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Vol. 41, No. 32 Aug. 11-17, 2011

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

RECOUNT!

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Because of obvious errors in Queens neighborhoods, which elected officials brought up in Jackson Heights when preliminary numbers were released (pictured), Mayor Mike Bloomberg asked the Census Bureau Wednesday to check its math and reevaluate just how many people live in New York City. By Domenick Rafter…Page 3

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Gov. Hugh Carey, Saved NY In 70’s, Dies At Age 92

New Bill Would Make City Corral Rascal Raccoons

Youth Initiative Seeks To Offer Minorities Hope

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This Week.................................................................2 Deadline....................................................................3 Editorial....................................................................6 Police Blotter...........................................................7 Not 4 Publication.....................................................8 Closeup....................................................................9 Trib Pix....................................................................22 Leisure....................................................................25 Queens Today........................................................26 Focus......................................................................31 Classifieds..............................................................32 Confidential............................................................42

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Let Your Inner Wyld Chyld Show

Page 2 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

There are few things in life that last forever: weight can be lost or gained; hair tends to disappear in some places and appear in others; even scars fade. But a tattoo? That's forever - well, most of the time at least. A new tattoo parlor has popped up in one of the most unlikely locations -a strip shopping center on 14th Avenue in Whitestone, wedged between a women's clothing shop and an eyebrow threading salon. "You can lose everything, but you'll still have your tattoos," said J.T., the head tattoo artist at Wyld Chyld Tattoos, which opened in June. The store has seen some success so far, building on its reputation from two other locations, in Merrick on Long Island and on Geritsen Avenue in Brooklyn. J.T. said owner Bill DeLuso chose to open a third shop on 14th Avenue because he grew up in the area and his cousin owns Coppola's Pizza a few blocks away. Wyld Chyld also offers body piercings, jewelry done by an actress from the show "Jerseylicious" and cosmetic tattoos, such as eyebrows, lip-liner and eye liner. J.T., who has been a tattoo artist for nine years, said the parlor is family-oriented, has experienced artists and is very "community conscious." Depending on the financial situation of the person, they may negotiate to charge the person per hour or a flat rate depending on the size of the tattoo. "We offer very cheap prices," he said. A unique aspect of the parlor is the apprenticeship they offer, a year-long unpaid internship where a person would shadow an artist five days a week, doing chores such as cleaning and sterilizing needles, learning the ins and outs of tattooing, how to make a needle, the logistics of tattoos and dealing with customers. The apprentice is guaranteed a job at the parlor upon the completion of their internship. "Apprenticeships aren't offered much these days," J.T. said. "It shows what we're made of." At the age of 18, J.T. got his first tattoo of a dog on his leg and fell in love with ink. There isn't a common tattoo that people get, but every tattoo usually has its own significant meaning for each person, J.T. added. The one type of tattoo that he enjoys the most involves Japanese writing characters. "It's more visually appealing," J.T. said. He cautions, however, that prior to getting Japanese writing tattooed on their bodies, people conduct research about what the letters actually mean. Although he is putting

it on their body, he is certainly not a master of the language and would hate to see somebody made to look foolish for their choice. "I am generally very cautious with the initial consultation," he said. J.T. stressed that when getting a tattoo, the customer needs to trust the artist and feel they are in good hands. Since he and his coworkers have been in the business for a long time, people always feel at ease when sitting in the chair, he said. "You just want to make sure you do the best job you can," he said. "Experience generally allows you to take control of the situation." The store is located at 150-44A 14th Ave., and is open seven days a week from noon to 10 p.m. Learn more at wyldchyldwhitestone3.wordpress.com. Reach Intern Jason Cohen at jcohen@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 128. — Jason Cohen

Fighting To Return Dignity To Dead For decades, Bayside Cemetery in Ozone Park has been notorious for its lack of upkeep. The Jewish cemetery that sits between Liberty and Pitkin Avenues only a few blocks from the Brooklyn border dates back to the 19th century and is the final resting place for more than 35,000 people. But burials ended a quarter-century ago, and since then the cemetery has mostly been forgotten about. About two years ago, efforts began to restore the cemetery: to cut down the overgrowth that had taken over the burial plots and restore and renovate the broken mausoleums and gravestones, led by the Community Association of Jewish At-Risk Cemeteries, a Westchester County-based organization aiming to restore aging Jewish cemeteries in the New York area. Aside from organizing teams of volunteers to clean up the cemetery during the last year, CAJAC has also advised the owner of the cemetery, Congregation Shaare Zedek in Manhattan, to hire a landscaping company to assume day-to-day maintenance and on-site management. The group also lobbied elected officials on the cemetery's behalf. Councilman Eric Ulrich (R-Ozone Park), who grew up just blocks from the cemetery and took part in the cleanup, has helped secure funding grants from the Council for security, including rebuilding and strengthening the fence around the cemetery and installing cameras. But despite efforts to clean it up and

Wyld Chyld Tattoos, a community conscious parlor that is not afraid to color you.

restore it to its former glory, the cemetery has still been plagued by vandalism. Recently, the situation got so bad, people walking by have witnessesed open graves and rotting corpses. "Obviously, as proud as we are about the incredible gains that have been made in fighting off the flora which had overwhelmed the cemetery, CAJAC is extremely concerned about these heinous assaults on the dignity of the deceased," said Andrew Schultz, Director of CAJAC. In response, Schultz said CAJAC went to the 106th Precinct for help, and were warmly welcomed. The organization got to speak to cops at the 106th about the cemetery. The NYPD received permission from Congregation Shaare Zedek to arrest those found trespassing at the site and stepped up patrolling around the cemetery. As a result, cops have arrested three intruders. In a letter to supporters on Aug. 1, Schultz said CAJAC will continue helping the cemetery and taking steps to protect the progress that was made. Already, Schultz said, at least three mausoleums that were destroyed by vandals have been fixed. "CAJAC remains committed to protecting historic Jewish cemeteries like Bayside from vandalism and will continue to serve as an ombudsman and liaison between Jewish cemeteries and law enforcement," Schultz said. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125. — Domenick Rafter

Gennaro Has Distr ict Graffiti Covered In an effort to beautify his district, Councilman Jim Gennaro (D-Fresh Meadows) grabbed a spray painter and covered up graffiti on a roll-down store gate in Jamaica. "So long to graffiti on Hillside Avenue," said the councilman, who added the graffiti cleanup program is a good use of the taxpayer money allocated to him. Gennaro started what he called the "graffiti removal apocalypse" on the corner of 172nd Street and Hillside Avenue in Jamaica July 25. An increase in funding allows the councilman to partner with local businesses, such as City Solve, to clean up blocks at a time. The cleanup program started out as a complaintdriven program, but has evolved into something more. Instead of waiting for complaints, if the councilman or a member of his staff sees graffiti on a store gate or building while out in the 24th District, it will be added to the cleanup list. "We're going to see it, we're going to get rid of it," Gennaro said. City Solve Owner Bruce Pienky said cleaning this block was the largest cleanup to date, as 145 gates were on the to-do list. The project has also removed graffiti from the Union Turnpike area and Francis Lewis Boulevard and Main Street intersection. The cleanup project is not only limited to gates. The group will also remove graffiti from sidewalls, homes, mailboxes and traffic control boxes. In order to prevent property from being retagged by vandals, the group does a monthly inspection of each property they cleaned up, and will remove the graffiti again if necessary. By constantly removing graffiti, Gennaro said it will break the spirit of vandals who may be tempted to recreate their artwork again on private property. This graffiti removal is free to the businesses and residents in Gennaro's district, which would otherwise cost them $500 to $1,000 for the service. City Solve's highpowered spray painters allow crews to remove graffiti from an area in just minutes. Andrew Manshel, executive vice president of the Greater Jamaica Development Corp.,

Photo by Veronica Lewin

Queens This Week

Councilman Jim Gennaro covers graffiti on a store gate on the corner of 172nd Street and Hillside Avenue in Jamaica. said cleaning up graffiti in Queens' neighborhoods is important to the perception of social control in the area. If an area has too much graffiti, people will begin to have a negative perception of the neighborhood, which could lower property values and increase store vacancy rates. By cleaning up graffiti, a neighborhood can maintain its value. To make a complaint about graffiti in your area, call the councilman's district office at (718) 217-4969. Reach Reporter Veronica Lewin at vlewin@queenspress.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 123. — Veronica Lewin

Ver izon Workers Strike In Queens Some 35,000 Verizon union employees, including many based in Forest Hills, went on strike after their contract with the telecommunications giant expired on Aug. 6 and the standoff has turned ugly. Verizon management claimed strikers vandalized equipment and strikers claimed they were physically targeted by non-union employees of the company. At the root of the standoff is Verizon's plan to curb pensions, mandate union workers contribute toward their healthcare expenses, and making it easier for the company to fire union workers. Verizon has also proposed cutting back or eliminating disability benefits and paid sick days. In response, two unions representing more than 45,000 Verizon workers - Communication Workers of America and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers - called a strike and workers have been picketing since Sunday. "Verizon executives are trying to take money from working people while paying themselves more than ever," said Chris Shelton, Vice President for CWA District 1, which includes workers in Queens. More than 10,000 workers have picketed across the city, including outside Verizon's building at 107-05 70th Rd. in Forest Hills. They took aim at the company's executive compensation, noting Verizon's CEO took home more than $80 million in pay over the last four years, and charged that the company was trying to prevent workers from unionizing. In a statement, Verizon refuted the union's claims, saying its executive compensation promotes a "performance-based culture" and has been approved by 90 percent or more of its shareholders. Verizon also explained that the reduction of union workers is due to loss of workers through attrition, the spin-off of the company's assets and buyouts. Verizon also denied it was coercing workers to not join a union, instead saying that has been the choice of the workers themselves. "Verizon employees have made their own decision not to organize, and that decision is based on a thoughtful analysis of the facts. It was entirely their decision," the company said in a statement. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125. — Domenick Rafter


Queens Deadline Census Snafu

Mayor Asks: Where Did Queens Go?

Livery cabs take up metered spots at the intersec tion of 31st Street and Ditmars Boulevard - a problem that has existed for decades. back to businesses. The students' professor, John Trujillo said the project has taken on a life of it own since he issued the assignment, and the gears of political activism seem to be spinning. "I wanted them to get out there and fight for something they believed in," said the Urban Studies educator. "It seems they are. It's real life now and they are no longer dealing with the issue in a classroom." According to Lucille Hartman, who has been a part of Community Board 1 since the 1970s, the livery cab situation goes back a long time and is not that easy to alleviate. Nonetheless, she welcomed the student effort with optimism that it may bring different views to the table. "Either way it's terrific," Hartman said. "You never know, sometimes you get new blood that may come upon something others have not before." Although the project is far from seeing results, Trujillo says he sees the sparks of political activism brewing within his students. "This project has exceeded beyond my wildest dreams what I wanted from them so far," Trujillo said as he recalled when the students were still trying to figure out how to earn a passing mark. "It seems they may get a good grade, but we'll have to wait and see if anything happens." Reach Reporter Jason Banrey at jbanrey@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 128.

The protest from the Mayor and New York's t wo Senators is primarily over the fact that the immigrant neighborhoods of Jackson Heights and others that adjoin it along the 7 train were dramatically undercounted in the Census. rooted and historic lack of trust between government authorities and the aforementioned groups, which I highlighted in my 2010 request for immigration authorities to work with communities to ensure accurate censuses." The Jackson Heights and Corona area are historically the most diverse locations in New York City, and home to one of the greatest densities of new immigrants. If a challenge is won and the Census bureau does issue new numbers, it would not change reapportionment or redistricting, but would affect allocations of government funding. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125.

Raccoon Round-Up Suggested In Queens By JOSEPH OROVIC The borough has been suffering from a growing population of unwelcome (and furry) Dept. of Sanitation helpers, according to local legislators who want to kick the vermin out of Queens. State Sen. Tony Avella (D-Bayside) has introduced legislation geared toward the removal of raccoons, which he said have consumed a growing chunk of his constituent complaints. "It's an infestation," Avella said. "They're reaching out in every area." The bill would mandate the City's Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene to remove raccoons on an as-reported basis, with the agency responding to either 311 or local elected officials. The animals would be neutered and re-released, preferably somewhere outside the city. DOH spokeswoman Susan Craig said the agency has seen a decrease in the number of raccoon cases reported via 311 since the success of a trap-vaccinate-return program in Central Park, adding Avella's bill would be a costly plan geared toward a Sisyphean task. "Non-rabid raccoons are a nuisance that do not pose significant health risks," she said. "They can be controlled with community involvement. The Health Department focuses its resources on initiatives that impact human health." As a policy, the agency addresses potentially rabid raccoons reported to 311 (attacks should be called in to 911). The animal is picked up by a contractor from Animal Care

and Control and tested. The efforts are part of a broader agenda to map where rabies is circulating, Craig said. Avella and Assemblyman Andy Hevesi (DForest Hills) gathered with members of the community at a press conference held in front of an empty lot at 164-11 45th Ave. The Senator said the property's overgrown state allowed the outsized vermin to run roughshod all over the neighborhood, with neighbors complaining about trash can invasions and backyard intrusions. Craig characterized Avella's bill as burdensome monetarily and in time. "Picking up a raccoon is pointless without addressing the problems that make the area, home or building attractive to them," she said. "If this were to be a commonly used service, it could be very expensive to be done safely and humanely." Avella and Hevesi promised to find funding for the legislation. "I avoid unfunded mandates," Hevesi said. Avella believes the raccoons' growing numbers can be attributed to a loss of their natural habitat. As a result, they have become more accustomed to human contact, in some cases having the nonchalance of pigeons. "The City is reluctant to address the everincreasing population of raccoons in our neighborhoods and it is simply not acceptable anymore," Avella said. Reach Deputy Editor Joseph Orovic at jorovic@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 3

By JASON BANREY If at first, others do not succeed - give it a crack yourself. That seems to be the motto of a group of students at LaGuardia Community College who are attempting to take on Astoria's public parking issues. According to Melodia Duval, an Astoria resident who helped create the Livery Cab Project, a student-led advocacy group, livery cabs are making it difficult for area residents to park along 31st Street, a situation upsetting customers and business owners alike. "It's has become a noticeable situation," Duval said, "especially for customers in the Ditmars Boulevard area looking for parking." Livery cab drivers who idle their cars along Astoria's major commercial corridors, occupying precious metered parking, have long been an issue for area residents. The students hope to add a different element to the mix of voices which have already been heard. Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. (D-Astoria) spoke with the students in Duval's practical politics course in July about different ways to be an effective advocate for the community and they were inspired. When efforts to get the Taxi and Limousine Commission to intervene were fruitless, Duval and her classmates took the councilman's message to heart and jumped into gear. "We wanted to take action and do something," Duval said. "This project is all about helping give the neighborhood what it wants." Since then they have been busy. After researching local legislation, the group of seven created a Facebook page, issued a letter to the TLC and even developed a resolution petition which received an overwhelming response from shop owners, said Tatiana Udavichenka, an honor student apart of the project. "Owners seem to be very annoyed by the situation," Udavichenka said after taking the petition door to door in to stores along 31st Street. "There is a taxi stand close to the train station but it isn't enough for all of them." With a focus on tackling one busy corridor at a time, the advocacy group is now aiming to give the streets back to consumers along 31st Street and bring the bucks

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

Students Taking On Livery Meter Thieves

whereas the Census results are more in line with those numbers elsewhere in the city, including areas that suffered a foreclosure crisis like Southeast Queens. Also, the mayor's office said, the high vacancy rates in these neighborhoods would not make sense because rents and pace of new housing construction remain high in Astoria and Jackson Heights. "To say there are abandoned buildings in growing, bustling neighborhoods is on its face absurd," said U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer. "The City is right to file this challenge." Some who defended the Census findings say the financial crisis and recession may have had an effect on the results. The economic crisis might have stunted any growth from earlier in the decade. U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand followed Bloomberg's letter with one of her own in support of the City's challenge. Last year, Gillibrand expressed concern to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano about chronic undercounting in New York's immigrant neighborhoods, particularly in Jackson Heights, Astoria, and Sunset Park. Immediately after the 2010 Census numbers were announced, Gillibrand wrote to thenCommerce Secretary Gary Locke urging him to review the 2010 Census results and correct any undercount to ensure New York communities get their fair share of federal resources. "There is well-documented evidence of, while well-intentioned, considerable shortcomings in the efforts to reach racial and ethnic minority populations, including immigrants, during Census 2010," Gillibrand wrote. "Many of those shortcomings were based on a deeply-

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

are and continue to be among our most stable, growing and vibrant neighborhoods," the mayor said. "This disproportionate concentration of vacancy suggests that some aspect of the census enumeration went awry in these two offices, with likely processing errors that may have hindered the proper reporting, compilation, and tabulation of census results." The other location Bloomberg's letter focused on was Bensonhurst and Bay Ridge in Brooklyn. Bloomberg is contesting the results through the Count Question Resolution Program, which allows elected officials to challenge the results of the Census and present evidence that the counts are wrong. The mayor's office submitted housing unit statistics that show the Census results in those two areas would mean vacancy rates there would be dramatically different than rates the New York Dept. of City Planning found in 2008,

By DOMENICK RAFTER Mayor Mike Bloomberg announced Wednesday that his office is officially challenging the results of the 2010 Census that showed paltry population growth citywide and in Queens, including a drop in the populations of two of the borough's most vibrant neighborhoods. In a letter to Dr. Robert Graves, the director of the U.S. Census Bureau, Bloomberg singled out two sections of the city, one of them being Astoria and Jackson Heights, both of which Census figures said saw a drop in population since 2000, despite being popular and thriving neighborhoods through much of the decade and remaining a popular and desired place to live. The administration says as many as 50,000 people could have been left out of the count. "Numerous data sources cited in our submission refute the prevalence of widespread vacant housing units in those areas, which


Carey, ‘Greatest Governor,’ Dies At 92 By DOMENICK RAFTER Former Governor Hugh Carey, who led the state through New York City's fiscal crisis in the 1970s, has died. A service had been planned for Thursday at Manhattan's St. Patrick's Cathedral. Carey died Aug. 7 at his home in Shelter Island at age 92. The Brooklyn native served in Congress for seven terms during the politically volatile 1960s before being elected governor, where he was praised for his handling of the fiscal crisis that shook New York City in the mid-1970s. Carey was born and raised near Prospect Park in Brooklyn and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He was elected to Con-

gress in 1960; the same day fellow Irish-American politician John F. Kennedy was elected President of the United States, representing Western Brooklyn neighborhoods of Park Slope, Red Hook, Sunset Park and Bay Ridge. In Congress, he served on the Ways and Means, Education and Labor committees; he was there when the Civil Rights Act passed and Medicare and Medicaid were enacted. He was one of the first New York representatives to oppose the Vietnam War. Carey was elected New York's 51st governor in 1974, defeating Republican incumbent Malcolm Wilson after the Watergate scandal swept Republicans from power across the country. In his first term as governor,

Pair Charged In Arson After Rock Incident By DOMENICK RAFTER 30 minutes to bring under control. The fire It was a case of letting him who is without occurred during the July heat wave and sin cast the first stone – and then temperatures at the time of the trying to set him on fire. fire were around 90 degrees. The Two men were arrested and building that went up in flames is accused of setting a fire in a South two stories, with a store called Richmond Hill building last Anjees on the first floor, and two month that left four people, inapartments on the second floor. cluding two firefighters, with seThe fire extended into the two rious injuries. second-floor apartments, seriFDNY Fire Marshals have arously injuring an elderly couple. rested Imran Ali, 23, and Devindra Two firefighters also suffered Ramnaryan, 21, of Queens for injuries. setting a fire at 123-11 Liberty Ali was arrested on July 27. Imran Ali Ave. in South Richmond Hill on Ramnaryan fled the country after July 23. The suspects allegedly the fire, but was arrested shortly set fire to the location around after his return on Aug. 1 follow2:30 a.m. on the second floor ing surveillance of the neighborlanding after illegally entering the hood by Fire Marshals. Ali and building; they believed rocks Ramnaryan face multiple were being thrown at them from charges, including arson, atthe building’s rooftop. tempted murder, assault, burThe fire was reported at 2:34 glary, criminal mischief and recka.m. and the first units arrived on less endangerment. scene in just over two minutes. In Reach Reporter Domenick all, 12 units comprised of 60 Rafter at Devindra firefighters responded to the alldrafter@queenstribune.com or Ramnar yan hands fire, which took more than (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125.

