. 4. asprey Keep your keys on court and off with the sterling Tennis Racket Keyring from Asprey; $270. 5. lilly pulitzer Your iPad’s safe poolside in Lilly Pulitzer’s netbook sleeve in classic white “Do The Wave” pattern; $24.95. 6. hermès The Steeple wallet in H-printed toile canvas is equestrian chic as only Hermès does; $680. 7. anya hindmarch Penny Tote in beige canvas with chocolate tan leather handles; $250. 8. tory burch The nylon logo Zip Continental wallet is hot in blood orange; $175.

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Keeping Your Cool Widely regarded as one of the best-dressed men in Hollywood, Rock Hudson was born in Winnetka, Illinois, the son of an auto mechanic and telephone operator. Best known for his deep voice and thick head of hair, Hudson appeared on screen opposite Doris Day. Leaning against a mint-green car, his gray shirt and slacks look as on point as the spring runways did this season. Grays and greens are always cool, as everyone from Ralph Lauren to Hermès to Theory prove.

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1. band of outsiders Go green in these olive drawstring shorts ($175) and cotton ripstop workshirt ($265), paired with a gray ribbed cotton jersey tee ($175) and Band of Outsiders for Sperry boat shoes ($175). 2. ralph lauren A gray look from Ralph Lauren Black Label, including the tech silk Flyaway Bomber ($1,795). 3. hermès Metis lambskin T-shirt with Tunisian collar ($3,300), cotton straight narrow trousers ($660), and “Caracas” sandals in toile H-Panama canvas and calfskin ($760). 4. etro This summer look from Etro shows that sophisticated prints aren’t just for the ladies: Tribal silk shirt ($1,150) paired with silk board shorts ($1,450). 5. theory Cool tones in Theory’s reliable color palette are always a safe bet, no matter what season: Marcelo heather T-shirt ($65), Karl pants in seed ($175), black Rhys sweater ($225).

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110 East 55th Street

N e w Yo r k , N e w Yo r k 1 0 0 2 2

Te l e p h o n e : ( 2 1 2 ) 7 5 5 - 7 3 7 2

Fax: (212) 755-7627

www.belgianshoes.com


Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

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“When we were children, we used to think that when we were grown up, we would no longer be vulnerable. But to grow up is to accept vulnerability. To be alive is to be vulnerable,” said author Madeleine L’Engle. Renée Zellweger is most definitely alive. And she is also perhaps the most nakedly vulnerable movie actress currently performing. She has two sides, onscreen. One is defiantly spunky, resourceful, determined. The other side is an appealing cry for love. There’s the don’t-mess-with-me chin, the slightly scrunched-up look of being just on the verge of tears, The spunky side reminds me of Ginger Rogers. The hurt side is very Marilyn Monroe. It is unusual to have the ability to combine both. (Ginger was never terribly convincing when she had to go too soft. Marilyn had a difficult time expressing toughness and anger onscreen.) Renée walks the tightrope of these emotions and personality traits, and her expertise at

Living Legend Renée Zellweger

by

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Liz Smith

never going too much one way or the other has assured her particular place and value in the pantheon. I’ve known the Texas-born Renée for a number of years. (She is of Swiss and Norwegian ancestry, and her good-looking mother still has more than a trace of her Norwegian accent. Her father is quite a looker, too.) Like everybody else, I was charmed by Renée’s breakout role in 1996’s Jerry Maguire. She uttered one of the all-time great modern movie lines: “You had me at ‘hello.’” Somehow, she managed to hold her own against the dynamo that is Tom Cruise. At that point, I hadn’t realized she’d played small roles in Reality Bites and Empire Records. And I had no idea she’d starred in, and survived, The Return of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. Renée was the only victim allowed to


RenĂŠe Zellweger is considered one of the most likeable actresses today. > Opposite: Zellweger played the lead in Bridget Jonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diary, in 2001, and Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, in 2004.


get out alive, and when I forced myself to watch the movie, years later (after I’d met Renée) I saw that her special qualities were evident even then—under the gore and the screaming, there she was—fighting for her life, and oh-so-huggable. But, of course, Renée began making real history with Bridget Jones’s Diary. She’d already won a Golden Globe for the quirky Nurse Betty, but her portrayal of the insecure, self-deprecating Bridget, comically besotted by Colin Firth, put her on map for good. She’d gained weight for the role, which the tabloids made a big deal out of. But the Helen Fielding novel on which the movie was based made a point of Bridget’s plumpness and her issues with that. “If you’re not going to be who she is, then what’s the point?” explained Renée when some people thought her dedication to the role was extreme. The result was a voluptuous Renée, comically different from her usual delicate appearance, but hardly unattractive. And her Brit accent was superb. Renée would receive her first Oscar nomination for Bridget.

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She then inhabited the role of murderess Roxie Hart in the screen version of Kander & Ebb’s musical Chicago. Here, truthfully, was the role Renée was born to play. A fevered fantasist, pugnacious but frightened, concerned less about dying at the end of a hangman’s noose than her coverage in the newspapers. She was every bit as razz-ma-tazzy as Ginger Rogers had been in the non-musical version, Roxie Hart, back in 1944. But there was that other side—Monroe as the talentless “chanteuse” of Bus Stop. When Renée’s Roxie gives full vent to her visions of fame and fortune and glamour, it comes out in one of the screen’s great musical numbers. In silvery spangles, set against a black background, Roxie envelops herself in a dream world she cannot possibly hope to conquer in her waking hours. She bumps, she grinds, she purrs. “I’m a star. And the audience loves me. And I love them. And they love me for lovin’ them and I love them for lovin’ me. And we love each other. And that’s cause none of


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RenĂŠe Zellweger is known to transform for her roles, often changing her hair color and weight. > Opposite: In 1996, the actress co-starred with Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire.


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us got enough love in our childhoods. And that’s showbiz, kid.” I’ll say it was showbiz! And it was genius. Renée was again Oscar nominated as Best Actress. She did not win. (Her co-star Catherine ZetaJones, who played Velma Kelly, took a statuette for Best Supporting Actress and Nicole Kidman won the top spot for The Hours.) The following year, Renée co-starred with Kidman in Cold Mountain, playing tough-talking Ruby Thewes, helping Kidman’s character survive the horrors of the Civil War. Renée was terrific, and her chopping the head off that rooster was a small but epic moment. Nominated for Best Supporting Actress, Renée finally took the gold. But many in Hollywood felt that no matter how good she was in Cold Mountain, the Academy was compensating her for Chicago. It was several years and several films later that I finally met Renée. She’d written me several sweet notes thanking me for my support, but we’d never sat for a chat. So, on rather drizzly morning I met with Miss Z. at a café on Central Park South. She wore gray sweatpants, a nondescript T-shirt, and running shoes. She had not a stitch of makeup on

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her face. She looked about fifteen years old. I felt complimented that she had shown herself to me sans flash and foundation. She behaved instantly as if we were old friends—which we were, kind of—and a good deal of our talk was about her growing up in Texas. (She was born in Katy.) She wasn’t like an actress at all, though she said she’d gotten the bug early. I don’t recall if she was promoting a movie. I don’t think she was. She seemed simply to want to meet me, thank me personally for what I’d written about her over the years, and…just talk. Like girlfriends. By that time she’d been in and out of relationships with Matthew McConaughey and Jim Carrey. She’d later marry country singer Kenny Chesney. Their marriage ceremony lasted fiteen minutes. The marriage itself lasted only a bit longer. Renée received the only bad publicity of her career in the wake of the Chesney divorce—she awkwardly worded a statement about the separation, which brought a lot of speculation down on Chesney. But that was the past. I never cared why it didn’t worked and I never pressed her. The protective vibe she gives off is strong—and genuine. There’s nothing tragic about her. But she seems a bit too open to be in such a ruthless business— the land of false positives and relentless negatives. We parted affectionately. And then, she sent a spectacular thank you. Wonderful cookies from a place called DeLuscious Cookies & Milk. And it didn’t stop there. Christmas, my birthday, any mention of her in my column—those incredible cookies would arrive. I sent her back a note once: “Honey, you are always so skinny—you have to have a few of these cookies for yourself?!” (Renée insists she’s not a fanatic dieter. “I have a huge energy level. I burn it off!”) Since that time, I’ve run into Renée quite a number of times in Manhattan. She was always adorable, friendly, and made one feel you’d be ready challenge somebody to a duel if they dared to hurt her in any way. In March of this year, Renée was to be honored at the Austin Film Society annual gala. She was to be inducted into its Hall of Fame. I knew the Austin Film Society well. I’d been inducted myself, and had the honor of inducting former Texas governor Ann Richards. It was always a wonderful event. So imagine my surprise when the event’s big man, Evan Smith, called to say, “We are inducting Renée Zellweger this year.” I said, “Oh, fabulous. And she’s a real Texan, at least!” (The AFS has inducted non-Texans in the past; they are quite democratic that way.) Evan said: “Well, Liz, one little problem. She is insisting that you, and only you, can induct her, hand her the award. I think it’s a deal-breaker if you don’t come.”


