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Vol. 42, No. 36 Sept. 6-12, 2012

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Page 34

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Vote to End the Lies and Culture of Corruption in our State Senate.

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A NEW DEMOCRAT FOR DISTRICT 16

W A J

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

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Candidates in the Sept. 13 State Senate and Assembly races ready for the final week of the campaign. By Tribune Staff … Page 12 and 14.

John A. Messer

NEW YORK STATE SENATE

It’s Time for A Change. Vote Messer on Thursday September 13th. www.messerforsenate.com


Page 2 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: ELPIDA MICHAEL LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/ 29/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Vasilis Litos, 1087 Maple Lane, New Hyde Park, New York 11040. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 4016 31st AVENUE LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/ 17/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Polyxeni Kaliabakos, 20-07 35th Street, Astoria, New York 11105. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: ROLSI LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/25/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 11-42 46th Road, Long Island City, New York 11101. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ______________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of JC HOLDING INTERNATIONAL LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on April 27, 2012. NY office Location: Queens County. Secy of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. Secy of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to JONG CHAN LEE, 4536 161 st 3FL Flushing 11358. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act or activity. ___________________________________

RAYMOND D. LOWMAN Plaintiff, -against- THE HEIRS OF JAMES E. LOWMAN, JAMES E. LOWMAN, JR. REGINALD LOWMAN DEBORAH LOWMAN KIMBERLY LOWMAN if said defendant(s) be living or dead, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: spouses(s), widow(s), heirsat-law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assigns of such deceased, any and all persons deriving any interest in, or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under said defendant(s)’ respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs-at-law, next of kin, descendant(s), executors, administrators devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE Defendants. TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon plaintiff’s attorney an answer to the complaint in this action within twenty days after the service of this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York, or within 30 days after completion of service if service is made any other method. In case of your failure to answer, judgement will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. This is an action to determine a claim and quite title to real property known as 147-44 230 Pl., Rosedale, NY 11413 (Block 12710, Lot 22), giving notice to heirs, and as much, basis for the venue designated in the County in which the subject premises is situated. BEGINNING at a point of the Westerly side of 230th Place formerly known as 231st Street (80 feet wide) distant 348.80 feet Southerly from a corner formed by the intersection of the said Westerly side of 230th Place and the Southerly side of 147th Avenue formerly known as

Cherry Avenue as shown on aforesaid map: running thence Westerly at the right angles to the Westerly side of 230th Place, 100 feet; thence Southerly paralell with the said Westerly side of 230th Place, 40 feet thence easterly again at right angles to the Westerly side of 230th Place, 100 feet to said Westerly side of 230th Place; thence Northerly along the westerly side of 230th Place 40 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING.Dated: December 1, 2011 Bellerose, New York SOMEKH & ASSOCIATES By: Lori R. Somekh, Esq. 247-19 Jericho Turnpike Bellerose, N.Y. 11426 (718) 740-3300 (718) 343-6295 - fax ___________________________________ 12-63 Redfern Partners LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/ 14/12. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 251 Monitor St., Brooklyn, NY 11222. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ Catapult Ventures LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/15/ 12. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Eugene Kurdy, 4737 159 th St. Flushing, NY 11358. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of CASA VESPA, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY on 6/20/12. Office location: Queens County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Mollo, 241-17 44 th Avenue, Douglaston, NY 11363. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of Jingying, LLC. Art, of Org. filed Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/28/2011. Office location: Queens County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 11424 Dalian Court 2FL, College Point, NY 11356. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________

Queens County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 2 Bay Club Dr. 18A Bayside, NY 11360. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of Wu Plaza, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/6/ 12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 42-09 Gleane St., Queens Village, NY 11373. Purpose: any lawful activities. ___________________________________ 24-54 37 TH REALTY, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/ 1/08. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 24-54 37 th St., Apt. 4R, Astoria, NY 11103. General Purposes. ___________________________________

terest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index #5710/09 Michael G. Sileo, Esq., Referee Peter T. Roach and Associates, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff, 125 Michael Drive, Syosset, NY 11791 Dated: 8/9/2012 ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of ZIMBA COLLECTIONS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/21/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Kelsy Zimba, 45-50 30th St., 7th Fl., NY, NY 11101. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ____________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of 47 TH AVENUE HOLDINGS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/ 6/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 12-40 Clintonville Street, Whitestone, NY 11357. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Rem Tech Construction LLC filed with NY (SSNY) 7/5/12 Office: 45-45 40 Street Sunnyside NY 11104 Purpose: Engage in any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of LONG INFORMATION LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 7/2/ 12. Office location in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to 138-12 62nd Rd, Flushing, NY 11367. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of JAMES 168, LLC. Articles of Organization Filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/16/2012. Office Location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon

whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail Copy of any process to 15908 59th Ave, 1st Fl, Fresh Meadows, NY 11365. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that license pending has been issued to the undersigned to sell Beer and Wine at retail in a Restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law in the premises located at 6144 Springfield Blvd., Oakland Gardens, NY 11364 for on-premises consumption. Riverview Inc 6144 Springfield Blvd, Oakland Gardens, NY 11364. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of Earth & Sky Massage Therapy, PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/06/12. Office Location: Queens County, SSNY is designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 531 50th Ave, LIC, NY 11101. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of DeMarquee LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/24/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o US Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: E-Z PERMIT NY, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/06/ 12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 30-16 33rd Street, #3F, Astoria, New York 11102. Purpose: For any lawful purpose.

SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, COUNTY OF QUEENS Index No.: 12497/08 Date Purch.: 5/19/08 SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS

Notice of Formation of MF Wellness Holdings LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/25/ 2011. Office location:

NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT - COUNTY OF QUEENS HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 Plaintiff, AGAINST OK SOON KIM, et al. Defendant(s) Pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale duly dated 6/13/2012 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Queens County Supreme Court, 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Courtroom #25, Jamaica, NY 11435 on 9/21/ 2012 at 11:00 AM premises known as 2838 UTOPIA PARKWAY, FLUSHING, NY 11358. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York Section, Block and Lot: Block 5965 Lot 46 Approximate amount of judgment $499,327.54 plus in-

To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 149 or E-Mail Your Copy to the Tribune at: legals@queenstribune.com


Queens Deadline

Commission Unveils Council District Draft By ROSS BARK AN The City Council districting commission unveiled their preliminary draft of new district lines, irking minority advocacy groups who believe the lines fail to account for radical demographic changes over the last decade. After a series of public hearings throughout the City, the commission released a City Council map on Sept. 4 that may still undergo additional changes. A new cycle of public hearings, set to begin in October, w ill be based upon the preliminary map. The 51 districts are altered e very 10 years to reflect demographic shifts recorded by the Census. “There are many more views that need to be shared with the commission given the significance of redrawing these lines for the next 10 years,” said Benito Romano, the redistricting commission chairman. “We encourage the public to par t icipate and look forward to hearing from more of the public in the second round of hearings.” In Queens and throughout New York Cit y, the preliminary district lines do not var y much from their predecessors. Small alterations, like moving downtown Jamaica and part of Fresh Meadows out of termlimited Councilman James Gennaro’s (D-Fresh Meadows) 24th District, were made. Political

insiders believe Assemblyman Rory Lancman (D-Hillcrest) will run for that seat next year. Council members not term limited in 2013 will benefit from districts that are similar to their current ones. The Asian American Community Coalition on Redistricting and Democracy, a coalition of 14 Asian-American advocacy organizations, have been lobbying for changes to Queens district lines that have, at least at the moment, not been adopted. An ACCORD member organization, the Asian American Legal D e f e n se a n d E d u c atio n Fund, spearheaded the Unity Map, a proposal for City Council district lines that would have united Richmond Hill and South Ozone Park into a single district, Councilman Eric Ulrich’s 32nd (R-Ozone Park), a nd merged par t of Oakland Gardens into Bayside, among other changes. These proposals, ACCORD argued, would bet ter account for a surging Asian population that is now 23 percent of the borough, up 31 percent from a decade ago. Queens has one Asian member of the Cit y Council, Councilman Peter Koo (D-Flushing), and the joining of heavily-Asian Oakland Gardens into the 19th District, now represented by Councilman Dan Halloran (R-Whitestone), would

increase the possibility of Queens sending another representative of Asian descent to the City Council. A burgeoning South Asian and Guyanese population in South Ozone Park and Richmond Hill is sliced up among four districts currently, and the commission’s proposed map would maintain those divisions. “Essentially, it doesn’t look like community input has figured into the drawing of this draft which is surprising because there have been five public hearings, one in each borough, and dozens of testimonies,” said James Hong, civic participation coordinator for ACCORD. “There are very incremental changes in many places; this is while demographically the City has undergone rapid and dramatic shifts within its population.” The districting commission, mandated by the City Char ter, is made up of 15 members, eight appointed by the Cit y Council par ty leaders and 7 by the mayor. There must be members from each borough. Racial and language minority groups must be represented as well. Former State Sen. Frank Padavan and former Councilman Tom Ognibene are among t he 15 members. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com

A map of the preliminar y Cit y Council distric t lines draft for Queens.

Queens Schools Facing Shutdown Again

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

tion or be shutdown in the next three years. Representing the bottom 5 percent of elementary, middle and high schools in New York, almost all of the schools on the list had

Officials rallied to save Flushing High School from closure in February. The school has now been named as one of 16 schools in Queens that risk closure if its students do not improve.

high concentrat ions of pover t y. The schools were targeted for a variety of reasons, including low graduation rates or rock bot tom test scores. The 16 Queens schools, some of which were in danger of closure this year, are: Newtown High School, Grover Cleveland High School, Flushing High School, Mart in Van Buren High School, M.S. 053 Brian Piccolo, August Mart in High School, Beach Channel High School, Richmond Hill High School, John Adams High School, J.H.S. 008 Richard S. Grossley, Jamaica High School, I.S. 192 The Linden, E x c e l s i o r P r e p a r a to r y H i g h S c h o o l , P. S . 1 1 1 J a c o b Blackwell, William Cul len Br yant High School and Long Island City High School. “The State’s new system more closely resembles the City’s school Progress Report s by recognizing growth and measuring students’

college and career readiness,” Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott said, noting 55 schools were recognized for their “strong per form a n c e ” i n c l u d i n g P. S . 8 9 i n Elmhurst. “There is still more work to do, and we will continue to suppor t our struggling schools wh ile holding them accountable to the high standards our students deserve.” The schools were chosen through a new system now that New York has a waiver from the No Child Left Behind law, granting it more flexibility over federal dollars. Schools are no longer labeled Schools in Need of Improvement if they do not meet cer tain performance targets; instead, the State DOE looks at the bot tom 15 percent and labels the schools “priority” or “focus.” Priorit y schools have to develop whole school improvement plans that are in line with the federal government’s School Improvement Grants no

later than the 2014-15 academic year. The schools are required to increase teaching time and must spend more of their federal funding on “parent engagement.” They must also have new plans for judging teacher per formance. Flushing, William Cullen Br yant, Long Island Cit y, August Mar t in, Richmond Hill, John Adams and Grover Cleveland were all targeted for closure this year before a court r uling blocked the DOE’s initiative, known as “turnaround,” that would have replaced 50 percent of the schools’ staffs and renamed the schools. The United Federation of Teachers and local elected officials fought the initiative, arguing it was a politicallymotivated ploy to punish the UFT for failing to reach an agreement on teacher evaluations. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com

www.queenstribune.com • Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 3

By ROSS BARK AN The State Dept. of Education last week released a list of 221 struggling schools throughout New York State, including 16 in Queens that must take drastic ac-


Queens This Week Corona Welcomes Public Mural

"Yield in the Name of Creativit y" was unveiled last Friday at the High School for Arts and Business in Corona. Photo courtesy of Madeleine LeMieux.