Tribune photo by Ira Cohen

Page 4 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

Welcome Home:

New York's newest Met, Mike Baxter, made a triumphant return home Tuesday night. The Mets picked the 26-year-old Archbishop Molloy standout up off waivers from the Padres last month, and with injuries to Daniel Murphy and Jose Reyes, the Whitestone native got the call to The Show on Tuesday. He answered it with an RBI-scoring double in the 8th inning to bring the Mets one run closer to their win that night.

Carey found New York City marred in a fiscal chard Brown, who served as Carey's counsel crisis that threatened to engulf the entire for two years, noted his leadership on issues state. When the federal government refused of justice, including creating merit-based to step in, he slashed spending, including selection of judges and changing how the court system was funded. axing free tuition at CUNY "Hugh Carey forged a lastschools. Former NYC Couning legacy of bold leadership, cil Speaker Peter Vallone commitment to public serSr. said Carey's leadership vice, consummate profesduring that time should sionalism and unimpeachrank him among the state's able integrity," Brown said. top governors. Carey was reelected in "He's one of the greatest 1978, defeating Republican governors, if not the greatAssembly Leader Perry est governor, this state has Duyrea of Suffolk County, in ever had," said Vallone, who a close race many expected was on the City Council Fihim to lose. nance Committee during The Carey administration the city's fiscal crisis while saw progress in help for the Carey was governor. "He mentally ill, a reaction to the saved the city of New York." scandal of abuse and overVallone added that he crowding in the Willowbrook thought Carey has been Hugh Carey State School in Staten Is"greatly underappreciated." Gov. Andrew Cuomo, whose father Mario land, and on environment issues, thanks in Cuomo served as Carey's lieutenant gover- part to the ecological disaster at Love Canal nor and succeeded him in the governor's in Niagara Falls. He was governor when the mansion, also praised his leadership during state hosted the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid. the fiscal crisis. Carey retired from politics when his term "He called for shared sacrifice and asked all New Yorkers to come together. New ended in 1982 and he returned to practicing Yorkers across the state heard the Governor's law. He attended the swearing in of Gov. call to action, followed his lead, and the ship David Paterson in 2008. Carey fathered 14 children with his first was righted," Gov. Cuomo said. Carey was responsible for the construc- wife Helen, who died of cancer shortly before tion of major public works projects. He also he was elected governor. His son Paul served successfully blocked conservative legislators in the Clinton administration as a commisfrom both parties from overturning New sioner of the SEC. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at York's abortion laws - a stance he later said he regretted - and from reinstating the death drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 357penalty, which he opposed. Queens DA Ri- 7400, Ext. 125.


Maloney Slavery Bill Would Hit Traffickers By JASON BANREY One Queens Congresswoman has spent her career campaigning against human trafficking and is not about to stop until she sees results. Last Wednesday, standing on the steps of City Hall, U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney (DAstoria), announced the introduction of the Business Transparency on Trafficking and Slavery Act. If passed, the legislation would require companies earning over $100 million worldwide to disclose an annual report to the Securities and Exchange Commission, revealing their employment practices to consumers. According to Maloney, 12.3 million people are enduring “enslavement,” working in some form of forced labor worldwide. “We have seen a global shift in trafficking in weapons and drugs to trafficking in children and humans,” Maloney said. “Drugs and guns can be used only once, but the human body can be used over and over again.” Using the legislation as a tool to topple trafficking, the bill would also oblige companies to be transparent about their employment policies, Maloney said. During Maloney’s tenure in Congress, she has been at the forefront in the fight against trafficking, cosponsoring numerous pieces of legislation such as the Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking Deterrence and Victims Support as well as the Human Trafficking Fraud Enforcement Act of 2010. Although previous efforts have stalled in the capital, and this bill is still in the first step in the legislative process, Maloney seemed hopeful the legislation

would see its way through. The Congresswoman’s proposal was also backed by some members of the City Council. Council Speaker Christine Quinn said she was proud to stand with Maloney and affirm her commitment to “stamping out human trafficking.” “It’s time we stop thinking about trafficking-whether it’s labor trafficking, or sex trafficking, of adults or children- as someone else’s problem,” Quinn said. “This happens right here in New York and it happens to children and it is unacceptable.” Councilwoman Julissa Ferreras (D-Corona) supported Maloney’s efforts to curtail the “sad reality” of sexual exploitation and trafficking. Ferreras’ district has allegedly been plagued with issues of human trafficking, which has given rise to an increase in prostitution along Roosevelt Avenue in Elmhurst. She suggested that the proposed bill would develop transparency between companies and consumers. “We as consumers and taxpayers should know that our money is not filling the corporate wallet by means of heinous activities like human trafficking, slavery, and child labor,” said Ferreras, chair of the City’s Women’s Issues Committee. “One way we can be responsible consumers is by knowing that a company has in place policies that address this issue, ensuring that the supply chain is not marred by any form of trafficking.” Reach Reporter Jason Banrey at jbanrey@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 128.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 5


Edit Page In Our Opinion:

Four Years Later… The announcement last week of the City's new Young Men's Initiative, designed to offer a greater focus for opportunity for the City's black and Latino populations, is welcome, if not long overdue. Four years ago, when Harvard professor Dr. Alvin Pouissant and Bill Cosby co-authored a book titled "Come On, People," this newspaper launched an eight-part, in-depth series that painted a picture of the state of affairs for the black communities of Queens. This award-winning excursion into the national issues facing black families and how those issues play out in Queens highlighted the exact issues raised by the Mayor's new initiative. It seems that four years later, the Mayor's plan follows the basic outline established by Pouissaint and outlined in our series: family structure, the justice system, education and role models. When we wrapped up our series, we closed with a quote from Dr. Pouissant: "By doing the things we can do, we can make the future much brighter for poor black youth, much brighter for everyone. No more excuses, no more delays. Come on, people." We're happy to see that the City has picked up the gauntlet that we threw down nearly four years ago.

In Your Opinion:

Page 6 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

Who's To Blame? To The Editor: Want a wild ride on the stock market? Here it comes! Who can we blame for the S & P downgrading of U.S. credit? S & P said the downgrade was not due to the amount of debt alone, but also the lack of both parties coming together to create solutions going forward. So, who wouldn't come together? The Tea Party, that's who. They refused to negotiate at every opportunity. It was their way or else. The world is now reacting to the S & P downgrade with down markets in other countries. There's more to come this week and we'll see some wild rides until the dust settles. The rest of the world can't believe that members of our Congress waited until the witching hour to raise the debt ceiling. This insane behavior doesn't happen in other countries. Treasury Secretary Geithner said that S & P made a $2 trillion error in calculating the debt analysis it presented and mistakenly went ahead with the downgrade anyway. Last Thursday, Italian authorities raided the Milan offices of S & P and Moody's Investor Services to see if they were involved in dubious movements in the Italian market. Stay tuned. One has to wonder if the downgrade was at all politically motivated. Also ask yourself, how much credibility does S & P have anyway after they gave outstanding ratings to worthless debt before the housing collapse?

First of all, there is no debt "crisis." That term was used by the Tea Party to connect the debt ceiling to draconian cuts in the budget. We have a lot of debt, yes, but it isn't a crisis. The term debt crisis was picked up by the right-wing media, Fox, the right-wing pundits, used it constantly until it became perceived as real. This year, Congress didn't routinely vote to raise the debt ceiling as they had every time in the past. This time was different because the newbie Tea Partiers, flexing their muscles, insisted the debt ceiling be connected to a vote on drastically slashing the budget. They flaunted their unwillingness to budge in interview after interview. House Speaker John Boehner, in a last ditch effort to just get through the debt ceiling hurdle, even presented a one-page item vote on it. That would have solved the problem, but the minority Tea Partiers rejected it. It became clear that the Tea Party, behaving like schoolyard bullies, were willing to throw the economy off the cliff unless they got their way. They thought it would be no big deal if we defaulted, and picked up the pieces. In this game of chicken, the Democrats saw that the Tea Partiers were crazy enough to do it, and flinched in order to save the country and divert a total financial disaster. Luckily, they did. Otherwise, we would be waking up today to a crashed economy, the likes of which we have never seen. We will still pay a costly price for their long delay in the

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months to come as the market fluctuates and our reputation suffers. If the debt ceiling vote had taken place as in all previous years, we could have avoided this mess. Then the budget could have been taken up as a separate issue and nobody would have gotten the jitters. S & P would have seen that both parties were working together to create workable solutions to the debt problem, and they wouldn't have dropped their ratings on us. They have said so. When asked prior to the last election how they would cut the budget, the Tea Partiers couldn't tell you. They still can't tell you, and their latest reckless behavior has shown that they could care less about our economy. They rode into power on angry rhetoric and money funded by the same sources and people that fund the Republican party. They are just the most extreme right of the extreme Republicans. Geographically speaking, most come from the South. Some of them are waking up to the fact that their mantra of cutting everything, means they would have to take cuts to their Social Security, and Medicare, and are not happy about that. Seeing this, some have abandoned the cause. They've created a fissure in the Republican Party, and the majority of Republicans don't know how to deal with them. They've openly threatened to launch primary challenges to those Republicans who are not fully onboard with their radical agenda. It's a story of the tail wagging the dog in that party now. No doubt more to come is on the horizon. Tyler Cassell, Flushing

Motives To The Editor: It's nice that Mayor Mike Bloomberg and his friend George Soros will help fund a program called The Young Mens Initiative. It would help Black and Latino men with job placement, education, etc. I don't mind that Bloomberg and friends will put up some money toward paying for this program. I do mind that some of my taxes will be paying for it, too. I think this program using New York City taxes is illegal because it discriminates against White and Asian men and all women. Where is the ACLU? If this program would be for White and Asian men you would hear from them. Would it not be better to use that $127 million to help keep the hospitals in Queens open? Already three hospitals are closed and a fourth is ready to close. The hospitals that are still open have become overcrowded because of these closings. Could this thing that Bloomberg is pushing be his way of paying the people who helped him run for a Deputy Editor: Joseph Orovic

Regina Vogel Queens Today Editor

Michael Nussbaum Executive V.P./Associate Publisher

Malpractice Up date To The Editor: The news that the Peninsula Hospital in Far Rockaway is closing is all too familiar. All across New York, hospitals and health care facilities have been forced to shutter their doors, denying many New Yorkers access to basic medical care. One of the principal drivers of these closures is the rising costs of medical liability insurance in New York, and one of the principal drivers of these higher costs is New York's antiquated medical liability system. New York is facing an unprecedented medical liability crisis, and the cost of insurance continues to outpace all other measures. New Yorkers pay more than $130 million annually in taxes to subsidize the cost of malpractice insurance, yet the premiums paid by doctors and hospitals remains astronomically high when compared to other states. Doctors in some parts of New York pay upwards of $200,000 per year in premiums and some health care providers cannot get coverage at all. Earlier this year, eight of the 13 obstetricians at the Bronx-Lebanon hospital received notice that their insurer would not renew their coverage. One proven solution to this problem is to cap non-economic damages in medical malpractice cases. Health care professionals and businesses in New York work under constant threat of multi-million-dollar judgments that can destroy their businesses and the jobs they provide, like the 1,100 jobs at Peninsula Hospital. By capping non-economic judgments (that is, judgments above and beyond medical costs or lost wages), we can stem the tide of hospital closures and show doctors and health care professionals we are open for business. Those who are injured as a result of an accident should be compensated for their medical bills and lost wages. It is the excessive and unpredictable nature of such things as the "pain and suffering" settlements that cause problems for the medical community and serve little or no purpose except to enrich trial lawyers. Many states, most notably Texas and California, have passed similar limits to great success. New York should join them and end the current "Lawsuit Lottery" system that threatens the economic growth of our state. By reducing the cost and unpredictability of malpractice insurance, New York would increase access to health care and make it more affordable for more New Yorkers. James Mammarella

Marcia Moxam Comrie, Contributing Editor

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Governor Cuomo included a noneconomic cap in his 2011 budget, but the cap did not make it through the legislature. If we as New Yorkers are going to stop the closures of hospitals, increase access to health care and lower the costs of medical liability coverage, the governor must put the cap in his budget in 2012, but this time, we must pressure the legislature to pass the cap, before there are no hospitals left. Thomas M. Stebbins, Executive Director, Lawsuit Reform Alliance of NY

Where Are The Cuts? To The Editor: Where are the specifics of spending cuts over the next 10 years? This certainly sounds like another scam: big promises and no action, except that the debt ceiling has been raised giving the government more money to squander around the globe. We should hold our representatives' feet to the fire to find out where they intend to stop wasting our money. Some items immediately come to mind: foreign aid, perpetual wars, government regulations ad infinitum just to name a few. Frank St George, East Rockaway

Cuts Par t II To The Editor: For several days, I've watched Secretary of Defense Panetta sound the alarms over potential defense budget cuts, how terrible it will be for national security. What he, and the rest of us, should be worried about is whether or not there will be anything left of this country to defend. Karen Ann DeLuca, Alexandria, Va.

Lost Seals To The Editor: I am greatly saddened, as most Americans are, with the death of 30 U.S. troops which included 22 of Seal team 6 in Afghanistan by the Taliban. Their courage, bravery and dedication to duty must not be forgotten. As a nation mourns, I ask all my fellow Americans to display our flag at half mast from every home, business and throughout our communities in memory of those who gave their last breath protecting democracy in Afghanistan and throughout the world. Remember, freedom comes with a price. My heartfelt prayers go out to their family, friends and their fellow servicemen and women they served with. May they rest in peace and may God bless America. Frederick Bedell Jr., Glen Oaks Mitch Kronenfeld: Classified Manager Elizabeth Mance: Administrative Assistant Classified Ad Representatives: Nadia Hack, Peggie Henderson, Fran Gordon, Marty Lieberman, Chris Preasha, Lorraine Shaw, Sheila Scholder, Lillian Saar

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101st Precinct DEADLY SHOOTING: On Tuesday, Aug. 2, at approximately 5:56 p.m., police responded to a call of a man shot in front of 51-11 Almeda Ave., in Edgemere. Upon arrival, Brian Jones, 34, who lived at the location, was found with a gunshot wound to the head. EMS responded and transported Jones to Peninsula Hospital where he was listed in critical condition. On Wednesday, Aug. 3, he was pronounced brain dead. Two days later the case was ruled a homicide. There were no arrests at this time, and the investigation was ongoing. 103rd Precinct MAY MURDER: The NYPD is seeking the public's assistance for information in regards to a murder that took place in St. Albans in May. On Thursday, May 26, at approximately 7:05 p.m., police responded to a 911 call reporting a man shot at the front of 105-22 188th St. in St. Albans. Upon arrival, police discovered the victim, Kyle Padmore, 30 of the same address, who had been shot once in the back of the head. EMS also responded to the location and transported the victim to Jamaica Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival. There are no arrests at this time and the investigation is ongoing. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers' Web site at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to CRIMES (274637), then entering TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential. 105th Precinct CYCLE CRASH: On Monday, Aug. 8, at approximately 6:14 p.m., police responded to a 911 call of a motor vehicle accident at 136th Avenue and Brookville Boulevard in Rosedale. Upon arrival police determined that a 2006 Honda Motorcycle operated by a 36-year-old man was traveling southbound on Brookville Boulevard when he struck the side of a 2007 Toyota Camry which was making a U turn at the location. EMS also responded to the location and pronounced the driver of the motorcycle dead at the scene. The investigation was continuing. Identification of the victim was pending proper family notification.

106th Precinct PULLED FROM WATER: On Monday, Aug. 8, at approximately 11:45 p.m., police responded to a call of an unconscious man at the Joseph P. Addabbo Bridge in Howard Beach. Upon arrival, responding members from the NYPD Harbor unit removed an unidentified white man, 35-40 years old, from the water. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The Medical Examiner was to determine the cause of death. The investigation was ongoing. CELLS SNATCHED: Police are asking for the public's assistance in locating a suspect wanted in connection with a robbery pattern that has occurred in Ozone Park. On Tuesday, Aug. 2, at approximately 7:25 a.m. at the 88th Street/Boyd Avenue A train station at Liberty Avenue and 88th Street a man robbed a 35-year-old Asian woman. Later that morning, at 8:45 a.m., at the Rockaway Boulevard A train station at Liberty Avenue and Rockaway Boulevard, the same robber attacked a 36-year-old black woman. The suspect is described as a black man, 30-40 years old, 6-feet, slim build and wearing a white t-shirt, khaki shorts and reading glasses. He approached the victims, verbally abused them, grabbed their cell phones, and fled on foot. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers' Web site at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to CRIMES (274637), then entering TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential. 114th Precinct 10-YEAR-OLD KILLED: On Sunday, Aug. 7, at approximately 6:37 p.m., police responded to a 911 call for a motor vehicle accident at 31st Street and 34th Avenue in Astoria. Upon arrival police determined that a 2009 Nissan Sentra was traveling westbound on 34th Avenue when it struck a 2004 GMC minivan, which was traveling northbound on 31st Street. A passenger of the GMC minivan, Sabrina Mangas, 10, of Tennyson, Australia, was transported to Mt. Sinai Hospital Astoria where she was pronounced dead on arrival Six others in the Nissan were taken to area hospitals in stable condition. The investigation was ongoing. www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 7


The Government Abyss: How Low Can You Go? By MICHAEL SCHENKLER I think I may be star ting an argument, but the United States Congress is not the worst legislative body at work in our country today.