This page, clockwise from top left: Zellweger began her career in Texas; in 2008, she starred in Leatherheads; no stranger to red carpets; as Bridget Jones; in the Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1994; she recently split from Bradley Cooper; the paparazzi document her every move; the actress embodies a vulnerability not unlike Marilyn Monroe; dancing with Catherine Zeta-Jones in Chicago. > Opposite: Zellweger received an Oscar for her role in Cold Mountain in 2003; the actress has been in 39 films so far in her career.

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Hmmm…well, I thought Evan was gilding the lily—surely Renée’s presence did not depend on me?!— but it was vastly flattering. I agreed. I arrived at the old Austin aircraft hangar where the gala was being held. I was taken to Renée’s table, where she was surrounded by her parents, her brother, and her godparents. She looked divine in a strapless black cocktail dress. We chatted like magpies before the lights went down. The event itself was not up to past efforts, and it was freezing cold in the room, but Renée was a trooper. And in accepting her award from me, she was lovely but mercifully brief in her thank-yous. The night had been punctuated by very long introductions and acceptance speeches. By everyone else. Renée and Rip Torn were succinct. Everything broke up fast after that. We posed for pictures and then Renée was hauled off for other duties. I headed back to the Four Seasons in Austin. It had been a long night, but I decided to have a margarita and a beef slider in the lounge before turning in. I’d barely taken a sip when, who should arrive but Miss Z. and her party? She, too, was staying at the Four Seasons. She was way across on the other side of the room. I did not want to oblige her to recognize me, wave, or otherwise be any sweeter than she’d been. I thought I’d allow her to relax. But quicker than you can say Southern charm and hospitality, the movie star left her parents, brother, godparents and dashed

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across the room in her perilously high heels, sat down with me, and stayed for almost two hours! I was floored by her generosity of spirit. But I was even more impressed by her immense curiosity, her eagerness to learn and listen. For all her adult smarts, she is much like an eager adolescent; she jumps in her seat and gestures expansively. She is the personification of charm. (As James M. Barrie said—if you have it, nothing else matters, if you don’t, it doesn’t much matter what else you have.) We spoke that night about the internet, blogging, Facebook, reality TV, the coarsening of the cultural landscape, the lack of civility in this cyber age, the bizarre nature of modern stardom—who and what is a star these days? (She also loves science and history, as do I, and she laughed, “Oh, you’re the other one watching those programs about how the universe was formed!”) She was deeply curious as to my thoughts. I felt I knew her better than ever after that evening. She seems to be still attempting to understand her own stardom and what it means. She knows the press finds her a little odd. Because of that vulnerable quality, they would like her to be a victim. But she won’t go that way. And she’s not a villainess, either. How do you solve a problem like Renée, ask the gossip sites? She is an actress and a woman still in search of herself, in a business that often short circuits self-awareness. But she’s not a drag about her journey. She’s not pretentious. She is so open and real that after we finally said our goodbyes that evening, I thought, “She is the kind of girl men fall madly in love with over one dinner.” Alas, right after our Texas jaunt, Renée and her beau of two years, handsome Bradley Cooper, announced they were splitting. His loss, I say! Renée has confessed, “My life has far exceeded what I might have ever dreamed because I could never have been so bold as to dream that these things might happen to me.” But I don’t see Renée as a dreamer. I see her as a searcher. She’s looking for the answers. And while none of us find all the answers, I think Renée will find many, which will then lead her to more seeking. She’s a movie star. But that’s just what she does for a living. That’s only one part of the story. And not that big a part. Renée Zellweger is a real person trying to make sure she has a real life once the klieg lights sputter a bit. She’s no fool. She knows what matters. Now, if she’d just have another cookie… u

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RenĂŠe Zellweger has been recognized with an Oscar and three Golden Globes. Inset: Zellweger with Liz Smith at the Texas Film Hall of Fame Awards, presented by the Austin Film Society. > Opposite, from top: Critics raved over Zellweger's Roxie Hart in Chicago, in 2002; the author likens the actress's spunk to Ginger Rogers'.


< Gray Suiting

Falling Forward by

Daniel Cappello

and

Elizabeth Meigher

Gucci

For the first time,

we’re excited to offer a full smattering of trends that truly inspired us on the Fall 2011 runways. Smart suiting in shades of gray defined the look of the reticent dresser; meanwhile, our assemblage of “blood orange” is sure to speak to the more fiery. Retro prints rocked the runways, and subtle sheers proved swish. Winter white, black leather, and beige are always sexy and chic—you can never have too much of any of them. We were thrilled to see a penchant for green, from celadon to “Welly” to olive. The green movement, as fall runways proved, is definitely in!


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Gray Suiting > Gray tones—a classic for fall—are

Akris

To m m y H i l f i g e r

suit cuts.

Marc Jacobs

in sharp, modern

C a ro l i n a H e r re ra

S a l va t o re Fe r ra g a m o

brought to life

< Blood Orange For the bold at heart, blood orange adds a

Prabal Gurung

shades of autumn.

Lu c a Lu c a

E t r o

Gucci

Ti b i

zest of life to the safer

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Retro Print > The â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s live on in these

and shows off

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Fe n d i

an edgy sexiness.

Max Mara

bold and confident,

Ra l p h L a u r e n

Black leather is

Piazza Sempione

Leather >

Prabal Gurung

Milly

Erdem

E t ro

Cy n t h i a Row l e y

C a ro l i n a H e r re ra

Miu Miu

inspired prints.


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< Sheer Feminine, sophisticated, alluringâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t underestimate

< Shades Of Beige For fall, deisgners are proving that beige is anything E l i e Ta h a r i

Va l e n t i n o

Dennis Basso

Carolina Herrera

Max Mara

Va l e n t i n o

Ra l p h L a u re n

Va l e n t i n o

C a ro l i n a H e r re ra

Christian Cota

Gucci

the power of sheer.

but boring.

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Cy n t h i a Row l e y

Chanel

Chloe

Ra l p h L a u re n

Milly

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Greens > From Brunswick green to British green, celadon to celery, greens are in for the season.

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Des ig ner N ame

Milly

Yigal Azrouël

Prada

Chanel

E l i e Ta h a r i

< Winter Whites No matter how you wear it—in jackets, suits, or dresses—winter white will warm you up.


Piazza Sempione

< Greens

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Milly’s Moment It’s a year of milestones for Michelle Smith, and everything is coming up Milly. by

Pretty. Smart.

Colorful. Sexy, but not overtly so. Playful, but not comical. Modern, but not too conceptual. Classic, but not boring. Much like women, the Milly brand is a study in contradictions. And these same words that so aptly describe the clothes work just as well when talking about the “Milly girl,” or of the designer behind the creations, Michelle Smith. It’s been a banner year for Smith and her clothing line. First, this year marks the tenth anniversary of the company she began with her husband, Andrew Oshrin. In January, Milly launched its first collection of handbags and costume jewelry, which arrived in stores along with the first line of children’s clothing, called “Milly Minis,” for girls ages two

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Georgina Schaeffer

to seven. These are among the first brand extensions (she launched her swimwear line, “Cabana,” in 2005), and they surely will not be the last. Finally, Milly is opening its first store in the United States on Madison Avenue and 73rd Street later this month. This is a year of milestone developments for the brand—a true moment for the thoroughly modern Milly. Over the last decade, Smith has remained consistent in her designs, with collection after collection of smart and sexy clothes known for having a “vintage vibe” combined with a “modern sensibility.” It is her remarkable vigilance that has made her a favorite for cosmopolitan women in this city and around the world. With a finely trained eye, Smith uses bold combinations of color and pattern, but mixed with an air of


Milly designer Michelle Smith, photographed in a dress of her own design at her New York City design studio.


