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Vol. 42, No. 29 July 19-25 2012

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Questions Arise Over Statue Removal Page 3

Cooling Centers Cause Concern In Richmond Hill

Comeback Kid?

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Turnaround Plan Awaits Decision From Court Q

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I N ­S I D E Deadline......................................................................3

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Focus........................................................................12 Trib Pix......................................................................16 Leisure......................................................................18 Queens Today..........................................................21 Classifieds................................................................23 Confidential..............................................................31

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With reports that Anthony Weiner is considering a run for mayor in 2013, many Queens residents say they would vote for the embattled former Congressman. By Ross Barkan‌Page 4.


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Queens Deadline

Statue Plans Cause Confusion In Queens somewhere else," Andrews said. By STEV EN J. FERRA RI Julianne Cho, a spokeswoman Reports that the City plans to move a controversial statue that sits for DCAS, denied reports of a plan outside Borough Hall to Brooklyn to move the statue to Brooklyn. She caused confusion this week, as a noted that the fencing was placed City agency has denied that any around the statue as a safety precaution because parts of the statue plan is in place. Fencing went up around the were deteriorating. "There's no secret plan, no final statue, called The Triumph of Civic Virtue, about three weeks ago as a decision has been made," Cho said. safety precaution because parts of "Right now, we're looking at options to preserve the statue were detethe statue." riorating. Cho noted that Borough President “There's no Helen Marshall said her secret plan, no the cemetery released a statement office called the Dept. late Wednesday that of Citywide Adminis- final decision no plan has been trative Services after has been finalized for the fencing went up statue. around the statue about made. Right "It's premature t h r e e w e e k s a g o . now, we're to be writing about DCAS explained that it at this stage," Cho there was a crack in looking at said. the statue that needed options to The statue, to be repaired. which was moved According to Dan preserve the to Queens by Andrews, a spokesman statue.” Mayor Fiorello for Marshall, the family —Julianne Cho L a G u a r d i a , h a s of sculptor Frederick been criticized as MacMonnies, who crafted the statue, had expressed an sexist for its depiction of a nude interest in having the statue re- man - the personification of civic paired at Green-Wood Cemetery in virtue - standing over two women, Brooklyn. Members of MacMonnies' depicting vice and corruption. Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. family are buried at the cemetery and Andrews noted that the cem- (D-Astoria), who has expressed his etery also specializes in statue re- disappointment in the decision, said he disagrees the statue is sexist. pair. "This statue portrays a myth, it "We never advocated moving it

shows Hercules standing atop the sirens, they are not women," Vallone said. "If you oppose this sort of statue, you oppose the statue of Perseus of upholding the head of Medusa." When asked about Cho's statement, Vallone said that when he spoke to City officials, he was told that the statue would be placed permanently on loan to the cemetery. "The result is the same," he said. "Whatever you call it, the statue is being removed." The statue has seen its share of controversy in the past, as former Borough President Claire Shulman tried to remove the statue while she was in office. Marshall, the current borough president, said in a statement that the statue's "depiction of the male Civic Virtue towering over females depicted as vice and corruption was not" a work of art. Regardless, Marshall expressed remorse that the statue was being moved. "We would have liked it if the family had decided to restore it here," she said. Andrea Crawford, chair of Community Board 9, said no one contacted them about decision. She said she was upset that a piece of public art was given away without any consultation. "For the last ten years, we've been trying to do something about

The Triumph of Civic Virtue. the statue in terms of restoration, priate to put up a monument to the and no one called us," she said. women of Queens. "The space has to be dedicated "Whether they like the statue or not, it's an important piece by an to women," she said. Reporter Ross Barkan asimportant sculptor and it deserves sisted with the reporting in this respect." Marshall's office said that there article. Reach Managing Editor had already been informal discussions about replacing the statue. Steven J. Ferrari at (718) 357Ext. 122, or With the controversial nature of the 7 4 0 0 , statue, she said it would be appro- sferrari@queenstribune.com.

By ROSS BARK AN Estelle Cooper, former administrator of Flushing Meadows Corona Park and executive director of its nonprofit fundraising conservancy Unisphere Inc., was indicted Tuesday on charges that she stole more than $50,000 from the conservancy. The 82-year-old Cooper had been under investigation since early 2012 after the conservancy's accountant and Queens Republican Chair Phil Ragusa discovered irregularities in the conservancy's financial records. Queens District Attorney Richard Brown announced that Cooper was arraigned on July 17 before Queens Supreme Court Justice Fernando Camacho on a twocount indictment, charging her with second and third degree grand larceny. Cooper faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted and

Estelle Cooper will be tried beginning on Sept. 12. The alleged fraud was initially discovered in November of last year as the result of an internal audit

conducted by Unisphere Inc. The results of the audit were referred to the district attorney's office in February. Afterwards, a Queens grand jury charged that Cooper obtained access to Unisphere funds and then systematically stole more than $50,000 between Nov. 1, 2007, and Dec. 31, 2011. It was initially reported last month that Cooper had allegedly stolen as much as $90,000. According to Unisphere Inc.'s latest records, the conservancy had a deficit of $44,868 in November 2011. Cooper's lawyer, Vito Palmieri, and Conservancy Chairman Bruce Bendell did not respond to requests for comment as of press time. "The charges announced by the Queens District Attorney [Tuesday] against former Flushing MeadowsCorona Park Administrator Estelle Cooper are serious," said Parks

Dept. spokesman Zachary Feder. "If the charges are proved to be true, this would be an inexcusable theft of private funds that were donated to benefit a public park." Cooper resigned as executive director of Unisphere Inc. in January. According to Ragusa, she was asked to resign after the board discovered that she had continually made thousands of dollars in ATM withdrawals. Having helmed the park for the last 17 years, Cooper founded a Republican consulting firm, Cooper and Company, with her grandson Michael Balsamo, after she stepped down as the park's administrator. Cooper and Company is advising the congressional campaign of former Councilman Allan Jennings. Even before this indictment, Cooper was no stranger to controversy. In the summer of 2011, her daughter, Ilene Balsamo, drew fire

for allegedly not paying some camp counselors and vendors involved in her community day camp, which she operated in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Cooper ran for State Senate as a Republican in 1978 against Emanuel Gold and for Borough President in 1986 against Claire Shulman. She was defeated both times. In 1994, Mayor Rudolph Giuliani appointed her as an assistant parks commissioner and administrator for Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Upon her retirement, the Parks Dept. said that Cooper had brought many improvements to Flushing Meadows Corona Park, including new synthetic soccer fields, the Flushing Meadows Aquatic Center and the Al Oerter Recreation Center. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com

www.queenstribune.com • July 19-25, 2012 Tribune Page 3

Cooper Indicted On Grand Larceny Charges


Page 4 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

By ROSS BARK AN A little over a year after he was forced to resign his seat in Congress, former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner is back in the news, as speculation builds that he may be considering a run for mayor in 2013. Weiner reentered the public arena when he offered comment on the Supreme Court’s upholding of the Affordable Care Act. Speculation soon followed that he was mulling a political comeback, either in a run for mayor or public advocate in 2013, an assertion the Democrat quickly denied. “As with everything else the New York Post has written about me and my family, the stories of the last [week] are pure fiction,” Weiner said in an email to the Tribune. A source close to Weiner, however, said he was considering a mayoral run and would not be interested in running for public advocate. If an announcement were to come, the source said, it would be after the presidential election in November. Weiner found himself in trouble last year after it was revealed that he sent sexually explicit pictures to several women through the micro-

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

Does Weiner Cut The Mustard For Mayor?

Anthony Weiner meets with constituents in 2010. Residents in his former Congressional distric t seem to support a Weiner run for mayor in 2013. blogging site Twitter, including one to a 21-year-old college student in Seattle, Wash. The incident unleashed a media firestorm that forced him to resign. A release from the City Campaign Finance Board, however, shows that Weiner’s war chest is well-stocked. The report noted he still has $4.5 million left from his aborted 2009 mayoral campaign,

though he has yet to raise any money for a possible 2013 run. But after the events of last year, would he be able to get the support of his former constituents? A random poll of more than a dozen people living within his old Congressional district overwhelmingly showed support for a potential mayoral run. “I would still vote for him be-

cause he reached out to the community,” said Lois Brill of Woodhaven. “He came before us.” Support for Weiner was also a reflection of disdain or indifference to the other candidates in the race, according to multiple interviews. Tom Turner of Forest Hills said he would support Weiner because he is “pro-union” and a Democrat, though he could not name any candidates Weiner would theoretically run against, like City Council Speaker Christine Quinn (D-Manhattan), Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, former mayoral candidate William Thompson, Comptroller John Liu and Manhattan Media CEO Tom Allon. Manny, a Flushing resident, knew who the mayoral candidates were, but was not impressed with them. He said he would support Weiner if he made a comeback. Other respondents chose to draw a line between Weiner’s personal and political life. Ozone Park resident Ramdas Mengroo said that Weiner’s Twitter trouble, while upsetting, was a personal matter and did not affect his ability to be an effective representative.

“I think the guy, the wackadoo, can come back into politics,” said Howard Blue of Forest Hills. “He’s a good liberal Democrat, though he had the reputation of being rough with his staff.” Though critics of Weiner were in the minority, they were no less vocal. Joseph Edwards of Ozone Park recoiled when the former congressman’s name was mentioned. “We should forget about him,” Edwards said. “He should bury himself in the ground.” Political consultant Jerry Skurnik would not rule out a Weiner comeback but does not believe the former mayoral frontrunner would again be at the head of the pack. “I’m generally skeptical about people coming back from these kinds of scandals,” Skurnik said. He suggested that the public advocate position would be more easily attainable for Weiner. “This idea Americans are forgiving people, that’s not true, though sometimes it is. Stranger things have happened.” Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com.