Now don’t get me wrong, the performance of Congress over the past month dealing with the nation’s debt ceiling is likely the most pathetic performance on an issue of any legislative body in this state. Shame on them – on all of them – and my President, too. Although I think blame for the brinkmanship can clearly be affixed to the Republican Party held hostage by an extreme group of Tea

Party extremists, the President and the Democrats caved, and participated in the damaging proce ss with results that not only did not benefit the people they represent, it did harm to the nation. The President did not lead. The Democrats did little and the Republicans did damage. A lengthy Standard and Poor’s statement accompanying the downgrade of long-term sovereign credit rating on the United States to ‘AA+’ from ‘AAA,’ asserted: “We have changed our assumption on this because the majority of Republicans in Congress continue to resist any measure that would raise revenues, a position we believe Congress reinforced by passing the act.” Yes, my friends “raise revenue” is a euphemism for “tax increase” and in Democratic terms “a tax increase on the wealthiest Americans and Corporations.” But it is apparent that the Dems in Congress don’t have the collective courage to lay on the table and demand passage of a tax increase of a specific percentage,

based on gross income, so that 95 percent of Americans can understand that they wouldn’t pay more. For instance, you would not be subject to such a tax unless you were earning (my assumption) $250,000 per year, and then it would cost (assumption again) 10 percent of the gross or $25,000. And the tax increase would go up from there for people who earn more. I don’t know their formula but the Dems and the President failed to make their tax increase case to the people. And they failed to let the Republicans know that it was a non-negotiable par t of their package. “We control one House – the Senate – and we have the President” they could have said, “and insist that for ever y dollar cut in spending, we increase revenue by a dollar by taxing millionaires and billionaires and the wealthiest of corporations.” I am saddened, disappointed and totally unimpressed how my government and my representative per formed for the county on the debt ceiling legislation. And a “no”

vote does not score points in my judgment. The Dems who “broke” with their leadership and the President, in my opinion, were really “yes” votes if they were needed to pass the legislation. While the “no” vote does reflect a bit of principle expressing their dissatisfaction with the legislation and the fact that the wealthiest Americans are not contributing to the solution, I view it as an equal amount of pandering, because if needed they would have voted “yes.” And finally, if done with leadership’s knowledge and approval, you can’t move your caucus. The Tea Part y didn’t ask John Boehner for permission to draw their line – as a matter of fact, they took control. Progressive Democrats, learn a lesson. Mr. President, you too have lessons to learn. Taking options off the negotiating table based on your knowledge of constitutional law is no way to win a street fight. T he Progre ssive Democrats are in a brawl with the Tea Par t y Republica ns and the right wing knows how to

fight. And our side just doesn’t. The results: pathetic. With all that said and with Congress having the lowest approval rating in memory, I have no problem placing them a rung up from the most abysmal legislative body in the nation: The New York State Legislature. Hovering just above that black hole leading to the abyss is the New York State Legislature, which has been slightly improved by the leadership of Gov. Andrew Cuomo. In the months to come, as they decide whether redistricting will be done independently or as part of the same ‘ol political self-serving proce ss that has marked t heir years in the abyss, we shall be able to determine if there is any hope for the State and its legislature. As far as Congress is concerned, they may learn a lesson from their debt ceiling fiasco and the price we and they have paid. Or perhaps, we New Yorkers will continue to compete with the people of the nation in a game of “how low can you go?” MSchenkler@QueensTribune.com

Page 8 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

Clinton Suggested Obama Resist Threats of Default By HENRY STERN Journalism is habitually critical of government officials and bureaucracy. Most people, when polled objectively, tell us that they hold public officials in modest regard. Traditionally, legislators rank substantially lower Henry in public esteem than execut ives. Notwithstanding those sentiments, however, voters usually re-elect their local representatives, unless the public mood shifts substantially, as it did in 2010. The popularit y of the President, a governor or a mayor will vary during his term according to the course of events and the way that elected officials respond to the challenges of the day. Gov. Cuomo rose after his first six months as a result of his success in dealing with the legislature. President Obama, on the other hand, lost public esteem in the wake of the dispute over the national debt ceiling, even though he acted responsibly on that difficult issue. The President’s decline in voter support came because, in yielding on many points in order to avert default, which he believed would be a national disaster, he was widely perceived as weaker and less effective than Speaker Boehner and Senator McConnell, the Republican Congressional leaders who threatened him, compelling the Democrats to accept substantial budget cuts which, if implemented, would significantly sabotage national programs, many of which are mandated by law.

In an interview two weeks ago, former President Clinton said that he would invoke the Constitutional option “without hesitation, and force the courts to stop me” in order to prevent a default should Congress and the President fail to achieve Stern agreement. “‘I think the Constitution is clear and I think this idea that the Congress gets to vote tw ice on whether to pay for [expenditures] it has appropriated is crazy,’ he said. Lifting the debt ceiling ‘is necessary to pay for appropriations already made,’ he added, ‘so you can’t say, ‘Well, we won the last election and we didn’t vote for some of that stuff, so we’re going to throw the whole country’s credit into arrears.’” The Constitution and the 14th Amendment authorize the public debt and provide that its validity shall not be questioned. We quote the relevant passages: Amendment 14, Section 4: “The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned.” It clearly state s t hat t he United States must pay its debts. The pattern of imposing a ceiling on the national debt began with a law passed in 1917, after the Second Liberty Bond act. Since then,

the ceiling has been raised on numerous occasions, in recent years with increasing frequency. Most of these i ncrease s were approved without controversy, since they simply applied to existing obligations. The authority of the Congress to add to the national debt is specified in the Constitution. The Constitution of the United States: Article I, Section 8: “The Congress shall have the power: ... “2. To borrow Money on the credit of the United States; ...” It is certainly arguable whether the blanket Constitutional authority trumps the frequently amended debt ceiling statute. If it desired to reduce the national debt, Congress could, for example, repeal Medicare, but it cannot simply refuse to pay the bills that come in pursuant to legitimate appropriations. Congress can refuse to build aircraft carriers, but it must pay for what has already been built. Similarly, it can terminate employee s to reduce headcount, but it cannot fail to pay people for services properly ordered and performed. Of course, we know from Bush v. Gore (2000) that the law of the land is what five justices of the Supreme Court say it is, and in the current political configuration of the justices, the narrow conservative minority may be influenced by who is on which side in the controversy. Then again, they may not, or take a different view.

A decision by President Obama to follow his predecessor’s advice would, most likely, have provoked what could be called a constitutional crisis, since its outcome would affect the powers of different branches of our tripart ite government. T hat would be unfortunate and unsettling, both to the United States and to world markets. That being said, the markets seem to have been doing pretty badly anyway. The alternative, however, submitting to the will of the House of Repre sentat ive s, give s t he national legislature the power to reverse public policy and overturn previous commitments to the American people, not by passing legislation to that effect, which is their right, but simply by

declining to raise the debt limit, a maneuver that requires no more than 41 Senators or 218 representatives. That would result in a major shift in the balance of power between the executive and legislative branches. If it were done by legislation, it would face challenge before the judiciary, which would ultimately decide the issue, subject to a Constitutional amendment. To attempt to accomplish such a seismic shift in the American system of checks and balances, simply by one branch being more willing to risk economic disaster than the other, is unacceptable in a mature democracy. It requires leadership, however, to reject such an irresponsible course. StarQuest@NYCivic.org

Not 4 Publication.com by Dom Nunziato


Queens CLOSEUP Mets Blood Drive The New York Mets are teaming up with the American Red Cross to host a blood drive this Saturday, Aug. 13 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Caesars Club at Citi Field. Donors can enter the ballpark through the Seaver VIP Entrance and park in Lot D. As a special thank you, all donors will receive a complimentary pair of tickets to an upcoming Mets game, a limited edition tshirt, a coupon for a free box of six pieces of chocolate dipped fruit redeemable at Edible Arrangements stores, a sample of All Natural Shaving Oil from Pacific Shaving Co., and a chance to win a daily raffle of a $200 Staples gift card. Donors are encouraged to schedule an appointment in advance by calling 1-800RED CROSS or by visiting redcrossblood.org. All presenting donors will also be able to enter to win prizes including a home entertainment system with a 60-inch TV and stereo system, a pair of Stevie Nicks tickets to the upcoming Jones Beach concert, two packages including an overnight stay at the Holiday Inn LaGuardia Airport Hotel across from Citi Field, dinner in the Pine Restaurant and two tickets to a MetsPhillies game in September, and two Field Level seats to select upcoming Mets games. Prizes are not redeemable for cash and nontransferable.

Photo Contest

Line Dancing Every Saturday from 2-4 p.m. at Holy Family R.C. Parish Church - Msgr. Mahoney Hall located at 175-20 74th Ave., Fresh Meadows. (Utopia Pkwy-2 blocks from Union Tpke). Light refreshments available. Bring your friends, your smiles, and enjoy. Instructor - Nena Matela.

Passport Fridays Egypt Leave your baggage at home and bring a picnic blanket out to Flushing Meadows Corona Park for the Target Passport Fridays at the Queens Museum of Art Interna-

from the daily and local newspapers will question the candidates on issues that are meaningful to local residents and have national significance as well," she said. For more information, call (718) 5398462.

The Ultimate Excercise

Blood Dr ive

Sponsored by the Arthritis Foundation of NYC, the 8 week "Tai Chi class for people with Arthritis or limited mobility" will be held every Wednesday morning from 9:30 to 10:30 am at Flushing Town Hall through Aug. 17. Tai Chi a time honored exercise that derives its history from the Chinese Martial Arts. 9:30 am, Flushing Town Hall, 137-35, Northern Blvd., Flushing. (718) 4637700.

Bloodmobile in front of Rite Aid, 65-35 Woodhaven Blvd., Rego Park, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20. Donors will get a free Scott & Todd Phone Scam CD. Donors must: bring valid ID with a picture or signature; be 16 to 76; minimum weight 110 lbs; eat well and drink fluids before donating; and have no new tattoos for past 12 months. For questions regarding medical eligibility, call (800) 688-0900; to make an appointment call Peter at (718) 738-1111.

Flushing Camera Club Flushing Camera Club: Founded in the fall of 1971, for 40 years the Flushing Camera Club (the friendly club) who's door are always open to all who wish to attended offers the residents of Queens and Flushing more than just the opportunity to meet other local photographers of all levels of experience who have a mutual interest in photographic image taking. Meets at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium of Flushing Hospital, at 146-01 45th Avenue, enter at 45th Ave & Burling Street. We meet on the 1st, 3rd and 5th Wednesday of the month, Sept. 7 & 21. Come and spend an evening with us to learn about good photography and to enjoy excellent photography related programs. Validated free parking is available. For more information contact (718) 749-0643 or flushingcameraclub.org.

Pianist Needed Our talented Senior Acting group is looking for a piano player, also retired, to enhance our performances . We're S.T.A.R. Senior Theatre Acting Repertory and we meet on Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m., at the Hollis Public Library, 202-05 Hillside Ave. and on Fridays, at 10:30 a.m. at the Queens Village Public Library, 94-11 217th Street. Call the Assistant Director at (718) 776-0529 for more information.

12-Step Program Nar-Anon Never Alone is a 12-Step support group for anyone affected by a loved one's use and/or abuse of drugs. There are no dues or fees. Meetings are held at the VFW Hall in Whitestone, 19-12 149 St., every Thursday from 7:30-9 p.m. Newcomers are welcome. For further information, please contact Norma at (718) 217-0364.

Candidate Forum The Queens Civic Congress, a coalition of 110 major Queens neighborhood based civic groups, will hold a Candidates' Forum with Bob Turner and David Weprin, candidates in the 9th Congressional district special election, on Monday Aug. 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the Young Israel of Kew Gardens Hills, 70-11 150th St. The event is open to the public and QCC encourages 9th district voters to attend. "We agree with political observers who think this race will be decided in Queens neighborhoods like Fresh Meadows, Forest Hills, Middle Village, Glendale, Rego Park and Kew Gardens as well as the Rockaways and Howard Beach, which is why we chose central Queens as the venue for the QCC Forum," said QCC president Patricia Dolan. "We are following the format used in the presidential debates. A panel of reporters

Summer Sw ing NYS Senator Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr. will co-sponsor, along with local elder law attorneys Brady & Marshak, an outdoor summer concert of swing music on Thursday, Aug. 25 from 7-9 p.m., at PS 232, 84th Street between 149th and 151st Avenues, Howard Beach. Admission is free. The event is rain or shine; in case of bad weather, the event will move indoors to the school auditorium. Everyone is invited to come out for the annual Arnie Mig Memorial Concert and enjoy the music of the Big Band Era. Back this year, Frank Pedulla will lead The Music Staff Swing Orchestra in a concert to honor Arnie Mig, who for many years brought big band swing music to the community. Bring a chair, your dancing shoes and come show love for the man who brought us music of the big bands for over 20 years. For more information, please call Senator Addabbo's Howard Beach District Office (718) 738-1111.

Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival The tradition of Dragon Boat Racing is an annual Chinese rite commemorating the idealistic poet and reformer Qu Yuan who drowned himself in the third century B.C. to protest against his emperor's policies. The locals raced in their boats in an attempt to rescue the poet. To prevent fish and water dragons from eating his body, the locals beat their drums and splashed their paddles. Free admission; rain or shine. Flushing Meadows Park, Meadow Lake. All day Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 13-14.

Veterans Barbecue Before the summer passes all too quickly, NYS Senator Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr., a member of the Senate's Veterans, Homeland Security & Military Affairs Committee, wants to invite all local veterans and their families to his 3nd Annual Veterans' Barbeque, outside his Howard Beach office. Save the date: Saturday, Aug. 20 - Veterans' BBQ, 160th Avenue & 102nd Street, Howard Beach, Noon to 3 p.m.

Stop The World The Jubilee Cluster Players present the Anthony Newley musical "Stop The World I Want To Get Off" Saturday, Aug. 13, 7 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 14, 3 p.m. at Community United Methodist Church, 75-27 Metropolitan Ave., Middle Village. For further information call (718) 8948654, e-mail babba0310@gmail.com or go to jcplayers.com.

Senior Dance The Howard Beach Senior Center, lo-

cated at 156-45 84th St., is featuring "Latin Dance" Lessons and Exercise Program every Friday afternoon at 1 p.m. Sara will be teaching mambo, salsa, cha-cha, meringue and other Latin dances to interested seniors.

Volunteers Needed QSAC, an award winning non-profit organization, needs volunteers to help with clerical tasks, including filing, envelope stuffing, data entry, answering telephones, and direct care with autistic children, at its after-school programs in Astoria, Hollis Bronx, Fresh Meadows, and in Whitestone Queens. QSAC has many different volunteer opportunities, and we will happily try to match your interests and skills with an appropriate volunteer assignment. This is a wonderful opportunity to gain experience working with children with autism or to gain office experience if you are looking for work or just starting in the office community. The best part of it all is that you get to make a difference in the lives of children with autism! Volunteers are vital to QSAC; please help us to help others! If you can spare a few hours a week to volunteer with QSAC or come in on a regular part-time basis, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, contact Perry Brown at (718) 728-8476, ext. 2059. Students, seniors, displaced homemakers, and recent retirees are welcome.

Community House Relax, improve your health with meditation, every Thursday at 10 a.m. with Ronnie at the Queens Community House Kew Gardens, 80-02 Kew Gardens Road, Suite 202.

KISS In Queens Music writer Ken Sharp is working with KISS on an official book about their early days circa 1972-1975. In the book, there's a chapter about Coventry, site of their first live show. We're in need of an exterior photo of Coventry as well as images of KISS performing at the club. The club was located in Queens on 47-03 Queens Blvd, Long Island City from 1973 to 1976. If you can help, please email sharpk@aol.com.

Church In The Gardens Aug. 13-Notes on a Scandal: 2006 psychological thriller with Judi Dench, and Cate Blanchett (both nominated for Oscars). Potluck dinner at 6 pm. RSVP to Helen Howey and let her know what dish you will be bringing. The Church-in-the-Gardens is located at 50 Ascan Ave., Forest Hills. Call (718) 2689142.

Revealing the Source Members of FCCA who are visual artists show their work in 2011 Member Exhibition, on display July 10-Sept. 11. This year's theme, Revealing the Source, hopes to illuminate the unique paths that individual artists take in their careers, showcasing works of art that typify members' "signature" work. Many art works are for sale and a portion of the proceeds benefits FCCA's Visual Arts programs. (718) 463-7700.

Send your people news to: Queens Focus, Queens Tribune, 150-50 14th Rd., Whitestone, NY 11357

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 9

Keep this in your memory card: North Shore University Hospital's (NSUH) will hold its annual photo contest and it is open to all photographers. Sponsored by the hospital's Auxiliary, the annual photo contest is seeking colorful, striking photographs that will be displayed on the hospital's walls in hopes of uplifting the spirits of patients, visitors, staff and volunteers. The winning entries, signed and titled, will be exhibited in the hospital for all to enjoy. This contest is open to all photographers - amateur and professional. Only color prints, that are either 5 by 7 inches or 8 by 10 inches, will be accepted. There is a $5 entry fee per print and submissions are unlimited. Sept. 23 is the deadline for all photos that will be considered, so please make sure your photographs are received by the cutoff date. All photos should be mailed with an entry form, to: Auxiliary Photo Contest, NSUH, 300 Community Dr., Manhasset, NY 11030, or delivered to the hospital's main lobby, Don Monti Memorial Pavilion. Look for the blue entry box marked "Photo Contest." All entries must be made from a single negative or digital disc from which an exact replica can be made. First, second and third prize winners will receive a complimentary enlarged photographic print. All winners will receive an award certificate, which will be presented at a photo contest awards reception. For more information and an entry form, call the hospital's Auxiliary/Volunteer Office at: (516) 562-4947.

tional Outdoor Film, Dance and Music Series. This week we celebrate Egypt! Dance and music program begins at 6:30 pm and film begins at 8 pm. Queens Museum of Art, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Friday, Aug. 12.


Page 10 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of EVERYTHING CABLES ASSOCIATES LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/28/2011. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process served against the LLC to: 4208 248 TH STREET, LITTLE NECK, NY 11363 Purpose: any lawful act or activity. _____________________________________________________________ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS INDEX NO. 6718/2011 NYCTL 2010-A TRUST AND THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND CUSTODIAN, Plaintiffs –against- STACEY SKINNER, if living, and if she be dead, her representative heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors, and successors in interest, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said defendants who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise, any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the amended complaint herein, MICHAEL L. DORSEY, if liv-

LEGAL NOTICE ing, and if he be dead, his representative heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors, and successors in interest, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said defendants who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise, any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the amended complaint herein, MERS as Nominee for RESAME MORTGAGE CORPORATION, CRIMINAL COURT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, CITY OF NEW YORK PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU, CITY OF NEW YORK ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION & FINANCE, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA – INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICES, and “John Doe No. 1” through “John Doe No. 100” inclusive, the names of the last 100 defendants being unknown to plaintiff, it being intended to designate fee owners, tenants or occupants of the tax lien premises and/ or persons or parties having or claiming an interest in or a lien upon the subject property, if the aforesaid individual defendants are living, and if any or all of said individual defendants be dead, their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, executors, ad-

LEGAL NOTICE ministrators, trustees, committees, devisees, legatees, and the assignees, lienors, creditors and successors in interest of them, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by, through, or against the said defendants named as a class, of any right, title, or interest in or lien upon the premises described in the complaint herein, Defendants. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1793 8 1 4 3 rd R O A D , I N T H E COUNTY OF QUEENS IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK; BLOCK 13074, LOT 23. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff Attorney(s) within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above entitled action is to foreclose a tax lien for the amount due and interest, recorded in the

LEGAL NOTICE office of the Register/Clerk of the County of Queens on the 12 th day of August, 2010 and bearing City Register File Number 2010000272817 covering premises described as follows: A D D R E S S : 1 7 9 - 3 8 1 4 3 rd ROAD BLOCK: 13074 LOT: 23 COUNTY: QUEENS The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the tax lien described above. Plaintiff designates Queens County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the county where the Property being foreclosed upon is located. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO THE PLAINTIFF WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Dated: July23, 2011 New York, New York THE LAW OFFICES OF THOMAS P. MALONE, PLLC THOMAS P. MALONE, ESQ. ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFFS 60 EAST 42 ND STREET, SUITE 1540 NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10165 PHONE: (212) 867-0500 FAX: (212) 867-0511 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing supplemental summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Court dated JULY 6, 2011 and filed along with the supporting papers in the QUEENS County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a tax lien. SCHEDULE 1 - DESCRIPTION ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the County of QUEENS, Borough of

QUEENS, City and State of New York, known and designated on the City of New York Tax Map as BLOCK 13074, LOT 23. _____________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 7/ 22/11, bearing Index Number NC-000632-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) EKATERINA (Last) GOUNKO. My present name is (First) KATERINA (Last) GUNCO AKA EKATERINA GOUNKO. My present address is 1111 137 th St., College Point, NY 11356. My place of birth is UKRAINE. My date of birth is March 04, 1992. _____________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 7/ 22/11, bearing Index Number NC-000631-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) DIMITRIY (Last) GOUNKO. My present name is (First) DMITRY (Last) GUNKO AKA DMITRY GOUNKO. My present address is 1111 137 th St., College Point, NY 11356. My place of birth is Ukraine. My date of birth is March 04, 1992.