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This page, clockwise from top left: Models backstage during the Milly Spring 2011 show; a Spring Milly look pairs two distinct prints in a daring combination; Dalia Oberlander front row at the Milly Fall 2011 collection show at Bryant Park. > Opposite page, from left: Models backstage at the Fall 2011 show; one of the favorite dresses from Milly’s Spring 2011 collection. Inset: A model backstage, Fall 2011.

easy sophistication to produce witty and whimsical designs. Combine these attributes with luxurious fabrics (often of Smith’s own design), timeless silhouettes, and an attention to detail, and the result is clothing that gets pulled out of the closet year in and year out, because—quite simply—it never goes out of style. A career in fashion beckoned early to Smith, when she was awarded an art-school scholarship to study fashion illustration. A graduate of the Fashion Insitute of Technology in New York, Smith also credits her years studying in Paris at the Ecole Supérieure des Arts et Techniques for her success. Notably, while she was at F.I.T., she worked part-time at Hermès and wrote a letter to the president of the company asking for an internship at its headquarters in Paris. Her request was granted and Smith became the first American employee to ever work for the legendary house in Paris. While in Paris, she worked at several major fashion houses as she continued her studies. At Christian Dior Haute Couture, Smith honed her fashion illustration techniques (a return to her early passion) for Dior’s private clients. This training would serve as a great advantage to her future in design. When she returned to New York

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P h ot 0 C re di t


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three years later, Smith designed her first capsule collection in 2000 with her boyfriend Andy Oshrin, whom she would marry in 2003. The line was quickly picked up by the same stores that carry the Milly brand today—Bergdorf Goodman and Saks Fifth Avenue among them. Oshrin, whose business savvy extends from a family-owned textile company, remains the financial brain behind the brand. Then came the little dress that could. Call it luck, call it timing, but just as WWD was reporting that “retro” was coming back into vogue with full skirts, drop waists, and fifties-florals, one of Smith’s fun and flirty spring dresses found its way onto two major television series’ sets. First worn by Jennifer Aniston as Rachel on “Friends,” and then again by Kristin Davis on “Sex and the City,” this little floral dress put Michelle Smith and Milly on the map. Since those first years, the customer and fan base of Milly has only continued to grow, including such celebrity clients as Gwyneth Paltrow, Victoria Beckham, Beyoncé, and Thandie Newton. Today, Milly is a favorite for current hit television show “Gossip Girl.” Upper East Side It-Girl Blair Waldorf, played by Leighton Meister, often appears in Milly mini-skirts and pea coats, along with her signature headband, creating a modern prep-school appeal.


This page: Illustrations from the Milly Fall 2006 collections; Michelle with her husband and business partner, Andy Oshrin. > Opposite, clockwise from top left: Spring 2001; one of Millyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first brand extensions were the handbags from spring of 2011; Kristin Chenoweth having a laugh in the front row at the Milly Fall fashion show.

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For her most recent collection, Smith revisited the 1970s with culottes, maxi skirts, and bow-tie blouses. But if that sounds like too much of a flashback, the collection maintains that remarkably modern Milly touch. Sassy, but not even a touch rude. Amid a winter white scene of snowtopped trees framing the runway, a blend of bright red, tangerine, and emerald hued pieces (the palette was inspired by Guy Bourdin’s artwork) were paired with high boots, floppy hats, big sunglasses, and the second collection of handbags (all bearing her signature “M” charm, which can be removed for the client who prefers to live without logos). At the end of the show, Smith takes her bow with her daughter, Sophia, who is clad in her own Milly Mini (a scaled down version of the Milly line, using the same colors, fabrics, and designs, just a bit smaller). The little Miss Oshrin visits her mother at the office on Fridays and even works on her own designs. On one recent Friday evening, she set up two chairs and seated her guests—Andy and Michelle—for a show. Music came on and Sophia modeled a design created from two tutus—a confection of color and tulle—in the front hallway of the Oshrin apartment on the Upper East Side. She may not quite be ready for the big stage, but one thing is certain: the girl has fashion and style running through her veins. u

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This page: Looks from the Fall 2011 Milly fashion show. > Opposite, clockwise from top: Michelle Smith, with daughter Sophia, takes a bow at the end of a show; a dress from the Milly Mini collection for children; Fox anchors Kimberly Guilfoyle and Ainsely Earheardt at the Fall Milly fashion show.


Brigitte Bardot wearing a bikini and bangles on the boat La Madrague, in St. Tropez, 1968


S T Y L E

R I Z Z O LI

Q U I N T E S S E N T I A L

An Eye For Style by

Georgina Schaeffer

Each photo in longtime fashion editor and style maven Elizabeth Walker’s new book, Style Book: Fashionable Inspirations (Flammarion), is accompanied only by a short, pithy caption, allowing the images to fully elicit reaction from the reader. To further the eye’s education, Walker often juxtaposes disparate photographs from varying eras against one another, causing the idea behind the fashion to transcend its own time. With 450 images from 1865 to the present, the book is divided into fourteen chapters, highlighting themes of patterns, stripes, polka dots, checks, plaids, florals, denim, exotic influences, swimwear, fur and feathers. “One picture is worth a thousand words,” writes Walker in the introduction. “And these carefully selected images are set to inspire anybody fasSPRING 2011/

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cinated by either fashion, foibles, or simply the photographs themselves. It is all about stylish contrasts, strange situations, and rarely glimpsed pictures, all set to get the mind buzzing and the creative juices flowing.” Walker looks back on iconic moments in fashion history, such as Diana Ross’s striped jumpsuit, Marilyn Monroe’s simple sheath dress, Louis Armstrong’s argyle socks, Kate Moss’s bondage dress, Tom Selleck’s Magnum P.I. jeans, Raquel Welch’s itsy-bitsy bikini, Jackie O’s embroidered peasant blouse, Lauren Hutton’s menswear suit, Farrah Fawcett’s chain-mail tank dress, and many others, each with its own indisputable style. “The earliest example in this little book is a portrait of an Indian army

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This page: Princess Grace of Monaco, wearing a peach towelling turban and a Pucci print dress, at the Palm Beach Club, Monte Carlo, 1972. > Opposite: A couple gazes out over ocean wearing the classic color palette of white and blue: white trousers and a striped trouser suit, 1950.

commander clad in tartan and taken in 1865; facing him is a picture of a Japanese painter in the 1920s, also dressed in plaid,” writes Walker. “One can imagine either of these gentlemen gracing the catwalks of a Comme des Garçons show in Paris.” So while Style Book is small in size (it’s only eight-by-five inches), it is very big on fashion. u


R i zzo li


This page: A design from winning emerging designer Charlotte Hess. > Opposite: Fern Mallis celebrates her birthday while judging the Emerging Designer Competition at Charleston Fashion Week.

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Doing The Charleston Fas hi o n Wi re Pre ss (f ro n t row )

J o sh ua D rak e ( r un w a y m o de l) /

by

When people think of Charleston, South Carolina, the common associations tend to be historical: the Battery, the Civil War, The Citadel, maybe the College of Charleston. As a frequent visitor myself, I always find a delicious new restaurant, an unknown chic boutique, or a gorgeous new home. But it wasn’t until my most recent trip this past March that I found my best discovery—Charleston Fashion Week. Charleston Fashion Week got its start the way so many dreams do—you see something amazing, you get inspired, and that spark becomes the drive into reality. For Ayoka

Jessica Zaganczyk

Lewis of Charleston Magazine that’s exactly how it happened. After attending the 2007 fashion shows in New York City, she and her colleagues, with the help of local P.R. maven Vail Duggan, decided it was time to try their hand at producing their own version of Fashion Week. They saw the potential for their economy and knew they could tap into the wealth of local talent. Within six months of returning from that visit, Charleston Fashion Week was born. Marion Square Park, located in the center of Charleston’s bustling downtown, became the center of the action. With-


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This page, clockwise from top left: designers from the Emerging Designer Competition; makeup backstage; a dress by Troubador; a model wears an ornate flower arrangement at a bridal show. > Opposite, clockwise from top left: “Eavesdrop” mixed media on canvas by Jason Davis; the conclusion of a bridal show; a model gets prepped; backstage; a look from Charlotte Hess; a coat from Troubador; artist Jason Davis.