Queens This Week Woodhaven Resident Honored One Woodhaven man has been giving a volunteer effort that is downright presidential. Etienne David Adorno has been honored with the President's Volunteer Service Award for the over 4,000 hours he devoted to community service. Created in 2003, the award serves as "a way to recognize, thank and honor Americans, who by their commitment and example, inspire others to engage in volunteer service," according to the award's description. The award is a special recognition presented on behalf of President Barack Obama. Adorno volunteered to be an educator and translator for individuals who did not have the knowledge of financial resources to navigate the complex American legal system. Acting as an intermediary, Adorno spent hours making certain those he helped were not taken advantage of by the legal system. He set up a consumer advocacy website and used social media to keep Queens and all of New York aware of shifting parking regulations and traffic laws. A graduate of John Jay College, Adorno is a member of the Woodhaven Residents Block Association and Community Board 9, where he serves on the consumer affairs, public safety and education committees. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com. -Ross Barkan

Bayside P.O. Facing Closure

Speeding Cars Worr y Residents The residents of Doran Avenue in eastern Glendale are not singing "slow down, you're moving too fast." They are shouting it. Residents of Glendale and neighboring communities converged on a Community Board 5 public hearing last week to discuss ways to address speeding cars on Doran Avenue, a small street connected with Woodhaven Boulevard. Located south of St. John's Cemetery and within walking distance of Forest Hills Gardens, Doran Avenue can be a place where motorists speed after leaving Woodhaven Boulevard. Residents have asked for speed bumps or stop signs, though the Dept. of Transportation argued that turning Doran Avenue into a one-way eastbound street between 89th Street and Woodhaven Boulevard would be the best solution. Doran Avenue would remain a west-bound street from 89th to 88th Street. DOT Queens Borough Commissioner Maura McCarthy argued that this would give motorists more options to travel down 89th or 88th Streets. Residents of those streets,

however, were not thrilled to hear that a traffic burden would be shifted from Doran Avenue to the other streets. "We should go back to the drawing board with a plan all communities can accept," said Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley (D-Middle Village), who has endorsed a 4-way stop sign. The DOT's study did not find that the intersection needed a stop sign. McCarthy also said a speed hump would get in the way of Doran Avenue driveways. Community Board 5 will discuss the matter further and is not yet ready to make a recommendation. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com. -Ross Barkan

Lions Club Prepares For Summer Festival The Rego Park/Forest Hills Lions Club is hosting its annual summer festival on July 21 for Forestdale families and supporters. Though not open to the public, the festival will benefit the children of Forestdale, the only child welfare agency headquartered in Queens. Forestdale seeks to ensure that children have a safe and secure home, educational opportunity and health and sexuality education. The festival will be held at Forestdale's campus at 67-35 112th Street, near Forest Hills High School. Having been celebrated for more than a decade, the festival features arts and crafts, face painting, free candy, tug of war, water balloon toss and other games. It serves as a way to bring together children in foster care with their biological parents, as well as provide a safe and fun place for the children to enjoy themselves. "The Lions Club Festival is a wonderful event that Forestdale's families look forward to every year," said Forestdale Executive Director Anstiss Agnew. "Our kids always head home with big smiles at the end of the day. Our strong partnership is a great example of the commitment and support Forestdale receives from the Queens community." For Cher Sparano, vice president of the Rego Park/Forest Hills Lions Club, the festival is special in many ways. "A couple of hundred kids come every year, it's a ball," Sparano said. "They love being outside, playing, having fun." Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com. -Ross Barkan

Senior Center Offers Computer Classes While today's youth take for granted the digital world they were born into, there are millions of people who came of age in a world without computers or cell phones. For senior citizens, typewriters and rotary phones were a norm for most of their lives, making the transition to new technologies sometimes difficult. But the Howard Beach Senior Center is easing that transition by offering a six-week class training seniors on how to use a computer. The class, which will cost $25, is open to seniors who do not reside at the Howard Beach Senior Center. "We start at a basic novice class, for somebody who knows nothing about computers," said Judy Ascherman, assistant director of the Howard Beach Senior Center. "A lot of seniors begin with an idea like, 'hey you should learn how to email your grandchildren.'" The classes have been offered for a couple of years and were made possible by a grant received four years ago. Volunteer instructors, some of whom are seniors themselves, lead classes that are usually no larger than three, allowing for maximum one-on-one interactions. The age range of the classes is actually between 60 and 90, opening up learning opportunities for those under the age of 65. Simple tasks like using a mouse or turning on the computer must be taught as well, and can be confounding for some individuals, though confusion does not coincide with age. Younger seniors can have much more trouble with adapting to the computer age than older seniors: it is all up to the individual, explained Ascherman. Seniors can build on their basic skills and learn more advanced tasks like how to take pictures off of a digital camera, how to email them and how to save them on a disk. Playing solitaire on the computer is an excellent way to boost basic mouse skills. Right now, classes are still quite small and the Senior Center is looking for more students. For more information, contact

the Howard Beach Senior Center at 718-738-8100. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com. -Ross Barkan

Newtown Creek Residents Speak Out On July 17, a heated discussion took place at La Guardia Community College between members of the Newtown Creek Alliance Committee Advisory Group (CAG) and representatives from the Dept. of Health. Since 2007, CAG has reached out to the DOH to expand the scope of a proposed study that would examine the health status of residents living near the site of the Greenpoint oil spill that occurred in September 1978. The study has yet to be completed. Angered residents refused to remain quiet during a presentation from DOH Research Scientist James Bowers. “I don’t even know how you sleep at night,” yelled Laura Hofmann, resident of North Greenpoint. Hoffman said she has been personally affected by the oil spill and expressed frustration with the amount of time the DOH has taken to conduct the study. “You are trying to deny that there is a problem, and it offends me,” Hoffman continued as the silence overshadowed the room. Much of the crowd echoed Hoffman’s sentiments and demanded that a study be conducted of residents living within a half mile radius of Newtown Creek. Previously, the DOH had suggested that a study within a quarter mile radius would yield a more accurate representation of affects, which CAG refuted. Taking the public’s concerns into account, the DOH agreed to survey a half mile radius. Much of the statistical data reported will include possible birth defects, birth outcomes and cancer and asthma diagnoses in relation to the exposure from the oil spill. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queens tribune.com. -Megan Montalvo

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U.S. Rep. Gary Ackerman (DBayside) has sent a letter to U.S. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe strongly opposing the proposed closing and consolidation of the Bayside Post Office, stating that the move is actually against the law. The Bell Boulevard location would be consolidated and moved to an isolated Postal annex at 41-29 216th St., which some say is a much less convenient location. "Upon inquiring, my office has been told that the United States Postal Service intends to claim that this action does not require public consultation and input that current law clearly requires," Ackerman wrote. "We have also been verbally advised that the USPS intends to call this a 'node study,' in order to avoid legal requirements. We have seen no 'node study,' whatever that is." Current law outlines that the USPS must provide adequate notice of intentions to close a post

office at a required 60 day prior to the proposed date. "While it is the USPS' contention that closing one office and moving it to another location does not constitute a closing or loss of service to the community, the proposed move is to a geographically isolated location, and is less accessible and convenient for my constituents and the Postal Service's customers," Ackerman said. Ackerman added that he would like USPS to explain why it does not feel the need to provide adequate public comment and provide answer to his constituents concerns. Connie Chirichello, USPS Corporate Communications Representative and Spokesperson for the Northeast Area of the Postal Service said, "USPS was assessing facilities in the face of the challenging financial issues facing the Postal Service." The Bayside office, she said, was chosen because of the decreasing volume it has handled. "In the case of Bayside, we are taking a prudent course of reviewing our physical assets and considering ways we might look to serve the community if we could make different use of space, staffing, equipment or transportation. Our review in Bayside is still underway, "she said. Reach Reporter Wayne Dean Doyle at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125 or wdoyle@queenstribune.com. -Wayne Dean Doyle


Edit Page In Our Opinion:

Communication Breakdown Confusion has broken out this week over a supposed plan to remove The Triumph of Civic Virtue, a statue that has sat outside Queens Borough Hall for decades, to be repaired and possibly moved to a cemetery in Brooklyn. Queens officials say they were told of plans to move the controversial statue after the Dept. of Citywide Administrative Services had placed a fence around the crumbling landmark. But the DCAS asserts that no plans have been finalized and the agency is looking at its options – nothing more, nothing less. The situation is an example of government bureaucracy at its absolute worst. Instead of working together to attain the best possible outcome, it seems that no one is sure of what is really happening and the result is the City and the Borough are at odds when open communication could have solved a number of problems. If the statue is to be removed – something that many officials over the years have tried to do – it should only be done once all involved have been informed of the decision, and a plan should be enacted to replace the landmark. Hopefully, City and Borough officials can figure out a way to get on the same page without causing so much confusion in the future.

In Your Opinion:

Page 6 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Save Saturdays To The Editor: There is a problem facing our community that needs to be addressed – the future of our postal system. We hear all the time that the United States Postal Service is losing money but if a proposed bill in Congress, H.R. 2309, is passed, the results will be disastrous. The results of this so-called solution will hurt all of us. For generations Americans have traditionally relied on six-day service of dependable doorstep delivery of everything from postcards to packages. If Congress passes H.R. 2309, Saturday delivery will be eliminated. In a misguided attempt to purportedly save the USPS, we will inevitably see its rapid decline and eventual death.