Zheng Dynasty Takes On The World By MARLENA MATUTE While actual emphasis on the once-popular animated show has died down in the past few years, Pokémon is st ill held in high e steem in the form of trading cards and video games. This passion for the cartoon animal gladiators is shared by children and enthusiasts - and even more so by par t icipants of the Pokémon Video and Trading Card Game Championships. These events are part of Play! Pokémon, and are an international affair consisting of players from countries across the world. The idea of the competition is similar to that of the show; when trainers bat tle against opponents with their Pokémon, health points are depleted. The competition is structured within three divisions according to age: Junior, Senior and Masters. At this time the team to represent the United States has been chosen following the three-day National Championships at the Indiana Conventions Center last month. Of the champions crowned, two are brothers, Aaron Zheng, 13, and Brendan Zheng, 8, from Fresh Meadows, each at top positions of their respect ive divisions. "It's pret ty awesome," Aaron said, "having a team of two brothers finish in the top two in the country." Dubbed the Zheng Dynasty, a name created by fellow players of an online forum, the boys have indeed created a history for themselves in competition. Aaron began playing the card game ver y early in the third grade, then moved on to compete in 2008 before being introduced to the video game competition via the Internet by a friend. "I played the card game a lot more competitively that year, and had already secured an invitation to Worlds, but decided to go

Brendan and Aaron Zheng at Nationals. check out the video game tournament just to see what it was like," he said. "I built a team the day before the tournament and actually managed to finish in the top four, earning a free trip to Florida for Worlds. I was one of the two kids in the country to qualif y for both the card game and video game World Championships." While Aaron enjoys playing the trading card game as much as the video game, he is focusing on t he v ideo version th is year. Moreover, he is also the one responsible for his brother's role in the Junior Division of

the same competition. "My brother talked me into competing because he thought I could do well," Brendan said. "I've had a lot of fun and met a lot of new people." Aaron said he knew that his brother would do well, yet he is still impressed by Brendan's performance at Nationals this year. "He only picked up the game last year and plays really well for someone so young and in his second year of competing," Aaron said. "Most of the kids he had to compete with were 11 or 10, he is only 8."

This year the rules were changed slightly, resulting in a more challenging stage for compet itors; including limiting the Pokémon to that of the Unova pokedex - the recently released black and white versions of the video game. The iconic yellow Picachu character from the game and TV show is nowhere to be found. The players are forced to choose Pokémon that they are not familiar with, bringing it all down to strategy. "Playing under these new rules was confusing at first, because I had to learn all the new Pokémon and rules," Brendan added, "but I eventually got used to it." The World Championship will be held in San Diego Aug. 12. As this is his first year competing at Worlds, Brendan is both nervous and excited; Aaron jumps at the chance to make ne w friends. "To me, t hat was my favorite par t. Regardless of if I do well or at Worlds, I'm just really excited to be representing the U.S. and to see my friends again, along with meeting people from around the world." The brothers have been training for the next round soon, with Aaron helping Brendan with his team as he has done since introducing him to the game. The Zheng Dynast y intends to continue par t icipat ion in the tournaments well after Worlds, as it is something they both enjoy. "Pokémon is just something that I do for fun when school is over, but I've got ten to travel to a ton of places, compete and meet people. It's a great experience, and I'm really happy I got into it." Aaron said, "It's been a great four years." Reach Intern Marlena Matute at mmatute@queenstribune.com or (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 11


which of these will not reduce your electricity use? a. replacing light switches with dimmers or motion sensors b. focusing light where it’s needed instead of lighting a whole room c. removing lamp shades d. keeping bulbs and fixtures clean

ceiling fans can improve energy efficiency… a. in the summer b. in the winter c. in both summer and winter

answer: c

an efficient way to keep your home cool in the summer is to... a. close shades or drapes to keep out the sun’s heat

what is the recommended setting for your a/c thermostat? a. 80° b. 78° c. 72° d. 60°

c. leave windows open for a breeze, even when it’s hot out

©2011 Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Ad: Arnell Group

Page 12 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

b. leave your a/c on all the time so it doesn’t have to cool a warm house

answer: c

answer: a

answer: b

for 100+ energy saving tips visit conEd.com or find us on Facebook at Power of Green


LEGAL NOTICE

the Limited Liability Company Law FIRST: The name of the limited liability company is: EMBELLISH STYLE LLC SECOND: The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is: Queens. THIRD: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: 115-108 221 St Cambria Heights, NY 11411 Nancy Hernandez (signature of organizer) Nancy Hernandez (print or type name of organizer) ____________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation Milou Realty LLC art. of org. filed Secy. of State NY (SSNY) 4/ 12/02. Off. Loc. in Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 57-58 59 th St, Maspeth, NY 11378. Purpose: Any lawful purpose, latest date 12/31/ 2152. _____________________________________________________________ ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION OF F.X. Real Estate Holdings, LLC Under Section 203 of the LImited Liabilitiy Company Law FIRST: The name of the limited liability company is: F.X. Real Estate Holdings, LLC SECOND: The county, within this state, in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is: Queens THIRD: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: F.X. Real Estate Holdings, LLC 2043 Hemlock Farms Hawley, PA 18428 USA Louis SA Abrams (signature of organizer Louis S. Abrams (print or type name of organizer) _____________________________________________________________ 3902 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/10/11. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 102-10 Metropolitan Ave Ste 200, Forest Hills, NY 11375. Purpose: General _____________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of JMS PARTNERS LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/11/2011. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process served against the LLC to: 65-20 BOOTH STREET, APT. 3L, REGO PARK, NY 11374 Purpose: any lawful act or activity. _____________________________________________________________ STATE OF SOUTH CARO-

LEGAL NOTICE LINA COUNTY OF CLARENDON CASE NO: 2010-DR-14-456 IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT SUMMONS FOR ADOPTION LOUIS MAYS, JR. AND VIRGINIA R. MAYS, PLAINTIFFS, VS. MYA BEVERLY HARRIS, A MINOR UNDER THE AGE OF SEVENTEEN YEARS, LATARA CLARK, NATURAL MOTHER AND JAIME HARRIS, NATURAL FATHER, DEFENDANTS. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, of which a copy is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint on the subscribed Land, Parke & Welch, P.A., 29 South Mill Street, Manning, South Carolina 29101 within THIRTY (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that within THIRTY (30) days of receiving notice you shall respond in writing by filing with the Court in which the adoption is pending notice and reason to contest, intervene or otherwise respond; The Court must be informed of your current address and of any changes in address during the adoption proceedings; Your failure to file a response within THIRTY (30) days of receiving notice constitutes consent to adoption of the child and forfeiture of all rights and obligations with respect to the child. LAND, PARKER & WELCH, P.A. BY: William Ceth Land, Esquire Post Office Box 138 29 South Mill Street Manning, South Carolina 29102 803-4358894 December 14, 2010 Manning, South Carolina _____________________________________________________________ TEMP DIRECT, LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 06/27/2011. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 34-41 77/Th St. (#526), Jackson Heights, NY 11372. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. _____________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of ASTORIA DOG WALK, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on May 11, 2011. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC 2042 23 rd Street, 2nd Floor, Astoria NY 11105. Purpose: any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of Benmillam LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/08/2011. Office located in Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Benmillam LLC, 14370 Ash Ave, Flushing, NY 11355. Purpose: any lawful purpose. pose: any lawful activity.

LEGAL NOTICE _____________________________________________________________ File No. 2005 – 3764/D 2nd SUPPLEMENTAL CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: ERNESTINE SORRENTINO, ANNA CAMERLINGO, THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR OF THE COUNTY OF QUEENS, THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. To the heirs at law, next of kin, and distributes of Dolores Camerlingo, deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence. Being the persons interested as creditors, legatees, devisees, beneficiaries, distributees or otherwise in the Estate of Dolores Camerlingo, deceased, who at the time of her death was a resident of the County of Queens, state of New York, A petition having been duly filed by Judith De Lorenzo, who is domiciled at 337 149th Place, Whitestone, New York 11357, YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at the Queens General Courthouse, 6 th Floor, Room 621, 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, City and State of New York, on the 25 th day of August, 2011, at 9:30 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of DOLORES CAMERLINGO, lately domiciled at the Clearview Nursing Home, 157-15 19 th Avenue, Whitestone, in the County of Queens, City and State of New York, admitting to probate a Will dated May 26, 1998, a copy of which is attached, as the Will of DOLORES CAMERLINGO, deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that [ X ] Letters Testamentary issue to: JUDITH DE LORENZO. Dated, Attested and Sealed JUL 07, 2011, HON. PETER J. KELLY, Surrogate, Queens County, MARGARET M. GRIBBON, Chief Clerk, CHRISTOPHER HANSCOM, ESQ., (203) 644-2257, Attorney for Petitioner, 666 Old Country Road, Suite 509, Garden City, New York 11530. This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you. _____________________________________________________________ CITATION File No. 2010-197 SURROGATE’S COURT, Queens COUNTY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: Estelle Nathanson Salberg, Beatrice Nathanson Elsman, being known distributees of the decedent Public Administrator, Queens County And to the

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of HENRY NATHANSON, deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot after due diligence, be ascertained. A petition having been duly filed by Meryl Finkelstein who is/are domiciled at 234 Community Circle, Old Bridge, New Jersey 08857 YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York, on September 1, 2011, at 9:30 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Henry Nathanson lately domiciled at 108-25 Horace Harding Expressway, Flushing, New York 11368, United States admitting to probate a Will dated January 6, 2004 (and Codicil(s), if any, dated ) a copy of which is attached as the Will of Henry Nathanson deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that: Letters Testamentary issue to Meryl Finkelstein Dated, Attested and Sealed, JUL 05 2011 Seal HON. Peter J. Kelly Surrogate Margaret M. Gribbon Chief Clerk Douglas J. Chu, Esq. Print Name of Attorney Hynes & Chu, LLP Firm 475 Park Avenue So., 26th Fl., New York, New York 10016 Address (212) 643-1112 Telephone NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you. _____________________________________________________________

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: M.G. CARDIOLOGY PLLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/28/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the PLLC, 79-23 Metropolitan Avenue, Middle Village, New York 11379. Purpose: For the practice of the profession of Medicine. _____________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of 224650 THIRD AVENUE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/24/ 11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/ o Gloria LoSchiavo, 138-22 11 th Ave., Whitestone, NY 11357. Pur _____________________________________________________________ Forever Fortune LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 05/ 11/11. Office Location: Queens County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 58-77 Maurice Ave., Maspeth, NY 11378. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. _____________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: SANFORD A. SCHWARTZ, Ph.D., PSYCHOLOGIST LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/24/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Mordente Law Firm, LLC, 160-29 Union Turnpike, Fresh Meadows, New York 11366. Purpose: For the practice of the profession of Psychology. _____________________________________________________________ New York Home Care Agency LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/24/11. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Nancy Martinez, 1032 Beach 20 St, Far Rockaway, NY 11691. Purpose: General. _____________________________________________________________ PGL Billz LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/21/11. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 99-32 66 Rd Ste 3X, Rego Park, NY 11374. Purpose: General.

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: BAR 131 LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/15/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 131-02 14th Avenue, College Point, New York 11356. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Notice of formation of MV Elements,LLC. Articles of Org. filed with the Sec. State of NY on 06/08/11. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail any process to: The LLC, 26611 Bridgewater Ave. Floral Park, NY 11004. Any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________ “THE UNBAKERY LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) Nov. 09, 2009. Office in Queens Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 6714 108 ST, F O R E S T H I L L S , N Y. P u r pose: Any lawful purpose.” _____________________________________________________________

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www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 13

GALIS COMPANY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/21/2011. Office in Queens Co. SSNY design. agent ofLLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 47-15 195 th St., Flushing, N.Y. 11358. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of JAG & JORA TRANS LLC, a domestic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 05/09/ 2011. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Jorawar Singh, 135-19 128 Street 2nd Fl, South Ozone Park, NY 11420. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. _____________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of Ugly Art Room LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on 05/13/2011. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC 64-02 79th St, Middle Village, NY 11379. Purpose: any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________ Davidov Capital LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/2/11. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Alexy Davidov, 68-61 147th St, Flushing, NY 11367. Purpose: General. _____________________________________________________________ Roth Realty Management LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/2/10. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 79-63 68 th Rd, Middle Village, NY 11379. Purpose: General. _____________________________________________________________ Notice of Qualification of POOCH PALS LLC, Authority filed with the SSNY on 05/ 13/2011. Office location: Queens County. LLC formed in DE on 03/05/2011. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 3110 23rd St., Apt 5G, Astoria, NY 11106. Principal office of LLC: 31-10 23rd St., Apt 5G, Astoria, NY 11106. Cert of Formation filed with DE Div. of Corps, 401 Federal St., Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. _____________________________________________________________ The Law Firm of Ryan J. Walsh & Associates PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/8/11. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Ryan J. Walsh, 70-50 Austin St Ste LL 106, Forest Hills, NY 11375. Purpose: Profession of Law. _____________________________________________________________ ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION OF EMBELLISH STYLE LLC Under Section 203 of

LEGAL NOTICE


Hospital Awards Vet Med Scholarship Iraq War veteran Benjamin Smith, one of 40 medical students who started classes Aug. 1 at the new Hofstra North ShoreLIJ School of Medicine, has been named the recipient of The Florence and Robert A. Rosen Family Foundation Veteran’s Medical School Scholarship Award for Excellence. The annual scholarship is given to a veteran who has served the nation in an exceptional and honorable capacity. “Having a medical student with Ben’s proven leadership and life experience will enrich the learning experience for everyone” said Dr. Lawrence Smith, dean of the Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine. “It’s a privilege to have a scholarship for returning veterans. We owe them our thanks and our support.” “Having completed two tours of duty, Benjamin Smith has served his country proudly and I’m sure he will bring the same level of commitment to the practice of medicine,” said Rear Admiral Robert Rosen, NYNM (Retired), a member of the North Shore-LIJ Health System Board of Trustees. “In recognition for all he has done for his country, the Rosen Family Foundation is proud to honor him with its Veteran’s Medical School Scholarship Award for Excellence.” Smith, 31, now a resident of Huntington, grew up on the base at The United States Military Academy at West Point, where his father was a military bandsman. He graduated from West Point in 2003

and was sent for training to Fort Benning, Ga. His first duty station was in Colorado Springs. Four months later, he was sent to Iraq, where he served a five month tour, then returned to Colorado Springs. A year later he was deployed again to Iraq, where he fought for another 15 months. He was considering what he wanted to

'11

Page 14 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

EDUCATION

do with his life — he had married in 2007 — and was looking for a career that gave him the satisfaction that he had felt during the military without being away from home. Smith has a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics from West Point and also attended Dartmouth College for additional undergraduate work before applying to medical school. “Medicine seemed to be a logical extension of the Army experience,” Mr. Smith said. “Hofstra was so exciting that I imme-

diately felt like this was where I wanted to be.” The Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine received more than 4,000 applications for entry into the inaugural class. Those 40 students accepted were selected from more than 700 applicants who were interviewed over a five-month period. The 20 women and 20 men range in age from 22 to 36 years old and come from more than 38 different hometowns, 14 different states and 33 different universities.

Sign (Language) Of The Times With American Sign Language now the fourth most-studied language in the United States, the Lexington Vocational Services Center is currently accepting applications for the fall semester of its popular ASL course. It will be the 20th year the course has been offered by Lexington, the largest organization serving the deaf and hard of hearing community in New York State. Enrollment in ASL courses in college increased more than 16 percent from 2006-2009, according to “Enrollments in Languages Other Than English in United States Institutions of Higher Education, Fall 2009,” released by the Modern Language Association of America. With the growing acceptance of ASL to meet college foreign-language requirements, its increasing value as an

employment credential, and personal interest in communicating through the visual language, more than 90,000 students enrolled in sign-language classes in 2009, the most recent year for which data is available. The program offered by Lexington is structured to help hearing adults learn ASL by studying vocabulary, sentences and grammar needed to communicate in common life situations. Each student will learn at an individual pace using acquired skills at eight levels of fluency. “ASL is becoming a mainstream interest and Lexington is pleased to have the staff and resources to fulfill the public’s growing fascination,” said Adele Agin, executive director of Lexington Vocational Services. “The teaching and learning of ASL

supports Lexington’s mission to help deaf and hard of hearing people integrate into mainstream society by bridging the gap between them and giving them a way to successfully communicate with one another.” Lexington Vocational Services is an affiliate of the Lexington School for the Deaf, the largest school for the deaf and hearing-impaired in NY State. Classes will be offered Tuesdays at various times for ten weeks beginning Sept. 20. The cost to register is $150 before Sept. 6 or $165 after, plus $35 for the course workbook, which is used for the first four levels. For schedules and other details, or to register, call (718) 350-3031 or email ASL@lexnyc.org. Enrollment is limited and is offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

Where success starts… …and continues.

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State Exam Scores Up In Both Math, English Mayor Mike Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott announced Monday that New York City public school students in grades 3 through 8 made gains on the State’s annual Math and English exams, outpacing the rest of State and showing that, despite large changes to the tests, significant progress is being made in New York City schools. The percentage of New York City students meeting the State’s bar for proficiency increased by 3.3 points in Math – from 54 percent to 57.3 percent – and 1.5 points in English – from 42.4 percent to 43.9 percent. Unlike New York City, none of the Big Four urban school districts – Rochester, Yonkers, Buffalo, and Syracuse – saw increases in both Math and English. Beginning with last year’s test, the State increased the number of correct answers required for a student to be labeled proficient – as a result, the percentage of students meeting standards fell across the State, although City students expanded their actual progress by all other measures. This year, the exams themselves were made longer and more challenging. Even so, City students made significant gains in nearly every grade and subject. “All of our students, teachers and principals should be very proud of their progress and the fact that we continue to raise achievement levels and outpace the rest of the state,” said Bloomberg. “But as much progress as we have made, we know we have much more work to do. We are fully committed to ensuring that all of our students are

prepared for a successful future.” “This is real proof that when expectations are raised, our students can rise to the occasion,” said Walcott. “It’s a model we plan to follow across the board – with higher standards in our curriculum, graduation requirements, and accountability measures for schools – to ensure our students are on track for success in college and careers. New York City students and families should be proud of their continued progress, even with these tougher standards for success.” Across all groups this year, more New York City students met the State’s bar for proficiency. In Math, the percentage of proficient black students went from 40.4 percent in 2010 to 44.2 percent in 2011, and the percentage of proficient Hispanic students went from 46.2 percent to 49.2 percent. In English, the percentage of proficient black students went from 32.6 percent to 34.8 percent, and the percentage of proficient Hispanic students went from 33.7 percent to 34.7 percent. White students, Asian students, English Language Learners and students with disabilities all made gains in Math, and all groups except English Language Learners made gains in English. Starting on Wednesday, Aug. 17, families can view their child’s test results within ARIS Parent Link at arisparentlink.org. Families who need their username and password can visit an ARIS Parent Link Access Station at select libraries between Monday, Aug. 22 and Saturday, Aug. 27.