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fer an inexpensive and competitive platform for undiscovered talent. Past participants include the 2008 winner Carol Hannah Whitfield (later a finalist on Project Runway), 2009 winner Marysia Dobranska Reeves, (whose swimsuits were picked up by Barney’s and featured in the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Edition), and 2009 finalist Lindsey Carter, of Troubador, who was dubbed a “designer to watch” by Women’s Wear Daily. It was this success that led a very established fashion posse down to Charleston to be judges for this year’s Emerging Designer Competition. Led by the Grande Dame of Fashion Week, founder Fern Mallis, this was a group that had seen its fair share of international front rows. The panel consisted of nine fashion veterans, including Elle’s Anne Slowey, Gilt

Kar s o n Ph o to gra p hy / Fas hi on Wi re Pre ss

in days, the large white tents you see at New York’s Fashion Week went up. Retailers, young designers, models, and a slew of sponsors jumped on board. All shows and parties were made available to the general public through ticket purchase. By shedding the longstanding myth of exclusivity typically associated with fashion week, Charleston’s engaged the entire community. For three years, the team behind the effort worked on a shoestring budget and a skeleton crew, but produced solid and respectable designer, retail, and bridal shows season after season. In 2008, Charleston Fashion Week created an Emerging Designer Competition specifically for up-and-coming fashion designers living in the eastern United States. The goal was to of-

J o na th a n ba ll i e t/ Cg yl e Su e z/ Jo s h ua B ra ke /

> Center, from top: a model wears pheasant feathers; Van H Design rings.


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Groupe co-founder Alexis Maybank, VMan’s Derek Blasberg, and Janie Bryant, the costume designer for “Mad Men.” The panel unanimously chose twenty-eight-year-old designer Charlotte Hess as the winner. Each judge was impressed at the level of talent and execution exhibited in her collection of handmade knitwear and women’s ready-to-wear. The win awarded Hess a prize package valued at over $35,000 and included a free runway show at Charleston Fashion Week next season. Not to be treated like a step-child to the designer runway shows are the bridal presentations (which sell out year after year). Charleston is the second most common wedding destination in the U.S. (behind Las Vegas), and these presentations are just as much of an integral part of the week, sharing an equally important role in the marketing and promotion of the week. In the “Style Lounge,” local retailers, artists, and accessories designers also exhibit during the week in a Bazaar-like setting. It also gives attendees a nice place to take a break from the action, get a drink, take a seat, or listen to the DJ. On one of my own runway breaks, I discovered two incredible local talents who

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I’m now obsessed with—jewelry designer Annie Van Harlingen of Van H Designs and contemporary artist Jason Davis. Charleston Fashion Week embraces multimedia in its shows by heavily integrating growing trends in technology. Live tweets are simultaneously projected onto the runway, edgy documentary shorts play for the crowds in between shows, and live musical performances keep the energy high. With iPads now outnumbering notebooks in the front row, Charleston Fashion Week didn’t seem like it was going to have any trouble keeping up with the new 4G generation fashion flock. I left the Lowcountry awed by the potential for Charleston Fashion Week and the city itself. It might one day find itself as relevant to the fashion community as a Los Angeles or a Miami, maybe even surpassing them in a few years. No matter what the future holds for this young-gun of a Fashion Week, there is one thing it has already succeeded in doing—Fern Mallis celebrated her birthday here. Watching from the front row, smiling with delight as the audience serenaded her with “Happy Birthday,” the message was clear: Charleston Fashion Week has arrived. u

Fas hi o n Wi re Pre ss (H e ss o n r u n w ay )/ Cy le Su e sz (m o de l on r un w a y)

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This page: another extraordinary knitwear look designed by Charlotte Hess. > Opposite: Charlotte Hess walks the runway in celebration of her win of the Emerging Designer Competition at Charleston Fashion Week.


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This page, clockwise from left: House of Lavande owner Tracy Smith; House of Lavande vintage earrings ($848); House of Lavande vintage Kenneth Jay Lane bracelet ($2,498). > Opposite: from the jewelry house’s current visual campaign, inspired by a 1969 photo of Britt Ekland by Slim Aarons (inset).

Movers & Shapers A girl can never have too much jewelry. From the big and bold to the delicate and close-at-heart, jewelry is, it turns out, something like a girl’s best friend. Sometimes that favorite piece just falls in your lap (or on your wrist, as it were). Strolling a street on a summer vacation, you stumble upon the cuff you never knew you wanted (or never knew existed, for that matter), but suddenly wouldn’t be able to live without. In today’s world of costume jewelry, there’s a seemingly endless choice of designers to suit every occasion. How’s a girl to choose? Here are spotlights of three favorite standouts to start with.

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Daniel Cappello

House of Lavande > House of Lavande, located in Palm Beach, specializes in vintage jewelry of just about every period, from the Victorian era to the electrifying ’80s. And while the designs may vary, the quality does not. Prices range from $65 to $12,000, which leaves room for just about every woman on every budget. “I never only consider what will sell as a factor when I buy,” owner Tracy Smith explains. “That way, if it doesn’t sell, it is still a part of my private collection.” And private collections are important to Smith. As a collector herself, she wants to help other women cull and edit jewelry collections that will speak to their unique tastes and wardrobes. House of Lavande sets itself apart from other jewelry boutiques by offering consultative services on what pieces of jewelry should be worn with specific clothing. It’s a

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This page, from top left: Sisters Jodie and Danielle Snyder, the owners and designers of DANNIJO; the Bellatrix necklace ($336); the Edra necklace ($595). > Opposite: A runway look from the fashion house Vena Cava’s Fall 2011 show, for which DANNIJO styled the jewelry; the Rex earrings ($370); the ZWI studded cuff in turquoise ($288).

level of customer service that few others can offer. And while clients have come to trust Smith and House of Lavande with their own senses of style, they also look to Smith for inspiration. Her inherent chic permeates House of Lavande, from her closely curated collections to the house’s visual campaigns. This season, Smith captured the house’s jewelry in a campaign meant to conjure the nostalgic old-world Palm Beach glamour and lifestyle in a modern way. Think beautiful blonde women (like Britt Ekland) wearing Lavande jewelry­—the kind of woman who would spend her time in Palm Beach, Cannes, and St.-Tropez, as if living in a Slim Aarons photo. Vintage but modern. Classic but fresh. What’s not to like about that?

Dannijo > Sisters Danielle and Jodie Snyder—the designers behind DANNIJO—are something of the “It” girls on today’s jewelry scene. They’re young. They’re hip. They’re cool. They’re wearing the clothes and jewelry that women everywhere want. They’re their own best models. Ever since breaking out with a display case in Bergdorf Good-

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Bj o r n Lo o ss / p or tra i t; DAN N IJ O / j e we lr y ; Ve na C ava / r u n w ay

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man, they’ve been a media sensation and a hit among trendy women and celebrities alike. When Beyoncé purchased and wore the signature entangled Ruth Celia necklace, the rest was, well, ­history. In life and in their design, Danielle and Jodie certainly complement each other. Jodie has a more classic style, while Danielle’s is a bit more bohemian-meets-rock-’n-roll. “The line is eclectic and speaks to a range of fashion personalities,” Danielle says. “It’s easily individualized and constantly evolving, which sets us apart from other designers who tend to stick to a specific design aesthetic.” Indeed, the influence of their inspiration, from movies, characters, architecture, music, travels, New York City, and their mother—their muse—is reflected in their stylish, confident, and adventuresome jewelry (an apt description for the kind of woman who would wear it, too). This year, DANNIJO took a leap from boutiques and department stores straight to the runway. Fashion designers, including current sensations Bibhu Mohapatra and Vena Cava, approached them to style their shows. The results were capsule

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collections that were very different from their current lines. “Collaborating with other designers really forces you to push yourself creatively,” Danielle says. Collaboration seems to be the binding theme with DANNIJO. After all, Danielle and Jodie are sisters, best friends, and business partners—a prolific marriage, to say the least.