Tribune photo by Megan Montalvo.

Page 4 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

On a simple drive down the Horace Harding Expressway in Corona, one may be hard-pressed to notice the High School for Arts and Business, located at 105-25 Horace Harding Expressway North. The road, which routinely hosts hoards of cyclists, drivers and pedestrians, recently received a face lift drawing attention to the school's presence. On Aug. 31, Groundswell, a nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing the practice of public art making, partnered with the Dept. of Transportation's Office of Safety Education to unveil a new public mural that was painted on 83 feet of the high school's exterior space. Over the summer, Groundswell paired 16 young people ages 14 to 20 with artist Yana Dimitrova of Forest Hills to create the mural, aptly named "Yield in the Name of Creativity." By aiming to combine the message of street safety with the creativity that stems from the local students, the team of muralists designed winding roads with an ever watching eye overseeing the heavily trafficked area where the mural is located. At the focal point, two children are featured in a representation of the dual aspects of the business and art focuses of the high school. As one child sketches a "Yield" sign that embodies the overall theme of the painting, the other, clad in a suit, depicts the various creative paths to attract opportunity and success. "The roads in the painting not

only refer to traffic safety but also to the different roads the students must take in life," Dimitrova said. "We would like for the drivers to see the mural and be aware that there are students who are arriving here every day with the purpose of becoming successful." The mural's unveiling marked a first for Groundswell, as it is the first public mural the Brooklynbased organization has created in Queens. "Groundswell is thrilled to continue our successful partnership with the Department of Transportation," said Groundswell Executive Director Amy Sananman. "Through this collaboration, Groundswell engages underserved youth, professional artists, and community members in the creation of public art with a real and visible impact on the lives and safety of New Yorkers." The mural's timely unveiling also comes on the heels of the DOT's recent extension of the City's Neighborhood Slow Zone Program to a nearby set of Corona intersections. "This is a part of a vision that we all have," said DOT Assistant Commissioner Kim Wiley-Schwartz. "These streets are not for cars only, they're for everyone. As the mural shows, these streets can be as livable as you can imagine them." Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queens tribune.com. - Megan Montalvo

Senior Center Opens Its Doors

Le a d M u r a l A r t i s t Ya n a Dimitrova (left) stands with Assistant Artist Olivia Fu (right) in front of the school's mural.

There is some big news for the elderly in Howard Beach. The Howard Beach Senior Center will be open Sunday, Sept. 23 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lunch will be served at 12 p.m. Dancing and fun will then ensue when DJ Rich starts spinning some cool beats. This is just one of many activities

the senior center is known for. Computer classes, talent shows and photography classes are all offered by the senior center. On Friday mornings in October, seniors can learn how to better utilize digital cameras. Previous computer experience would be helpful for this class. The Howard Beach Senior Center is located 156-45 84th St. and the entrance is on 85th Street. The center is funded under contract to the New York City Dept. for the Aging and is open to anyone age 60 and over. For questions, call (718) 7388100. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com.

Kids Running Show At Flea Market A very unusual flea market is coming back to Kew Gardens. On Sunday, Sept. 9, a group of parents will be hosting the third annual Kew Gardens Kids for Kids Flea Market. There will be selling tables, new and gently used merchandise and bargaining but the difference is that children between the ages of 5 and 12 will be in charge of their tables and their parents will be assistants. Each child will be selling toys, games, books and clothes and each child will also be making a donation to the The River Fund, a Richmond Hill-based charity that aids impoverished families, seniors and adults. Jennifer Giardina, a Kew Gardens parent, is heading the event because she wants her children to "appreciate and value the things that they have and to realize and acknowledge that there are children who are less fortunate than they are." Giardina is passionate about giving her children empowering experiences so that they will "know that they can make a posi-

tive difference in their world and in their community." The flea market committee hopes community members will come on Sept. 9 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Kew Gardens Cinemas Park, located on Austin Street off of Lefferts Boulevard. Community members will have an opportunity to meet a group of committed young entrepreneurs and will enjoy face painting and arts and crafts - children will be working on a project that will be displayed at Odradeks Coffee House - story-telling and entertainment. Severa neighborhood businesses will be donating food, supplies and raffle items to Kids For Kids Flea Market. There will be a raffle with many great gifts to win. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com.

Council Seeks To Help Emerging Ar tists While Queens may be wellknown for its vast array of art museums and attractions, it can often be difficult for up-and-coming individual artists to get their name into the mainstream art world. For struggling artists on the rise, a lack of funding may often force an artistic vision to be placed on hold. Fortunately for locals, gaining access to funding has never been easier. Each year, the Queens Council on the Arts supports contributions from the borough's creative residents through their annual grant program, the Queens Arts Fund (QAF). From now until Oct. 11, QCA will be accepting new applicants for the 2013 award dispersal in January. Last year, QCA awarded a total of $222,597 in grants to 21 individual artists and 50 organizations for the creation of local arts and cultural programming. Those who are interested in applying for this year's QAF may complete an application workshop. The workshops will be available both online through QCA video tutorials at queenscouncilarts.org and in-person at one of the following four locations: Forest Hills Library, located at

108-19 71st Ave. on Sept. 6; Flushing Library, located at 41-17 Main St. on Sept. 12; the Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning, located 16104 Jamaica Ave. on Sept. 19; and the Long Island City Entrepreneur's Incubator Space, Classroom 2, located at 36-46 37th St. on Sept. 26. All in-person group workshop sessions will begin at 6 p.m. and will last for an hour and a half. Reservations are not required. For more information about QCA or the QAF grant program, contact QCA directly at (347) 5053019. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queens tribune.com. -Megan Montalvo

Bay Terrace Waldbaum's A nnounces Upgrades Customers who frequent the Waldbaum's at the Bay Terrace Shopping Center have been treated to some upgrades at the store, which is in the midst of a grand re-opening celebration. The Bay Terrace Waldbaum's has upgraded its bakery, which will give customers easier access to fresh bread, special-occasion cakes, exclusive OMG brownies and more, located at the front of the store. The bakery also includes a new case of gluten-free products, including blueberry muffics, cupcakes, brownie bites, pizza crust and different types of bread. A new specialty kosher foods section will include more than 900 new items. Items now available at the store will feature kosher dairy and grocery products including cheeses, yogurts and snacks. The store will also feature a broader variety of specialty cheeses, an expanded shrimp assortment and more natural and organic products. To celebrate the grand re-opening, the store will host its second weekend of events at the store, located at 213-15 26th Ave., Bay Terrace. Grand re-opening activities will include free samples, coupons, recipes, coloring tables, giveaways and supermarket trivia games.

Send Queens This Week News and Photos to: Queens Tribune 150-50 14th Rd., Whitestone, NY 11357


Weight Watchers Joins Mayor’s Soda Ban ing Meadows Park. For the first time in my life I’m at a healthy weight range, and I plan on staying here.� On Sept. 4, Conley stood alongside Mayor Mike Bloomberg at Flushing Meadows Corona Park and used her testimony to back his sugary beverage portion proposal. “It’s time to face the facts: obesity is one of America’s most deadly problems and sugary beverages are a leading cause of it. As the size of sugary drinks has grown, so have our waistlines – and so have diabetes and heart disease,� Bloomberg said. “Our proposal for reasonable

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

By MEGAN MONTALVO When Queens Resident Rachelle Conley first joined Weight Watchers, she was not quite sure of how her decision would soon affect her waistline. By drastically cutting down her sugary beverage intake, Conley said she was able to lose 91 pounds. “Before losing weight, I would drink 48 ounces of fruit flavored juice drink each day and coffee with 25 packets of sugar every morning,� Conley said. “Now, I’ve completely cut out sugary beverages, drink mostly water, eat healthy portions and exercise near Flush-

Mayor Mike Bloomberg discusses details of his proposed ban on sugary drinks of more than 16 ounces during a press conference at Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

portion sizes won’t prevent anyone from buying or drinking as much soda as they want, but it will help people keep from inadvertently taking in junk calories simply because the small drink they ordered was actually very large.� Lauded by Weight Watchers President Dave Burwick, the proposal will face a vote by the Board of Health on Sept. 13. If passed, the legislation will go into effect by next

March and would limit the serving size to 16 ounces or less at restaurants, delis and concession stands at movie theaters. According to Health Commissioner Thomas Farley, if the proposal passes, the City could see a decrease in obesity numbers as quickly as within a few months. “In a City with large sizes of high-calorie snack foods and beverages at your fingertips around the

clock, it is no wonder many New Yorkers struggle to maintain a healthy weight,� Farley said. “Reducing sugary drinks is the simplest dietary change that people can make to lose weight or avoid gaining weight. We hope that our proposal will help New Yorkers do just that.� Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queens tribune.com.

Woman Gets 11 Years In Prison For Infant Death By ROSS BARK AN A 28-year-old Corona woman was sentenced on Sept. 4 to 11 years in prison after pleading guilty to causing the death of a threemonth-old infant. Ana Delarosa of 104-52 39th St. pleaded guilty to one count of second-degree manslaughter and one count of first-degree assault, admitting she violently shook the child to death because he was crying. “Today’s sentencing will hopefully give some closure to the child’s parents and spare them from hav-

ing to sit through the painful testimony of a trial,� District Attorney Richard Brown said. Brown said that, according to the guilty plea, Delarosa, a family friend, was babysitting threemonth-old Addison ReinosoXoyatla at her residence on Dec. 29, 2010, when, sometime after 11:00 a.m., the baby awoke and began crying. Delarosa tried to console the infant but he continued to cry. Delarosa shook the baby until he stopped crying and went limp. She then sought help.

The child arrived at Elmhurst General Hospital later that day in cardiac arrest. An examination of the child revealed that he suffered severe brain injury, as well as bleeding around the nerves that connect the eyes to the brain. He died on Jan. 4, 2011. Delarosa confessed to the police that she violently shook the baby when she became frustrated because the child wouldn’t stop crying and was then arrested. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com

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Edit Page In Our Opinion:

Queens Tribune Primary Endorsements State Senate District 10 As the incumbent in this primary race faces indictment for funneling money into a nonprofit run by a family member and a former aide, it is clear that voters need to send a message to Albany that elected officials need to serve the best interests of their constituents, not themselves, their friends or their special interests. While he would be a new face in Albany, James Sanders is experienced in serving his constituents, having effectively represented Southeast Queens in the City Council since 2001. The Queens Tribune endorses James Sanders

Page 6 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

State Senate District 15 Councilman Eric Ulrich has been a rising star among Queens Republicans since he took office in 2009. Ulrich speaks confidently and knowledgeably about the issues that he feels are important to the district. He has been a hardworking member of the City Council who we believe would be a hardworking member of the State Senate as well. The Queens Tribune endorses Eric Ulrich.

State Senate District 16 For too long, Albany has allowed a culture of corruption to cultivate in its legislative chambers. Getting fresh

faces and new ideas in the Legislature is the first step in changing that culture. Too many state officials put their own interests ahead of those of their constituents. The challenger, John Messer, seems to have the best interests of the community in mind. Messer has experience as a small business owner and a local attorney, and can relate to the concerns of the people in Senate District 16. We have no doubt he will use that experience to fight for them in Albany. The Queens Tribune endorses John Messer.

Assembly District 25 The race to fill the seat of outgoing Assemblyman Rory Lancman features a primary between a young newcomer and an established civic leader looking to step up. We believe that either candidate would do the district proud in Albany, as they share many of the same stances on important issues. What it comes down to, then, is experience. Jerry Iannece has been a civic leader in Queens for more than two decades. He has the experience necessary to walk in to the Assembly and confidently work towards his stated goals. As a freshman Assemblyman, that experience will be appreciated by his constituents. We encourage Nily Rozic, his bright young opponent, to continue her worthwhile quest to make government truly responsive to the people

and their needs. The Queens Tribune endorses Jerry Iannece.