The argument in favor of H.R. 2309 is a weak one. The thought is that to save money, you simply cut back on costs and services. As someone who runs a small business, that kind of thinking is nonsense. You have to ask the follow-up question, “What will the impact of those cutbacks be?” Here is where the cutback crowd ignores reality. You can’t cut services, raise prices, and be successful. If you limit the service you offer – especially a growing segment of postal business such as parcel delivery – all that will result is a dangerous disadvantage for the USPS. The list of H.R. 2309’s negative consequences is lengthy and frightening. It doesn’t acknowledge that business in America is now conducted around the clock. If the USPS Saturday delivery is elimi-

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nated, businesses will have to rely on more expensive private services, unnecessarily increasing their costs. Nor does H.R. 2309 take into account the number of jobs, approximately 80,000, which would be lost. Veterans, a segment already hurt badly by the weak economy, hold many of these jobs. We can’t afford to lose the USPS. Urge Congressman Turner to vote against H.R. 2309. Dennis O’Brien, Forest Hills

Live Free Or Diet To The Editor: We live by one-liners in this country. The above might come from a corn syrup ad, encouraging your sweet tooth. But generally speaking, mottos that have been around for a long time don’t seem to hold up any more. So, let’s change this one and make it: “Live Free And Diet.” Now it becomes good advice to a corpulent politician who worries about his/her election chances. You’ve heard “Free Market Forces (insert your favorite).” After decades, one guru had to admit to Congress that he wasn’t so sure any more. It would be a shame to give that one up. Why not change it to “If Market Forces Were Free …” No, that’s too bland. Let’s try a pseudo-Libertarian threat: “Leave Market Forces Free Or Die.” Now we are getting somewhere. When asked what to do to help returning veterans get jobs, one West Coast mayor said on TV: “The Money Isn’t There!” That was the gist of Pharaoh’s dream in Genesis, Chapter 41. He had spent all his money on self-serving projects, and then there was a bad harvest and a recession. Joseph advised him, “do this, do that and the money will be there!” Let’s make that a promise to future enlistees. Many of the 99 percent protesters have probably read last year’s blockbuster, “Winner-Take-All Politics,” which describes how we arrived at the 1 percent phenomenon. The authors conclude that politics can’t solve it because it was created by both sides of the aisle. How about a third side of the aisle Veronica Lewin, Deputy Editor Marcia Moxam Comrie, Contributing Editor Reporters: Harley Benson, Wayne Dean Doyle, Ross Barkan, Megan Montalvo Interns: Asia Ewart, Cristina Foglietta Photographers: Ira Cohen, Michael Fischthal, Lee Katzman

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with a motto, “Winner-Don’t-TakeAll Politics.” Help me, if you think of a better one. Robert C. Ferber, Jackson Heights

Blight Revisited To the Editor: In an earlier letter (Briarwood Blight, Queens Tribune, Nov. 25 to Dec. 1, 2010), I pointed out the environmental deforestation and concomitant damage to the ecosystem of Briarwood due to the present Van Wyck-Kew Gardens Interchange construction project’s widening of the three-lane Van Wyck Expressway. However, reporter Ross Barkan’s article, “Traffic Nightmare: Queens Highways Rank As Most Congested” (Queens Tribune, July 12-18, 2012), accurately explains the reason for this “Wasteland” in terms of Robert Moses’ ideological opposition to public transportation “to offset the debilitating congestion on Queens and Long Island’s roadways.” According to Barkan, “a lack of a northsouth subway line that runs through Queens is one culprit for the Van Wyck’s congestion.” Yet, “Moses also quashed proposals for a subway extension along the Van Wyck, built between 1947 and 1963).” So the cause for this environmental debacle in Briarwood is due to the lost battle of the Long Island Regional Planning Board’s Lee Koppelman, who opposed highway construction “at the expense of public transportation.” The cure to the Van Wyck congestion lies not in the present widening construction, but rather in the accommodation of new commercial traffic through widening of the Belt Parkway and a subway extension along the Van Wyck. The present project of building an elevator at the Briarwood-Van Wyck E-F subway station is a minimal MTA concession granted their $68 million deficit in the 2011 budget. But the whole problem is traceable to the aversion of Robert Moses and Mayor Bloomberg to democratic “urban planning and oversight” (Julian Brash, Bloomberg’s New York: Class and Governance in

Gerry Laytin Director of Advertising and Marketing Shelly Cookson Corporate Advertising Account Executives Donna Lawlor Elizabeth Rieger Shari Strongin

Ronald Bakman Merlene Carnegie Joseph DelliCarpini Tom Eisenhauer

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the Luxury City). So, we have the Briarwood Wasteland as a perpetual legacy to our children. Thanks also are extended to the Queens CB 8 and the Briarwood Community Association. Joseph N. Manago, Briarwood

Goose Questions To The Editor: Well, once again, the hysteria has begun. Now 700 Canadian geese were rounded up and killed so that they would not collide with and cause an accident with a plane. To begin with, those birds were living on federally protected land, the Jamaica Wildlife Refuge. Why was an airport ever built so close to such a sanctuary? That was not a very practical thing to have done at all. While it is very possible that birds can and have had collisions with planes, it is just as possible and likely that there could be near collisions on the airport runways between planes, which would have nothing to do with birds but would be human error. In 1977, there was a tragic collision between two passenger planes on a runway in the Canary Islands - human error, and no birds were involved there. Over 500 people were killed due to human error. Is it the goal of the government to destroy the Jamaica Wildlife Refuge? There must be another more humane way to reduce the threat of plane-bird collisions other than killing them. The skies must be safe for both people and birds. John Amato, Fresh Meadows

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Pomonok Plagued By Lack Of Funding

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

By WAYNE DEAN DOYLE Despite the City Housing Authority’s efforts to maintain the Pomonok Houses complex, a lack of funding and resources continues to hasten its decline. “I called maintenance three times before they came out to me, and when they did, it was a private company. I have had bed bugs a couple of times and it got so bad that maintenance said I got to throw out my furniture, but I can’t afford to buy more,” Rebunta Caplin, a Pomonok resident, said. “When I moved in the service was good, but not anymore, it’s getting tougher.” NYCHA has defended its department by stating that it “does it’s best to make the opportunity of public housing available both to the many families who already rely on it as a strong foundation and to those who seek that fair start in their own lives. NYCHA has more than 161,000 people on its waiting list, of which approximately 25,000 have chosen Queens as their first borough of preference.” Shamartha, 14, said, “My elevator keeps getting stuck, it is terrifying because you don’t know if you are going to get stuck in there, and

Pomonok residents and elec ted officials gathered during a rally outside the building in December. I have even seen rats and water bugs.” Felix Alberto had a similar insight to offer.“There is an issue with feces and urine in the elevators and the main grounds, it’s quite bad.” Another resident, who did not wish to be identified, said he has been a resident of Pomonok for more than 40 years and he has seen the quality of life drop. “You have people who don’t

care how they live or where they live; that wasn’t the case when I moved here,” he said. “It used to be one or two maintenance workers for each building but now it’s like one person per eight to ten buildings.” Eli Goldstein, a Korean War veteran, contacted the Tribune again to report more inefficiencies within management and the building itself. The Tribune reported on Goldstein’s case in December 2011,

when the family paid $300 to Environmental Management Services to perform an independent round of tests; asbestos was found in two different bedrooms beneath tiles, and in one bedroom, results were dangerously high. Goldstein, who noted that he had a heart condition, said he “can no longer live the life he and his family are living.” “Maintenance and management are making life extremely difficult, they are not doing the jobs properly, there are broken windows, infested cupboards and filth lining the walls and floors,” Goldstein said. As referenced in the NYCHA five-year strategic plan, “the need for more affordable housing in NYC is massive. In 2002, Mayor Michael Bloomberg released an ambitious affordable housing plan — the New Housing Marketplace Plan — with a focus on creating and preserving 165,000 units of affordable housing by the end of 2014,” Zodet Negrón, a NYCHA spokesman, said. “Despite New York City’s best efforts to bring about more affordable housing and preserve what already exists, the stock of affordable housing is shrinking in the City.

Federal, state and city governments have all stopped funding the development of new public housing and in 1998 the U.S. Congress passed an amendment that capped the number of traditional public housing units for federal government subsidy,” Negron said. “Consequently, it became nearly impossible to add more units to the public housing inventory, regardless of demand.” Negron noted that the model for creating and preserving public housing in America has changed, and that NYCHA must develop innovative approaches to identifying and tapping into alternative sources of funding. “While NYCHA is not in a position to be the sole financier of new government subsidized housing, it will analyze financing options to develop new affordable housing as part of Mayor Bloomberg’s New Marketplace Housing Plan, and explore options for building mixedincome and market-rate housing and for monetizing development rights to fund existing NYCHA capital needs,” Negrón said. Reach Reporter Wayne Dean Doyle at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125 or wdoyle@queenstribune.com.

www.queenstribune.com • July 19-25, 2012 Tribune Page 9


Richmond Hill Feeling The Heat

Page 10 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

alleged misappropriation been slashed across the City; of $33,000, cannot alloRichmond Hill library is not cate any money himself beopen on Saturdays or Suncause Council Speaker days and the neighborhood Christine Quinn (D-Mandoes not have a senior cenhattan) suspended his ter. Council powers. Quinn Richmond Hill, allocated Wills’ money and bounded by the Van Wyck drastically reduced Expressway and neighborCrowley’s discretionary ing Ozone Park, is teeming budget, believed by politiwith Guyanese, Caribbean cal observers to be retaliaand Punjabi immigrants. tion for defying Queens Storefronts adorned with InDemocratic Chair U.S. dian saris share blocks with Rep. Joe Crowley (D-Jackrestaurants cooking son Heights) by making a Trinidadian delicacies like run for Congress against doubles, though the once his chosen candidate, AsIrish and Italian neighborsemblywoman Grace Meng hood does not have a cen(D-Flushing). tral community center that The Office of Emerneighborhood advocates The Richmond Hill Librar y serves as a cooling gency Management said believe it desperately needs. center during hot weather. that there should be a coolCivic leaders have lamented that seniors looking for a no single elected representative on ing center “within walking distance” place to gather are forced to cluster the State or City level, funding is but did not comment specifically on in a local Burger King. The scarce for any social services. Coun- the availability of weekend centers. Woodhaven-Richmond Hill Senior cilman Ruben Wills (D-Jamaica) and In Woodhaven, there are several Center, despite its name, is located Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley nearby cooling centers, including Woodhaven library, on Jamaica Avenue in Woodhaven. (D-Middle Village) each represent t h e Vishnu Amadeo, executive direc- portions of Richmond Hill and will Woodhaven-Richmond Hill Senior tor of the Richmond Hill Economic fund the community far less than Center and Glendale library, but on Development Council, has argued before for very different reasons: weekends, the closest cooling centhat since Richmond Hill possesses Wills, under investigation for the ter is the Cypress Hills-Fulton Street Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen.