BSGE Students Earn IB Degrees earned the IB diploma, and the colleges they will attend in the fall: Stephanie Aristakesian, University of Southern California; Amy Augello, Syracuse University; Mark Bosz, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Amalia Carusone, Boston University; Ariel Chajet, State University of New York at Buffalo; Jackie Chen, State University of New York at Stony Brook; Arafat Chowdhury, City College of New York; Fiona Clarkson-Farrell, Manhattanville College; Jaymee Collado, Hobart and William Smith Colleges; Emily Davis, State University of New York at Stony Brook; Helen Gianoulas, Hunter College; Argina Girsang, St Lawrence University; Gautier Godard, Baruch College; Erick Gonzalez, Baruch College; Takesha Graham, Barnard College; Matthew Gray, Babson College; Jessie Heller, State University of New York at Binghamton; Kristopher Kesoglides, Baruch College; Nicole Kung, Rochester Institute of Technology; Daniela Lam Lo, Bryn Mawr College; Shuyi Lin, Bryn Mawr College; Meghan McCullough, Amherst College; Christina McEachern, Macaulay Honors College at Hunter College; Karen Moy, Boston University;, Olivia Myszkowski, State University of New York at Stony Brook; Nathan Nikolic, University of Delaware; Kristin O’Connor, State University of New York at Stony Brook; Ricardo Pineda, Pennsylvania State University, Altoona; Oliver Ponce, Colby College; Santiago Preciado, Vassar College; Ana Maria Pamela Reyes, Hunter College; Karina Rhem, University of Southern California; Kristen Spang, Queens College; Jolijt Tamanaha, Washington University in St Louis; James Turturo, State University of New York at Binghamton; and Simran Vazirani, Brown University.

'11

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NOW IN QUEENS! CLASSES NOW OFFERED AT: Immaculate Conception Center 7200 Douglaston Parkway Douglaston, NY 11362 RSVP - 631.755.5510 (Located midway between the Long Island Expressway and the Grand Central Parkway)

Take Graduate classes at this off-campus location and receive a 30% tuition discount.

Call Today for Program, Application and Registration Information Sal Rizzo, Assistant Director,

Make the Smart Move. Your Graduate Education Degree can be just the beginning of an inspiring future. Nationally-recognized yet conveniently local, our Graduate Education Program will inspire your passion to teach, while personal guidance from our directors and educators will help you to do it well. Like all our Graduate programs, you’ll have a choice of schedules and locations in Rockville Centre, Douglaston, South Huntington and East Farmingdale, so you can earn your Graduate Degree in Education – or Business, Nursing or Social Work* – while you live your life.

Off-Campus Programs 516-678-5000 ext. 7510 srizzo@molloy.edu Fall Classes at ICC begin: Thursday, September 8, 2011 5:25 p.m. & 7:45 p.m.

GO AHEAD. FINISH WHAT YOU STARTED. Call Sal Rizzo at 516.678.5000 ext. 7510, e-mail srizzo@molloy.edu or visit www. molloy.edu/offcampus

1000 Hempstead Ave., PO Box 5002, Rockville Centre, NY 11571-5002 www.molloy.edu

*Fordham University MSW through partnership with Molloy College

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 15

The Baccalaureate School for Global Education announced that 36 students of its senior class have been awarded the prestigious International Baccalaureate Diploma in 2011. The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program is an international system of teaching and learning for students in 11th and 12th grades that leads to rigorous final examinations offered at schools worldwide. The IB Diploma prepares students for success in postsecondary education by teaching academic and personal skills as well as international mindedness to prepare for the 21st century world. “The achievement of this year’s graduates brought tears to my eyes. I am proud of their accomplishments and the dedication of BSGE’s faculty and staff,” said Kelly J. Johnson, principal at BSGE. “My sheer joy for our graduates, however, overshadows my pride.” At BSGE, IB Diploma Program students have taken assessments in English, Spanish, Chinese, French, history, biology, chemistry, math, art and technology, as well as completing an Extended Essay, a course in philosophy called Theory of Knowledge, and 150 hours of extracurricular activities through the Creativity, Action and Service program. The BSGE class of 2011 had a 98.5 percent graduation and college acceptance rate. Members of the class of 2011 come from neighborhoods throughout the borough of Queens, including Astoria, Flushing, Forest Hills, Glendale, Jamaica, Jackson Heights, Kew Gardens, Maspeth, Rego Park, Rosedale, Sunnyside, Woodside and Woodhaven. The following is a list of the students who

You don’t have to travel far to make a difference.


Young Men’s Initiative:

Boro Reaction Mixed On Mayor’s Plan To Change Futures For Blacks, Latinos By VERONICA LEWIN After years of accepting the fact that it is more likely for men of color to be victims of homicide than to get a diploma, a new City program hopes to change the fate of these youth from tragedy to success. Young white, black and Latino men are represented almost equally in New York City's population, but the quality of life is unequal. Mayor Mike Bloomberg's Young Men's Initiative seeks to decrease the disparities between men of color and their peers in the Big Apple. The $127 million program is funded by the City, Campaign for Black Male Achievement of the Open Society Foundations and the Mayor himself, who provided $30 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies. "When we look at poverty rates, graduation rates, crime rates and employment rates, one thing stands out: blacks and Latinos are not fully sharing in the promise of American freedom, and far too many are trapped in circumstances that are difficult to escape," Bloomberg said. When the Mayor announced the three-year program Aug. 4, he said it was the first of its kind in the nation. Many have said it could be a model for other cities in the future. The program is the result of a study conducted by Bloomberg's office, which highlighted the overwhelming inequalities for men of color compared with white The initiative will help reinforce positive outcomes as part of a cultural need. males.

Page 16 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

By The Numbers According to the study, the poverty rate for blacks and Latino men is 50 percent higher than white and Asian young men. The rate of unemployment is 60 percent higher. Men of color are two times more likely not to graduate from high school and even more likely to become teen fathers. Most alarming, more than 90 percent of all young homicide victims and perpetrators are black or Latino. Black and Latino men are less likely to have access to quality early childhood care and education, which causes significant achievement gaps that appear as early as third grade. These students are three times more likely to be in special education classrooms than their white counterparts and less likely to graduate from high school.

Fixing Education Imbalance Starting next month, school progress reports will feature specific statistics on black and Latino students to better measure school performance and to ensure schools are working on closing the achievement gap. Over the next three years, the DOE will develop a strategy for suspended students to succeed following a return to the classroom. The program also strives to introduce more literacy programs and mentoring for young males.

Prior to the launch of the program, Bloomberg and the City have been taking steps to reduce inequalities. Since 2005, the citywide graduation rate has gone up 13 percentage points. During that same time period, the graduation rate for black and Hispanic students went up 14 percent, which helped close the black-white and Latino-white graduation achievement gap by 22 percent and 23 percent respectively.

Shifting The Legal Balance Outside of the classroom, the Young Men's Initiative plans to change the criminal justice system for men of color in order to decrease recidivism upon release. The City plans to advocate allowing juveniles to be sent to community-based programs instead of detention centers far away from home, while expanding programs for youth who would otherwise be sent to state facilities run by the Office of Children and Family Services. The Mayor's program seeks to eliminate the employment barriers faced after incarceration, which primarily affects black and Latino males. "The barriers to obtain work and housing because of criminal records make it extremely difficult to reenter into society and can limit young men of color to a cycle of instability and illegal employment," the report reads. In order to prevent businesses from

color were served and underserved in the community. City agencies gave input and helped design interventions that would produce better outcomes for the young men they serve.

But Is It Positive?

The new initiative will help put a focus on aiding young children.

pre-screening otherwise qualified candidates, the City plans to remove the section of an application that asks if the applicant has a criminal background. To help increase chances of employment, the City will enter public-private partnerships to support more jobs for youth.

It Starts At Home NAACP Jamaica Chapter President Leroy Gadsden said youth benefit from having two-parent households, a characteristic that lacks in many black and Latino households. Males are often the absent parent in single-parent households. According to the Mayor's study, children of color often grow up without a male role model, which can lead to deviant behavior in the future. In an attempt to break the cycle of single-parent households, the City is launching the Fatherhood Initiative, which strives to reduce barriers to father engagement and create new opportunities for fathers and their children. CUNY will soon launch Project REDRESS, which will strengthen males' parenting skills while giving them education and employment opportunities. The Young Men's Initiative will establish criteria for health clinics that serve teens to help them better serve and understand youth, while making it easier for teens to access care. As a way to get feedback from the group the Young Men's Initiative intends to serve, the City will establish the Mayor's Youth Leadership Council program in partnership with the Coro New York Leadership Center. The program will give young people leadership skills, who will later give the City advice on youth policy matters. Before implementing the Young Men's Initiative, the City surveyed its agencies to identify how they are currently serving young men of color and analyzed where and how young men of

The launch of the program has seen mixed reaction from leaders in the borough. "Good intentions have too often produced little more than lip service," said State Sen. Jose Peralta (D-East Elmhurst). "In the Young Men's Initiative we may finally have an effort where ambitious vision, planning and resources replace platitudes and promises." The senator said his constituents and other communities around the City and country desperately need the Young Men's Initiative to succeed and is willing to help implement the program. Councilman Ruben Wills (D-South Jamaica) said the fate of men of color in the City is the result of a systemic problem. "The education system has actually failed our children," Wills said. "We are the greatest city in the world, but for us to have such a high dropout rate among minorities, there's something wrong there." The councilman supports the Mayor's program if it is executed as written, and if the right stakeholders are at the table. Wills said too many times people have come to the area who do not understand the unique challenges the City faces, resulting in unsuccessful attempts to change the lives of youth. Councilman James Sanders (DLaurelton) applauded the Mayor for his Young Men's Initiative, but said it is too early to know of the program will succeed. "While this tremendous initiative will positively impact over 300,000 youth, many poorly thought out policies, procedures and rules are putting them 10 times more at risk," Sanders said. Sanders made several suggestions to improve the quality of life for the City's black and Latino youth, including extending the school year to prevent the educational loss that often happens during the summer months, ending hospital closures in the area and improving the Minority and Women-owned Business Enterprise. "If people of color do not create businesses, their poverty rate will remain disproportionately high," Sanders said. Gadsden said the Young Men's Initiative recognizes there is a problem in the City and is looking forward to seeing the effects of the program in his community. Gadsden is hopeful the program will have an impact on the recidivism rate in the City. He said many people in predominately black and Latino communities have lost their trust in government, which could make it difficult to get people to buy into the program. The NAACP plans to encourage the community to embrace the concept of the Young Men's Initiative and trust in government once again. Reach Reporter Veronica Lewin at vlewin@queenspress.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 123.


Tribune Professional Guide To reserve your space call 357-7400

Rikers Island, where women are rehabilitated through the power of reading.

Women Behind Bars Get Hope From Books visitors, and they suffer from substance abuse and mental health issues, reading books is often the highlight of their day, McGowan said. Not only has she bonded with her clients, but reading has brought them even closer. "They look forward to me coming," she said. Besides their prison uniforms and tennis shoes, these women have no belongings; by receiving books they now have possessions, McGowan said. As news spread throughout the prison about the flood of books, this humble volunteer was coined the "domestic violence book girl." Because of the backgrounds of the women, the majority of the books they read are urban fiction, which deals with violence, prostitution and drugs. Her clients "pay it forward," passing the books on to other inmates once they are done with them. "The people that help each other really feel good," she said. Lucia Rivera, the director of Steps, said she knows how important it is to help women in the program. What she is doing with the women is remarkable and she should be recognized. "Being able to use books to spur discussion and share experiences has been very helpful," Rivera said. Sharman Stein, the Deputy Commissioner for Public Information of the NYC Department of Corrections, said McGowan is making a difference in the women's lives. "Providing opportunities for self-improvement to inmates is one of the Department's key priorities," Stein said. "We support all initiatives to bring books and other helpful materials to incarcerated men and women, to help them make the most of their time in jail, and to help prepare them for life after their release." Reach Intern Jason Cohen at jcohen@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 124.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 17

By JASON COHEN Isolation, loneliness, depression and boredom are only a few of the things that can affect a person in prison. But Michelle McGowan, a volunteer at the women's prison at Rikers Island, has given a glimmer of hope to these women by bringing books into their lives. McGowan, 23, of Bushwick, Brooklyn is a recent graduate of Columbia University with a Master's in social work, who interned with Steps to End Family Violence, an Alternative to Incarceration, for a year and a half. The program addresses the needs of domestic violence survivors who have been charged with crimes related to the abuse they have experienced. In February, McGowan started volunteering at the prison where she holds support groups for women who are incarcerated for domestic violence. "No one is more upset about what happened than they are," she said. Once she got to know her clients, she decided to broach the idea of bringing a few books in for them. The women were receptive to the suggestion of having the opportunity to read. While not all of them read on the same level, everyone agreed to help each other, McGowan said. "I wanted to bring the books in there," McGowan said. "I noticed a lot of women couldn't read." McGowan realized she couldn't afford to keep bringing books in; she needed donations. A system of inmates and pen pals corresponding was established: inmates send letters asking for books; the letters and books are delivered to a bike shop that her friend owns a few blocks from her house so she can screen them making sure everything is okay. "People are writing out of their kindness of their heart," she said. Because many of these women do not get


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LIFELONG LEARNING: MUSIC THROUGH THE AGES Page 18 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

August 12th • 11am Presented by Harvey Wechsler

CENTER STAGE: HAWAIIAN LUAU ON THE PATIO August 25th • 3:30pm Dance to the rhythm of David Patrick’s Island Soul

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KRYZAK LEADERSHIP AWARD WINNERS CHOSEN

United Adult Ministries, the parent company of Flushing House, will honor three outstanding persons with The Rose Kryzak Senior Leadership Award, during their annual gala fundraising dinner on Thursday, Nov. 3. The awards are named after the late Rose Kryzak, a prodigious public advocate who fought for the rights of older adults. A resident of the UAM-sponsored Flushing House for her last 13 years, she passed on June 24, 1999 at 99 years of age. To keep her legacy alive and further the many causes she cared for, UAM established the Kryzak Awards in 2000 and New York's former First Lady Matilda Cuomo officiated at the program's inauguration. Kryzak was best known for spearheading passage of New York State's landmark 1987 Elderly Pharmaceutical Insurance Coverage legislation (EPIC). But earlier in her life she fought for passage of Social Security, for the poor and elderly during the Federal budget cuts of the 1980's, for increases in New York's share of Supplemental Security Income, and for mandatory Medicare assignments and passage of universal health care. At each annual Gala, Kryzak's grandchildren and family attend to help honor the award winners for their continuing good works on behalf of older adults. The award winners must have established, operated or expanded programs that benefit our older adult population, and have a track record of advocacy and securing funds for senior programs.

ing 240 seniors daily. This year's honorees are Lawrence made sure the Lawrence Harfmann, center adhered to proStavroula Joannidis and Rose gram compliance with all Lawrence. "They have all solgovernmental regulations. diered on in the great tradition She coordinated cultural of Rose Kryzak, making major and educational activities, contributions of service and plus transportation for caring for older adults," said medical and recreational Robert Salant, Flushing House trips. And she worked director of community relaclosely with elected offitions. "The legacy of Rose cials, advocating effectively Kryzak shall not be forgotten, and that's why Rose Lawrence (l. to r.), Lawrence Harfmann and Stavroula Joannidis for federal, state and city funds. each year since her will be honored Nov. 3. Lawrence was quoted passing, we bestow these awards in her name," Community Advisory Board. Earlier in his in a full-length article with color photos in career, he served for 16 years as an assis- the New York Times (March 27, 2011) Salant said. Harfmann has served as pro- tant manager in ABC TV administration. titled "Alone, Together." The article inJoannidis was appointed director of cluded many stories from seniors living gram manager of the CCNS Catherine M. Sheridan Senior Cen- the HANAC Archbishop Iakovos Senior alone, who have found true friendships ter, Jackson Heights, from April 2001 to Center of Long Island City in 1993. Her with others at her center. Rose was quoted the present. He is responsible for daily center is housed in the first HANAC Se- as saying that with her center under recuroperations of the center, serving over 160 nior Residence. Since the start, Stavroula rent threat of funding cuts, her people will older adults; for budgetary management, ran a supportive center that ensures se- not feel safe until next year's budget cycle case management, dietary and transporta- niors access to services, a nutritious lunch is completed. She previously served as tion services, and supervises a staff of nine. and recreational/educational programs. program director of the St. Louis Senior He ensures all center functions are in com- She is also director of the HUD Service Center, Brooklyn, from 1990 to 2004. The gala fundraising dinner will be pliance with DFTA guidelines and govern- Coordinator program, a federally-subsiment regulations. Harfmann advocates ef- dized program linking HANAC's senior held on Nov. 3 at Westbury Manor, and fectively for center funding, working with housing residents to services, enabling begins at 6 p.m. Those interested in attending should federal, state and city officials and agencies. residents to age in place. Between 1995 and 2002, she served as RSVP by Oct. 24 by sending in their name From 1992 to 2000, Harfmann was a community relations assistant for New the site manager for the HANAC Senior and address, along with a $75 check payYork City Council Services. On a volun- Residence, the federally-subsidized build- able to United Adult Ministries, to Robert tary basis, Larry served as chairman in ing housing seniors and disabled adults. F. Salant, director of community relations, 1982 of the 'Save Our Social Security Of- She has a Masters in Psychology and Post- Flushing House, 38-20 Bowne Street, fice' campaign in Glendale, which was suc- Masters Certificate in Gerontology. She Flushing, NY 11354. For more informacessful in keeping the office open. He was always works hard on issues affecting se- tion, call (347) 532-3025 or send an email also chairman of the Elmhurst Hospital niors, tirelessly advocating on their be- to rsalant@uam.org. half. For several years she was HANAC's All proceeds support a special endowrepresentative to the Action Committee ment fund, which allows Flushing House of the Council of Senior Centers and to remain affordable for many of the Services of New York City. older adults who live there. Lawrence was program manager of the Built in 1974, Flushing House is a notCCNS Seaside Adult Community Center of for-profit retirement residence, and was Rockaway Beach since 2004, until she retired one of the first to offer older adults indein July 2011. She ran the daily operations at pendent living with supportive services her center, including staff supervision, bud- on-premises. Visit flushinghouse.com for get management and service delivery; serv- more information.