Assembly District 33 While it is clear that New York State would be better if more established members of the Legislature were replaced with people who were not beholden to special interests, sometimes we need to keep an experienced fighter in office. Assemblywoman Barbara Clark is an old-time reformer who has stood up to Albany leadership in the past and can be counted on to do it again. The Queens Tribune endorses Barbara Clark.

Assembly District 38 Assemblyman Mike Miller is still a fresh face in Albany, having won his seat in a special election in 2009. With a history of working for the people in his district, Miller seems committed to the betterment of his community. Miller seems dedicated to leaving his district a better place than he found it, and we believe he should be given the opportunity to continue. The Queens Tribune endorses Mike Miller.

Assembly District 40 As Grace Meng continues her bid to become the first A s i a n - A m e r i c a n Congressmember from New York, her Assembly district needs someone who can represent that very diverse dis-

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Poll Site Changes Unacceptable they now have to travel 10 blocks By GRACE MENG The right to vote is the corner- to vote when their previous pollstone of our democracy. It’s what ing location was only a block or the suffragette’s fought for a cen- two from their home. In recent tury ago and what our troops de- weeks, as I’ve spoken with more fend when sent overseas. In many voters and more of my colleagues, states across the country, there has I have begun to realize the scale been a resurgence of legislation and gravity of the problem. I am encouraged to learn that making it more difficult and onerous for people to vote. Thankfully, some poll sites have been moved back to closer and more we don’t have such convenient locations, and problems here, and I apI understand that redisplaud Governor tricting may require some Cuomo’s introduction modifications, but there of online voter registraare still too many legitition in New York. But mate grievances. On the we still must be sensiwhole, voters should not tive and responsive have to travel any farther when large numbers of to vote than they have in citizens feel as though Grace Meng the past. In an important they are being disenpresidential election year, franchised. The sudden and confusing where voter participation reaches changing of poll sites throughout its highest levels, I strongly urge the the city is proving to be unfair Board of Elections to do everything and terribly inconvenient for in its power, including public serQueens’ residents, particularly vice announcements and additional many elderly and disabled voters direct outreach to voters, to ensure who will now have to travel long that Queens’ voters are not unduly burdened. Our strength and vitaldistances in order to vote. My office has been inundated ity of our democracy depends on it. Assemblywoman Grace with phone calls from residents who fear they will now be unable Meng (D-Flushing) represents to vote. They are rightfully con- the 22nd District and is a candicerned and confused as to why date for Congress.

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dedication to the people of Queens, and it is clear that she would give the same dedication to her constituents as a member of the New York State Assembly. The Queens Tribune endorses Yen Chou.

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trict with the same dedication. With her experience as a teacher and a community leader, Yen Chou is the person the 40th Assembly District needs as its representative. Chou has a history of

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LIC Welcomes Farm Fresh Food Program Marcel Van Ooyen, executive director of GrowNYC, and local residents to launch the borough's first affordable farm fresh food program at the Queensbridge housing project, located at 10-06 41st Ave. By allocating a total of $10,000 to GrowNYC, a hands-on nonprofit dedicated to improving the City's environmental programs, Van Bramer hopes to open a new world of fresh eating opportunities for local residents. "Access to healthy food options can be difficult for some residents to access in Western Queens, especially seniors," Van Bramer said. "By bringing fresh fruits and vegetables directly into a community that needs, and wants them, our initiative is able to address a real need here in Queensbridge." Every week, staffers from GrowNYC will showcase the produce in front of the Jacob Riis Neighborhood Settlement House, located in the cenCouncilman Jimmy Van Bramer greets ter of the housing coma customer using the farm fresh food plex. Produce bags will be program. By MEGAN MONTALVO At a time when junk food has become more affordable than the organic alternatives, it is no wonder that obesity and diabetes is on the rise, especially for low-income communities like the Queensbridge Houses in Long Island City. In an effort to combat the obesity epidemic on a local level, Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer (DSunnyside) is taking up the task of developing easier access to fresh produce. On Aug. 29, Van Bramer joined

available for purchase at $10 each and will contain a variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables selected from regional farms. In addition to the fresh produce, the bags will also come with recipes and nutritional materials to help participants prepare food at home.

By MEGAN MONTALVO After years of anticipation, Central Queens Academy Charter School (CQA) finally opened its doors for the first week of school, welcoming an inaugural class of 110 fifth graders on Aug. 27. Since inception, CQA was intentionally designed to close the achievement gap for recent immigrant and English Language Learner youth, which are among the nation's most at-risk students. For CQA Founding Principal Jesse Tang, being able to offer District 24 a much needed relief from overcrowding while being able to cater to

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the large population of immigrant youth in the neighborhood marked a milestone not only for the school, but also for the entire community. "Opening our doors on Monday for the first time, I felt such a pure sense of excitement," Tang said. "We have had so much anticipation and preparation for the arrival of CQA's first class of fifthgrade that while I know we have a long road ahead of us, having our scholars here and in our building really does feel like a long-awaited dream realized." In addition to providing priority curriculum for English Lan-

guage Learner students, the tuitionfree public charter middle school also offers longer school days, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., an extended school year with a total of 190 days and after school programs. As the school continues to grow, administrators say they hope to add classes for 6th through 8th graders. CQA is located at 55-30 Junction Blvd. in Elmhurst. For more information about CQA, visit centralqueensacademy.org, or call (718) 271-6200. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@ queenstribune.com.

www.queenstribune.com • Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 9

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"We are very grateful to Councilmember Van Bramer for his support of this important project." For more information about GrowNYC and the farm fresh food program, visit grownyc.org. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queenstribune.com

Crowded District Welcomes New Charter School

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Residents on public assistance will be able use their EBT cards and Food Stamps to pay for the produce. "The Queensbridge Food Box program is an innovative model that has enabled us to provide Queensbridge residents with a convenient source of fresh, locallygrown produce," Van Ooyen said.


ATTENTION: DO YOU SUFFER FROM IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS ALSO KNOWN AS IPF? If so, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is currently enrolling patients diagnosed with IPF in a 52 week research study for an investigational medication. To qualify you must: • Be at least 40 through 80 years of age • Be diagnosed for at least 6 months and not more than 4 years. • Be a non-smoker • Not have any other significant pulmonary diseases

Page 10 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Eligible participants will receive study related tests and study drug at no cost while participating in the study. Those who qualify to be in the study may receive reimbursement for their travel related expenses.

Please call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Clinical Research at 718-206-5800 or 718-206-5844 for more information.

Compiled by STEVEN J. FERRARI

18, wanted in connection Borough-w ide with a strong-arm robbery BANK ROBBERY: The that occurred on Aug. 19, at NYPD is seeking the public’s approximately 3:50 a.m. in assistance with the wherefront of 41-26 71st St., in abouts and identity of the folWoodside. lowing individual wanted in The victim, a 40-year-old connection to a bank robbery Asian male, was approached pattern in the confines of the from behind by the suspects, 104th, 108th and 115th Prewho assaulted him and fled cincts. During these incidents, on foot with the victim’s the suspect enters the banks, wallet and two cell phones. approaches the tellers and The first suspect is depasses a demand note. After This suspec t is wanted scribed as a white or Hisreceiving the money, the sus- in connec tion to a bank panic male, 15-18 years old, pect flees the location to parts robber y pattern. 5-foot-6, 140 lbs., with long black hair, wearunknown. The first incident occurred on July 17 at ing a white T-shirt and blue jeans. The susapproximately 3 p.m. at Amalgamated Bank, pect had a skateboard, which he later re78-01 37th Ave., in Jackson Heights. The turned to retrieve. The second suspect is described as a white victim complied with the demand note and the suspect received an undisclosed amount or Hispanic male, 15-18 years old, 5-foot-9, 180 lbs., wearing a baseball cap and blue jeans. of cash. The third suspect is described as a white The second incident occurred on Aug. 10 at approximately 5:50 p.m. at Chase Bank, or Hispanic male, 15-18 years old. The suspect is described as a Black male 74-03 Metropolitan Ave., Middle Village. The victim walked away from the station and in his 30s, approximately 6-foot, 200 lbs. In the suspect fled the bank without any cash. the Aug. 20 incident, the suspect was wearThe third incident occurred on Aug. 20 ing a white striped shirt, jeans, sunglasses at approximately 1:52 p.m. at HSBC Bank, and a blue baseball cap. Anyone with information is asked to call 22-15 43rd Ave., Long Island City. The victim complied with the demand note and Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). the suspect received an undisclosed amount The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers’ website at of cash. The suspect is described as a Black male nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their in his 30s, approximately 6-foot, 200 lbs. In tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential. the Aug. 20 incident, the suspect was wearing a white striped shirt, jeans, sunglasses HOMICIDE: Police arrested Ramiro and a blue baseball cap. Anyone with information is asked to call Martinez, 28, on charges of second-degree Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). murder and fourth-degree CPW in connecThe public can also submit their tips by tion to a homicide that occurred on Aug. 26 logging onto Crime Stoppers’ website at at approximately 4:30 p.m. at 69th Street and nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their Woodside Avenue in Woodside. According to police reports, NYPD retips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. sponded to a 911 call at the above address All calls are strictly confidential. and observed Enrique Morales Martinez, 37, with stab wounds to the neck and shoulder. EMS responded and removed the victim to 108th Precinct ROBBERY: Police are asking the public’s Elmhurst Hospital, where he was pronounced assistance in locating three males, aged 15- dead on arrival.


City Finds Its Way to ‘Play Street’ By MEGAN MONTALVO For more than four years, the Jackson Heights Green Alliance (JHGA) has been working to reclaim a piece of land for the neighborhood. The strip of pavement that spans Travers Park from Northern Boulevard down 78th Street to 34th Avenue, better known as the “Play Street,” has long been the site where the nonprofit organization has hosted a slew of summertime activities. However, until now, JHGA has yet to reach their goal of acquiring fulltime status for the pedestrian plaza. After holding a series of meetings with community members, the work of JHGA finally paid off as the Dept. of Transportation announced last month that the Play Street will now be permanent. On Sept. 4, the DOT officially began construction on the Play Street. In addition to creating 13,000 square feet of public space, the DOT plans to permanently close the southern section of 78th Street to through traffic by creating a

The DOT provided a rendering of what the Play Street will look like post construc tion. dead-end street. A new turnaround will be constructed on the northern section of the block, and vehicles will be redirected to enter and exit 78th Street from Northern Boulevard. “We were very excited for work to begin,” JHGA President Dudley Stewart said. “Jackson Heights does not have a lot of open space for pedestrians. Having the Play Street really gives our community some where to go and enjoy being outdoors.” While the nonprofit organization holds the DOT’s announce-

ment as a victory, news of the Play Street’s permanent status has caused some locals to make arguments against the construction project. “Some people are concerned the Play Street might decrease parking spaces in the area, but the DOT has done numerous studies and found complaints about possible traffic congestion to be baseless,” Stewart said. “The great thing about the area is that there are no residential buildings along the Play Street, so thankfully, parking is less of an issue there.”