By ROSS BARK AN Richmond Hill and Woodhaven residents are hoping, for once, that the City keeps them out in the cold. If a heat wave scorches Queens again on a Saturday, like it did on a sultry July 7, there will be no cooling centers in Woodhaven and Richmond Hill to handle exasperated residents who lack access to air-conditioning. Richmond Hill residents have despaired over the absence of cooling centers open on the weekend. Residents without airconditioning can stay at the Richmond Hill library on weekdays or trek to the Lefferts Library, open only on Saturdays, to avoid temperatures nearing 100 degrees. “Richmond Hill is the orphan child of Queens,” said Albert Baldeo, a Democratic district leader. “There has always been a paucity of social services, job centers, health centers. We have been reduced to a neglected neighborhood, forgotten.” Cooling centers, established by the City to provide a free air-conditioned place where people can stay during a heat wave, are typically situated in either libraries or senior centers. Weekend library hours have

Senior Center in Cypress Hills, Brooklyn. “It is a problem, they have cooling centers in libraries but they could have made arrangements with churches and synagogues for people to go there,” said Mary Ann Carey, district manager for Community Board 9, which represents Richmond Hill, Woodhaven, Ozone Park and Kew Gardens. Carey wrote a letter to Mayor Mike Bloomberg after a man complained to her that on July 7, he was shut out of the Richmond Hill and Woodhaven cooling centers, each located in a closed library. “There are other alternatives.” Ed Wendell, president of the Woodhaven Residents’ Block Association, did not agree that a lack of cooling centers was a pressing issue for the Woodhaven community. He expressed concern that Carey did not speak with him about the letter. “Our office fields a lot of complaints but we’ve rarely heard complaints about cooling centers,” Wendell said. “I’m not saying it’s not a problem, I don’t want to minimize it, but there are a lot of other issues.” Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com..


Compiled by STEVEN J. FERRARI

101st Precinct HOMICIDE: The NYPD responded to a report of a person shot in the vicinity of Beach 29th Street and Seagirt Boulevard on July 13. Upon arrival, responding officers discovered the victim, Shawn Plummer, 18, of 205 Beach 31st St., Far Rockaway, with a gunshot wound to the head. EMS also responded and transported the victim to St. John’s Hospital, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. There have been no arrests made and the investigation is ongoing. 105th Precinct ROBBERIES: The NYPD is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the following suspect who is wanted in connection with commercial robberies in the the 105th and 113th precincts. In each incident, the suspect walks into the locations and displays a firearm while demanding cash. The suspect then goes behind the front counters and removes cash before fleeing. There were no injuries sustained as a result of these incidents. The first incident occurred at 10:15 p.m. on July 9 inside a Howard Johnson’s Hotel, 153-95 Rockaway Blvd., Jamaica. The second incident occurred at 11:45 p.m. July 10 inside a Subway restaurant, 252-18 Rockaway Blvd., Rosedale. The suspect is described as an AfricanAmerican male, 27-30 years old, 5-foot-7 to 5-foot-9 and weighing 130 to 150 lbs. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers’ website at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

BANK ROBBERY: The NYPD is asking the public’s assistance in identifying and locating a suspect wanted for a bank robbery. At approximately 12:15 p.m. on July 9, the suspect entered Astoria Federal Savings

114th Precinct BURGLARY: The NYPD is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the following suspects wanted in connection with a burglary. At approximately 1:15 a.m. on June 15, the suspects entered the basement area of 2333 31st Ave., Astoria, and removed two bicycles before fleeing. The first suspect is described a white or Hispanic male, medium build, with a beard. The second suspect is described as a white of Hispanic male, medium build, bald with a beard. BURGLARY: The NYPD is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the following suspect wanted in connection with a burglary. At approximately 10:40 p.m. on July 6, the suspect entered through the rear of the Sushi X restaurant, 47-15 Northern Blvd., Long Island City, and removed an unknown amount of food from the kitchen area before fleeing. The suspect is described as an AfricanAmerican male, 30-40 years old with a thin build. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers’ website at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. ATTEMPTED BURGLARY: The NYPD is seeking the public’s assistance in identifying the following suspects wanted in connection with an attempted burglary. At approximately 2:56 p.m. on July 7, an African-American male and a Hispanic male attempted to enter a residential location in the vicinity of 75th Street through the garage door. No property was taken and the suspects fled the location in an unknown direction. No injuries were reported. The first suspect is described as an African-American male, 5-foot-8, 150 lbs., bald and bow-legged. He was last seen wearing a red T-shirt, dark jeans and dark sneakers. The second suspect is described as a Hispanic male, 5-foot-6, 150 lbs., balding with white hair. He was last seen wearing a white T-shirt, light colored shorts and sandals.

www.queenstribune.com • July 19-25, 2012 Tribune Page 11

107th Precinct BANK ROBBERIES: The NYPD is seeking the public’s assistance with the whereabouts and identity of an individual wanted in connection with two bank robberies. On July 9, an African-American or Hispanic male entered two Capital One banks, 69-09 164th St. and 75-21 Main St. In both incidents, the suspect entered the banks dressed in a U.S. Postal Service uniform and handed the teller a demand note while displaying a black firearm in his waistband. On both occasions, the suspect fled on foot. The suspect is described as being 35-40 years old, approximately 5-foot-9, medium complexion, goatee, with a medium build and wearing dark sunglasses. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers’ website at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577.

Bank, 179-25 Hillside Ave., where he approached a teller, displayed a firearm and handed her a note demanding cash. The teller complied and handed the suspect an undetermined amount of money. The suspect then fled the bank. The suspect is described as an AfricanAmerican male, 30-40 years old, between 5foot-7 and 5-foot-8, 180 lbs., light complexion and freckles. The suspect was wearing a light blue short-sleeved shirt, light blue jeans, black shoes, a blue Yankees baseball cap and mirrored sunglasses. He was also carrying a black shoulder bag.


Queens Focus PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE...PEOPLE..PEOPLE... Local students received degrees during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga. They include: Rego Park: Anna Gordan, Associate in Arts. Gordan was also named to the Honors List; Marta Eggers, Bachelor of Arts.

Page 12 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Assemblyman Edward Braunstein recently announced 71 students from 33 local schools who he presented Assembly Citation of Merit awards during graduation ceremonies. They include: Archbishop Molloy High School: Kathleen Loftus. Bayside High School: Lauren Solano, Ruben Yeganeh. Benjamin N. Cardozo High School: Joaly Trinidad, Melissa Wong. Divine Wisdom Catholic Academy: Catherine Heitz, Victoria Martini. Holy Trinity Catholic Elementary School: Michael Santos, Madeleine Verge. JHS 194 - William H. Carr Junior High School: Valen Lock.

MS 158 – Marie Curie Middle School: Max Lacoma, Luanna Chan. MS 294 – Bell Academy: Christian Castro, Elizabeth Lee. Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament School: Audrey Sabatino, Stephen Velez. PS 9 – The Walter Reed School: Joshua Moore. PS 21: Caroline Huang, Kimberly Melendez, Irene Wu. PS 31 – The Bayside School: Sai Vishudhi Chandrasekhar, Sammi Lin, Kai Wong, Brian Ying. PS 32: Edward Escotto. PS 79- The Francis Lewis School: Peter Dujmovic, Bailey Falco, Jessin Wang, Valentina Koyfman, Paige Poulakis. PS 94 – David Porter School: Kerlous Aweeda, Isabella Di Salvo, Marcello Roselli. PS 115 – Glen Oaks School: Kayleigh Fernandez. PS 129 – The Patricia A. Larkin School: Valerie Macias.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

MOROCCAN ADOPTION CONSULTATION SERVICE LLC, a domestic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 06/22/2012. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Fatiha Berger, 31-73 30th Street, Astoria, NY 11106. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/1/12, bearing Index Number NC-000277-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Gideon (Last) Ang My

present name is (First) Garcia (Last) Hong aka Gideon Angkasa My present address is 3447 92 nd Street, Jackson Heights, NY 11372-3741 My place of birth is Indonesia My date of birth is January 10, 1968 __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 7/10/11, bearing Index Number NC-000389-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Raymond (Last) Lee My present name is (First) Perry (Middle) Raymond (Last) Lee aka P Raymond Lee, aka Raymond Lee My present address is 98-20 62 Drive, Rego Park, NY 11314 My place of birth is Manhattan, NY My date of birth is April 04, 1968 __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/18/12, bearing Index Number NC-000309-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17

Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Shamil (Last) Kurmakayev My present name is (First) Shamil (Middle) Rizvan (Last) Kurmakay aka Shamil R. Kurmakay, fka Shamil Rizvan Kurmakayev My present address is 23-56 Steinway Street, Apt. #3F, Astoria, NY 11105-1971 My place of birth is Azerbaijan My date of birth is August 25, 1957 __________________________________ Notice of Formation of Vindio Records, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/7/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 20417 Hillside Ave., Ste. 314, Hollis, NY 11423. Purpose: any lawful activities. __________________________________ “Notice is hereby given that a license, number 1264329 for liquor has been applied for by Drunken Fish Inc to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 5235 Metropolitan Avenue, Ridgewood, NY 11385 for on premises consumption.”