This page: The designer Nicholas Liu in his studio in Sheung Wan, Hong Kong, at his mood board (left) and workbench (right); the Tilda earrings ($1,600). > Opposite: The Waterfall Necklace ($3,500) and Waterfall Bracelet ($2,435); the Wings of Victory Earrings ($1,025). Liu doesn’t have a favorite material or shape per se; instead, he says, “I am interested in composition—the relationship between shapes that are placed together.”

his eye for the artistic. As a child, his parents, who are both art collectors, regularly took him to auction houses and galleries. They’d point out what distinguished the “best of” pieces from the flawed pieces, laying the groundwork for his formal training in art, design, and jewelry at institutions like Central St. Martins, Buckinghamsire, and the Royal College of Art in London. It’s no surprise, then, that Liu’s jewelry is marked by an extraordinary sense of style and design, with an acutely sharp sense of detail. After finishing design school, Liu worked as a product designer and brand consultant for the likes of Shanghai Tang, Kotur Ltd., and Blanc de Chine. Finding multiple product lines a bit broad, he decided to focus on jewelry, and has never looked back since. “I loved that in such a small item, the minutest of details can make a good

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piece of jewelry into an amazing piece of jewelry,” he explains. Liu’s pieces are refined works of art. He marries stones with the luscious nature of previous metals to create organic forms that are juxtaposed with elegant curves. There’s an influence of art deco in his work, along with an haute couture quality, which has attracted an international following. Liu is distinguished on today’s jewelry market by offering products on a slightly larger scale. “I am not price-conscious,” he admits. “I design and then create the pieces not knowing what the final price will be.” This commitment to his artistic vision—often inspired by Maharajas overloaded with jewelry, or maximalist interiors that he loves—is well appreciated by his clients, who, typically, are women who take time to style their outfits to their best advantage, even if it means changing jewelry to go from lunch to business appointments to dinner. Above all, according to Liu, “Jewelry is an emotional purchase, so I encourage clients to buy the best they can afford—it will only pay off in the future.” u

Ca ro ly n Fo n g P h o to grap h y / p o r t ra i ts ; D an M cC oy P h o to grap h y / j e wel r y

Nicholas Liu > Nicholas Liu has had a long time training


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Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pastime by

Georgina Schaeffer

This page: Baseball legend Mickey Mantle. > Inset: Chicago White Sox baseball camp, 2008. > Opposite: President Richard Nixon tossing a baseball at the Senatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opening game in Washington, D.C., 1969.


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Walt Whitman wrote,

“I see great things in baseball. It’s our game—the American game. It will take our people out-of-doors, fill them with oxygen, give them a larger physical stoicism. Tend to relieve us from being a nervous, dyspeptic set. Repair these losses, and be a blessing to us.” The quintessential American sport, baseball can trace its roots all the way back to fourteenth-century France. But the sport as we know it became codified in “The Knickerbocker Rules,” written by

Alexander Cartwright (a member of New York City’s Knickerbockers Club), in 1845, with the first “official” game taking place in Hoboken, New Jersey, on June 19, 1846. The baseball craze took over Manhattan in the mid-1850s, and, by 1856, the game had its first governing body, the “National Association of Base Ball Players.” Baseball has remained the classic American pastime ever since. After all, as Humphery Bogart put it,“A hot dog at the ballgame beats roast beef at the Ritz.” SPRING 2011/

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This page, clockwise from top left: Tommy Thevenowe of Indiana; Tim Cullen playing for the Oakland As, 1972; crowds gather watching a scoreboard during the 1911 World Series game in New York; early baseball card for New York Yankee Russ Ford; the Pittsburgh Crawfords, 1935; Bob Feller at an old-timersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; game at Doubleday Field in Cooperstown, New York, 2010; > Opposite, clockwise from top left: the Polo Grounds in New York, 1910; captains of the twelve clubs in the National Baseball League, 1895; Casey Stengel and Ted Williams pose with their plaques at Baseballâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hall of Fame, July 25, 1966; Hall of Famers Jim Rice and Ricky Henderson; Fresno State player Drew Bourdet; three baseball stars, George Sisler, Babe Ruth, and Ty Cobb at the World Series, October, 1924.


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This page, above: Playground baseball, May, 1914. Below: Joe DiMaggio salutes his bat, 1941. > Opposite: Babe Ruth signs a ball for a fan at an all-star game, Griffith Stadium, 1937. Inset: a portrait of Babe Ruth, circa 1920.

Robin Ashford Macy Occupation > Swimwear designer. When did you begin watching baseball? > When I was five years old. What’s your first baseball memory? > My brothers’ little league games. What’s your favorite stadium? > Yankees! Do you have any game-day traditions? > I don’t cross my legs when they swing. Do you have any good-luck charms? > A Yankee cap. What’s your fondest baseball memory? When I was the princess of my father’s softball team!

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Pamela Friedman Occupation > Table linen designer. When did you begin watching baseball? > My earliest memory of going to a game is from third grade. What’s your first baseball memory? > The Yankees/Orioles game at Yankee Stadium. What’s your favorite stadium? > Yankee Stadium. What’s your fondest baseball memory? > As a child, attending many Yankees games in the first row, behind the third base dugout. And getting lots of autographs from visiting players. SPRING 2011/

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Phil Negus

Occupation > Travel journalist. When did you begin watching baseball? > I began watching baseball regularly as a young teenager back in the 1970s. What’s your first baseball memory? > I went to a game with my best friend from grammar school and her dad back 1972. I remember being in awe at the size of Yankee stadium. I also vividly remember ordering a hot dog and coke and thinking how great a hot dog tasted at the stadium as opposed to at home! What’s your favorite stadium? > Oh, I didn’t realize there were stadiums other than Yankee Stadium in the Bronx? Do you have any game-day traditions? > Absolutely! I always go to my local deli in Manhattan and order a turkey sandwich on a roll with lettuce, tomato, and hot peppers to bring to the game. If I don’t get the sandwich, they won’t win. Do you have any good-luck charms? > I always wear my yankee hat, rally style. What is your fondest baseball memory? > Taking my father to opening day in 1999. I had first-row seats near home plate. My dad was so impressed that his “little girl” could get such great seats. My other great memory is being at the stadium for David Wells’s perfect game.

Occupation > Chicago White Sox Minor Leaguer. When did you begin watching baseball? > I’ve been watching baseball for as long as I can remember. What’s your first baseball memory? > I’m not sure if it’s my first memory, but my most vivid memory is going to my first game at Fenway Park in Boston. I can still remember coming up the ramp from the concourse to the field and seeing the field for the very first time. What’s your favorite stadium? > My favorite stadium to watch a game is Fenway Park, and my favorite stadiums to play are Turner Field (Braves Field) in Atlanta and Florida State’s stadium. Do you have any game-day traditions? > The only ritual I have is, before throwing my warm-up pitches before the start of a game, I slap the rosin bag. Do you have any good-luck charms? > Baseball players are very superstitious, but I don’t have anything I wear specifically. Sorry, no rally thongs or anything. What is your fondest baseball memory? > My fondest memories were winning two New England prep-school titles for Exeter and being drafted by the White Sox. u

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Lisa Loverro


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This page: Umpire Dick Nallin makes the call as Washington Senatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Earl McNeely slides safe into home against the Red Sox, September 6, 1925. > Inset: a baseball card for Edward J. Abbaticchio, who played for the Boston Nationals, circa 1910. > Opposite: The New York Yankees winning the World Series.