As part of the development plans, JHGA will work together to iron out the finer details of the improvements, such as choosing a paint color for street and adding seating areas. “So far, we are leaning towards painting the street either green or blue to brighten up the space,” JHGA Member Munro Johnson said. “We’re also hoping to place some planters in the area and develop some green landscaping to tie in with Travers Park and the nearby playground.” Over the summer, the Play Street

hosted a series of free events, including yoga classes, dance performances, composting lessons and movie screenings. Along with the added changes, JHGA members said they look forward to collaborating with residents to offer outdoor events year round. “The great thing about the Play Street is that all events that happen there are always free to the public. That is how it will always be,” Stewart said. “We really want to encourage our neighbors in the community to feel at home in the space and use it as an opportunity to get to know one another.” The DOT is scheduled to finish construction by October. JHGA is accepting donations for plaza maintenance. To make a donation or for more information about the Play Street, visit jhgreen.org or call JHGA directly at (646) 450-8444. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@ queenstribune.com

www.queenstribune.com • Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 11


State Senate District 16

Differences Define Stavisky, Messer By ROSS BARK AN Of the few primary races heating up in Queens, the clash between State Sen. Toby Stavisky (DFlushing) and attorney John Messer has easily reached its boiling point. Each candidate is accusing the other of vicious and underhanded campaign tactics and their supporters, at least at a forum held last week at New York Hospital Queens, are trading verbal jabs. Much is at stake for Stavisky, who was first elected in 1999 and trounced Messer in 2010, though the runner-up in that race, Isaac Sasson, is backing Messer. The Stavisky name has dominated the Flushing area for more than a half century, ever since her husband Leonard, now deceased, was first elected to the City Council in 1954. Since taking over Leonard Stavisky’s state Senate seat, Stavisky has cruised to repeated election victories, though Messer is now claiming that he holds a slight lead in the race. Backed by the Queens Democratic Party,

Messer wants them exStavisky has a little over panded. $164,000 cash on hand, Messer, portraying himaccording to latest filings. self as a centrist pro-business Messer, largely self-financDemocrat, hails from a small ing his campaign, has altown in Michigan and came most $105,000. In downto New York 22 years ago as town Flushing, the heart a part of the New York City of a new Asian-majority Government Scholars Pro16th Senate District that gram. He was once a regisreaches into neighbortered Republican, supports hoods like Forest Hills and term limits and believes that Fresh Meadows, Messer tax burdens need to be reand Stavisky campaign duced on small businesses. signs blanket walls and John Messer Toby Stavisk y He brought a lawsuit against storefronts. Unlike other Stavisky, later withdrawn, primary battles, where candidates of the same party tee on Higher Education. Situ- that alleged one of her petitioners struggle to distinguish themselves ated more on the political left than signed the name of a deceased from their opponents, Messer and Messer, Stavisky, like many Demo- woman on Stavisky’s petitions. Both candidates claim they are Stavisky clash on a variety of is- crats, is championing a hike in sues. The winner of the Sept. 13 New York State’s minimum wage the victims of malicious campaign primary will face Republican J.D. and the passage of the DREAM tactics. At a raucous forum hosted Kim. Act, which would grant condi- by the Queensborough Hill Civic “I understand small businesses, tional permanent residency to un- Association on Aug. 29, Messer I know more than anyone else in documented immigrants. Messer supporters distributed fliers attackthis race,” Messer, an owner of supports both but wants the mini- ing Stavisky and her son Evan, who several small businesses, said. mum wage to be hiked in two is a partner with the Parkside Group, Stavisky is a ranking minority phases. Stavisky adamantly op- a lobbying firm closely allied with member on the Senate’s Commit- p o s e s c h a r t e r s c h o o l s , w h i l e the Democratic Party. Stavisky

called the fliers “garbage” and when a heckler stood up to yell that “it’s time for a change in Flushing,” Stavisky shot back at the heckler and Messer. “With all due respect, that’s the kind of campaign that’s being waged against me,” said Stavisky. “Let me indicate that I do not respond to bullies.” Stavisky, in turn, attacked Messer for a scandal that embroiled a mortgage firm he headed five years ago. An office manager at the firm was charged with identity theft and jailed. When Messer ran against Stavisky two years ago, the scandal was brought up by the Stavisky campaign as well. “I have worked everyday of my life to make sure I make the right decisions,” Messer said. “This individual was convicted, went to jail and served his time. None of those events had anything to do with me.” Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com

Assembly District 25

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Iannece, Rozic Spar Over Experience By ROSS BA RK AN and STEV EN J. FERRA RI Colliding in the new 25th District, where Assemblyman Rory Lancman (D-Hillcrest) opted not to seek reelection, Jerry Iannece and Nily Rozic are both hoping to win an election for the first time. Iannece, chair of Community Board 11, lost a 2009 City Council Democratic primary in which Councilman Dan Halloran (R-Whitestone) ultimately triumphed. Backed up by the Queens Democratic Party, the 53-year-old Iannece faces an upstart challenger in the 26-yearold Rozic, on leave from her job as chief of staff for Assemblyman Brian Kavanagh (D-Manhattan). During a sit-down interview with both candidates in the Queens Tribune offices, Rozic and Iannece agreed that they share many of the same positions. With similar views on the issues, the candidates focused on why they would do a better job serving the district. Iannece touted his experience as a civic leader, serving on Community Board 11 and as president

of the Bayside Hills Civic Association. “I can point to things I’ve done as long as she [Rozic] has been alive,” Iannece said. “I’m a proven commodity, I’ve been rolling up my sleeves for the last 25 years.” Rozic noted her experience as Kavanagh’s chief of staff, which gives her an understanding of how Albany works. She also said Jerry Iannece Nily Rozic she was dedicated to the district, where she has lived Dean Skelos (R-Long Island). her entire life. Rozic and Iannece both called “We need someone who is going to get serious about govern- for more transparency from the ment,” she said. “We need some- party leaders, saying that it would one who has a passion for the neigh- help to change a corrupt culture. Iannece also called campaign fiborhood and the district.” Both candidates agreed that nance reform one of his top issues, things needed to change in the state calling for a limit on what can be legislature, calling for more trans- accepted from lobbyists. When asked about a situation parency from the “three guys in a room” making deals, referencing involving the Parkside Group, Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Assembly headed by Evan Stavisky, who Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Man- Iannece hired to consult for his hattan) and Senate Majority Leader campaign, where the firm lobbied

for a client in the State Senate in front of Stavisky’s mother, State Sen. Toby Stavisky (DFlushing), Iannece said it “shouldn’t be allowed.” “I would say that we need to change the law to prevent all lobbyists from doing [that],” Iannece said. “This is why people have lost their trust in government.” Iannece noted that he still supported Stavisky in her reelection campaign. “Toby is my candidate,” he said. “She’s earned another two years.” Rozic agreed that campaign finance reform was needed, also calling for public financing of campaigns to even the playing field for first-time candidates. “There’s nothing more convincing that we need public financing than actually being a first-time candidate,” she said. While there has been little vitriol in the race so far, ethnic tensions have begun to surface. A post on the website of the Bayside Hills

Civic Association, the civic Iannece once headed, referred to the Jewish Rozic as an “instant opponent,” speculating that people would vote for her only because “it would have something to do with ethnicity.” Iannece, who said he has not headed the civic in a decade, said he asked for that line to be removed. As the conversation turned to the state of education in New York, both candidates called for aggressive reform. Rozic vowed to form a coalition of elected officials to address the disparity in how state funds are distributed. She also stressed the need to fix overcrowding in schools. Iannece called for the end of mayoral control in New York City schools to begin to address the educational issues. “[Mayor Bloomberg] is making it worse. His whole plan is to water it all down and make good districts worse,” he said. Neither candidate felt that using public funding for charter schools was an acceptable answer, each stating that public money should be used for public schools.


www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 13


Sign On!

Let’s March

Officials celebrated the lighting of the Jet Blue sign in Long Island City. Pictured (from left) are U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Borough President Helen Marshall, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Queens EDC Executive Director Seth Bornstein and Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer (D-Woodside). Photo by Ira Cohen.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (left) stands with singer Harry Bellafonte, who served as a grand marshal for the West Indian Day parade. Photo by Ira Cohen.

Jewish Council Honors

Prepared For Service

pix

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Queens Events Edited By Harley Benson U.S. Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-Bayside, center) was honored by the Queens Jewish Community Council with a lifetime achievement award. He is pictured with Cantor Josee Wolff and Paul Trolio of Temple Sholom of Floral Park, which was presented with the council’s New Tamid Award.

College Welcome Victoria Azarenka awaits a serve in her match against Kirsten Flipkens at the U.S. Open on Aug. 29. Azarenka defeated Flipkens in two straight sets. Photo by Ira Cohen.

No Graffiti

Councilman Peter Koo (D-Flushing) was presented with the Council’s Community Service Award. Pictured (back row, from left) are Public Advocate Bill deBlasio, Michael Nussbaum and Warren Hecht, QJCC president; (front row) Councilwoman Karen Koslowitz (D-Forest Hills), Koo and Cynthia Zalinsky, QJCC executive director. Photos by Ira Cohen.

Queens College Student Association President Karamvir Singh led hundreds of students on the college quad in a flash mob performance of a popular Indian dance routine, masala bangla. The dance was one of several events held for over 1,000 new and returning students as part of the college’s annual Welcome Day festivities. The bands Red Baraat and We the Kings also performed. Photo by Georgine Ingber.

Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. (D-Astoria), Communications Director Michael Pantelidis and intern Courtney Watson stand beside a freshly-painted mailbox at Shore Boulevard and Astoria Park South. Vallone and his staff painted the mailbox to cover up graffiti.


Queens Focus PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE Local students were named to the Dean’s List and President’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Berkeley College. Students named to the President’s List include: College Point: Irina Lalicic. Flushing: Maria Behrens, Or Moladjan, Noemi SaldivarTorres. Students named to the Dean’s List include: College Point: Anthony Pescara. Flushing: Francisca Acevedo, Shamim Ahmadi, Tae Kyun Cha, Qing Feng, Weijian Gu, Xinyi Ju, Tommy Kong, John Lee, Xiaoqian Li, Ashley Lin, Maria Llaguno, Bernard Mondezie, Kelvin Ng, Meiyue Piao, Angelica Vargas, Wenjing Zhang, Hui Dan Zheng. Whitestone: Shirley Alvarez, Nicole Munoz, Lori Sexton. DiFenni Shi of Flushing received a Bachelor of Music in Performance during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Berklee

College of Music, in Boston, Mass. Solomon Schecter School in Flushing received one of 13 $500 mini-grants from the Hadassah Foundation, in honor of its “bat mitzvah year” of service. The school will use the grant to start a Rosh Hodesh program for teen girls. Damian Badal and Michelle Chin of Bayside were named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Berkeley College. Clark University junior Alexandra S. Katechis of Bayside spent her summer in Worcester, Mass., interning with the Worcester Education Collaborative, which works with students in the public school system to help them succeed. Katechis is the daughter of Rebecca Katechis of Bayside. Students named to the Dean’s List include: Floral Park: Angela Miller. Fresh Meadows: Mustafa Naseer.

Campaign Kick-off:

Tennis Clinic : Nesquik-sponsored athletes Mike and Bob Bryan recently conducted a clinic at the West Side Tennis Center with 100 kids as part of the 2012 “Little Mo” Internationals – Forest Hills, a youth tennis tournament drawing more than 300 players from around the world for ages 12 and under.

Queens Village: Natasha Rajcooar, Sergio Turbides, Roland Vaval.

Rego Park: Christine Aragoncillo, Rizki Hamid, Susan Leviyev, Aye Mya Ya Mon.

Nadia Suen of Fresh Meadows was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Berklee College of Music in Boston, Mass.

Shuyao Wu of Rego Park participated in Purdue University’s annual Summer Transition, Advising and Registration program in advance of fall enrollment to the university.

Dennis Rim of Little Neck has been named a Danforth Scholar at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. Rim recently began his freshman year at the university. Natasha Lazare of Queens Village received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in fashion during commencement ceremonies at the Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Ga.