To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 149 or E-Mail Your Copy to the Tribune at: legals@queenstribune.com

PS 159: Michael Gerhardt PS 169 - Bay Terrace School: Samantha Mack, Rachel Tannenbaum, Jake Weingarten. PS 184 – Flushing Manor School: In Sun Oh. PS 193 – Magnet School of Discovery: Christopher Canzoneri. PS 209 – Clearview Gardens School: Zack Fine, Britney Shao, Rachel Ng. PS 214 – Cadwallader Colden School: Darren Dai, Sherman Li, Rebecca Rivera. PS 221 – The North Hills School: Anthony Chung, Carmen Looi, David Ravens, Hyo Joo Ryu. PS 242- The Leonard P. Stavisky Early Childhood School: Sahithi Attada, Brandan Gee, Carol Han, Geetha Palchuri, Rachel Young. Q 285- World Journalism Preparatory School: Anthony Salati Sacred Heart School: Renata Bilello. Saint Kevin School: John Kundmueller. Saint Mel’s School: Rosa DiMaria, Philip Pavich, Christina Gabriel, Alexa Roberto, Allison Galante, Theresa Shields. St. Andrew Avellino School: Sally Pak. St. Luke School: Nishwa Ali, Laura Geoghegan. St. Robert Bellarmine School: Victoria Gonzalez . Townsend Harris High School at Queens College: Audrey Foo.

Behrend College, in Eria, Pa. Army National Guard Pvt. Yecenia Morocho has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. Morocho is the daughter of Celina Morocho of Flushing. Jing Lin of Flushing has won a scholarship from United Health Foundation’s Diverse Scholars Initiative to pursue a career in health care. Local students received degrees during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Metropolitan Campus in Teaneck, N.J. They include: Forest Hills: Artur Kondov. Kew Gardens: Caroline Brossard. Michelle Cusumano of Forest Hills was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Fairfield University in Fairfield, Conn. Cynthia Delaney of Forest Hills was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Buffalo State College.

Local students received degrees during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Metropolitan Campus in Teaneck, N.J. They include: Flushing: Alan Schlanger, Jonah Zweig, Kenneth Kranczer, Meir Kops, Michael Gross, Tibisay Palomo.

Susan Hisler of Rego Park received a degree in court and realtime reporting during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Alfred State. Local students received degrees during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at the College of Saint Rose in Albany. They include: Forest Hills: Deepak Marwah, Mavis Smook, Eon Parks, Melissa SawickiMallien. Kew Gardens: Neil Rosenblatt. Rego Park: Lisa Liu, Vanessa Maldonado.

Dae Gon Chung of Whitestone was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Buffalo State College.

Anna Gordan of Rego Park was named to the Honors List for the spring 2012 semester at Oxford College in Atlanta, Ga.

Local students received degrees during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at the College of Saint Rose in Albany. They include: College Point: Claudia Barros-Paula. Flushing: Josefa Sande, Clara Kang, Margaret Moowad. Whitestone: Alfonzina Alaimo-Lloyd, Anna DiMilta.

Victoria Iwanowski of Rego Park earned academic honors for the spring 2012 semester at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.

Tony Tan of Flushing was named to the Merit List for the spring 2012 semester at Oxford College in Atlanta, Ga. Local students received degrees during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga. They include: Flushing: Philip Chang, Bachelor of Business Administration. Whitestone: Xiaoyuan Liu, Bachelor of Arts. Anthony Trochtchenkov of Rego Park was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Penn State Erie, The

The New York Lottery announced the names of area Lottery players who claimed a winning scratch-off ticket and received a cash prize valued at $10,000 or more. Najib Bennani of Astoria won $20,000 on the Cashword Doubler scratch-off game. Bennani’s winning ticket was purchased at Alexandria’s Deli of NY, 28-13 Steinway St., Astoria. Javier Perez of Jackson Heights won $50,000 on the Set For Life scratch-off game. Perez’s winning ticket was in Manhattan. Anees Virani of Rego Park won $100,000 on the $5,000,000 Cash scratchoff game. Virani’s winning ticket was purchased in Brooklyn. Marc-Anthony Forgenie of Richmond Hill received a degree in architectural engineering technology during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Alfred State.


LIC Prepares To Say Farewell To 5Pointz Board 2 meeting in June. The construction project is scheduled for the fall of 2013 and would redevelop the 200,000 square feet of space the factory currently encompasses into two residential towers, 41 and 47 stories tall. The rental units would range from stu-

dios, one bedroom and loft apartments and would include amenities such as a gym, basketball court, pool and outdoor barbecue area. “We’ve been dealing with an empty building for so long; it really doesn’t pay,” said Walkoff. “Things change, neighborhoods grow and

Tribune Photo by Megan Montalvo

By MEGAN MONTALVO Out with the old, in with the new – that’s what is being said of the iconic 5pointz building in Long Island City. Owner David Walkoff unveiled plans for the demolition of the urban landmark at the most recent Community

5pointz, the Long Island City graf fiti landmark, is scheduled for demolition next year.

we’re excited to be changing with the times.” For the artists, news of change is bittersweet. Although Walkoff says that new property would incorporate 1,200 feet of artist work space per tower, some artists feel this is not enough. “I have tons of artists that come here to use the building as an outlet,” said curator Jonathan Cohen. “It has really played a vital role in the graffiti movement and has solidified graffiti as an art form.” Cohen, who is better known under his artistic name Meres One, began his work as curator at 5pointz 10 years ago and is also credited for giving the graffiti mecca its name. Cohen says that with the demolition, he has received mixed reviews from his devoted artists. “Some of them plan to stop painting altogether,” said Cohen. “But some artists might take this as a

It has really played a vital role in the graffiti movement and has solidified graffiti as an art form. —Jonathan Cohen

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slap in the face and rebel.” The concern for an increase in public vandalism is refuted by Walkoff, who says the new space will not only be a welcome change for Long Island City but will also continue to establish itself as a draw for local artists. “When the time comes we’ll sit down with the artists and do as it has always been done - tastefully enough to be an attraction and attractive,” said Walkoff. On the heels of the structure’s tenth anniversary, Cohen says he still plans on hosting events at the location as well as give tours up until the structure’s looming demolition date. “I’m not going to make [this anniversary] a gloomy one,” said Cohen. “I want to continue with the celebration and not plan a funeral.” Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@ queenstribune.com


School Turnaround Plan

Page 14 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

By ROSS BARKAN When Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott admitted last week that 24 struggling schools across the City are planning for the return of the same teachers and principals this fall, the ambitious and polarizing “turnaround” plan appeared to be, at best, on life support. On July 11, a State Supreme Court judged ruled against the City’s request to suspend an arbitrator’s decision from June, which halted the Dept. of Education’s plan to fire 4,000 teachers in 24 “turnaround” high schools throughout the City. Walcott and the Bloomberg Administration are hopeful that the State Supreme Court will ultimately overrule the arbitrator’s decision that DOE violated their collective bargaining agreements with the United Federation of Teachers and Council of School Supervisors and Administrators by trying to dismiss principals and half the staffs of the 24 schools, including seven in Queens. Oral arguments will begin on July 24 and a final decision will come sometime afterwards. “I have a responsibility to open our schools, and open our schools in a way that allows our students to learn,” Walcott said at a Bronx public school last week. “We have to operate under the principle that the staff who were at the school will be coming back.” The Dept. of Education wanted to secure nearly $60 million in federal funding for “turnaround.” With its federal funding jeopardized, the DOE could switch to one of three other federal models for school improvement. The DOE directed all questions to the City Law Dept., who did not return requests for comment.

UFT Victory Emerging from a disagreement with UFT about the implementation of teacher evaluations and a desire to reform schools that had been persistently underachieving, “tur naround” enraged many teachers, students and community members. At the seven Queens schools – Flushing, Newtown, Long Island City, William Cullen Bryant, August Mar tin, John

Photos by Ira Cohen

Court Set To Decide Fate

Elected officials gathered with teachers outside of Flushing High School to protest the school’s announced closure in February. Adams and Richmond Hill – re- critic of the DOE’s latest reform rather than “turnaround.” Bryant actions to the plan to dismiss effor ts, contending that the was originally designated as a staff and rename the schools struggles of schools like Bryant “transformation” school, meanthemselves were a mix of indig- are exaggerated. Van Bramer ing the school replaced its prinnation and rage. “Save our supported the “transformation” cipal, received additional fundschool” chants boomed through model of school improvement ing and instituted “comprehensive instr uctional rerallies and raucous public forms,” in the words of hearings. Many Queens the U.S. Dept. of Educaelected officials joined the tion. protesters. “I’ve been fighting “The mayor needs to these closures for two put aside this pettiness of years because I don’t politics and move forward believe they are the best with a real educational way to go about improvplan,” said Dermot Smyth, ing these schools,” Van a Queens UFT represenBramer said. “We have tative. to be careful about callFor the UFT, a State ing all these schools Supreme Court ruling fi‘struggling.’ We’re thrownally nullifying “tur ning out the baby with the around” would be a major bath water. There are a victory. The UFT is highly lot of really good things skeptical of a centralized going on at Br yant, DOE that allows Mayor though it still needs to Mike Bloomberg to wield improve.” considerable power in all At August Martin in matters related to educaJamaica, PTA president tion. The Bloomberg AdJose Ferr uzola welministration and DOE comed the prospect of have countered that “turnaround’s” demise. schools that are receiving Like UFT representamultiple “F’s” on their tives, Ferruzola believed yearly report card need the potential closure of drastic restructuring to reAugust Mar tin was verse years of decline. purely a “political move.” Councilman Jimmy Van “I’m very proud, I’m Bramer (D-Sunnyside) A protester holds a sign outside August Marso happy. I knew that the has been an outspoken tin High School during an event in April.

mayor was not going to get his way,” Ferruzola said. “We’re just worried now that the teachers who will be returning will be pressured by the administrators to leave, since they weren’t wanted in the first place.”