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Maggie Cordish

“We are not lost. That’s what we want you all to know. All we need is a little help.” That was the message thoughtfully delivered by Peterson Rodriguez at the most recent meeting of the New Yorkers For Children Friends Committee. There was not a dry eye in the room. Rodriguez, age nineteen, spent thirteen years of his young life in foster care, following a childhood branded by the hallmarks of poverty and neglect. He is now a junior at John Jay College, an aspiring psychologist, and a survivor. He is also a New Yorkers For Children Guardian Scholar, a program that provides him with comprehensive support, the way a family otherwise would, as he transitions into adulthood. The idea is to supplement financial aid with the equally critical emotional and academic assistance for children in foster care. This has been the mission and practice of New Yorkers For Children since its founding, in 1996, by the former commissioner of New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, Nicholas Scoppetta. Scoppetta’s tenure there was marked by his strides to reform the agency and build partnerships with


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Above: youth in foster care at the NYFC Information Technology Network to Success; below: Chantel Johnson, 2005 NYFC Spirit Award recipient, serving as a panelist at the NYFC Information Technology Network to Success on March 16, 2011. > Opposite: New Yorkers For Children Friends Committee members with a young volunteer at the NYFC 2010 Wrap to Rap.

organizations such as the public school system to provide children in foster care with broad-based support. New Yorkers For Children steps in to supplement the basic services provided by ACS, funding programs across the city to meet such diverse needs as job training, tutoring, and college scholarships. “These kids and young adults know what it is like to suffer and overcome great hardship,” says Allison Aston, the Friends Committee’s programming chair. “They have direction and want to succeed badly. We just try to help them get there.” As a longtime supporter and a Friends Committee member, I have been fortunate enough to witness first-hand the tremendous efficiency, ingenuity, and success of many of its initiatives. “Young people in foster care have personal and professional goals, just like everyone else,” says executive director Susan Magazine. “The difference is that they often lack the means and resources to reach them. New Yorkers For Children has created programs that provide these youth with the essential tools to reach those goals and become successful, self-sufficient adults.”


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Walking into New Yorkers for Children’s annual educational conference, the energy is palpable. Last year, nearly one hundred children attended, showing up with the kind of eager-eyed determination that undoubtedly helped them navigate a life full of obstacles, and which will, with a little luck and support, propel them through the challenges of college. Last year, the organization sent nearly one thousand back-to-school packages to college-enrolled youth in foster care, including everything from laptops and printers to bed linens. “I mentored a young woman named Zhanna Raymond who I am proud to say is now going to college as a Hugh Jackman-New Yorkers for Children Guardian Scholar,” says CNN correspondent and Friends Committee member Alina Cho. “She is supported financially for as long

as she is enrolled in school. And that is invaluable.” An indisputable goal of a Friends Committee member is to support the development efforts of the group, including its annual benefit events, which have become fixtures on the New York social landscape. Last year’s “A Fool’s Fête” raised nearly $450,000 in a single night, and this year’s benefit sold out before the invitations were even printed. It raised a record high of over $575,000. But that is only a small part of what it means to be involved with such an organization, where every member is expected to not just put his or her name on the invitation, but also to roll up sleeves. What might be most amazing is the way these children touch our lives. “I feel so lucky to get to be a part of such a special organization and to get to meet amazing people like Peterson,”


This spread, clockwise from top left: redecorating at the ACS Children’s Center; the writer and Tinsley Mortimer at Wrap to Rap; 2008 Spring Dinner Dance; Sports Network to Success with Alonzo Mourning; Zac Posen and Selita Ebanks at 2009 Wrap to Rap; Nicholas Scoppetta with inaugural Guardian Scholars Jessica and Basilia at Hunter College graduation; 2010 Fall Gala; 2010 Spring Dinner Dance; NYFC cocktail reception 2010.

said Marisa Brown, Friends Committee chair. The courage and determination of the children that enter our programs is intoxicating. “I want to be a therapist,” Rodriguez said, eyes gleaming with pride, “I want to help other people, the way you all helped me.” That is the thing about giving, it’s contagious. It spreads out and multiplies in so many unexpected ways. u  


Ralph Lauren Ralph Lauren, the ultimate American fashion designer, has built an empire that stands for timeless beauty. This spring, that classic American beauty can be identified as Blair Husainâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the perfect muse for this beaded long dress of embroidered tulle.

Dressing The Best Eight designers illustrate looks inspired by their favorite leading ladies about town. By daniel cappello

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Dennis Basso Dennis Basso is the king of fur, but he is also sought after for his fashion-forward designs and dresses, which are regularly spotted on the most fĂŞted women on the Manhattan gala circuit. This black silk tulle dress is a natural fit for the ever-elegant Ivanka Trump.


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Carolina Herrera Known for her elegant, sophisticated style, Carolina Herrera has been adored by the likes of everyone from Jacqueline Onassis to Nicole Kidman. Here, Herrera has designed an etched organza gown with black faille Korean bow for the impeccable Julia Koch, one of New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest supporters of the artsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and one of the best dressed, at that.

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J. Mendel Gilles Mendel, fifth-generation heir apparent of J. Mendel, transitioned the family fur house into ready-to-wear in 2003. He’s been the go-to master of draping ever since. Here, he has designed a tiger lily washed crêpe-de-Chine strapless gown with skirt peplum for New York’s stylish Dr. Lisa Airan.


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Katie Ermilio Katie Ermilio, whose family has dressed everyone from Bouviers to Eisenhowers, designed this pink silk faille dress for the trend-setting Pop editor Shala Monroque. “Nobody mixes modern and retro better than Shala,” says Ermilio. “This dress pays homage to her classic taste and uniquely feminine style.”

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J.Crew This one-shoulder silver metallic tulle dress with silk tulle overlay sprayed with antiqued bugle beads and sequins would be the perfect fit for British-born model and It-girl Poppy Delevigne. This chic knee-length dress was designed by Tom Mora, J.Crewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Weddings & Parties Collection designer.

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Christian Cota CFDA/ Vogue Fashion Fund-nominated Christian Cota is one of the most talked-about young designers, and a favorite of style maven Lauren Santo Domingo, for whom he designed this spring look, which he describes as â&#x20AC;&#x153;an urban garden...deconstructed flowers, fuchsias, yellows, and saturated prints.â&#x20AC;?

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Naeem Khan Here, Naeem Khan designs a flirty cocktail dress for Bergdorf Goodman’s Linda Fargo. As Khan says, “Linda is confident and has a luxurious sense of style, embodying the qualities of the Naeem Khan woman. It is not just about wearing a dress—it is about having an experience and making a statement.”

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To celebrate the opening of the new exhibition “Balenciaga and Spain,” 350 guests representing the international fashion, art, tech, and social worlds gathered on March 24 at the de Young Museum in Golden State Park. The exhibition, guest curated by Vogue’s Hamish Bowles, was organized by the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco and presented by sponsors Google and Boutiques.com. The evening included a three-course, sit-down dinner and a performance by the seven-member troupe Archangel Flamenco, of Seville, Spain.

1. Suzy Dominick, Joy Bianchi, and Hamish Bowles; 2. Maggie Rizer; 3. Miranda Kerr; 4. Connie Nielsen, Vanessa Getty, and Maria Bello; 5. Anna Wintour and John Buchanan; 6. Trevor Traina and Vanessa Carlton; 7. Jamie Tisch.

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Guests showed for the Brooklyn Artsts Ball on April 27 at the Brooklyn Museum from every borough. The event, hosted by Stephanie Ingrassia and “Work of Art’s” Sarah Jessica Parker, celebrated arts and culture in Brooklyn, and the artists like Norman M. Feinberg, Lorna Simpson, Fred Tomaselli, and Fred Wilson, whose work defines the local scene. Sixteen artists, including Sara VanDerBeek and Dustin Yellin, created unique centerpieces, or “environments,” for each banquet table, around which the attendees were invited to dine.

1. Matthew Wilkin, Julia Chapman, and Jeffrey Sched; 2. Matthew Settle; 3. Sarah Jessica Parker and Liv Tyler; 4. Hannah Bronfman; 5. Michelle Finocchi, Bettina Prentice, and Kristy Corcoran; 6. Elizabeth Edelman and Max Levai. 7. Bob Colacello, Dustin Yellen, and Vito Schnabel 8. Carlton DeWoody, Gillian Schwartz, Kyle DeWoody, and Gordon Hull.