U.S. Rep Steve Israel (D-Hauppauge) held a “Bagels and Schmear” breakfast to kick off his 2012 re-election campaign in Queens Country, where he met with volunteers, supports and local officials.

Local students were named to the Dean’s List and President’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Berkeley College. Students named to the President’s List include: Forest Hills: Georgy Samoylov. Kew Gardens: Lissette Rodriguez. Rego Park: Richard Devera. Students named to the Dean’s List include: Forest Hills: Mairi Inoue, Marie Esther Saintable. Kew Gardens: Valerie Owens, Maha Shahid, Kathyanne Smith.

Carlos Medina of Glendale graduated cum laude with a Bachelor’s degree in biology during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies from Tufts University in Medford, Mass. Myungsup Shin of Woodside was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Berklee College of Music in Boston, Mass. Hermes Pascoal of Sunnyside participated in Purdue University’s annual Summer Transition, Advising and Registration program in advance of fall enrollment to the university. Community District Education Council 27 has announced its list of officers and members for the 2012-13 school year. Officers include: Coralanne Griffith-Hunte, president; John Larkin, first vice president, Charlyene Blunt, second vice president and Borough President representative; Alexanderia Siler, recording secretary; Joshua Hirschman, treasurer. Members include:

Air Force Reserve Airman Maria C. Villa graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Villa is the daughter of Fabio Villa of Middle Village and is a 1999 graduate of Newton High School, Elmhurst. The American Association of University Women has awarded a 2012-13 Career Development Grant to Claudia Martinez of Jackson Heights. She is pursuing a master’s in education at Harvard University. Martinez is from Villa Nueva, Guatemala. She moved to Jackson Heights at the age of 12. Air Force Airman Thalia I. Ramos graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Ramos is the daughter of Milton Ramos of East Elmhurst and Cecilia Saldarriaga of Morrisville, N.C.

www.queenstribune.com • Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 15

Charissa Ng of Forest Hills graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor’s degree in American studies during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Tufts University in Medford, Mass. Ng was also named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester.

Daniel Taft of Forest Hills received a Master of Arts degree in industrial design during commencement ceremonies at the Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Ga.

Gina M. Davis, Dawn LoBello, Jennifer Keys McNamara, Raymond McNamara Sr. and Janice Wilson. Dawn LoBello also serves as Borough President representative.


Shop Gives Old Clothes New Life

By MEGAN MONTALVO In a city so nice they named it twice, a new store that echoes the theme recently opened its doors in Whitestone. On Aug. 1, Twice is Nice Consignment Boutique set up shop at 14-32 150th St., and has already made quite the mark on the neighborhood. As the first adult consignment store in the area, the

boutique sets itself apart by offering middle to highend men’s and women’s fashion at a fraction of the original retail price. Like all businesses, the beginning for Twice is Nice first started as a simple idea. When owner Donna Liggio of Whitestone was laid off by a former employer, she began to rethink her passions.

What she came up with was the foundation for her new boutique. “This is something I’ve always had in mind, but I never thought it was going to happen,” Liggio said. “I’ve always wanted to do consignment, and it’s great doing it in Whitestone because there is really nothing like it in the area.” After partnering with her former coworker Sabine Polesozsky of Whitestone, Liggio said her vision began to take form. “Sabine really took the bull by the horns,” Liggio said. “She did a lot of research and helped get the whole business side going.” Soon after the former ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ coworkers partnered together, Polesozsky’s sister Michelle Whiting also came on board as a silent partner. The trio worked together to choose a storefront, and the idea quickly took the shape of what is now the flagship for Twice Is Nice - turning Liggio’s dream into a reality. In its inaugural month, Twice is Nice has already added 51 consigners to their ledger and hopes to eventually expand into Astoria or Brooklyn. For Liggio, the secret to the consignment business lies in a firm belief in second chances. “We all do it,” Liggio said. “There has been so many times when I buy something and it just sits there. Consignment allows you to make a profit by reselling a garment you would have ordinarily thrown out.” In addition to the array of shoes, accessories and clothing available for purchase, Liggio also hopes to one day add home goods and furniture to the boutique. Since opening, the business has garnered the bulk of its merchandise from consigners living in Malba, Whitestone and Bayside. Although the store is currently accepting consignment submissions, it plans to host a formal grand opening on Sept. 8, from 4 to 8 p.m. Those interested in becoming consigners may visit the store in person or online at twiceisniceny.com. Each sale earns a 50 percent split profit, and a portion of the sale’s proceeds will be donated to local charities. Twice is Nice is open every Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m.; Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday from 11 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. The store is closed on Sundays and Mondays. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queenstribune.com.

Page 16 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Business, Banking & Real Estate

Partners Donna Liggio (right) and Sabine Polesozsky (left) stand by consignment items available for purchase at Twice is Nice Consignment Boutique.


The History Of Labor Day Labor Day, the first Monday in SepThrough the years the nation gave tember, is a creation of the labor move- increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The ment and is dedicated to the social and first governmental recognition came economic achievements of American through municipal ordinances passed workers. It constitutes a yearly national during 1885 and 1886. From them detribute to the contributions workers veloped the movement to secure state have made to the strength, prosperity, legislation. The first state bill was inand well-being of our troduced into the New country. York legislature, but Salute To The first Labor Day the first to become law holiday was celebrated was passed by Oregon on Tuesday, Sept. 5, on Feb. 21, 1887. Dur1882, in New York City, ing the year four more in accordance with the states — Colorado, plans of the Central LaMassachusetts, New bor Union. The Central Jersey, and New York Labor Union held its — created the Labor second Labor Day holiDay holiday by legisladay just a year later, on Sept. 5, 1883. tive enactment. By the end of the deIn 1884 the first Monday in Septem- cade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennber was selected as the holiday, as origi- sylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 nally proposed, and the Central Labor other states had adopted the holiday in Union urged similar organizations in honor of workers, and on June 28 of other cities to follow the example of New that year, Congress passed an act makYork and celebrate a “workingmen’s ing the first Monday in September of holiday” on that date. The idea spread each year a legal holiday in the District with the growth of labor organizations, of Columbia and the territories. and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in Information courtesy of the U.S. Dept. many industrial centers of the country. of Labor.

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Op-Ed

Celebrating New York’s Working Class By VINCENT ALVAREZ This Saturday, I and other union members from across the city will proudly participate in the annual Labor Day Parade. It’s a time to celebrate the contributions of working men and women of our city, and show our diversity and commitment. But this year’s parade is also a time to take stock of where organized labor stands in this country, to reflect on our organizing efforts here in New York and to make sure our workers are part of the discussion leading up to the Nov. 6 presidential election. The economic policies in Washington and New York over the last 10 years have not been kind to middle class and the labor movement. Declining or stagnant wages, persistent unemployment, dramatic increases in health care costs and eroding retirement security have be-

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come the new norm. A recent Pew Research Center report says the middle class has suffered through the “worst decade” since WWII. At the same time, many corporations and the wealthiest continue to amass extraordinary levels of income. State Labor Department figures put New York City’s unemployment rate for July 2012 at 10 percent, compared to 9 percent for July 2011, and a city comptroller’s report found that the top 1 percent of income tax filers in New York City received one-

third of the city’s personal income – twice the national average. Some employers and special interest groups continue to be hostile toward hard-working New Yorkers. Public sector workers and their long-standing benefits remain under attack, Con Ed recently locked-out 8,500 workers, jobs are sorely needed while our infrastructure remains neglected, and business groups are waging war against basic worker protections that would improve lives. Our parade up Fifth Avenue this Saturday is in celebration of labor unity, and it is also a reminder to all of us that we must build our future together. In our collective strength, we have the power to move the country in the best direction for all of us – not just billionaires and giant corporations. The labor movement will al-

Vincent Alvarez ways applaud hard work and success, just as we will always be outspoken about demanding fairness for all working people. We will never stop pushing – nationally and locally—for policies and legislation that allow a strong middle-class to flourish.

What we in New York and Americans across the country decide will have a dramatic effect on the course of our nation – and our working men and women – for many years to come. Vincent Alvarez is president of the NYC Central Labor Council

Page 18 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

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www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 19


Page 20 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ www.queenstribune.com


Leisure

New Brewery Comes To Astoria By MEGAN MONTALVO At tention all Queens craft beer drinkers: your drinking options are about to get a little w ider. As Queens awaits the long overdue openi ng of a local brewery, SingleCut Beersmiths are placing the finishing touches on their new facility, located at 19-33 37th St. in Astoria. S i n g l e C u t B r e we r y, w h o s e name comes from musical influences, will be the first full-scale

brewing operation to hit the borough since prohibition. Ironically enough, the address for the new brewery appropriately ties into the past as 1933 is also the year prohibition ended. The coincidence inspired owner and head brewer Rich Buceta to create a Lagrrr! – not to be confused with the traditional lager – by the same name. For the Jamaica-born Buceta, the excitement of opening the

A Worthwhile Mexican Meal

REVIEW

ducing his initial drafts of brew by November. A total of five brews, two lagers and three hoppy ales, will be released to pubs throughout Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn. Included in the long list of retailers are locals Queens Kickshaw, Alew ife NYC, Crescent & Vine and MexiBBQ. In addition to their flagship 1933 Lagrrr!, SingleCut will also offer a Sunburst Finish Lagrrr!, Pacific Northwest Mahogany Ale, 18Wat t Indian Pale Ale as well as a slightly hoppier version in HalfStack Indian Pale Ale. “Some of the brews are more extreme than others in terms of bit terness and taste, but I think people will find that they all have a unique approachability that will appeal to those who may not be craft beer drinkers.” While the brews will be initially restricted to draft sales, Buceta said he plans to eventually invest in a canning machine for fur thered distribution. In the meantime, Buceta says he will be patiently waiting out the construction process with the rest of us.

Rich Buceta “A lot has been happening ever y day w ith get t ing the brewery up and running, but when the day comes, and I can go to a local bar and see my tap handle behind the counter, that going to be an amazing moment. I might cr y,” Buceta said. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queens tribune.com.