MERCY EARNS TOP MARK FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

nationally. No other hospital on Long Island or in New York City has ranked in the top 10 percent nationally in every year of the study. The study found that patients at hospitals like Mercy, that achieve the highest Five Star level of quality care, are nearly 70 percent less likely to experience in-hospital complications, and spend, on average, a half-day less in the hospital than patients treated at average (1-Star) hospitals. Mercy is a Bariatric Surgery Center of Excellence designated by the American Society For Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the hospital's weight-loss surgery program is headed by Dr. Shawn Garber, the only bariatric surgeon included in Newsday's listing of Top Doctors on Long Island. Mercy offers monthly education and informational presentations for individuals who are contemplating bariatric surgery. For more information call (516) 62-MERCY, or go to MercyMedicalCenter.info HealthGrades' ratings for bariatric surgery along with other medical procedures, are published on line, free of charge, at: healthgrades.com.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 19

In the latest affirmation of the hospital's delivery of the highest quality patient care, Mercy Medical Center has received the 2011Bariatric Surgery Excellence Award from HealthGrades, the nation's leading independent healthcare ratings organization, for the sixth consecutive year, with the highest ranking of any hospital in Nassau County and the Five Boroughs of New York City. Mercy is the only hospital on Long Island or in New York City to receive both the Excellence Award and the organization's highest Five Star rating every year since HealthGrades began its ratings for bariatric surgery six years ago. The ratings are based on the latest HealthGrades annual study of Bariatric Surgery Trends in American Hospitals, which analyzed the outcomes of nearly 200,000 bariatric surgery discharges from 2007 through 2009 at 468 hospitals in 19 states where data is publically available. Mercy was ranked in the top 10 percent of all of the hospitals studied nationwide, and fifth in all of New York State, the sixth year in a row that it has been in the top five statewide as well as in the top 10 percent


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THE PATIENT BECOMES SURGEON AT LIJ In the past, the standard approach to treating many gynecological conditions such as cervical and uterine cancer, uterine fibroids, endometriosis, uterine prolapse or excessive bleeding was for surgeons to use a large incision to access the uterus and surrounding anatomy. At Long Island Jewish Medical Center and North Shore University Hospital, gynecologists have been using the da Vinci Surgical System to minimize the pain and risk associated with large incisions, while increasing the likelihood of a fast recovery and excellent clinical outcomes for patients. Using the robot, surgeons make small incisions with tiny surgical instruments that they manipulate while looking through a surgical telescope called a laparoscope. The system enables them to achieve greater precision, increased range of motion, improved dexterity, enhanced visualization and improved access. For patients, laparoscopic surgery often results in a shorter hospital stay, less blood loss and pain, and a quicker return to normal activities. That was the case with 83-year-old Irene Borovoy of Bayside. Because of the presence of polyps, Borovoy underwent surgery on June 9. Sitting at the robotic system's console a few feet from the patient, Dr. Diana Contreras, director of gynecologic oncology, LIJ Medical Center, performed every surgical maneuver. The robot arms, on the patient side cart, were inserted through one-centimeter incisions in Borovoy's abdomen. With a high-powered camera providing a three-

Page 20 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

LEGAL NOTICE _____________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 7/ 20/11, bearing Index Number NC-000562-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) ABUL (Middle) HOSSAIN (Last) HOWLADER. My present name is (First) IMAN (Last) HOSSAIN. My present address is 34 26 71 st STREET APT 2FL, Jackson Heights, NY 11372. My place of birth is BANGLADESH. My date of birth is January 02, 1960. _____________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on the 18 day of July, 2011, bearing Index Number NC5532011, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, N.Y. 11435-3710 in room grants me the right to Assume the name of: MAFIZUL HOSSAIN. My present name is: SHOHEL JEWEL. My present address: is 56-11 94th Street, Apt 3D, Elmhurst, N.Y. 11373. My place of birth is: Bangladesh. My date of birth is: May 21, 1961. _____________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that a license, number 1256139 for a “Restaurant Wine License” has been applied for by the

dimensional view and magnification 10 times that of the naked eye, Contreras guided the robot's arms, the tips of which are fixed with tiny, highly-specialized surgical tools. Just a little more than one week after her surgery, Borovoy and several former female patients participated in a "test drive" of the da Vinci system, learning more about the robotic device that successfully treated them. They happily became surgeons for a day as they watched the technology come to life. As Borovoy skillfully handled the controls, she said, "It's just amazing to know that I am using the machinery that made me well." Also on hand to guide their patients and explain the workings of the da Vinci robot was Dr. Antoinette Sakaris, also a gynecologic oncologist at LIJ. After hearing from their patients, who were united in their appreciation of the new tech- Irene Borovoy, 83 (r.), became surgeon for a day as she test drives a da Vinci robot that was used nology that allowed them to heal during her surgery in early June. Helping her understand the fine points of the highly-sophisticated so quickly and return to the robotic surgical system is her surgeon Dr. Diana Contreras, Director, Division of Gynecologic activities of daily life within a Oncology, LIJ Medical Center. week, Contreras said, "This is The demonstration was held at the North 390-9252 or (516) 562-4438. To learn more the way surgery should be done on patients -- state-of-the-art technology, mini- Shore-LIJ Health System's Women's Com- about North Shore-LIJ's minimally invasive mum pain, greatly reduced recuperation prehensive Health Center at 1554 North- and robotic surgery capabilities, go to: time. All in all, this is not your ern Boulevard in Manhasset. To make an www.northshorelij.com/wh/wh-our-serappointment with a gynecologist, call (718) vices/wh-min-inv-robotic-surgery. grandmother's surgery."

LEGAL NOTICE undersigned to serve Beer/ Wine at retail in the restaurant under the Alcohol Beverage Control Law at Matabeko African Restaurant and Lounge Inc., located at 144 07 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, New York 11435 for on premises consumption. _____________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 07/29/2011, bearing Index Number NC-000671-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) MOHSINA (Last) SAYED. My present name is (First) MOHSINA (Last) MERAJ AKA MOHSINA SAYED. My present address is 140-26 34th Ave., Apt. 3, Flushing, NY 11354. My place of birth is Afghanistan. My date of birth is April 18, 1965. _____________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 7/ 5/11, bearing Index Number NC-000489-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) LESLI (Last) FLORES JIMENEZ. My present name is (First) LESLI (Last) FLORES FUENTES (infant). My present address is 6102 Madison St., Apt. 2L,

LEGAL NOTICE Ridgewood, NY 11385. My place of birth is Brooklyn, NY. My date of birth is September 22, 2000. _____________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that a license, number 1256185 for on-premises liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer, liquor and wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 115-22 Liberty Ave, Richmond Hill, NY 11419 for on premises consumption. New Oriental Guyana Restaurant, Inc. _____________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: WINK REALTY LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York(SSNY) on 07/18/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 320 38th Road, Douglaston, New York 11363. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. _____________________________________________________________ BARCS LAUNDRY LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 5/12/11. NY Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against

LEGAL NOTICE the LLC served upon him/ her to The LLC, 18-35 130 th St., College Point, NY 11356. General Purposes. _____________________________________________________________ File #: 2010/2457/B THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK BY THE GRACE OF GOD, FREE AND INDEPENDENT. TO: Ronald E. Karpavich, Mary Ellen Karpavich, Jane Karpavich, The heirs at law, next of kin, and distributes of Casimira Genevich, deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributes, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence. Public Administrator of the County of Queens A petition having been duly filed by John. V. Janusas, who is domiciled at Three Maple

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Street, P.O. Box 71, Liberty, New York 12754 YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County at 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, New York on September 29, 2011, at 9:30am in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the Estate of Casimira Genevich lately domiciled at 86-15 Broadway, Apt. 16E, Elmhurst, New York 11373, United States admitting to probate a Will dated May 5, 2006 (and Codicil(s), if any, dated a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Casimira Genevich, deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that: Letters Testamentary issue to John V. Janusas Dated, Attested and Sealed Jul 28 2011 Hon. Peter J. Kelly, Surrogate, Margaret M. Gribbon, Chief Clerk.

Name of Attorney: I. Peter Rayo Address of Attorney: 26 Court Street – Suite 2114, Brooklyn, NY 11201 Telephone Number of Attorney: 718-858-0702 NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not obliged to appear in person. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you. If you fail to appear it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested. _____________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of 60-56 59TH DRIVE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/1/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 59-65 57th Drive, Maspeth, NY 11378. Purpose: any lawful activity.

To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 149 or E-Mail Your Copy to legals@queenstribune.com


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National Night Out Against Crime Across Queens

Good thing the FDNY was on hand at the 107th.

Mike Simanowitz (l.) and Sen. Tony Avella get ready to bowl at the 107th.

Hot dogs line the grill at the 107th.

Photos by Ira Cohen

pix

Page 22 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Events Edited By Harley Benson

Clockwise from top: Mayor Mike Bloomberg (l. to r.) is joined by Queens DA Richard Brown and Police Commissioner Ray Kelly at the 106th; Mr. and Mrs. Vito Turso; Sen. Joe Addabbo is joined by STARS Youth Center President Frances Scarentino and members of the Rotary Club of Southwest Queens; Capt. Thomas Pascale, CO of the 106th Precinct. joins P.O. Valinoti, P.O. Smyer-Young and P.O. Keyo; and NYPD Community Affairs takes a break from providing parents with free finger prints and photos of their children. Photos by Dan Miller

Clockwise from top: At the 109th Precinct, a young cowgirl gets a lesson; Councilman Dan Halloran addresses the 109th; Assemblyman Rory Lancman gets a few laughs at the 109th; Assembly members Grace Meng and Ed Braunstein at the 109th. Photos by Ira Cohen


           

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For help, call 311 or search NYC QUITS on nyc.gov. Made possible by funding from the Department of Health and Human Services and the New York State Department of Health.

Michael R. Bloomberg Mayor

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NYC Department of Parks & Recreation

NYC Department of Transportation

Thomas Farley, M.D., M.P.H. Commissioner

Adrian Benepe Commissioner

Janette Sadik-Khan Commissioner

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 23

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Page 24 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT


Leisure

Going Hip To Hip For Shakespeare the self-assured Beatrice is just as witty. She By BARBARA ARNSTEIN Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Noth- and Benedick endlessly war with words, neiing," as performed this summer by the tour- ther revealing their real feelings, until six of ing Hip to Hip Theatre Company, is a joy, the other characters conspire to trick them into doing it. pure and simple. Claudio's romantic dreams are almost Directed by co-founder and actor Jason Marr, the nonstop 90-minute performance sabotaged by the scheming Don John emphasizes the elements of farce as pranks (Rafael Miguel) and his follower Borachio (Cristina Carrion) until are pulled, dancers the bumbling constable prance, and sweethearts Dogberr y (Kevin fight a merry war of wits. Shimko) saves the day. E ve r y m a i n c h a r a c t e r The cast expertly handles eventually fools another the enter taining tw ists and is fooled in turn. and turns of tricker y in On Aug. 5 the com"Much Ado" as identities edy, set mostly in a garare exchanged, eavesden, was presented in its dropping is enacted and most appropriate venue, seeming tragedy turns to the beautiful Victorian triumph. garden behind the reKindard brings great stored gingerbread-style Per former ’s from “Much Ado m a n s i o n i n F l u s h i n g About Nothing” entertain at bor- dignity to his role (he alternates as the title charknow n as t he Voelker ough residents. acter in this year's other O r t h M u s e u m , a m i d st twining vines, dangling bunches of grapes Hip to Hip production, "Othello") along with excellent comic timing; Murray's Beatrice is and all types of colorful blooms. The story begins as soldiers Benedick wonder fully confident and comical; and Joy (Damon Kindard) and Claudio (Tim Dowd) Mar r's por trayal of Hero is spirited and return home from war to tackle the chal- charming. The actors demonstrate their verlenges of love. Claudio hopes to marry Hero sat ility by each acting out two very different (co-founder Joy Marr) while Benedick claims par ts, some originally of the opposite genhe never want s to marr y but is secretly at- der. Headquartered in Woodside, Hip to Hip tracted to the one woman he seemingly can't attract: Beatrice (Elizabeth Alice Murray). is a five-year-old non-profit company dediCalmer than Kate in "Taming of the Shrew," cated to presenting free Shakespeare in vari-

North Meets South

REVIEW

their mailing list, email contact@hiptohip.org. The Voelker Or th Museum is located at 149-19 38th Ave in Flushing. For information about tours, special events and exhibits, go to vomuseum.org or call (718) 359-6227.

Dragons On The Lake In Flushing Meadows In Celebrat ion of the Year of the Rabbit, the 21st Annual Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival in New York will be held this weekend, Aug. 13 and 14, at Meadow Lake in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. The festival will feature cash and prizes for competitors in this year's US Dragon Boat Open Championship. Other festival events consist of two special Cup The 21st Annual Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival races, The Hong Kong Cup and will commence Aug. 13. the Municipal Cup featuring various teams from our elected officials. This Boat Open Championship will be held on year's Corporate Invitational looks to be a Sunday, with the teams vigorously competgood one, with many Corporate Teams join- ing for their share of the cash and prizes. ing us to race for their company. The festival Racing star ts at 9 a.m. a nd events last will be held rain or shine; admission is free. throughout the day until approximately 5 Dragon Boat, a multicultural celebration p.m. each day. Other festival events consist a n d s p o r t i n g e v e n t , i s t h e l a r g e s t of the media invitational, corporate youth, multicultural fe st ival in New York and the charity race, women's invitational, and sponlargest festival of its kind in the U.S. The sors challenge, a photo contest and raffle as festival keeps up the age-old tradition of well as presentation on the Verizon Stage of Dragon Boat Racing in color ful, custom traditional Chinese art s, mart ial ar ts demmade teak boat s, which are virtual works of onstrations, the traditional dragon dance, ar t gliding on water. musical and other diverse per formances and Custom made by a small coterie of crafts- demonstrations of folk ar ts and craft s. men in Hong Kong, weighing one ton each, An ethnic food court and booths staffed colorfully painted with a dragon head at the by sponsors of the event many of whom will front and dragon tail at the rear, the boats are be giving away promotional items, and many piloted by up to 20 crewmen, including 18 community-based organizations par t icipatpaddlers, a drummer and steers person. For ing help make for a unique, action packed, 20 successful years HKDBF-NY has attracted multi-cultural, New York weekend. a diverse, multi-cultural audience of more than The tradition of Dragon Boat Racing is 60,000 attendees throughout North America. an annual Chinese rite commemorating the With more than 165 well-trained teams, idealist ic poet and reformer Qu Yuan who involving more than 2,000 participants com- drowned himself in the t hird centur y B.C. peting from across the U.S. and Canada, to protest his emperor's policies. The locals this year's festival is expected to be notable raced in t heir boats in an at tempt to rescue in its scale and fierce competition. the poet. To prevent fish and water dragons An opening day parade will be held at from eating his body, the locals beat their noon on Saturday, followed by the New York drums and splashed their paddles. This was City Championship Races. The U.S. Dragon the beginning of Dragon Boat Racing.

Queens Day At Coney Beginning this week, thrill-seekers from Queens can receive 50 percent off a regular unlimited-ride wristband at Coney Island's Luna Park on Wednesdays through the new "Ride with Borough Pride" promotion. For the rock bot tom price of $13, Queensite s can get four hours of unlimited access to all 19 at tract ions at Luna Park. From Aug. 10 to Sept. 1, Queens residents can show their valid New York Cit y identification and receive up to four bracelets per ID. "Coney Island is as New York as it get s, and visitors travel here from all over the world to experience that authenticity firsthand," said Valerio Fer rari, pre sident of Central Amusement International. "'Ride with Borough Pride' is a way to say 'thank you' to al l the real Ne w Yorkers who call Cone y

Island their sandbox." Luna Park features 19 rides by Zamperla the world's leading designer and manufacturer of amusement at tractions - as well as a world-class mix of games, entertainment and food. Among the park's custom-built attractions are a number of Zamperla originals, including Air Race, which made its world debut last year in Coney Island. Simulating the experience of a fighter pilot, Air Race flips riders upside down while spinning around a central axis with up to 4 Gs of force. Last year in its inaugural season, nearly half a million people from all over the world visited the new Luna Park, helping Coney Island enjoy its most successful summer in decades. The world-famous Cyclone and the Scream Zone roller coasters are not included in this promotion.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 25

mixture of unique spices and is a must taste. Likewise, the Balchao, which is chicken cooked in coconut milk and sauce, sautéed with curry leaves, dr y chilies and mustard seeds, is a requirement. The meat filled bread we tried was called Keema Paratha and it reminded my guest and I of the variety of naan (Indian bread) that we could chose from. The bread is There's a lot to discuss at the Delhi Pal- traditionally used to scoop the rest of the ace. This beautiful restaurant is serious food, but it is a treat in itself. about options and combines We stuffed ourselves with the nor th and sout h Indian food in RESTAURANT boneless Murg Kabuli Tikka, their authentic form. The menu which is chicken on a skewer that may be intimidating for somehas been cooked over charcoal one not well versed in Indian with onions, spices and lemon. food, but the staff is happy to This minimalist dish is a nice help navigate you through the counterpoint to the rich, warm curries, the meats, the breads spices of the saucier dishes. and the vegetarian options. With For vegetarians, there is a such quality ingredients, you plethora of options, but lets focan't go wrong. cus on one: the Kadai Bhindi The concept of the Delhi PalMasala. If you like okra, do not ace is to combine different types of Indian miss this dish, which consists of that infafood in one place. Southern Indian food mous vegetable cooked with herbs and is prepared with a lot of coconut milk, spice s i n a tradit ional fr y pan. If you exot ic spice s, Indian cur r y leave s and haven't had the best experience with okra, mustard seeds. this dish will change your mind if anyThe highlight of the southern Indian thing could - the okra has no hint of its food was the dosa, which is a large crepe sometimes slimy and flavorless incarnamade from coconut milk filled with a vari- t ions. Instead, it features a dr y and smoky ety of meats and vegetables. These light curry quality and has a crisp texture somepockets are the perfect vehicle for the where between eggplant and zucchini. Delhi's Palace's rich spices and complex By the end of the meal, we were too full flavors, and my guest and I am could not to adequately sample the sweet shop, but stop until the entire dosa was gone. the variety available combined with the top Nor thern Indian food is probably more quality of the preceding meal made it just familiar to a New Yorker and includes such one more reason to come back to the Delhi chicken dishes as the Murg Hara Masala, Palace time and time again. the Murg Balchao and the lamb-based One hint: if you order a lassi, ask to Gosht Vinaloo. The Hara Masala is a green have it without ice. DELHI PALACE 37-33 74th St., Jackson Heights (718) 507-0666 HOURS: Sun-Thurs 11:30am to 10:15pm; Fr i-Sat 11:30am to 10:45pm. PARKING: Street CREDIT CA RDS: Yes

ous parks (and Voelker Or th's garden) including For t Tot ten Park, Forest Park and the Socrates Sculpture Park. Find them at hiptohip.org or call (718) 729-8567 to see their remaining summer schedule. To join


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today SECTION EDITOR: REGINA VOGEL

Send typed announcements for your club or organization’s events at least TWO weeks in advance to “Queens Today” Editor, Queens Tribune, 150-50 14 Road, Whitestone NY 11357. Send faxes to 357-9417, c/o Regina. IF YOUR ORGANIZATION MEETS ON A REGULAR BASIS, SEND ALL DATES FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR.

ALUMNI THOMAS JEFFERSON Sunday, January 15 class of 1961 will meet in Florida. Tjhs1961@aol.com

DANCE LINE DANCING Saturdays 2-4 at Holy Family RC Parish Church, Msgr. Mahoney Hall, 175-20 74 th Avenue, Fresh Meadows. Light refreshments. Bring friends! ISRAELI FOLK Mondays 7:15-9:45 at Hillcrest Jewish Center, 18202 Union Turnpike. $10 session. 380-4145. LINE DANCING Mondays 6:30-9:30 at Kowalinski Post 4, 61-57 Maspeth Avenue. $7. Cake and coffee. 565-2259.

Page 26 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

RELIGIOUS BIBLE SCHOOL August 22-26 Vacation Bible School at the First Reformed Church of College Point. 359-3956. ICE CREAM & DOGS Saturday, August 27 ice cream social and dog show at 1. Sundaes and floats 1.5. Dog show at 2 with Blessing of the Animals. First Reformed Church of College Point, 118-17 14 th Avenue, College Point.

FLEA MARKETS FLEA MARKET Saturdays and Sundays through Oc tober 1 at Faith Mission, 114-40 Van Wyck Expressway. THRIFT SHOPS Saturdays 11-4 at Bargain Boutique Thrift Shop, Queens Baptist Church, 93th 23 217 Street, Queens Village.465-2504.