Lingering Uncertainties The possible end of “turnaround” was not greeted with universal elation. Some parents, teachers and educational observers saw the plan as a way to replace staff members that were not responsive to the diverse student populations in their hallways. At Richmond Hill, home to a large immigrant South Asian population, Vishnu Amadeo, parent action committee treasurer for Richmond Hill, viewed “turnaround” as a way to hire educational staff more attuned to the needs of immigrants. “My concern about Richmond Hill and John Adams is that these schools need to have changes in order to help these kids and bring back the prestige of the school,” Amadeo said. “There have been major changes within Richmond Hill in terms of student population and the administration of the school does not reflect this. There has been no outreach by the administration to the Punjabi community.” Though UFT trumpeted the arbitrator’s decision, teachers themselves who were guaranteed jobs are now left with a far more uncertain educational environment heading into the fall. A teacher in a Queens “turnaround” school who did not wish to be identified described the possible reversal of the initiative as a “total mess.” He does not know which administrators he will be reporting to in September. “My issue from the beginning is that it was a totally undemocratic sham process where every community was against it and it was obviously political,” the teacher said. “I thought the inter view process was a total mess; there were only 15-minute interviews for teachers who had been there 25 years. It was ridiculous and unfair. But a lot of changes being made were good decisions. I thought we would be a better school. Now no one knows who’s working where, there’s no prog ram for the school, I don’t know who the principal will be, if we’ll have an EPO [educational plan organization], or anything like that.” Reach Repor ter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbar kan@ queenstribune.com.


LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

At an IAS Part 19, of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of Queens, held at the Courthouse, located at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York on the 27 day of June 2012. ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE Index No. 8332-12 PRESENT: HON. BERNICE D. SIEGAL Justice In the Matter of the Application of KIN WAI LAM, Holder of One-Half of all Outstanding Shares Entitled to vote in an Election of Directors, Petitioner, -against- LAP FUNG SUN and MILESTONE KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN INC. for the Dissolution of MILESTONE KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN INC. a Domestic Corporation Respondents. UPON the annexed Petition of KIN WAI LAM, Petitioner, herein, duly sworn to on the 3rd day of May, 2012, the affidavit of KIN WAI LAM sworn to onthe 3rd day of May, 2012, the affirmation of HAROLD I. GUBERMAN, ESQ. dated the 7 th day of May, 2012, together with the exhibits annexed thereto, and upon all the prior pleadings and proceedings heretofore had herein, LET the Respondents show cause before this court at an IAS PART 19, Room 48, to be held at the Courthouse, located at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York on the 15 day of August, 2012 at 9:30 AM of that date, or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, why an Order should not be made and entered herein: (A) Awarding Petitioner’s monetary damages in accordance with the demands of the Petition; (B) Dissolving the corporation known as MILESTONE KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN, INC. (C) Upon the Fourth Cause of Action in the Petition appointing a Receiver for said corporation; (D) Ordering Respondents to provide a full accounting to Petitioner of all receipts, expenses, accounts receivable, debts and liabilities of MILESTONE KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN, INC. (E) Awarding to Petitioner a counsel fee in the sum of $10,000.00 for the prosecution of this application; and (F) Granting Petitioner such other, further and different relief as to his court may seem just and proper, and it is further ORDERED that pending the hearing of this application the Respondents, and their agents, servants and employees are hereby enjoined and restrained from transferring any assets, whether real or personal property, except as necessary in the ordinary

course of business or personal affairs and for full value. SUFFICIENT CAUSE APPEARING THEREFORE, LET service of a copy of this Order to Show Cause together with the papers upon which it is based by personal delivery upon LAP FUNG SUN, individual Respondent and upon MIESTONE KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN INC. pursuant to C.P.L.R. 311 (a)(1) including by service upon the Secretary of State, as a designated agent of the corporation and upon the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance by mailing a copy of this Order to it at Building 9, W.A. Harriman Campus, Albany, New York 12227-0125 by first class mail by July 6, 2012 and this Order to Show Cause, without the papers in support of same, shall be published at lest once in each of the three weeks before the return date of this Order to Show Cause in the following newspaper Queens Tribune to be completed on or before 8/8/2012 be deemed good and sufficient service. ENTER: Bernice Siegal J.S.C. HON. BERNICE D. SIEGAL Pursuant to Rule 130.1-(1) Harold I. Guberman __________________________________ Notice of Formation of Radiant Lotus, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY SSNY on 5/15/12. Office location: Queens County. Princ. office of LLC: 240-52 69th Ave. #3, Little Neck, NY 11362. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/ o Radiant Lotus, LLC. at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT- COUNTY OF QUEENS U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE TRUST 2007-2 ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2 Plaintiff, AGAINST CONRAD JONES, et al. Defendant(s) Pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale duly entered March 28, 2012 I the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Queens County Supreme Court, 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435 on 8/10/ 2012 at 11:00 AM premises known as 2288 JAYDEE CT., FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11690 a/k/a 2288 JAYDEE CT., FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11691. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improve-

ments thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the BOROUGH AND County of QUEENS, City and State of New York. Block 15663 and Lot: 37 Approximate amount of judgment $610,504.04 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment. Index # 29127/2009 Matthew M. Lupoli, Esq. Referee, Law Offices of Jordan S. Katz, P.C. - 395 North Service Road, Suite 401, Melville, NY 11747 JSK 12792 Dated: June 27, 2012 ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of 2 Iris Lane LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/12/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 45-25 47 th St., Woodside, NY 11377. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of NAV 291 L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/21/2012. Office Location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 5777 80 St., Middle Vlg, NY 11379. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of EnergyReset, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) ON 04/10/2012. Office location: Queens County Principal Office of LLC: 199-85 Keno Ave, Holliswood, NY 11423 SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o EnergyReset, LLC at the principal office of the LLC Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ El Chamo LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/1/12. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o John Cheserie, 2519 33rd Ave. Ste #1, Astoria, NY 11106. Purpose: General __________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: AUSTRO TILE & STONE, LLC. Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/25/12. Office Location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon

whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 3 0 - - - 2 5 9 3 rd S t r e e t , E a s t Elmhurst, New York, 11369. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. AUSTRO TILE & S T O N E , L L C 3 0 — 2 5 9 3 RD STREET EAST ELMHURST, NY 11369 PHONE: 718.898.4283 FAX: 718.898.4285 __________________________________ 65-86 TERRACE COURT LLC, a domestic LLC currently known as 65-86 LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/29/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 59-05 59 th Dr., Maspeth, NY 11378. General Purposes. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of Tool Time Home Improvement, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on 4/06/2012. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against THE LLC Post Office Box 200187 South Ozone Park, N.Y. 11420. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of KMC GROUP LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on April 9, 2012. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to 217-35 Peck Avenue, Hollis Hills, NY 11427. Purpose: any lawful purpose. __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/11/12, bearing Index Number NC-000312-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Erum (Middle) Ali (Last) Alyas My present name is

(First) Erum (Middle) Zia (Last) Malik aka Erum Z. Malik, aka Erum Ali Alyas My present address is 2517 Butler St., 1 st Fl., East Elmhurst, NY 11369 My place of birth is Baltimore, MD My date of birth is May 14, 1990 __________________________________ Notice of Formation of 10834 REALTY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/18/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 66-11 99 th St., #2C, Rego Park, NY 11374. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ TAXI REAL ESTATE SERVICES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/9/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 25-11B 41 st Ave., Long Island City, NY 11101. General Purposes. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of Rockaway Yummy LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/03/2012. Office location: Queens County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 16057 Rockaway Blvd, Jamaica, NY 11434. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ MITCHELL MARCUS CONSULTING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/31/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 7535 210 th St., Apt. 3E, Oakland Gardens, NY 11364. General Purposes. __________________________________ DENTAL TEAM LLP a domestic LLP, filed with the SSNY on 5/22/12. Office Location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon

whom process against the LLP may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLP, 23-91 Bell Blvd., Ste. LL1, Bay Terrace, NY 11360. Purpose: Dentistry __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on July 9, 2012, bearing Index Number NC-000377-12/ QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Rosanna (Last) Peres My present name is (First) Rosana (Last) Persaud aka Rosana Isaac, aka Rosana Rahamatulla, aka Rosanna Isaac My present address is 90-11 107 th St., Richmond Hill, NY 11418 My place of birth is Guyana My date of birth is May 29, 1976; Assume the name of (First) Isabella (Last) Peres My present name is (First) Isabella (Last) Persaud (infant) My present address is 90-11 107 th St., Richmond Hill, NY 11418 My place of birth is Manhattan, NY My date of birth is February 07, 2011 __________________________________ 2012 PALMETTO STREET, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/6/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Davidov Law Group, P.C., 108-18 Queens Blvd., Ste. 704, Forest Hills, NY 11375. General Purposes. __________________________________ Notice of Formation of Twice Is Nice, LLC., Arts of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY SSNY on 4/2/2012. Office location: Queens County. Princ. office of LLC: 14-31 150th St., Whitestone, NY 11357. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Twice Is Nice., LLC, at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

You Can E-Mail Your Legal Copy to legals@queenstribune.com To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tr ibune at (718) 357-7400 ext. 149

www.queenstribune.com • July 19-25, 2012 Tribune Page 15

LEGAL NOTICE


Dr. K Signing

Independence Celebration

Former New York Mets pitcher Dwight “Dr. K” Gooden signed autographs for Ridgewood Savings Bank’s Astoria branch. The signing was part of a community event that also included food, games and a balloon sculptor. Photo by Ira Cohen.

Happy Birthday, Frank

Councilwoman Julissa Ferreras and Assembly Members Francisco Moya and Michael DenDekker hosted the annual Independence of Colombia event at Queens Theatre in Flushing Meadows Corona Park on July 17. The event featured Colombian food and dance performances. Photos by Ira Cohen.

pix

Queens Events Edited By Harley Benson

Page 16 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Benefit Concert

Bayside community activist Frank Skala celebrated his 75th birthday over the weekend with a party.

Skala was presented with a proclamation by Councilman Dan Halloran (center right), along with Assemblyman Ed Braunstein and Community Board 11 Chair Jerry Iannece. Photos by Ira Cohen.