Queens Center Kiosk Highlights Pralines By MEGAN MONTALVO In 1912, the world was introduced to a new kind of chocolate, named the praline. The traditional chocolaty goodness the world came to know was forever changed when the Belgian chocolatier Jean Neuhaus II invented the first filled bite-sized chocolate. Since then, the Neuhaus Belgian chocolates brand has expanded to global lengths, offering more than 60 different varieties of pralines in 40 countries, including three store locations in Manhattan. Last month, the luxur y brand came to Queens for the first time with the opening of a luxury kiosk at the Queens Center Mall, located at 90-15 Queens Blvd in Elmhurst. Situated on the first level of the mall, the kiosk offers all the same Neuhaus signature classics that New Yorkers have enjoyed at the high-end Manhat tan boutique s. “The Queens Center mall is one of the highest quality and trafficked

art isanal nougat ine and hand-filled with a coffee flavored ganache coated in milk chocolate, and the Caprice, which is tradit ional ar tisanal nougatine hand-filled with smooth Madagascar vanilla fresh cream and coated with dark chocolate. All of products sold at Neuhaus kiosk in the Queens Center the kiosk are impor ted Mall. directly from Belgium. malls in the US, and we wanted to The kiosk will also offer pre-packbe present next to the other high- aged gift sets and will be open eve n d b r a n d s t h a t a r e a l r e a d y er y Monday t h rough Satur day p r e s e n t , ” N e u h a u s C E O J o s from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. and Linkens said. “We were at tracted Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information on the to the fabulous area, because it is the second largest populated bor- kiosk, visit w w w.neuhaus.be, or contact the kiosk directly at (718) ough of New York.” According to Linkens, locals 592-3900. Reach Reporter Megan can now par take in the joy of sampling Neuhaus’ fan favorites, such Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. as t heir tradit ional Tentat ion, 128 or mmontalvo@queens which is composed of homemade tribune.com.

www.queenstribune.com • Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 21

cream. We also decided to split a chicken tamale. In no time, the dishes were in front of us. As big fans of guacamole – who isn’t? – we dug right in to the chips. The guacamole was mixed per fectly and before we knew it, we had devoured it all. We chopped up the tamale into thirds so we could each take a Tucked away in a corner of bite. It was the first time she had 48th Avenue in Sunnyside, my t a s t e d a t a m a l e , s o s h e a p proached it tentatively, girlfriend and I found De but as soon as she took Mole when we recently decided to dine out with RESTAURANT a bite, she was ready for more. a friend who was in the Once we had cleared mood for some good our plates of the appeMexican food. The restizers, our meals aptaurant had been recompeared almost immedimended in the Queens ately. My girlfriend and Tribune’s recent Best of I each had a chicken Queens list, so we to enchilada with a green head out and give it a tomatillo sauce, while shot. It turned out to be our dining companion a great decision. As we walked in one week- chose a burrito filled with grilled night, the place seemed ver y steak. Each of our dishes came with cozy. As could be expected from generous servings of rice and pinto a small corner restaurant, the din- beans, which nicely complimented ing area was a bit small. Only a the large main dish. While our dining companion handful of tables dot ted the landscape, though, so we weren’t marveled over how good his crowded by the other people en- burrito was, my girlfriend and I joying their meals. Despite the could not have been happier with small dining area, we never felt the chicken enchilada. An enchicramped. The atmosphere was lada needs a good sauce, and the just what we were looking for: not tomatillo sauce we chose was a too loud, with just enough light- very good sauce, giving t he dish a great flavor. We ate it right up ing for a nice night out. While the restaurant’s appetiz- with no hesitation. In all, we had an enjoyable – ers offerings looked great allaround, we wanted to keep our and affordable – night at De meal light, so we decided on the Mole, and I look forward to headDe Mole nachos, which included ing out there again to try some dipping sauces of black beans, more of its extensive menu. -Steven J. Ferrar i guacamole, pico de gallo and sour De Mole 45-02 48th Ave., Sunnyside (718) 392-2161 w w w.demolenyc.com HOURS: 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. ever y day CUISINE: Mexican DELIV ERY/TA KEOUT: Yes CREDIT CARD: Yes

brewer y is second only to his pride of being able to offer the City a truly local craft beer. “For a city this size, we really don’t a lot of local breweries. A lot of the breweries that do exist here have had to source their production elsewhere like upstate New York or Pennsylva nia,” Buceta said. “People are star t ing to find out, and they’re not happy about it. The fact that we’re going to be brewed 100 percent in New York City really helps set us apar t.” As construction of the S i n g l e C u t B re we r y w r a p s u p , Bucheta said he looks forward to hosting a grand opening. A performance stage will be incorporated into the space, which will allow for Bucheta to showcase his second hobby as lead guitarist for his rock band Bandsaw. “ E v e r y o n e w h o w o rk s a t SingleCut is also a musician,” Buceta said. “We are looking forward to using the stage to perform and feature local DJs and other musical acts whenever we host beer tastings.” By next month, Bucheta said he hopes to have the facility up and running with the intention of pro-


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today SECTION EDITOR: REGINA VOGEL

Send typed announcements for your club or organization’s events at least TWO weeks in advance to “Queens Today” Editor, Queens Tribune, 150-50 14 Road, Whitestone NY 11357. Send faxes to 357-9417,

IF YOUR ORGANIZATION MEETS ON A REGULAR BASIS, SEND ALL DATES FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR.

Page 22 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

SENIORS ELDER LAW Monday, September 10 Eld e r L aw, P r o te c t i n g Yo u r Assets, Wills, Trusts, Health Care Proxies 1:15-2:00 at St. Johns Vianney Church, 14010 34 th Avenue, Flushing. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Mondays, September 10, 17 at the Queens Village library at 11. DENTAL SERVICES Tu e s d a y, S e p t e m b e r 1 1 free dental service to seniors at Center for Smiles in Bayside. 6311-7800 appointments needed. BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS Tuesday, September 11 at the South Ozone Park library at 10. STARS Wednesday, September 12 Senior Theatre Acting Repertory at the Hollis library at 11:15. AARP 29 Thursdays, September 13, Oc tober 11, November 8, December 13 AARP 29 meets at noon at Grace House, 155-02 90 th Avenue, Jamaica. HORIZONS CLUB Thursday, September 13 at 12:30 for those 55 and over at the Reform Temple of Forest Hills, 71-11 112th Street. Bring lunch. $4 includes coffee and cake. INTRO COMPUTER/EMAIL Thursday, September 13 at the Flushing library at 10. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Thursday, September 13 at the Auburndale library. Register. STARS Friday, September 14 Senior Theater Acting Repertory at the Queens Village library at 11. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Friday, September 14 a t the McGoldrick library. 3357547 to register.

MEETINGS LIBRARY DIRECTORS Saturday, September 8 Friends Board of Directors of Queens Library at Cambria Heights meet at 4. VFW 4787 Mondays, September 10, 24 Whitestone VFW Comm u n i t y Po s t m e e t s . 7 4 6 0540. CATHOLIC VETS Monday, September 10 American Mart yrs Catholic War Veterans Post 1772 in Bayside. 468-9351. AMER. LEGION Mondays, September 10, Oc tober 8, November 12, December 10 American Legion Post 510 at St. Robert Bellamine in Bayside Hills. 428-2895. TABLE TENNIS CLUB Mondays, September 10, 17 at 1:30 at the Seaside librar y. WRITING GROUP Monday, September 10 Shut Up And Write! Meetup Group at 6:30 at the Broadway library. SUNNYSIDE WRITERS Monday, September 10 at the Sunnyside library at 6:30. TELE. PIONEERS Tu e s d ay s , S e p te m b e r 1 1 , Oc tober 9, November 13, December 11 Te l e p h o n e Pioneers of America meet in College Point. 463-4535. LIONS CLUB Tuesday, September 11 Lions Club of Ravenswood at 6:30 at Riccardo’s by the Bridge, 21-01 21 st Avenue, Astoria. COMM. BD. 9 Tu e s d ay s , S e p te m b e r 1 1 , Oc tober 9, November 13, December 11 Communit y Board 9 meeting at 7:45. 286-2686 for location. WRITING GROUP Wednesday, September 12 Seaside Writing Group at the library at 3. 98 TH STREET Thursday, September 13 98 th Street Block Association meets at 6 at the East Elmhurst library. HORIZONS CLUB Thursday, September 13 at 12:30 for those 55 and over at the Reform Temple of Forest Hills, 71-11 112 th Street. “Rossini and the Barber of Seville” is the topic. Bring lunch. $4 includes coffee and cake. JEFFERSON DEMS Thursdays, September 13, Oc tober 11, November 8, December 13 Jefferson Democratic Club meets 7:30 at the Clearview Golf Course Clubhouse. ILION BLOCK Fridays, September 14, Oc-

tober 12, November 9, December 14 Ilion Area Block Association meets at the African Center for Communit y Empowerment, 111-92A Farmers Blvd., St. Albans at 7:30. KNIT & CROCHET Friday, September 14 knitting and crocheting club at the Fresh Meadows library at 11:30. CHESS CLUB Friday, September 14 a t the Auburndale library at 3:30. PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturdays, September 15, 22 learn how to communicate effective 10-12 at the Elmhurst Hospital Conference Room A-1-15. 646-7488290. P-FLAG Sundays, September 16, Oc tober 21, November 18 P-Flag, a support group for parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays meet in Forest Hills. 271-6663.

HEALTH HEALTH TALK Saturday, September 8 Understanding Stroke, Diabetes and the New Health Care Regulations at the Bayside library at 2. BLOOD DRIVE Sunday, September 9 a t 188-15 McLaughlin Avenue, Hollis from 2-8. ALZHEIMERS Tu e s d ay s , S e p te m b e r 1 1 , 25 Caregiver Support Group in Forest Hills. 5925757, ext. 237. MS Tu e s d a y, S e p te m b e r 1 1 National Multiple Sclerosis Societ y Support Group meets at 1 at the Howard Beach library. WELL SPOUSES Wednesdays, September 12, Oc tober 10 well spouses or partners of the chronically ill and disabled meet at St. Charles Rehab Center in Albertson at 7. 516-8298740. WILLING HEARTS Wednesday, September 12 family caregivers relief at the North Hills library at 1:30. RECOVERY, INT. Thursday, September 13 Recovery International meets at 2:30 at the Forest Hills library. Addresses anxiet y, fear, obsessions, temper, stress, depression. MEDITATION CLUB Thursday, September 13 at the Bellerose library at 5:15. INTRO YOGA Friday, September 14 Glendale library. Register.


YOUTH QUEENS LIBRARIES Many branches of the Queensborough Library offer toddler and pre-school programs and more. Contact local branches. STORY BOOK LADY Saturdays 12:30-1:30 reading enrichment program for 6-9 year olds at Maria Rose International Doll Museum in St. Albans. $7.50. 2763454. SCIENCE LAB Saturdays Central library at 11. CHESS CLUB Saturdays Flushing library at 2. FLYERS TRYOUT Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, September 9, 10, 11 Flushing YMCA Flyers tryout at the YMCA in Flushing. 961-6880. For girls and boys 5-18. SHABBAT SCOUTS Sundays Shomer Shabbat B oy S c o u t Tr o o p 6 1 3 a t Yo u n g I s ra e l o f W i n d s o r Park. 969-1571. REPTILE EDVENTURE Monday, September 10 at the Ozone Park library at 3.

RAINFOREST BUTTERFLIES Monday, September 10 at the Woodside library at 3. Thursday, September 13 at the Astoria library at 3. WHERE’S WALDO? Monday, September 10 at the Seaside library at 4. LEGO TIME Mondays, September 10, 17 at the LIC library at 6:15. CRAFT KIDS Mondays at the Flushing library at 3. FASHIONISTA ST YLE Tu e s d ay s , S e p te m b e r 1 1 , 18 at the Broadway library at 3:30. HONEY BEE ALIVE! Tuesday, September 11 at the Sunnyside library. Register. Wednesday, September 12 at the Steinway lib ra r y. Re g i s te r. Tu e s d ay , September 18 at the Astoria librar y. Register. WII BOWLING Tuesday, September 11 at the Windsor Park library at 4. 9/11 TRIBUTE Tuesday, September 11 at the Central library at 4:30. For all ages.

PLAY-DOH PARTY Wednesday, September 12 at the Fresh Meadows library at 3. CRAFT ACTIVITIES Wednesday, September 12 at the East Flushing library at 4. BOOST MATH Wednesday, September 12 at the Central library at 4:30. AUTUMN CRAFTS Wednesday, September 12 at the Hillcrest library at 4:30. CHESS Wednesdays at 3:30 at the Queens Village library. TIMELESS TALES Wednesdays at 10 at the Central library. S TORY T I M E Wednesdays at the Seaside library at 11. GAME DAY Wednesdays at the Howard Beach library at 4. CRAFTERNOONS Wednesdays at the Ridgewood library. Register. SHEEP TO SHAWL Thursday, September 13 at the Sunnyside library. Register.

POETRY Thursday, September 13 at the Ridgewood library at 3:30. ARTS & CRAFTS CLUB Thursdays at the Seaside library. Register. BACK TO SCHOOL

Friday, September 14 celebration with magic, face painting and fun at the East Elmhurst library at 3:30. INTRO TO SCRATCH Friday, September 14 “Scratch” is a programming l a n g u a ge . C e n t ra l l i b ra r y.