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Palm Beach

The Paradise Fund held a benefit on April 14 at the Salvatore Ferragamo store. The event showcased a capsule collection designed exclusively for the resort community by Massimiliano Giornetti, creative director at Salvatore Ferragamo. A percentage of proceeds from the party benefited the hosting charity, which was formed in 2005 by a group of Palm Beach residents seeking to gather the community in support of the ongoing political, environmental, and social problems being faced by youth around the world. The event was chaired by Loy Anderson, Lourdes Fanjul, and Talbott Maxey.

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1. Kelly Murray, Beth Beattie, and Emily Mateer; 2. Elizabeth and Adam Munder; 3. Kurt von Hofmann and Joanie Elliot; 4. Kristina and Brad McPherson; 5. Richard Segerson and Lauriston Roach; 6. Loy Anderson and Talbott Maxey; 7. Piper Quinn and Lourdes Fanjul.

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Manhattan His Excellency Gérard Araud and the Young

Patrons Circle of American Friends of the Louvre hosted their annual Soirée au Louvre on May 12. The Louvre has recently launched a bold and ambitious contemporary art program, which invites reputable artists to showcase their vision of the Museum’s collections, and Soirée au Louvre screened the most recent venture of this line-up by photographer Nan Goldin, entitled Scopophilia. Guests enjoyed Grey Goose cocktails and carried on the reverie at the afterparty at Lavo.

1. Larissa Buchholz, Blair Brooks, Nilani Trent, and Alison Schrager; 2. Peter Davis, Clay Floren, Lacary Sharpe, and Lisa Yom; 3. Anne Huntington 4. Kipton Cronkite and Annika Connor; 5. Isabelle Forbes and William Fitzgerald; 6. Clare Gidwitz and Elizabeth Whitman; 7. Elizabeth Kurpis and Rebecca Janoff; 8. Meredith Ostrom and Krista Schulz; 9. Manuela Paz and Christopher Pastor; 10. His Excellency Gérard Araud and Cynthia Rowley.

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Pa tr i c k Mc Mu lla n (J a r v i s a n d B us h )

Beautiful At Every Age

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This page, from top: Dr. Robert Grant with CBS anchor Rebecca Jarvis; administering a treatment to a patient; with Sharon Bush. > Opposite: Dr. Robert Grant, plastic surgeon-in-chief at New York-Presbyterian’s Columbia University and Weill Cornell medical centers.

Dr. Robert Grant,

renowned plastic surgeon-inchief at New York-Presbyterian’s Columbia University and Weill Cornell medical centers, shares the latest news from the front lines of the cosmetic surgery industry. Q: What does the future hold for non-surgical procedures? A: The most exciting potential advance is the harvesting of stem cells, some of which can be obtained through liposuction. These cells can be manipulated to replace or enhance tissues, like in the breasts (meaning implants may no longer be necessary) or used instead of facial fillers (so that hyaluronic acid fillers may not be necessary). Plus, growing the patient’s own cells and tissue would help for reconstructive surgery of all types. Q: What sets you apart from other Manhattan plastic surgeons? A: As a plastic surgery educator, responsible for the training of the next generation of plastic surgeons, as well as being chief of the division of plastic surgery at New York’s top-rated hospital, I have a great perspective on trends, individual practitioners, and outcomes in plastic surgery. I know what works and what is hype. If I am not he surgeon to do the job I an make an appropriate referral. I have a philosophy called “Life Stage Personal Enhancement,” which describes how incremental improvements over time yields the best results. Anti-aging will never be possible, but effective age maintenance can be! Q: How do you and your patients work together to make decisions regarding surgery? A: It’s a partnership—it’s all about defining expectations. I spend large amounts of time exploring the motivations for plastic surgery, as well as focusing on the specific details of the patient’s appearance that they would like to change, enhance or improve. After all, all I can do is move tissue around—it’s up to the patient to incorporate the changes that come from undergoing plastic surgery into their enhanced body image, which allows them to feel happier, with a more fulfilled sense of self. u For more information on Dr. Robert Grant, call 212.832.6182 or visit robertgrantmd.com.

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4 1. anna karina Humidity and heat are hard on hair, but you can still keep a clean coif like French New Wave star Anna Karina’s, famously copied by Uma Thurman in Pulp Fiction, with these secrets of the best-tressed. Plus, our picks of the season’s top body care. 2. oribe Don’t let the heat get you down: mist hair with the Maximista thickening spray for instant uplift. $26. 3. ds organic haircare The Santorini Rebuilding Conditioner with koroneiki oil is part of a new haircare line from Upper East Side salon DS Studio. $22. 4. clarins The Sunscreen Care MilkLotion Spray is the ultimate in protection. $30. 5. molton brown The fresh Pettigree Dew Fine Liquid Hand Wash was inspired by a London garden. $28. 6. biologique recherche Treat your tresses to the soothing results that the French brand once reserved strictly for the skin. Shampooing Traitant Dermo-Apaisant, $52. 7. bliss For girls on the go, Poetic Waxing Strips are perfect for fast, between-appointment touch-ups. $25 (face), $36 (body).


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The Barbarella beauty obviously has a few tricks up her sleeve. At 73, Fonda is as active as ever— filming movies, gracing magazine covers, and championing humanitarian causes. Channel Fonda’s ageless allure with these skincare and makeup must-haves. 2. Kimara ahnert The reigning queen of Upper East Side beauty’s new range of rich Custom Creation Eyeshadows. $16. 3. chanel The sparkling Glossimer shades in Aurore, Pink Peony, and Pensée pair perfectly with a sun-kissed complexion. $28.50. 4. truth art beauty The Face Nourish and body products from this custom skincare line are blended fresh and delivered straight to your door. $54. 5. algenist Harnessing the regenerative power of alguronic acid (found in microalgae), the Complete Renewal Eye Balm restores the delicate skin around the eyes. $65. 6. face place Fight warmweather blemishes with the Face Shampoo Oil Control Cleansing Gel. $32. 7. clÉ de peau The Refreshing Protective Emulsion SPF 20 combats environmental aggressors and sun damage. $130. 1. Jane Fonda

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EVENING LOOKS

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Christian Dior remains an inspiration for truly elegant yet bold and sumptuous looks. This spring, take inspiration from the master himself with some standout selections of your own. 1. dior Photographed in the style of Jerry Schatzberg, who famously covered the Parisian collections of Dior and Yves Saint Laurent, a model in this photograph peeks out from behind the curtains at the salon of the legendary Dior atelier at 30 Avenue Montaigne, in Paris. 2. tiffany & co. The cushion-cut tourmaline and diamond ring set in platinum; $18,000. 3. judith leiber Make any evening special with the Fizzy crystal envelope clutch with bead detail in vintage rose multi; $1,995. 4. luca luca Go brazenly into the night in Luca Lucaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mirabel gown in fuchsia; $3,250. 5. ivanka trump fine jewelry Glamour is at your side in the form of the rock crystal, mother of pearl, and diamond chandelier bubble earrings from the Ivanka Trump Fine Jewelry Bubble Collection; $6,900.

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1 1. audrey hepburn With headlines everywhere about the Duchess of Cambridge (previously known as Kate Middleton), we harken back to Audrey Hepburnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character in My Fair Lady, Eliza Doolittle, who, with voice training, transforms her accent from lower-class Cockney to a more polished patrician, allowing her to pose as a royalblooded woman of mystery at an embassy ball. Whether marrying a prince, posing as a princess, or just in the mood to feel dressed up, these looks will go a long way. 2. de grisogono The Gocce drop earrings are made of 744 orange sapphires with diamonds set in pink gold; $73,400. 3. jimmy choo Vamp it up in Jimmy Chooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vamp sandal in glitter fabric champagne; $750. 4. douglas hannant A romantic buff gown; price upon request. 5. marchesa Satin organza rose draped medium box; price upon request.

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SHOPPING INDEX

B > Band of Outsiders: bandofoutsiders.com. > Barneys New York: 888.222.7639 or barneys.com. > Bergdorf Goodman: 888.774.2424 or bergdorfgoodman.com. > Biologique Recherche: 800.755.5270 or Paul Labrecque, paullabrecque.com. > Blair Husain: blairhusain.com. > Bliss: At Sephora, 877.737.4672 or sephora.com. > Bloomingdale’s: 800.777.0000 or bloomingdales.com. > Bulgari: 800.BVGLARI or bulgari.com.