THEATER STOP THE WORLD Saturday, August 13 at 7 and Sunday, August 14 at 3 at Trinit y Reform Church in Ridgewood. 894-8654. WEST SIDE STORY Through August 14 at St. Gregory Theatre Group in Bellerose. 989-2451

ENTERTAINMENT ANTIGONE Saturday, August 13 at 3 at the Broadway library. MENTALIST Saturday, August 13 D r . Mike performs at the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer in Flushing. Doors open 7, show 8. $10. 15716 65th Avenue. FILMS Saturday, August 13 “Notes on a Scandal.” Church in the Gardens in Forest Hills. Pot luck dinner at 6. 268-9142 information. LITTLE BRASS Saturday, August 13 Little Brass Band 4-6606-1800. AMERICAN SONGBOOK Saturday, August 13 at the Forest Hills library at 2:30. OPENING RECEPTION Saturday, August 13 opening reception for “Going Green” exhibit 3-6 at Crossing Art, 136-17 39 th Avenue, ground floor, Flushing. DIVAS OF JAZZ Saturday, August 13 at the Rochdale Village library at 3. BIG BAND Saturday, August 13 music of the big band singers at 2 at the Flushing library. SUMMER FUN Sunday, August 14 Los Chamanes (South American fusion). Sunday, August 21 Swedish Cottage Mario n e t t e s . 5pm at the 78 th Street Play Street, 78 th Street between Northern Blvd. And 3 4 th Avenue, Jackson Heights. MUSIC IN GARDENS Sundays, August 14, September 11 Music in the Barden, resented with Bang on a Can at Socrates Sculpture Park at 3. MOVIE NIGHTS Monday, August 15 at the Arverne library at 5. GAME NIGHT Monday, August 15 monthly family game night at 6 at the South Jamaica library. CUNNINGHAM MOVIES Monday, August 15 Despicable Me. Thursday, August 18 Grown Ups. Cunningham Park at 8. Bring blankets and chairs. DANCING Monday, August 15 Dancing the American Song at 6:30 at the Richmond Hill library. SINATRA Monday, August 15 at 7 at the Arverne library. FAMILY FILM Tuesday, August 16 family films at the Pomonok library. Register. SCRABBLE Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at the Fresh Meadows library at 1. FAMILY FUN Tuesday, August 16 at 2 at the Pomonok library. BIG BANDS SOUNDS Tuesday, August 16 at the Auburndale library at 2:30. GOLDEN AGE Tuesday, August 16 Golden Age of Radio and Television: A Retrospective at 2:30 at the Maspeth library. HARRY POTTER TRIVIA Tuesday, August 16 at the LIC library at 4. FILM FESTIVAL Tu e s d a y, A u g u s t 1 6 a n d

Thursday, August 18 Asian American International Film Festival at 5 at the Flushing library. OUTDOOR FILMS Wednesday, August 17 Cultural Diversit y of Quee4ns with Outdoor Cinema 2001 at 7 at Socrates Park. JEWISH MUSIC Wednesday, August 17 Yiddish Fest. 7pm at Cunningham Park, Union Turnpike and 196 th Street. Free. MY THS & MONSTERS Wednesday, August 17 at 2 at the Hillcrest library. READING PARTY Wednesday, August 17 at 3 at the Broad Channel library, JAZZ Thursday, August 18 MioSotio Latin Jazz. 7-9:30. 70 th Road between Queens Blvd. and Austin Street. GAME DAY Thursday, August 18 at the Woodhaven library at 4:30. JAPANESE DANCE Thursday, August 18 Japanese performance and dance workshop at the Briarwood library at 6. SCRABBLE GAME DAY Thursday, August 18 at the Bellerose library at 6:30. SUMMER MOVIES Friday, August 19 “Of Gods and Men.” St. Joseph Pari s h , 4 3 - 1 9 3 0 th A v e n u e , Astoria. 278-1611. BBQ begins at 7, movie at sundown. PASSPORT FRIDAYS Fridays through August 26 the Queens Museum of Art will hold its 7 th International Outdoor Film, dance and music series. 592-9700. READING PARTY Friday, August 19 End of Summer Reading Part y at 2 at the Arverne library. STAMP SHOW Fridays, August 19 Bayside3 Stamp Show at the Ramada Inn on Northern Blvd., Bayside. 10-4:30 Free. BOARD GAMES Friday, August 19 at the Broad Channel library at 1. READING PARTY Friday, August 19 at the Arverne library at 2. WII GAMING Fridays, August 19, 26 at the Woodside library at 3. BANANAGRAMS Fridays, August 19, 26 Windsor Park library at 2. EASTERN US MUSIC Saturday, August 20 at 2 Eastern US Music and Dance celebration of the Centennial Commemoration of the Republic of China at the Flushing librar y. SUMMER RECITAL Saturday, August 20 summer recital by young artists at 2 at the Forest Hills library. DUKE ELLINGTON Saturday, August 20 evening of Ellington and Billy Strayhorn at 3 at the Bayside library. VETERANS BBQ Saturday, August 20 Veterans BBQ 12-3 at 160 th Ave n u e a n d 1 0 2 nd S t r e e t , Howard Beach. RSVP required. 497-1630. SUMMER RECITAL Saturday, August 20 summer recital by young artists at 2 at the Forest Hills library.


EDUCATION/GAMES/CRAFTS Tuesdays at the East Flushing library at 3:30. GET YOUR YARNS OUT! Tuesdays after evening Minyan at 8, knitters, crocheters, needlepointers, and others meet at the Forest Hills Jewish Center. 263-7000, ext. 200. TOUR THE WORLD Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at 10:30 and Thursdays, August 18, 25 at 6 adults tour the world via the internet at the Rosedale library. INTRO INTERNET Tuesday, August 16 at 10:30 at the McGoldrick library. INTRO COMPUTER Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at the Queens Village library. Register. INTRO POWERPOINT Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at the Steinway library at 10:30. BASIC COMPUTER Tuesday, August 16 at the LIC library at 11. COMPUTER CLASS Tuesdays, August 16, 23 at the South Hollis library. Register. COMPUTER TRAINING Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at the Bellerose library. Register. INTRO EXCEL Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at the Steinway library. Register. KNIT & CROCHET Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at the Windsor Park library at 2. POETRY WRITING Tuesdays, August 16, September 20, Oc tober 18 poetry writing workshop at Barnes & Noble, 176-70 Union Turnpike, Fresh Meadows at 7:30. NOOK NIGHT Wednesday, August 17 at 7 at Barnes & Noble, 176-60 Union Turnpike, Fresh Meadows. MY THS & MONSTERS Wednesday, August 17 Myths and Monsters Around the World at the Hillcrest library at 2. LANGUAGE CLASS Wednesdays Conversational Hebrew 2:30-3:30 and Torah Stories in Yiddish 3:30-4:30 at the Bayside Jewish Center. 352-7900. TANGO CLASS Wednesdays, August 17, 24, 31 at Buenos Aires Tango in Forest Hills. 347-642-4705. COVER LETTER Wednesday, August 17 writing the best cover letter at the Central library at 10:30. INTERNET SEARHING Wednesday, August 17 at t h e W i n d s o r Pa r k l i b ra r y. Register. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesday, August 17 at the South Ozone Park library at 1. PLASTIC SCRAP Wednesday, August 17 transform plastic bottles into objects of design at the Woodside library. Register. INDOOR SOCCER – DADS Wednesday evenings at the Forest Hills Jewish Center. 263-7000. OIL PAINTING CLASS Wednesdays 6-8 adult classes, all levels. Grace

Lutheran Church in Forest Hills. 472-4055. WATERCOLOR CL ASS Wednesdays at 9:30 at NAL. Traditional and contemporary, all levels. 969-1128. BASIC COMPUTER Wednesdays, August 17, 24 basic computer at the Windsor Park library. Register. QUILTING CLASS Thursdays 10-2 at the Maria Rose Doll Museum in St. Albans. 276-3454 or 917817-8653 to register. QUILTERS Thursdays at the East Elmhurst library at 12:30. CHESS CLUB Thursdays at the East Flushing library. Register. COMPUTER CLASS Every Thursday at the Queensboro Hill library. Register. KNIT & CROCHET Thursdays at the Fresh Meadows library at 6. COMPUTER TUTORIALS Thursdays, August 18, 25 at the Woodside library at 6:30. BALLROOM DANCING Thursdays, August 18, 25, September 8 ballroom dancing for beginners at the Woodside library at 6:30. INTERMED. COMPUTER Thursdays, August 18, 25 at 10:15 at the LIC library. INTRO WORD Thursdays, August 18, September 1 at the Steinway library. Register. EXPLORE CAREERS Thursday, August 18 at the Central library at 3:30. JOB SEEKERS WRITING Thursday, August 18 at 6 at the Central library. Basic writing for job seekers. NAKHACHITRA Thursday, August 18 learn the art of Indian nail art at the Queens Village library. Register. CRAFTSMEN DAYS August 19, 20 1-5 meet craftspeople as they demonstrate crafts from the 1880s at King Manor in Jamaica. KingManor.org. KNITTING CLUB Fridays at the Maspeth library at 10. KNIT & CROCHET Fridays at the Fresh Meadows library at 10:30. ADULT GAME PLAYERS Friday, August 19 at the Hillcrest library at 2. COMPUTER COURSE Every Friday at the Ozone Park library. Register. CHESS CLUB Fridays, August 19, 26, September 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 at the Auburndale library at 3. WOODSIDE CHESS Fridays, August 19, 26 at the Woodside library at 4. JOB SEARCH BOOT CAMP Saturday, August 20 at the Central library at 10:30. PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturdays, August 20, September 3, 17 learn to communicate effectively at Elmhurst Hospital. 646-4367940. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Saturday, August 20 at Wesley United Methodist Church in Franklin Square. 516-872-8062.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 27

KAYAKING Week e n d s t h r o u g h O c to ber 9 (weather permitting) kayaking from Socrates Sculpture Park Beach at Hallets Cove. 228-9214. LANDSCAPE/FLORAL Charcoal and pen and ink classes. 969-1128. JH ART CLUB Classes in all art forms days and evenings for children and adults. 454-0813. WOODBLOCK PRINTING Easy method in full color at the National Art League. 969-1128. CRAFT CLASSES Saturdays 11-3 at Maria Rose International Doll Museum in St. Albans. 2763454. SCRABBLE CLUB Saturdays at 10 at Count Basie Jr. HS, 132 nd Street and Guy R. Brewer Blvd. 8865236. SCULPTURE WORKSHOP Saturdays through September 24 children and families at the Socrates Sculpture Museum. 956-1819. PET OWNERS Saturdays (not on holiday weekends) from 1-4 free Doggie Boot Camp a:at Crocheron Park in Bayside (weather permitting). 4545800. Reservations required. Donations accepted. FM POETS Saturday, August 13 Fresh Meadows Poets meet to discuss their work at the library at 10. BIKE COMMUTING 101 Saturday, August 13 save money – ride your bike to work at 11 at the Steinway library,. BOAT SAFETY Sunday, August 14 the US Coast Guard Auxiliary will give an 8 hour About Boating Safely class. 1201@verizon.net to register. SKYPE CHAT Mondays, August 15, 22, 29, September 12, 19, 26 at the Queens Village library at 2. COVER LETTER Monday, August 15 writing your best cover letter at 6 at the Central library. BALLROOM DANCING Mondays, August 15, 22, 29, September 12, 19, 26 at the Forest Hills library at 6:30. BRIDGE CLUB Mondays except holidays 12-4 at Pride of Judea in Douglaston. Lesson & play $10. Partners arranged. 4236200. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at the Douglaston/ Little Neck library at 4. DRAWING CLASS Mondays at the National Art League in Douglaston. 3610628. LINE DANCE Mondays beginner to intermediate lessons 6-9 in Bayside. 917-886-0519. KNITTING CIRCLE Mondays at Alley Pond Environmental Center. Register 229-4000. ADULT CHESS Mondays and Thursdays at the Queens Village library at 5:30. SCRABBLE CLUB

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT Page 28 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Today YOUTH FAMILY CRAFT Saturday, August 13 at the Bayside library. Register. DRAMA CLUB Monday, August 15 at the Arverne library at 2. PLAYGROUP Monday, August 15 at the Steinway library at 10:30. BASIC SEWING Monday, August 15 Far Rockaway library at noon. READING KIDS 4-7 Monday, August 15 at the Briarwood librar y. Register. READ TO ME Mondays, August 15, 22 at the Hillcrest library at 2. BOOK REPORT Monday, August 15 at the Lefrak Cit y library. Register. WORLD TRAVELERS Mondays, August 15, 22, 29 at the Peninsula library at 2. READING & CRAFTS Monday, August 15 Windsor Park library. Register. GREEK HEROES Mondays, August 15, 22 recycled art project at the Broadway library. Register. MOVIE NIGHT Monday, August 15 at the Arverne library at 5. DRAMA CLUB Monday, August 15 at 2 at the Arverne library. GARDENING CLUB Monday, August 15 at the Baisley Park library at 2. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS Monday, August 15 at the Baisley Park library. Register. MOVIE MAKING Mondays, August 15, 22 Woodhaven library at 4:30. FAMILY GAME NIGHT Monday, August 15 at the South Jamaica library at 6. S TORY T I M E Tuesday, August 16 bilingual storytime at the Astoria library at 10:30. READING GRADES 1-3 Tuesday, August 16 at the Lefrak Cit y library. Register. DROP IN & READ Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at the Peninsula library at 2. FAMILY FILM Tuesday, August 16 at the Pomonok library. Register. WII & BOARD GAMES Tuesdays, August 16, 23 at the Bayside library at 3. SUMMER READING Tuesday, August 16 North Forest Park library at 3. CHESS CLUB Tuesday, August 16 at the Steinway library at 3:30. CHESS LESSONS Tu e s d a y, August 16 Windsor Park library. Register. LEGO BUILDERS Tuesdays, August 16, 34, 40 at the LIC library at 1. MAD SCIENTISTS Tuesday, August 16 at the Arverne library at 2. GAME DAY Tuesday, August 16 at the Baisley Park library at 2. GREEK MY THOLOGY Tuesdays, August 16, 23 at the Broadway library. Register. STORY & CRAFT Tuesday, August 16 at the Central library at 2. ARTS & CRAFTS Tuesday, August 16 at the McGoldrick library at 2. DROP IN & READ Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30

at the Peninsula library at 2. FAMILY FILM Tuesday, August 16 at the Pomonok library at 2. ZINE MAKING CLUB Tuesday, August 16 at the Woodhaven library at 2. WII & BOARD GAMES Tuesdays, August 16, 23 at 3 at the Bayside library. GAME ON Tuesdays, August 16, 23 at the Glendale library at 3. MATH WIZARDS Tuesday, August 16 at the Arverne library at 4. HARRY POTTER TRIVIA Tuesday, August 16 at 4 at the LIC library. ACTIVITY DAY Tuesday, August 16 at the McGoldrick library at 4. PUPPETS Wednesday, August 17 Puppets in the Park at 10:30 at Alley Pond Park, 76 th Avenue off Springfield Blvd. CHESS Wednesdays at the Queens Village library at 3:30. READ TO ME Wednesdays, August 17, 24 Bay Terrace library at 10:30. READ TO ME CLUB Wednesdays, August 17, 24 Bellerose librar y. Register. READ & PLAY Wednesday, August 17 Broadway library at 10:30. TAKE ME TO THE WORLD Wednesdays, August 17, 24 Peninsula library at 10:30. FAMILY PLAY TIME Wednesday, August 17 Queensboro Hill library. Register. PRE-SCHOOLERS Wednesday, August 17 Lefrak Cit y library. Register. WORLD EXPLORERS Wednesdays, August 17, 24 at the Peninsula library at 2. FUN READING CLUB Wednesday, August 17 Bay Terrace library at 3:30. BABYMOUSE CLUB Wednesday, August 17 at the Arverne library at 4. KNITTING Every Wednesdays at the Bayside library at 4. TOPS TRUMP CARD Every Wednesday tournament at the LIC library at 4. PUPPETS Wednesday, August 17 Puppets in the Park at 10:30 at Alley Pond Park, 76 th Avenue off Springfield Blvd. FAMILY STORY TIME Wednesday, August 17 at 11 at the Seaside library. CRAFTS Wednesday, August 17 Bay Terrace library at 4:30. CRAFTS Wednesday, August 17 at the Steinway library at 11. BASIC SEWING Wednesday, August 17 at the Far Rockaway library at noon. BABY CRAWL Wednesdays, August 17, 24 Forest Hills library at 1:30. CRAFTERNOON Wednesday, August 17 at the Arverne library at 2. MAGIC SHOW Wednesday, August 17 at the Flushing library at 3. ENVIRONMENTAL SCI. Mondays and Wednesdays through August 26 at Idlewild Park Preserve. 347-

824-2301. ARTS & CRAFTS Thursday, August 18 at the Steinway librar y. Register. CRAFT TIME Every Thursday at 3:30 at the Ozone Park library. LEGO BUILDERS CLUB Thursdays, August 18, 25 at the LIC library at 1. THEATRICKS Thursday, August 18 at the Pomonok library at 2. BOARD GAMES Thursday, August 18 at the Auburndale library at 4. CHESS CLUB Thursday, August 18 at the Douglaston library. Register. ARTS & CRAFTS Thursday, August 18 at the Steinway library at 4. MAGIC WORKSHOP Thursday, August 18 Kew Gardens Hills library at 4:30. GAME DAY Thursday, August 18 at the Woodhaven library at 4:30. PAJAMA STORY TIME Thursday, August 18 at the Whitestone library at 6:30. SCIENCE CAMP Fridays through August 26 at Idlewild Park Preserve. 347-824-2301. TODDLER CRAFTS Friday, August 19 at the Briarwood librar y. Register. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays at 2 at the Queens Village library. FLASH FRIDAY Fridays, August 19, 26 at the Ozone Park library at 3. BASIC SEWING Friday, August 19 at the Far Rockaway library at noon. BOARD GAMES Friday, August 19 at the Broad Channel library at 1. ONE MAN CIRCUS Friday, August 19 at 2 at the Central library. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays LIC library at 2. GAME DAY Fridays, August 19, 26 Poppenhusen library at 2. GAME DAY Fridays at the Queens Village library at 2. GAME DAY Fridays, august 19, 26 Bay Terrace library at 2:30. CUDDLE UP TIME Friday, August 19 Japanese Cuddle-Up Story Time at the Forest Hills library at 2:30. FLASH FRIDAYS Every Friday at 3 at the Ozone Park library. WII GAMING Fridays, August 19, 26 at the Woodside library at 3. ACTIVITY TIME Friday, August 19 at the Briarwood library at 3:30. AERTS & CRAFTS Friday, August 19 at the Briarwood library at 4. GAME DAY Friday, August 19 at the McGoldrick library at 4. KIDS GAME DAY Friday, August 19 at the Rosedale library at 3. CHESS CLUB Fridays, August 19, 26, September 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Auburndale library at 3:30. BOOK BUDDIES Friday, August 19 at the Bayside library at 4. YU-GI-OH Fridays, August 19, 26 Queensboro Hill library at 4.


TEENS Wednesdays at 3:30 at the Queens Village library. BEAT SCHOOL STRESS Wednesday, August 17 at 11 at the Sunnyside library. MY THS & MONSTERS Wednesday, August 17 at the Hillcrest library at 2. KEYCHAIN Wednesday, August 17 at the Auburndale library at 3. KEYCHAIN Wednesday, August 17 at 4 at the Richmond Hill library. KEY CLUB Wednesday, August 17 at the Forest Hills library at 5. ORAL HISTORY Wednesday, August 17 at t h e W i n d s o r Pa r k l i b ra r y. Register. TEEN THURSDAYS Every Thursday at the Bay Terrace library at 3. CAMERA CLUB Thursday, August 18 at the Far Rockaway library at 11. TEEN GAMING Thursdays, August 18, 25 at the Fresh Meadows library at 3:30. SHSAT PRACTICE Thursday, August 18 at the Broadway library at 4. CHESS CLUB Every Thursday 4-5:30 at the Douglaston/Little Neck library. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS Thursdays, August 18, 25 at the Glendale library at 4:15.