TEENS CHESS CLUB Saturdays Flushing library at 2. FLYERS TRYOUT Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, September 9, 10, 11 Flushing YMCA Flyers tryout at the YMCA in Flushing. 961-6880. For girls and boys 5-18. POETRY Monday, September 10 at the Flushing library at 4. BULLYING Monday, September 10 at the St. Albans library at 4. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays Douglaston/Little Neck library at 4. FASHIONISTA STYLE Tu e s d ay s , S e p te m b e r 1 1 ,

18 at the Broadway library at 3:30. TAROT CARD READING Tu e s d ay s , S e p t e m b e r 1 1 , 18 Seaside library at 4. LIC CHESS CLUB Tuesdays LIC library at 4. BOOK BUDDIES Tuesdays Windsor Park library at 4. TEEN SPACE Wednesday, September 12 clay creations at 4 at the Windsor Park library. RESUME HELP Wednesdays at 3 at the Arverne librar y. GAME DAY Wednesdays St. Albans library at 4 and the Howard Beach library at 4.

Register. KIDS ACTIVITIES Fridays at 3:30 at the Briarwood library. GAME DAY Fridays at 3:30 at the Queens Village library. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays Briarwood library at 4.East Flushing Register. Ozone Park at 4. GAME DAY Fridays Windsor Park at 4.

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today

FLEA MARKETS OUTDOOR FLEA Sunday, September 23 Outdoor Flea Market 10-5 at the Free Synagogue of Flushing, 41-60 Kissena Blvd., Flushing. OUTDOOR FLEA Saturdays and Sundays through November 25 94:30 at St. Nicholas of Tolentine, Parsons Blvd. and Union Turnpike, Jamaica. FLEA MARKET Thursdays-Sundays MFM flea market at 221-02 Merrick Blvd., Springfield Gardens.

www.queenstribune.com • Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 23


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today

“Ben’s Rosh Hashanah Dinner For 10! Save $20 & Get 3 FREE Meals…” you order by Sunday, $ 99 When September 9, 2012, you SAVE $20 and get 3 Ben’s Friends on-card

319

ENTERTAINMENT

FOR 10

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SOUP

K 4 qts. Chicken Noodle Soup with 12 Matzo Balls

APPETIZER

ENTREE

CHOOSE ONE

K 5 Roast Chickens K Whole Roast Turkey (15 lb. avg.) K 4 lbs. Sliced Brisket

TH BY PHONE WI TICE. S. NO LEAST 24 HR ORDER. M $100 MINIMU

ACCOMPANIMENTS

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Page 24 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

– ROSH HASHANAH – Close 4pm Sun., September 16th Reopen Wed., September 19th – YOM KIPPUR – Close 4pm Tues., September 25th Reopen Thurs., September 27th

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PRE-ORDER NTER OVER-THE-COU P… K-U FOODS FOR PIC AT

GUERNICA 75 Through October new compositions by acclaimed young flamenco guitarist and composer Daniel Casares at Thalia Spanish Theatre in Sunnyside. 729-3880. LITERACY CELEBRATION Saturday, September 8 Fa m i l y L i tera c y Wa l k a n d Celebration starting at 11. Ravenswood library. DISCOVERY DAY Saturday, September 8 Discovery Day Street Fair at the Central library for the family starting at 11. BLUES Saturday, September 8 James Lewis sings the Blues at the Flushing library at 2. SHAKESPEARE Saturday, September 8 Shakespeare in Music: Scenes from Famous Operas by Great Composers at the Forest Hills library at 2:30. ARMSTRONG Saturday, September 8 Lincoln Center Local presents It’s All About Armstrong at the Peninsula library at 2:30. NEW PLAYS Sunday, September 9 “Jessie and Sam.” Sunday, September 16 “Wish Play.” at the Creek and Cave, 1093 Jackson Avenue, LIC. $7. www.ThePlat formGroup.org CUBAN DANCE Sunday, September 9 Papo Ortega’s Cubanoson at the Central library at 3. MOTORCYCLE SHOW Sunday, September 9 antique motorcycle show at the Queens Count y Farm Museum 11-4. $5. 73-50 Little Neck Parkway, Floral Park. 347-3276. NY OPERA Sunday, September 9 Saint Luke’s in Forest Hills presents a NY Opera Forum double bill: Meistersinger, Act III, Pt. 1 and Bartok’s Bluebeard’s Castle at 3. 85 Greenway South, Forest Hills. $10. LIVE JAZZ & R&B Sundays, September 9, 16, 23, 30 live jazz and r&b 610 at Déjà vu, 180-25 Linden Blvd., St. Albans. BUKHARIAN MUSIC Monday, September 10 Forest Hills library at 5:30. CLASSICAL PIANO Monday, September 10 at the Flushing library at 6. OPEN MIC POETRY Monday, September 10 at Barnes & Noble, 176-60 Un i o n Tu r n p i ke , F re s h Meadows at 7:30. AUDITIONS Mondays, September 10, 17 for the Oratorio Societ y of Queens. 279-3006.

TAROT CARD READING Tuesday, September 11 at the Seaside library at 4. SOUTH ASIA ON FILM Wednesdays through April 25 at 4:30 at the GodwinTe r n b a c h Museum at Queens College. 997-4747 for titles and other info. LOVE SONGS Thursday, September 13 Spanish and English love songs at the Poppenhusen library at 3. TANGO, BOLERO, R&B Thursday, September 13 at the Corona library at 5. AUTUMN PASSION Thursday, September 13 Chinese Communit y Center of Flushing presents Autumn Passion Performance at 6 at the Flushing library. SCRABBLE Thursday, September 13 at the Bellerose library at 6:30. CHINESE MUSIC Friday, September 14 Ba Ban Chinese Music Societ y Autumn Moon Concert at 5 at the Flushing library. CASABLANCA Saturday, September 15 “Casablanca” will be shown with a discussion and trivia game to follow at noon at the Ridgewood library. SPANISH DANCE Saturday, September 15 Flushing library at 2 and 4. ROCK & POP CONCERT Saturday, September 15 at the Forest Hills library at 2:30. BIG BAND SINGERS Saturday, September 15 Fresh Meadows library at 2:30. ECUADORIAN MUSIC DAY Saturday, September 15 at the Jackson Heights library at 2:30. SACRED FESTIVAL Saturday, September 15 Queens Botanical Gardens presents a performance celebrating the sacred traditions of master artists from around the globe at 2. GREEN FILM Saturday, September 15 “Fuel” will be shown at 3 at the Broadway library. AMAZING MAIZE MAZE Weekends through Oc to ber 28 at the Queens Count y Farm Museum, 7350 Little Neck Parkway, Flor a l Pa r k . 3 4 7 - FA R M . $ 9 adults, $5 children. PARISH BBQ Sunday, September 16 at St. Josaphat’s in Bayside. $15 adults, $10 children 1115, under 10 free. 7465138. STAMP SHOW Sundays, September 16, Oc tober 21, November 18, December 16 Bayside

Stamp Show at the Ramada Hotel, 220-33 Northern Blvd., Bayside from 10-4:30. Free admission and parking. 645-7659.

TALKS ELDER LAW Monday, September 10 Eld e r L a w, P ro t e c t i n g Yo u r Assets, Wills, Trusts, Health Care Proxies 1:15-2:00 at St. Johns Vianney Church, 14010 34 th Avenue, Flushing. WINDSOR PARK Monday, September 10 “One Thousand White Women” discussed at 2 at the Windsor Park library. CLASSIC BOOKS Monday, September 10 “Grapes of Wrath” discussed at 6:30 at the Peninsula library. HILLCREST BOOK Tu e s d a y, S e p te m b e r 1 1 “The Submission” discussed at 3 at the Hillcrest library. AESTHETIC REALISM Wednesday, September 12 at the Flushing library at 6:30. ELDER LAW Thursday, September 13 Elder law, estate planning, trusts, and asset protection at 1:30 at the Windsor Park library. NIGHT BOOK Thursday, September 13 “Strength In What Remains: A Journey of Remembrance and Forgiveness” at 5:30 at the Windsor Park library. GLENDALE BOOK Thursday, September 13 “In the Garden of Beasts” discussed at 6 at the Glendale library.

DINNER NETWORKING LUNCH F r i d ay, O c to b e r 2 6 9 0 t h Annual Salute to Commun i t y Le a d e r s N e t wo r k i n g Luncheon in Flushing. 6852802.

EXHIBIT VISIONARIES Through September 12 QCC Art Gallery highlights the works of Visionary Master Artists. Queensborough CC. 631-6396. INSRUCTORS EXHIBIT Through September 29 at the National Art League, 4421 Douglaston Parkway, Douglaston. 516-300-3025.


EDUCATION/GAMES/CRAFTS

PARENTS TODDLER PLAYGROUPS Starting in September at M a s p e th Tow n H a l l . 3 3 5 6049. OPEN HOUSE Saturday, September 8 Tip’s Place will hold an Open House – grandparent support group, family fitness, youth empowerment. 16110 Jamaica Avenue, suite 508 noon to 3. 558-5900. BACK TO SCHOOL Sunday, September 9 International Karate and Fitness Center at the Forest Hills Jewish Center at 2:30. 544-4698. NEW MOMS GROUP Wednesday, September 12 New Mom’s Group meets at the Briarwood library. Register.

KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at 4 at the Douglaston library. DRAWING CLASS Mondays National Art League in Douglaston. 3610628. ADULT CHESS Mondays and Thursdays Queens Village library at 5:30. SMALL BUSINESS Tu e s d a y , S e p te m b e r 1 1 Central library. Register. MASTERING WORD Tuesday, September 11 at the LIC library at 10. INTRO COMPUTERS Tuesday, September 11 at t h e O z o n e Pa r k l i b r a r y. Register. WATERCOLOR Wednesdays all techniques and subjects at the National Art League.969-1128. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesday, September 12 at the South Ozone Park library at 1. CRIMINAL RECORD Wednesday, September 12 Job Searching with a Criminal Record at the Far Rockaway library at 3. Also on Friday, September 14 at the Arverne library at 10:30. TECHNOLOGY Wednesday, September 12 Getting Organized with Technology at the Central library. Register. FICTION WRITING Thursday, September 13 at the Langston Hughes library at 5:30. MOCK INTERVIEWS Thursday, September 13 at the Central librar y. Register. GOOGLE DOCS Thursday, September 13 at the Central librar y. Register. BOOK CAMP Thursday, September 13 at the Arverne library at 10:30. INTRO COMPUTERS Thursday, September 13 at t h e O z o n e Pa r k l i b r a r y. Register. ECO JEWELRY Thursday, September 13 at the Woodside library. Register. METRIX LEARNING Friday, September 14 a t the Central librar y. Register. Free online training through Metrix Learning. BEGIN WORD Friday, September 14 Central library. Register. EXCEL Friday, September 14 a t the Flushing library at 10. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Saturday, September 15 at Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament in Bayside. 631-3609720.

BEGIN POWERPOINT Saturday, September 15 at the Central librar y. Register. INTER. POWERPOINT Saturday, September 15 at the Central librar y. Register. PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturdays, September, 15, 22, Oc tober 6, 20, 27 public speaking and effective communication at Elmhurst Hospital. 646-748-8290 information.

ENVIRONMENT GARDENING CLUB Saturdays help with our vegetable and shade garden at the Steinway library at 4. INDOOR COMPOSTING Saturday, September 8 H ow to P u t Yo u r K i t c h e n Scraps to Good Use at the Sunnyside library at 3. COMPOSTING Mondays June through November at the Steinway library 6-7:30.