Music legend Lionel Richie performed his greatest hits during the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research’s seventh annual summer benefit concert on July 11. The Feinstein Institute is a part of the North Shore LIJ Health System. Photo by Ira Cohen.


www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ July 19-25, 2012 Tribune Page 17


Leisure

‘Minervae’ Debuts in Athens Square Park the original play drew large crowds of local residents and theater lovers for the opening weekend. The per forma nce kicked off with a dramatic entrance from the cast, who encompassed the audience as they marched, drummed and chanted past the Roman columns into the park. From that point forward, it became clear that you were no longer in Astoria; the setting was now ancient Rome and the gods reigned supreme. Sprinkled with the notions of love, religion and violence, the comedic drama challenged members of the crowd to take an introspective look on how their own life may

Cuisine The Way You Want It as much food as they want plus soda or beer within a two-hour period for $25 a person. The rest of my dinner part y selected this and were very pleased. They consumed plates of strips of beef, seafood plat ters, chicken, short ribs and vegetables until their stomachs were completely stuffed and As you walk through the door satisfied. The y part icularly enat Baidu, it seems like entering joyed the angus beef, which is a the nightlife of hip city in China. restaurant favorite. Being a vegetarian, I went in Bamboo and silk cloth hang from another direction. I had the ceiling and the entire restaurant has dim RESTAURANT the vegetable combo and was pleased with lighting with various the amount of food it lights and decorations had to offer at an affordal l around. A waterfall able low price. Most of is in the middle of the the fresh vegetables on restaurant with colorful the menu, noodles and lights inside and a flat some tofu were all on screen TV in the cenmy plate, ready for me ter. You are surrounded to take a bite. They had by lightly colored brick to take a visit into the walls, bright red booths pot though of course. and beige tables and chairs. One by one, I dropped the Baidu has a full Sichuan and hot pot menus. If you’re tr ying spinach, corn on the cob, tomahot pot for the first time, each toes, mushrooms, slices of pumpperson gets a pot for themselves kin and cauliflower into my perto cook their own food at their sonal pot with vegetarian broth. seat, where there are stove tops. Next, I dropped my noodles into The choice is yours from the the pot. I watched as my dinner broth you cook your food in, sizzled in my pot and steam flowed entrees of meat and fish, sides of into my face. I found the experivegetables and different sauces ence amusing. If you are looking for delicious for dipping. You can have every part of your meal exactly the way Chinese food cooked to your likyou want it. The venue is also ing at a reasonable price come to vegetarian friendly, with a vari- Baidu Shabu Shabu. It is an enety of vegetable and tofu entrees. tertaining and satisfying dining Customers can also choose a experience! –Cristina Fogliet ta buffet, where a group can order

Page 18 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Baidu Shabu Shabu 37-04 Pr ince St., Flushing (718) 353-9538 Hours: Mon. – Wed., 6-11 p.m.; Thurs. – Fri., 7 p.m. – 2 a.m.; Sat. – Sun., Noon to Midnight Credit Cards: Yes, All Major

REVIEW

be affected by these critical aspects. In the first act, the idea of questioning internal beliefs is exhibited when Minerva, played by Rachel McPhee, reunites with her former mortal flame Axon, played by Rick Delaney. Abandoned by his longlost love, Axon has turned to Christianity, or as the play coins it “Christ-ianity,” for his newfound guidance and denounces Minerva. Hear t-broken a nd lacking in public adoration, Minerva later emerges in a camp of loyal “Christians” and soon finds herself tr ying to convince them of her existence as she struggles for survival. Throughout the play, intermittent scenes of an intricate love triangle between Mars, Venus and Vulcan touch on the themes of love, violence and a possible coexistence between the two. Erik Gullberg, who plays Mars, gives a humorous and convincing per formance of the war god that is not to be missed, while Brooklynborn Scarlet t Bermingham appropriately embodies the sexy and sassy go dde ss in her per formance as Venus. One highlight in the play comes from Bermingham’s performance when Venus is sent by Apol lo, played by the captivating Jeremiah Maestas, to seduce Vulcan, played

Photo by Megan Montalvo

By MEGAN MONTALVO When Astoria residents think of names like Neptune and Hermes, the local diner and laundromat are more likely to come to mind than the actual Greek and Roman gods for whom they were named. In a neighborhood steeped in Greek culture, it only seems appropriate that a deeper homage outside of these local businesses be repaid to the memory of these ancient go ds. On July 13, homage came with the inaugural performance of “The Minervae” at Athens Square Park. Hosted by an Astoria-based company, On The Square Productions,

Minerva tries to rekindle her romance with Axon as she tries to lure the mortal explorer with a new geographic voyage. by the eloquent British actor Rob Benson. Met with some hesitation, Venus obliges to Apollo’s request and quickly lures vital information from Vulcan as if it were child’s play. The entire cast of performers is tr uly entertaining and the tragic ending leaves the audience wanting more. Luckily, if you missed opening weekend or simply want to see it again, On The Square Productions will be hosting additional per-

formances over July 20-23 and 2629. Shows star t at 7:30 p.m. each night and attendees are encouraged to bring blankets and come early for priority seating. Athens Square Park is located at the corner of 30th Street and 30th Avenue. Admission to the play is free. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@ queenstribune.com.

New Literary Journal Comes To Queens By MEGAN MONTALVO Watch out Brooklyn and move over Manhattan, Queens has a new literar y journal coming to town. Appropriately named after one of the original towns that was incorporated into Queens in 1898, Newtown Literary is scheduled to hit the borough in November and has already received a long list of submissions. Created by Elmhurst resident Tim Fredrick, the journal will include works from both local authors as well as those who may not live in the area. “Queens is a ver y welcoming place to people of all backgrounds,” said Fredrick. “We want that to be reflected in the journal as well.” As a writer and resident of Queens for 15 years, Fredrick says that he has become intimately aware of t he lack of at tent ion

Queens receives from the literary world. “When people think of New York Cit y in terms of writing, they don’t usually think of Queens,” said Fredrick. “It’s been really gratifying being able to sit down with local writers to create something t he borough can be proud of.” When the idea for the journal first sprung in Fredrick’s mind, he doubted that it would get as much at tention as it already has. On the hills of the notoriety, he quickly found himself developing a full fledged non-profit organization devoted entirely to the journal. “I was initially very nervous and thought that the idea might be viewed as silly,” said Fredrick. “But as I started to tell people about it, I stated to see just how much it was needed.” From his work as a teacher of reading and writing at Queens Paideia School, Fredrick says that

he also looks forward to inspiring the future wave of authors by holding youth writing contests for publication. In addition to the entrance of t he varying writers’ submissions, each issue will also include book reviews from notable Queens writers. The inaugural issue is projected to highlight a review of the latest book of memoirs from local Jackson Heights author Sweta Srivastava Vikram. Submissions for Newtown Literar y w ill be accepted unt il Aug. 4. Copies of the journal will be published twice a year and will be available in both print and digital formats star ting at $10. For submission information, visit w w w.newtownliterary.org Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@ queenstribune.com


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

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Nobody should go thirsty just because they want to achieve a balanced diet. From sparkling beverages and sports drinks to waters, juices and teas, we’re offering more ways than ever to satisfy your tastes and calorie preferences.


Page 20 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT


SECTION EDITOR: REGINA VOGEL

Send typed announcements for your club or organization’s events at least TWO weeks in advance to “Queens Today” Editor, Queens Tribune, 150-50 14 Road, Whitestone NY 11357. Send faxes to 357-9417, IF YOUR ORGANIZATION MEETS ON A REGULAR BASIS, SEND ALL DATES FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR.

SINGLES 60+ SINGLES Thursday, July 26 Mind Readings and more 1-2:30. $10, $2 discount CQY members. Central Queens YMYWHA. 268-5011, ext. 160.

FLEA MARKETS OUTDOOR FLEA Sundays, July 22, August 26, September 23 Outdoor Flea Market 10-5 at the Free Synagogue of Flushing, 4160 Kissena Blvd., Flushing.

TALKS

RELIGIOUS

MEETINGS

BREAKFAST CLUB Sunday, July 22 “The Relationship of Abigail to David: From Coach to Co-Wife” Flushing-Fresh Meadows Jewish Center. 357-5100. $5 at the door. Bring a bible. 9:45 breakfast, 10:30 event.

PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturday, July 21 learn how to communicate effectively. 10-12:15 at Elmhurst Hospital. 424-9754. VFW 4787 Monday, July 23 Whitestone VFW Communit y Post meets. 746-0540. NY CARES Monday, July 23 New York Cares meeting to recruit new volunteers at 3 at the Forest Hills library. FH VAC Wednesdays, July 25, August 22, September 26 Fore st Hills Volunteer Ambulance Corp. 793-2055. STAMP CLUB Thursday, July 26 Queen Stamp Club at the Forest Hills library at 5:45. PUBLIC SPEAKING Thursday, July 26 at 6:15 at the Briarwood library.

HEALTH HEALTH FAIR Saturday, July 21 11-5 at L i n d e n P a r k , 4 1 st A v e n u e and 103 rd Street. 760-3141. CHAIR YOGA Saturdays, July 21, 28 at the Sunnyside library at 2. ZUMBA Mondays, July 23, 30, August 6 at the Seaside library. Register. ZUMBA Mondays, July 23, 30 at the East Elmhurst library and the L a n g sto n H u g h e s l i b r a r y. Register. MS Tuesday, July 24 National Multiple Sclerosis Societ y support group at 1 at the Howard Beach library. ALZHEIMERS Tuesdays, July 24, August 14, 28 Caregiver Support Group in Forest Hills. 5925757, ext. 237. INTRO YOGA Tu e s d ay, J u l y 2 4 a t t h e Hollis library at 2. Bring mat and optional cushion. ZUMBA Wednesday, July 25 at the Astoria librar y. Register. HEALTH FAIR Wednesday, July 25 5-8 at CC Moore Homestead Park, 82 nd Street and Broadway. 760-3141. CHAIR YOGA Wednesdays, July 25, August 1 introduction to chair yoga at the Hillcrest library. Register. OA Wednesdays Overeaters Anonymous at the Howard Beach library at 11. EAT HEALTHY Thursday, July 26 Eating Healthy Away From Home at 3:30 at the Far Rockaway library. LEARN CPR Thursday, July 26 at the L a n g sto n H u g h e s l i b r a r y. Register. ZUMBA Thursdays, July 26, August 2, 9 at the Rochdale Village library and Woodside library. Register. HEALTH FAIR Saturday, July 28 11-5 at the New Covenant Church of Christ (Baptist), 206-14 100 th Avenue, Queens Village. Blood pressure screenings, diabetes, arthritis, info, more.