GAME DAY Thursday, August 18 at the Woodhaven library at 4-30. ARTS & CRAFTS Friday, August 19 at the LIC library at 2. READING FUN Fridays, August 19, 26 at the Peninsula library at 3. CHESS CLUB Fridays, August 19, 26, September 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 at the Auburndale library at 3:30. BOOK BUDDIES Friday, August 19 at the Bayside library at 4. CHESS LESSONS Friday, August 19 at the Windsor Park library at 4. BOARD GAMES Friday, August 19 at the Broad Channel library at 1. ARTS & CRAFTS Friday, August 19 at the LIC library at 2. WII GAMING Fridays, August 19, 26 at the Woodside library at 3. TEEN GAME DAY Friday, August 19 at the Rose3dale library at 4:30. CHESS CLUB Fridays, August 19, 26 at the Woodside library at 4. TEEN GAME DAY Friday, August 19 at the Rosedale library at 4:30. SHSAT PRACTICE Saturday, August 20 at the Steinway library at 1.

SENIORS

MEETINGS

LIFE INSURANCE Monday, August 15 Life Insurance and Planning at the Langston Hughes library at 6:30. AARP DEFENSIVE DRIVING Friday, August 19 at the M c G o l d r i c k l i b ra r y. 4 6 1 1616 to register. STARS Fridays, August 19, 26, September 2, 9, 16. 23, 30 Senior Theater Acting Repertory at the Queens Village library at 10. LIFE INSURANCE Friday, August 19 Life Insurance and Planning at the LIC library at 2. VETERANS BBQ Saturday, August 20 12-3 outside Addabbo’s office, 1 6 0 th A v e n u e a n d 1 0 2 nd Street, Howard Beach. 7381111 to RSVP. FREE LUNCH Saturdays, August 20, September 17 at All Saints Church in Richmond Hill. 849-2352 reservations.

B ELLA ITALIA MIA Sundays, August 14, September 18 Bella Italia Mia meets at Christ the King High School, 68-02 Metropolitan Avenue, Middle Village. 426-1240. AMER. LEGION 131 Tuesdays, August 16, September 20 American Legion, Post 131 meets at 8 at 10-20 Clintonville Street, Whitestone. 767-4323. TALK OF THE TOWN Tuesdays, August 16, September 6, 20 learn the art of public speaking in St. Albans at 7:15. 640-7092. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT Tuesday, August 16 at Holy Family in Fresh Meadows. 969-2448. FLUSHING CAMERA Wednesdays, August 17, 31, September 7, 21 Flushing Camera Club meets at Flushing Hospital. 479-0643. TOASTMASTERS Wednesdays, August 17, September 7 learn the art of public speaking at the Voices of Rochdale Toastmasters Club in Jamaica. 9780732. GAY MEN Thursday, August 18 Queens Pride House Men’s Group meet. 429-5309. FCCBA Friday, August 19 12-2 the Flushing Chamber of Commerce meets at the Sheraton LaGuardia East. 358-5500, ext. 441 to register. VFW 4787 Mondays, August 22, September 12, 26, Oc tober 10, 24, November 14, 21 Whitestone VFW Community Post meets. 746-0540.

TALKS LITERARY SOUP Thursday, August 18 Literary Soup at the Queens Village library at 6:30. SEASIDE BOOK Monday, August 22 “Their Eyes Were Watching God” will be discussed at 6:30 at the Seaside library. SUNNYSIDE Monday, August 15 “Au thentic Happiness: Using the New Positive Psychology to Realize Your Potential for Lasting Fulfillment” Sunnyside library at 6:30.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 29

CHESS CLUB Every Saturday at the Flushing library at 2. GAMES Saturday, August 13 at the Far Rockaway library at 1. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at the Douglaston/ Little Neck library at 4. MOVIES Monday, August 15 at the Flushing library at 2. TRIVIA Monday, August 15 Are You Smarter Than a 6 th Grader at the Pomonok library. Register. SUMMER READING Monday, August 8 at the St. Albans library at 2. GARDENING CLUB Monday, August 15 at the Baisley Park library at 2. MOVIE NIGHT Monday, August 15 at the Lefrak Cit y library at 3. SUMMER READING Mondays, August 15, 22, 29 at the Peninsula library at 4. MOVIE NIGHT Monday, August 15 at the Arverne library at 5. TEEN CHESS Mondays, August 15, 22, 29 at the Bayside library at 6. DUNGEON & DRAGONS Monday, August 15 at the Baisley Park library. Register. MOVIE MAKING Mondays, August 15, 22 at the Woodhaven library at 4:30. GAME NIGHT Monday, August 15 at the South Jamaica library at 6. GAMES Tuesday, August 16 at the Far Rockaway library at 1. GAME DAY Tuesday, August 16 at the Baisley Park library at 2. SUMMER READNG Tuesdays, August 16, 23 at the Hillcrest library at 2. DROP IN & READ Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 and Thursdays, August 11, 18, 25 drop in and read at the Peninsula library at 2. ZINE MAKING Tuesday, August 16 at the Woodhaven library at 2. GAME ON Tuesdays, August 16, 23 at the Glendale library at 3. DESIGN A MURAL Tuesday, August 16 at the Laurelton library at 3. CRAFT Tuesday, August 16 at the Lefrak Cit y library at 3. TEEN GAMING Tuesdays, August 16, 23, 30 at the Fresh Meadows library at 3:30. HARRY POTTER TRIVIA Tuesday, August 16 at the LIC library at 4. FAMILY FILMS Tuesday, August 16 at the Pomonok library. Register. WII & BOARD GAMES Tuesdays, August 16, 23 at the Bayside library at 3. SUMMER READING Tuesday, August 16 at the Briarwood librar y. Register. CHESS LESSONS Tuesday, August 16 at the Windsor Park library. Register. GAME DAY Every Wednesday at the Howard Beach library at 4. CHESS

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

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QTP Cafe featuring excellent snacks and high quality light meals!

Page 30 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

*MUST USE CODE: EB36. Valid through August 14, 2011. Limit 6 tickets. Subject to availability. Not valid on previously purchased tickets or with any other offers.

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Photo by Rob Brumm | Cover art by Chris Jones


Queens Focus PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . . PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . Van Bramer & NA ACP: .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE ...PEOPLE . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE.. PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE . . .PEOPLE... Bo-hyun Moon, daughter of Mr. Ju-han Moon and Mrs. Young-mi Bae of Flushing, was named to the Spring Term 2011 Deans’ List at Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, Connecticut. Choate Rosemary Hall is an independent secondary school enrolling 850 boarding and day students from 40 states and 45 countries. Cornell University is pleased to announce the following students graduated with the Class of 2011 during Commencement ceremonies in Ithaca on May 29: Emily Casey of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture and Life Sciences; Wankyu Lee of Flushing graduated with a Artium Baccalarius degree in Arts and Sciences; Anita Suen of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture and Life Sciences; Krystal Lum of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture and Life Sciences; Wanshu Di of Queens graduated with a Artium Baccalarius degree in Arts and Sciences; Matthew Dilluvio of Whitestone graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial and Labor Relations; So Yung Kang of Whitestone graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture and Life Sciences; Elizabeth Petsios of Whitestone graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture and Life Sciences; Gong Joo Paik of Whitestone graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture and Life Sciences; Nicole Del Senno of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture and Life Sciences; Gabrielle Paolini of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial and Labor Relations; Marie Reda of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture and Life Sciences; Joan Chi of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Ecology; Johnny Lau of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering; Carlos Ramirez of Kew Gardens Hills graduated with a Artium Baccalarius degree in Arts and Sciences; and Ying Ru Chen of Flushing graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering.

The following students were named to the University at Albany’s spring 2011 Dean’s List for outstanding academic achievement: Joseph Desantis of Flushing; Xiaochao Jiang of Flushing; Janice Jin of Flushing; Wen Lin of Flushing; Victor Liu of Flushing; Yujin Moon of Flushing; Justin Sacks of Flushing; Jessica Tung of Flushing; Xiyang Wang of Flushing; Richard Weiner of Flushing; Guanglin Xu of Flushing; Jennifer Catera of Whitestone; Matthew Catera of Whitestone; Robert Pagan of Whitestone; Jessica Santagato of Whitestone; Nikoleta Papa of Flushing; Gregory Stavrakas of Flushing; Amy Su of Flushing; Yuen Ting Wong of Flushing; and Isaac Elyahou of Flushing. The second through fifth grade students in LeAp’s (Learning through an Expanded

Arts Program) PS 214 afterschool choral program opened their school doors to the community this morning for a sing-a-long performance. It was an inspiring experience as students, parents and other members of the community embraced their roots through an engaging multi-language celebration the 87 languages and cultures that represented the student body and their families. Led by LeAp Teaching Artist Robert Ross, the 2nd and 3rd graders kicked off the show with medley of traditional American songs including the “Erie Canal” by Thomas Allen, “Sixteen Tons” by Tennessee Ernie Ford, and jazz rendition of the Negro spiritual “Go Down Moses,” by Louis Armstrong. Ross also talked about the fact that Louis Armstrong had lived the last 30 years of his life right in Queens and that his house is now a museum. He suggested that it would be great field trips for the students or a interesting summer activity for the families to do. Next the 4th and 5th Graders took the stage with LeAp Teaching Artists Adriane Haye and Gabriel Jodorkovsky. They performed more contemporary songs such as “Born this Way” by Lady Gaga, “Sir Duke” by Stevie Wonder, and “Let it Be” by the Beatles. “We used the song ‘Love’s In Need of Love’ to convey a message of empathy towards others in need,” stated LeAp Teaching Artist Adriane Haye. “Those who are homeless, those suffering from tornadoes and hurricanes and a need for world peace.” Councilman Peter Koo attended the performance. Hiss support made this entire year long program possible. Councilman Koo joined the audience as students and parents leapt to their feet to dance and clap along to the music. An advocate of arts in the classroom Councilman Koo enabled SQ receive CASA Grant funding, Councilman Koo commended the students for their exuberant singing, and encouraged everyone to “keep singing in the shower!.” It is the meaningful support from local leaders that made this LeAp program possible.

On Saturday, May 21, Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer attended the NAACP Youth Fundraising Breakfast held in Jacob Riis Settlement House in Long Island City. During the event, Council Member Van Bramer made a personal donation of $100 to sponsor ten new young members. The NAACP Youth encourages community involvement as well as offers the young members opportunities, such as scholarships and leadership training. to making a difference in people’s lives. “Allstate believes that it is very important for corporations to take an active interest in the communities they serve. Allstate is proud to support the Woodhaven District Management Association through The Allstate Foundation,” concluded Collora.

The following local residents are among the 1,749 students who earned undergraduate and graduate degrees and certificates of advanced study as members of the Class of 2011 at The College of Saint Rose in Albany: Maria Mills, a resident of Astoria, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; Sheng Wu, a resident of Flushing, received a Master of Business Administration; Deana Rombone, a resident of College Point, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; William Johnson, a resident of Flushing, received a Master of Science in Education; Paul Perskin, a resident of Bayside, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; Steve Cavusoglu, a resident of Douglaston, received a Master of Science in Education; Lloyd Jones, a resident of Flushing, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; Thomas Carroll, a resident of East Elmhurst, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; Thomas Carroll, a resident of East Elmhurst, received a Master of Science in Education; Seth Kroll, a resident of Rego Park, received a Master of Science in Education; Lotus Triola, a resident of Forest Hills, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; Cynthia Kennedy, a resident of Forest Hills, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; Lotus Triola, a resident of Forest Hills, received a Master of Science in Education; Francis Stock, a resident of Woodside, received a Master of Science in Education; Joseph Mattina, a resident of Allstate Insurance agent Mark Maspeth, received a Certificate Klimm, whose office is located at of Advanced Study; Jennifer 84-15 Jamaica Avenue in Manzione, a resident of Woodhaven, has received the Maspeth, received a Certificate Agency Hands in the Community of Advanced Study; Jennifer Award for his commitment to volManzione, a resident of unteering in the community. With Maspeth, received a Master of this award came a $1000 grant Science in Education; Eva from The Allstate Foundation for Mark Klimm Lopardi, a resident of Middle the Woodhaven District ManageVillage, received a Certificate of ment Association, where Klimm Advanced Study; Kristin Lampasona, a volunteers. “Mark is an active and respected member resident of Glendale, received a Certificate of of the business community, protecting people Advanced Study; Jamie Vetter, a resident with insurance and financial services prod- of Glendale, received a Certificate of Aducts,” said Linda Collora, New York regional vanced Study; Michelle Velazquez, a resisales leader at Allstate Insurance Company. dent of Ridgewood, received a Certificate of “He also makes a point of getting involved Advanced Study; Patricia Crowley, a resipersonally by dedicating his time and efforts dent of Glendale, received a Certificate of

Advanced Study; Michelle Velazquez, a resident of Ridgewood, received a Master of Science in Education; Sharon Simmonds, a resident of Queens, received a Master of Science in Education; Brenda McDonald, a resident of Hollis, received a Master of Science in Education; Catherine Hernandez, a resident of Kew Gardens, received a Master of Business Administration; Katrina BillyWilkinson, a resident of Rosedale, received a Certificate of Advanced Study and a Master of Science in Education; Carmen Montas, a resident of Bellerose, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; Sheree Crane, a resident of Jamaica, received a Certificate of Advanced Study; Golda Gorin, a resident of Far Rockaway, received a Master of Science in Education; Caldine Rey, a resident of Far Rockaway, received a Master of Science in Education; Aileen Mullen Smith, a resident of Belle Harbor, received a Certificate of Advanced Study. The following students enrolled at Binghamton University, State University of New York, recently received Elizabeth Tucker and Geoffrey D. Gould Awards: Sumit S. Patel of Floral Park and Tamaria R. Chan of Fresh Meadows. These awards are presented to graduating seniors of merit who have provided service to the Binghamton University community and in particular, the Dickinson residential community.

Best Writers:

Assemblyman Ed Braunstein announced the winners of his Mother’s Day Essay & Poetry Contest for students in grades one through five: Pictured l. to r.: Chris Georgiadis, 5th Grade Grand Prize Winner; Grace Liu, 1st Grade Grand Prize Winner; Eric Samson, 2nd Grade Grand Prize Winner; Savannah Sclafani, 3rd Grade Grand Prize Winner; Sean Flynn, 4th Grade Grand Prize Winner.

www.queenstribune.com • Aug. 11-17, 2011 Tribune Page 31

The following students were graduated from the University of New Haven on May 15, 2011: Patrick Cox of Whitestone, who received a B.S. in Fire Protection Engineering; and Dina Lin of Whitestone, who received a B.S. in Accounting and a B.S. in Finance.

LeAp students perform.


One Of Our Own It’s not often we see the Mets sign a lifelong fan. Better yet, a borough native. But thats just what the Amazins did when they picked up left fielder Mike Baxter from the San Diego Padres. The 26-year-old Whitestone boy enjoyed a fruitful career at Archbishop Molloy High School before heading on to Columbia and eventually Vanderbilt University. Baxter enjoyed a fruitful stint in the minors, but given the Mets knack for injuries, it did not take long for us to see him roaming the Citi Field dugout.

Models Of Queens

Queens kid, Met fan and now a Met, Mike Baxter

Christine Roman has seen much tougher times but it definitely doesn’t show. From being homeless to being turned down at modeling gigs because of her weight, Roman has held her head high. In 2008, Roman entered the modeling scene optimistic her alternative, real look would wow photographers. Little did she know, the industry just wasn’t ready. “[Photographers] wanted me to lose weight,” said Roman after Macy’s and Express didn’t run her pictures in a catalog she posed for. “I’m not going to lose weight because someone else wants me to. I’m the type of girl who has curves.” And she now wears those curves with pride. Branching out on her own, Roman has landed a litany of glamour gigs since, fitting her alternative goth style to the tee. For those who are more familiar with the unconventional goth scene, you might recognize Roman by her stage name ‘Dead N Drippin.’ Featured in this year’s ‘Dead’ Gorgeous Hatchet Girlz Calendar, Christine Roman sporting two bright cotton Home: Glendale candy-colored ponytails, RoAge: 23 man says her modeling career seems to be taking off. Height: 5’7" “It keeps getting better and Weight: 155 lbs. better for me,” Roman said as Stats: 34-44-37 she readies for shoots which will debut her own section on Brooklyn MC Big Hodge’s Web site and sporting recycled jewelry on Earthmona.com. Despite her recent success, Roman says she’s been through a lot. Grateful for the opportunities she has been given, she holds tight to her motto and hopes others would follow the same mantra. “No matter what the situation is in life,” Roman says, “You have to keep on being strong.”

Slinging No More

Queens Idol, Pia Toscano

Page 42 Tribune Aug. 11-17, 2011 • www.queenstribune.com

Remember Her Pia Toscano? Remember her? It’s been a while since the Howard Beach songstress was voted off of American Idol, so you’re forgiven if you already forgot her. The nation will get a refresher on Pia’s golden pipes, as Interscope Records signed the singer to a record deal. An album is slated to be released by the end of the year. Hopefully it does better on the charts than her stint on Idol.

Queens' Peter Parker We are told that as we get older, we lose our heroes. Those who were important to us as children are not seen in the same light as they had been when we were starryeyed and impressionable. Sometimes, the meaning is more literal. Queens lost a hero recently when Marvel Comics decided to kill off the original Spider-Man. The man behind the mask, Peter Parker, was a bright kid from Forest Hills who was bitten by a radioactive spider and underwent a fantastic transformation. He died this

Brooklyn's Miles Morales month in an epic battle with the Green Goblin, only to be replaced by a new hero for a new era. Miles Morales of Brooklyn, half black, half Latino, has taken over for our white bread Parker. Though we appreciate the comic’s jump into diversity – despite the fact that the new Spidey is certainly not either the first black or Latino hero – we’re disappointed to see him swinging through the alleyways on the other side of the city. Farewell, Peter Parker. You’ve slung your last web.

One Man’s Trash Want a good New York souvenir? Don’t get a stupid snowglobe with the Empire State Building, an Ellis Island key chain or one of those foam Statue of Liberty crowns. How about something more authentic? Like garbage? For ten years artist Justin Gignac has been selling New York City garbage in a box, and has sold over 1,300 lucite boxes filled with discarded MetroCards, Starbucks cups and Mets ticket stubs to people as far away as Siberia. Each box is handpicked and labeled from where in the city the garbage came from. For $100, you can get garbage from Citi Field’s opening day, or from Shea Stadium’s last opening day. So you threw away that napkin with a girl’s number on it? Perhaps it’ll turn up in some Peruvian’s birthday gift.

Garbage: A New York gift

Hall Of Famer

St. John's superstar and now NBA Hall of Famer, Chris Mullin

St. Johns University’s Alum Chris Mullin has had a career filled - literally and figuratively - with gold. Over his career, the Golden Boy was drafted by the Golden State Warriors and grabbed two gold medals all while sporting a his signature golden crew cut. Mullin now has finally been inducted to the NBA Hall of Fame. Although the Golden Boy never won an NBA championship, his career will always be cast in gold. With a hairdo as glistening as his, who needs a shiny ring?

Confidentially, New York . . .



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