RELIGIOUS TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM Fridays, September 7, 14, 21, 28 Shabbat Services at 8. Saturday, September 8 Selichot Service at 8 followed by ice cream social. Sunday, September 9 Open House 9-11. Temple Beth Sholom, 171-39 Northern Blvd., Flushing. 463-4143.

MISCELLANEOUS FARMERS MARKET Fridays 8:30-4:00 at Dahlia Avenue off Main Street, Flushing. FARMERS MARKET Saturdays through November 17 8-4 at Roy Wilkins Park, Merrick and Baisley Blvds. 9/11 MEMORIALS Sunday, September 9 music, poetry and tribute program in the garden of historic Poppenhusen Institute, 114-04 14 th Road, College Point at 2. Tuesday, September 11 Forest Hills and Rego Park communities will hold their annual Memorial Tribute at 6:30 at Remsen Park, Alderton Street. Rain location American Legion Hall. AUDITIONS Mondays, September 10, 17 for the Oratorio Societ y of Queens. 279-3006. WALK-A-THON Sunday, September 16 sickle cell walk-a-thon in Queens Village. 712-0198.

www.queenstribune.com • Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 25

INTER. WORD Saturday, September 8 at the Central librar y. Register. BECOME A CITIZEN Saturdays, September 8, 15 at the Flushing library at 3. Becoming a US Citizen and Building Your Civic Knowledge. SOUND EDITING Saturday, September 8 at the Jackson Heights library. 592-9700, ext. 135. BEGINNERS EXCEL Monday, September 10 Central library. Register. INTRO COMPUTERS Monday, September 10 at the Flushing library at 10. Introduction computers and email. INTRO COMPUTERS Mondays, September 10, 17 at the Fresh Meadows library at 10:30. CRAFT CLUB Mondays, September 10, 17 at the Broadway library at 12:30. METRIX Mondays, September 10, 17 free online training through Metrix at the Central library at 1. SOCIAL MEDIA Monday, September 10 at the Arverne library at 5:30. RESUMES & COVER LTS. Monday, September 10 Central library. Register. SEASONAL EMPLOYMENT Monday, September 10 at the LIC library. At 6. BALLROOM DANCING Monday, September 10 Forest Hills library at 6:30. BRIDGE Mondays except holidays 12-4 at Pride of Judea in Douglaston. Lesson & play $10. Partners arranged. 4236200.

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today


Models Of Queens Venus

Venus Maldonado Home: Woodhaven Age: 21 Height: 5’ 0"’ Weight: 127 lbs Stats: 36-28-38

Painting, photography and music are just some of the talents displayed by this Woodhaven wonder, a returning favorite here at QConf. Venus grew up all over Queens – raised in Bayside, moving across the borough to Woodhaven a few years ago and graduating from Springfield Gardens High School where she focused on Veterinary science and played volleyball and softball. She isn’t looking for a career as a vet though; Venus is looking to attend the Fashion Institute of Technology for photography, her real passion. In her spare time, Venus enjoys hanging out in Greenwich Village, and is an avid painter, having sold some of her work. She calls her artwork “abstract” and “fantasy art,” and has painted dragons, Andy Warhol pieces and the character Harley Quinn from Batman. Venus also has painted pieces inspired by Pink Floyd, her favorite band. Other than Pink Floyd, her musical tastes vary. Although she enjoys listening to mostly heavy metal or classical rock music, she’s open to all types of music “I’ll listen to just about anything if it’s good,” she said. Venus is also a fan of horror movies, listing the classic “The Exorcist” as her favorite movie. She enjoys watching football and says her favorite team is the New England Patriots. “I don’t like to limit myself boundarywise,” Venus explains. “I try to learn and do everything”

Page 34 Tribune Sept. 6-12, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Put Down That Phone!

Astoria's Libby Sile

Aye, Dios Mio! This week, Astoria resident Libby Sile introduced readers to the Chilean Hotdog in a short piece in Esquire magazine. The article took the internet by storm and led to a subsequent profile on Sileand her hotdog-in a Chilean newspaper. While the write up included a very compelling description on what ingredients are in a Chilean Hotdog and how you can make your own, QConf cannot help but think one thing– Really? Astoria, we remember when you were known as the home of legends like Christopher Walken and Tony Bennett. Now, when people speak of you, it will just be in reference on where to find a decent dog.

One year after Gov. Andrew Cuomo passed a new law against texting while driving, the governor’s office announced that police state-wide have issued four times as many tickets to drivers in the last 12 months than they had the year before. In Queens, that number was significantly higher. From 2010-2011, NYPD issued 401 texting tickets. Between July 2011 and July 2012, that number jumped to 3,334 – an increase of more than 800 percent! Put down that phone, you may save a lot more than money.

Cartoonist Wanted Calling all artists! The Queens Tribune is holding a contest to find the next great editorial cartoonist. Submissions become property of the Queens Tribune and we reserve the right to print them. A small stipend is available if the newspaper selects an artist to become a regular editorial cartoon contributor who would then contribute 2 cartoons per week. To enter, send as many submissions as you wish via email to mschenkler@gmail.com. Make sure to include your name, email and contact information .

Spiderman at JFK Airport

Flying Spider There are many hassles associated with going to the airport – security lines, lost luggage, delayed flights among the most common. Travelers flying out of JFK airport recently had to deal with a more unusual one: Broadway. The cast of the Broadway hit “Spider-Man: Turn Off The Dark”

recently took to the stage, er, we mean terminal, to perform some songs from the formerly-troubled production, including a dance routine performed by multiple SpiderMen. Thankfully, there were no reports of webbing causing any delays.

On Fire Meet Darius Dorsett of Engine Company 260 in Long Island City. Darius, is featured on the cover of the $15.95 Calendar of Heroes 2013 Calendar produced by the FDNY, which is now on sale with proceeds funding fire prevention programs. Darius is a body builder, marathon runner and one of New York's bravest. You can get your calendars and more online at: www.fdnyfirezone.org.

Hello Children Kew Gardens Kids for Kids Flea Market will be held on Sept. 9 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Kew Gardens Cinemas Park There will be selling tables, new and gently used merchandise, bargaining but the difference is that the children, 5-12 years, will be “in charge” of their tables and their parents will be “the assistants.” Each child will be selling toys, games, books and clothes and each child will also be making a donation to a wonderful organization, The River Fund which serves the poor and those living with AIDS. Kids bargaining with kids? Sounds like the U.S. Congress.


LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

GRAND FULTON PROPERTY LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/19/12. Office in Queens Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC P.O. Box 610009 Bayside, NY 11361. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ 269 Randolph Street Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/22/08. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 213-19 99th Ave., Queens Village, NY 11429. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ Co-tan Family LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/24/10. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ 219-25 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/9/12. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 102-10 Metropolitan Ave Suite 200, Forest Hills, NY 11375. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that a license, number 1265305 for beer and wine has been applied for by LOMAZOYATL DELI GROCERY Corp. to sell beer and wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 10616 CORONA AVENUE in Corona NY 11368 for on premesis consumption. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of C L Real Estate Group, LLC. Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/ 07/2012. Office located in Queens County, SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against CL Real Estate Group, LLC., 144-11 Sanford Ave., STE 3J, Flushing, NY 11355. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County

on 7/18/12, bearing Index Number NC-000417-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Vaneetta (Middle) Mangra (Last) Singh My present name is (First) Venita (Last) Mangra My present address is 9148 112 th St., Richmond Hill, NY 11418 My place of birth is Guyana My date of birth is July 01, 1983 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 8/22/12, bearing Index Number NC-000452-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Baybe (Middle) Polaris (Last) Lopez My present name is (First) Marie窶年ieve (Last) Lopez My present address is 103-06 117 th Street, Apt. #4G, Richmond Hill, NY 11419-1932 My place of birth is Germany My date of birth is December 31, 1981 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 8/22/12, bearing Index Number NC-000394-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Alina (Middle) Elazar (Last) Kandov My present name is (First) Alina (Last) Elazar aka Alina Priyeva My present address is 144-42 75 th Avenue, Flushing, NY 113672415 My place of birth is Uzbekistan My date of birth is July 05, 1988 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 8/22/12, bearing Index Number NC-000912-11/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Anthony (Last) Giaconia My present name is (First) Anthony (Middle) Vincent (Last) Lastraglio aka Anthony V. Lastraglio, aka Anthony Lastraglio My present address is 43-15 45 th Street, Apt. #2F, Sunnyside, NY

11104-2367 My place of birth is Queens, NY My date of birth is April 25, 1983 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 8/22/12, bearing Index Number NC-000463-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Salomon (Last) Chalouh My present name is (First) Salomon (Last) Chalouh Solarte aka Salomon Chalouhsolarte (infant) My present address is 92-04 242 nd St., Bellerose, NY 11426 My place of birth is Town of North Hempstead My date of birth is December 29, 2011 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 7/11/12, bearing Index Number NC-000402-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Eve (Middle) Anne (Last) Rodriguez My present name is (First) Eva (Middle) Anne (Last) Rodriguez aka Eve Rodriguez aka Eve A. Rodriguez My present address is 18-15 21 st Ave, Apt 3B, Astoria, NY 11105 My place of birth is Queens, NY My date of birth is July 25, 1968 ___________________________________

me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Anton (Last) Hana My present name is (First) Amad (Middle) Anton (Last) Hana My present add r e s s i s 7 5 - 3 1 1 8 5 th S t . , Fresh Meadows, NY 11366 My place of birth is Egypt My date of birth is December 23, 1961 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 7/18/12, bearing Index Number NC-000411-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Shahnaz (Middle) Hasan (Last) Shewli My present name is (First) Shewli (Last) Begum My present address is 7808 97 th Ave., Fl #2, Ozone Park, NY 11416 My place of birth is Bangladesh My date of birth is November 30, 1988 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an order entered by the Civil Court Queens County, on the 22 day of August 2012, bearing Index No. NC-000175-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined

at the office of the clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of Pericle Gheorghias My present address is 46-01 39 Ave., Sunnyside, NY 11104. The date of my birth is July 16 th , 1980. My present name is Pericle Ghiorghies ___________________________________

TALLY CHIC, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) ON 07/ 30/12 Office Location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 146-16 223rd St, Springfield Gdns, NY 11413 Purpose: For any lawful purpose

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NAME: TO-

___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 8/ 8/12, bearing Index Number NC-000438-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Christian (Middle) Alexander (Last) Spatola Labrador My present name is (First) Christian (Middle) Alexander (Last) Labrador aka Christian A. Labrador My present address is 134-25 Franklin Ave, Apt 421, Flushing, NY 11355 My place of birth is Queens, NY My date of birth is December 18, 1982

www.queenstribune.com 窶「 Sept. 6-12, 2012 Tribune Page 35

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 8/22/12, bearing Index Number NC-000450-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Pei (Middle) Lin (Last) Lai My present name is (First) Peiliin (Last) Lai aka Pei Lin Lai My present address is 15266 Jewel Ave., apt. 113B, Flushing, NY 11367 My place of birth is Taiwan My date of birth is January 01,1987 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 8/23/12, bearing Index Number NC-000477-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF REGISTERED LIMITED LIABILITY PARTNERSHIP. NAME: PLAINE & KATZ, LLP. Certificate of Registration was filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/31/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLP, 80-02 Kew Gardens Road, Suite 5001, Kew Gardens, New York 11415, which is also the location of the partnership. Purpose: For the practice of the profession of Law. ___________________________________


To the people of NYC â&#x20AC;Ś From the men and women of

Navy Recruiting District New York ...

We Will Never Forget

Queens Tribune Epaper  

Queens Tribune Epaper 090612

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