C > Calypso St. Barth: 866.422.5977 or calypsostbarth.com. > Camilla Dietz Bergeron: 212.794.9100 or cdbltd.com. > Carolina Herrera: 212.249.6552 or carolinaherrera.com. > Chanel: 800.550.0005 or chanel.com. > Chloe: 212.717.8220 or chloe.com. > Christian Cota: 212.938.1933 or christiancota.com. > Christian Louboutin: 212.396.1884 or christianlouboutin.com. > Clarins: clarins.com. > Clé de Peau: At Bergdorf Goodman, 888.774.2424 or bergdorfgoodman.com.

From fine jewelers to the finest fashion designers, this list has it all. As usual, we’ve compiled this shopping guide to make it easier for you to find our favorite brands and designers, many of whom appear in our pages. This issue’s first-ever runway trend report for fall featured the looks of many designers whose addresses are listed here, for easy reference. Also, don’t forget to join the Quest and Q pages on Facebook, or follow our blog at questmag.wordpress.com. Happy shopping!

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> Coach: 212.754.0041 or coach.com. > Cynthia Rowley: 212.242.0847 or cynthiarowley.com.

> Akris: 212.717.1170 or akris.com.

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> Alexander McQueen: 800.307.3150 or

> DANNIJO: 646.755.8909 or dannijo.com.

alexandermcqueen.com.

> David Yurman: 877.908.1177 or davidyurman.com.

> Algenist: At Sephora, 877.737.4672 or sephora.

> de Grisogono: 212.439.4220 or

com.

degrisogono.com.

> Anya Hindmarch: 212.343.8147 or 115 Greene

> Dennis Basso: 212.794.4500 or dennisbasso.com.

Street, New York, NY.

> Douglas Hannant: 212.872.1701 or

> Asprey: 212.688.1811 or asprey.com.

douglashannant.com.


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> Lilly Pulitzer: 888.PB.LILLY or lillypulitzer.com.

> Elie Tahari: 212.334.4441 or elietahari.com.

> Louis Vuitton: 866.VUITTON or vuitton.com.

> Emilio Pucci: 212.230.1135 or emiliopucci.com.

> Luca Luca: 212.755.2444 or

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> Erdem: erdem.co.uk.

lucaluca.com.

> Ralph Lauren: 888.475.7674 or ralphlauren.com.

> Etro: 212.317.9096 or etro.it.

F > Fendi: 212.759.4646 or fendi.com.

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> Prada: 888.977.1900 or prada.com.

> Roberto Cavalli: 212.755.7722 or robertocavalli. com.

> Majestic Swim: Amazon Swim Shop at

> Roger Vivier: 212.861.5371 or rogervivier.com.

amazon.com.

> Ruby Kobo: rubykobo.com.

> Manolo Blahnik: 212.582.3007 or manoloblahnik.com.

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> Marc Jacobs: 212.343.1490 or marcjacobs.com.

> Saks Fifth Avenue: 877.551.SAKS or

> Marchesa: At Neiman Marcus and Saks Fifth

saksfifthavenue.com.

Avenue, 877.551.SAKS or saks.com.

> Sally Hershberger’s Face Place: 212.367.8200 or

> Havaianas: 866.822.0962 or havaianas.com.

> Max Mara: 212.879.6100 or maxmara.com.

faceplace.com.

> Hermès: 800.441.4488 or hermes.com.

> Michael Kors: 800.908.1157 or michaelkors.com.

> Salvatore Ferragamo: 866.908.1188 or

> House of Lavande: 561.802.3737 or

> Milly: 212.921.7800 or millyny.com.

ferragamo.com.

houseoflavande.com.

> Minnie Mortimer: 310.476.5438 or

> Sephora: 877.SEPHORA or sephora.com.

> Gucci: 877.482.2430 or gucci.com.

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minniemortimer.com

> Shoshanna: shoshanna.com.

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> Miriam Haskell: 212.764.3332 or

> Irwin & Jordan: +44 207.087.9103 or

miriamhaskell.com.

irwinandjordan.com.

> Miu Miu: 212.249.9660 or miumiu.com.

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> Ivanka Trump Fine Jewelry: 888.756.9912 or

> Molton Brown: at Saks Fifth Avenue, 877.551.SAKS,

> Theory: 877.242.3317 or theory.com.

ivankatrumpcollection.com.

saksfifthavenue.com, or moltonbrown.com.

> Tibi: 212.966.3773 or tibi.com.

> Smythson: 877.769.8476 or smythson.com.

> Tiffany & Co.: 561.659.6090 or tiffany.com.

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> J. Mendel: 212.832.5830 or jmendel.com.

> Neiman Marcus: 800.533.1312 or neimanmarcus.

> Tory Burch: 866.480.TORY or toryburch.com.

> J.Crew: 800.562.0258 or jcrew.com.

com.

> Truth Art Beauty: truthartbeauty.com.

> J.Press: 888.7.JPRESS or jpressonline.com.

> Nicholas Liu: nicholas-liu.com or shoplatitude.

> Jack Rogers: jackrogersusa.com.

com/shop-designer/nicholas-kiu.

> Jimmy Choo: 866.JCHOO.US or jimmychoo.com. > Judith Leiber: 866.542.7167 or judithleiber.com.

K > Kate Spade: 866.999.KATE or katespade.com. > Kimara Ahnert: 212.452.4252 or kimara.com. > Kotur Ltd.: koturltd.com.

L > Lee Angel: 212.334.6573 or leeangel.com.

O > Oribe: oribe.com. > Oscar de la Renta: 888.782.6357 or oscardelarenta.com.

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> Tommy Hilfiger: 917.237.0983 or usa.tommy.com.

V > Valentino: 212.772.6969 or valentino.com. > Van Cleef & Arpels: 877.VANCLEEF or vancleef-arpels.com.

W > Wempe: 212.397.9000 or wempe.com.

> Piazza Sempione: 877.379.3980 or

Y

piazzasempione.com.

> Yigal Azrouël: 212.929.7525 or yigal-azrouel.com.

> Prabel Gurung: 646.351.6199 or prabalgurung.com.

> Yves Saint Laurent: 212.832.7100 or ysl.com.

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Favorite Springtime Footwear 1. VALERIE FOX, ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR I love exploring the city in the summer in my Converse All Star kicks. 2. elizabeth meigher, editor I love these gold wedges from Jack Rogers. I love the design, and grew up with a mom and sister who wore them all of the time—now I can too! 3. S. CHRISTOPHER MEIGHER, PUBLISHER AND C.E.O. The L.L. Bean Duck Boot! I've been wearing them since high school. 4. georgina schaeffer, executive editor Toms cute and comfortable canvas wedges are heels with heart! For every pair of Toms shoes purchased, they give a pair to a child in need. Do good, feel good! 5. JAMES STOFFEL, CREATIVE DIRECTOR There's nothing quite like the feeling of sand between my toes. What better summer footwear can one wish for! 6. Kathy sheridan, assistant to the c.e.o. Like a lovely lunch outside, flip-flops (like these from Havaianas) embody the laid-back nature of a beautiful and relaxing summer day. 7. Elizabeth brown, associate editor My best friend introduced me to K.Jacques years ago while on a shopping trip to Bergdorf's. I feel so chic slipping into a shoe imported from St. Tropez! 8. Rachel corbett, senior editor Toms are the perfect summer slip-ons for lazy days in the park. 9. DANIEL CAPPELLO, FASHION EDITOR I love Ralph Lauren's Hysen Nappa Driver in this ideal shade of tan. They're perfect for everywhere—strolling and shopping in SoHo, driving to the beach or to the Berkshires, with shorts or with a white linen blazer.

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Hotel & Spa

A R T I S T I C I N E V E R Y D E TA I L The Surrey hotel is surrounded by Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exceptional culture. Guests are steps away from luxurious retail along Madison Avenue, adjacent to Central Park and nestled in-between world-renowned museums and restaurants. While in residence, indulge at The Spa, specializing in customized treatments or enjoy the view from our private roof garden. Gracious service, a discreet environment and award-winning interiors, The Surrey hotel.

2 0 E A S T 76 T H S T R E E T N E W YO R K N Y 1 0 0 2 1 | t

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Spring Q 2011