SENIORS FREE LUNCH Saturdays, July 21, August 18, September 15 All Saints Church in Richmond Hill. 849-2352 reservations. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Wednesday, July 25 at the Windsor Park library. Register. STARS Wednesday, July 25 STARS (Senior Theater Acting Repertory) meets at the Hollis library at 10:30. 60+ SINGLES Thursday, July 26 Mind Readings and more 1-2:30. $10, $2 discount CQY members. Central Queens YMYWHA. 268-5011, ext. 160. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Friday, July 27 at the Laurelton library. Register.

MORE YOUTH MAGIC WORKSHOP Thursday, July 26 at the Kew Gardens Hills library at 4:30. Ages 5 and up. COMPUTERS Friday, July 27 at the Hillcrest library. Register. PEARLER BEAD KITS Friday, July 27 Middle Village library. Register. DREAM BIG Friday, July 27 Broadway library at 2. LEGO WORLD BUILDER Friday, July 27 at the Glendale library. Register. MAGIC WORKSHOP Friday, July 27 Woodhaven library at 3. Ages 5 and up. FAMILY BINGO Friday, July 27 at the Queens Village library. Register.

TEENS TENNIS PROGRAM Tu e s d a y s a n d T h u r s d a y s through August at Pomonok Park. 347-4178156. MOVIE MONDAYS Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Flushing library at 2. CHESS CLUB Monday, July 23 at the Bayside library at 6. ECO JEWELRY Monday, July 23 at the Steinway library. Register. EFFECTIVE TEENS Mondays, July 23, 30 7 Habits of Highly Effective Te e n s a t t he Po m o n o k l i brary at 3. YU-GI-OH! Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Seaside library at 2. NH GAZETTE Mondays, July 23, 30 North Hills Gazette newsletter at the North Hills library. Register. DREAM IT Tuesdays, July 24, 31 East Elmhurst library at 2:30. MASTER MINDS Tuesday, July 24 at the LIC library at 2:30. Brain teasers, puzzles, games. JEOPARDY TRIVIA Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Seaside library at 3:30. TEEN GAMING Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Fresh Meadows library at 4. ORIGAMI Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Seaside library at 4. CHESS CLUB Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Woodhaven library at 2. LIC CHESS CLUB Tuesdays LIC library at 4. BOOK BUDDIES Tuesdays Windsor Park library at 4. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesday, July 25 South Ozone Park library at 1. ANIME SUMMER Wednesday, July 25 at the Flushing library at 2. GOOGLE DOCS Wednesday, July 25 at the Central library. Register. ROLE PLAYING Wednesday, July 25 at the Bayside library at 3. CLAY CREATIONS Wednesday, July 25 at the North Hills library. Register. RESUME HELP Wednesdays at 3 at the Arverne librar y. MOCK INTERVIEWS Thursday, July 26 at the C e n t ra l l i b ra r y. 9 9 0 - 5 1 4 8 register. SAVE YOUR STUFF Thursday, July 26 at the Central library. Register. RAP SESSIONS Thursday, July 26 at the Laurelton library at 5. OPEN MIC

Thursday, July 26 at the East Elmhurst library at 6. AMER. ANIMATION Thursday, July 26 at the Seaside library at 6. MASTER MINDS Thursday, July 26 at the LIC library at 2:30. Brain teasers, puzzles, games. GAME TIME Thursday, July 26 at the North Hills library at 3:30. TEEN SPACE Thursday, July 26 at the Windsor Park library. Space limited. 3:30. TEEN GAMING Thursday, July 26 at the Fresh Meadows library at 4. GAME DAY Thursday, July 26 at the Woodhaven library at 4. CHESS CLUB Thursday, July 26 at the F l u s h i n g l i b ra r y. L i m i t e d space. GAME TIME Thursday, July 26 at the Bayside library at 3. TEEN THURSDAYS

T h u r s d ay s Bay Te r ra c e l i brary at 3. CHESS CLUB Thursdays East Flushing library at 5.Sunnyside library at 5. TEEN HAPPY HOUR Friday, July 27 at the Flushing library at 4. BIG GAME DAY Friday, July 27 at the Broadway library at 3. BINGO Friday, July 27 at the Queens Village library. Register. READ & REVIEW Friday, July 27 Read, Renew, Return, Review at the Glen Oaks library. 831-8636 register. READING CLUB Friday, July 27 at the Fresh Meadows library at 3. BOOK BUDDIES Friday, July 27 at the Bayside library at 4. GAME DAYS Friday, July 27 at the Seaside library at noon.

YOUTH READ TO A DOG Mondays, July 23, 30 at the North Hills library. Register. BABY & ME Mondays, July 12, 30 at the Bayside library at 10:30. READ TO ME Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Fresh Meadows library at 10:30. ANT FARM IN CIT Y Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Steinway library. Register. DINOSAUR STORY TIME Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Seaside library at 1:30. READER BOYS Mondays, July 23, 30 at the St. Albans library at 2. MAKE & TAKE CRAFT Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Central library at 3. BOOK CIRCLE Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Ridgewood library at 3. WII GAMES Mondays, July 23, 30 at 3 at the Windsor Park library. CHESS CLUB Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Bayside library at 6. PJ STORY TIME Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Central library at 7. REPTILE ADVENTURE Monday, July 23 at the South Ozone Park library at 3:30. Ages 6 and up. WIGGLY WORM BINS Monday, July 23 at the Sunnyside library at 4. EXPLORING PLANTS Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Astoria library at 1:30. DREAM BIG

Tu e s d ay , J u l y 2 4 a t t h e Broadway library at 2. STORY & CRAFT Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Central library at 2. MYSTERY BOOK CLUB Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Seaside library at 2. ARTS & CRAFTS Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the North Hills library. Register. READ TO ME Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Cambria Heights library at 2:30. Pre-school-K. ORIGAMI Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at 4 at the Seaside library. READ TO A DOG Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Douglaston library. Register. CHESS CLUB Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Woodhaven library at 2. READING CLUB Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Douglaston library. Register. STORY & CRAFT Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Central library at 3:30. Tickets available at 1. DREAM BIG Wednesday, July 25 at the Broadway library at 2. STORYBOOK Wednesday, July 25 make your own storybook at the Pomonok library at 3. DREAM BIG Thursday, July 26 at the Broadway library at 2. ORIGAMI TOYS Thursday, July 26 at the East Elmhurst library at 3:30. (continued)

www.queenstribune.com • July 19-25, 2012 Tribune Page 21

LAURELTON Monday, July 23 “The Healing of America” discussed at 6:15 at the Laurelton library. FINANCIAL HEALTH Tuesday, July 24 at 4 at the Woodside librar y. POMONOK Wednesday, July 25 “The Year of Wonders” discussed at 2 at the Pomonok library. BOOK DISCUSSION Thursday, July 26 at the East Flushing library at 10:30. FRESH MEADOWS Thursday, July 26 “The Great Gatsby” discussed at 2:30 at the Fresh Meadows librar y. AUTHOR TALK Thursday, July 26 Jason Antos speaks on “Queens Then and Now” at the Whitestone library at 4:30. EAST ELMHURST Thursday, July 26 “Inner C i t y Fa c e s : C o n ve r s a t i o n Pieces: discussed at 6:30 at the East Elmhurst library. HOLLIS Thursday, July 26 “The Marriage Plot” discussed at the Hollis library. Register. PENINSULA Thursday, July 26 “A Night to Remember” discussed at 6:30 at the Peninsula library.

Queens Today

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT Page 22 Tribune July 19-25, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Today

Queens Today

EDUCATION/GAMES/CRAFTS PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturdays, July 21, 28, learn to communicate effectively at Elmhurst Hospital. 646748-8290. BEGIN POWERPOINT Saturday, July 21 a t t h e Central library. 990-5102. JOB SEARCH Saturday, July 21 a t t h e Central library. 990-0746. INTER. POWERPOINT Saturday, July 21 at the Central library. 990-5148. KNIT & CROCHET Saturdays, July 21, 28 at the Peninsula library at 10. METRIX LEARNING Saturday, July 21 at the Far Rockaway library at 10:30. Monday, July 23 at 5:30 at the Ar verne librar y. Saturday, July 28 at the LIC library at 4. Learn about free online training through Metrix Learning, including certifications in Office, Quickbooks, Adobe. BEGIN EXCEL Monday, July 23 at the Central library. 990-5176. JOB SEARCH Monday, July 23 social networking and your job search at the Central library. 9905176. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Douglaston library at 4. Bring your own needles and yarn. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Mondays, July 23, 30 assistance at 1 at the Far Rockaway library. COMPUTER BOOT CAMP Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at th e Fa r Ro c k away l i b ra r y. 327-2549 register. BALLROOM DANCING Mondays, July 23, 30 at the Forest Hills library at 6:30. METRIX LEARNING Monday, July 23, Friday, July 27, Monday, July 30 at 1 a t t h e C e n t ra l l i b r a r y. Learn about free online training through Metrix Learning, including certifications in Office, Quickbooks, Adobe. ECO-JEWELRY Monday, July 23 at the Steinway library. Register. URBAN CHICKENING Monday, July 23 at 6 at the Woodside library and Saturday, July 28 at 10:30 at the Steinway library. LEARNING LAB Tuesday, July 24 at the LIC library at 1:30. INTRO WORD Tuesday, July 24 at the Central library. 990-0769. BASIC COMPUTER Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Rosedale library at 10:30. BASIC COMPUTER Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Arverne library at 10:45.

ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Tuesdays, July 24, 31 assistance at the Far Rockaway library. 327-2549 register. SMALL BUSINESS WORK. Tuesdays, July 24, 31 small business workshops at the C e n t r a l l i b ra r y. 9 9 0 - 5 1 4 8 register. INTER. OFFICE Tuesday, July 24 at 10 at the Flushing library. INTRO EMAIL Tu e s d ay, J u l y 2 4 a t t h e Queens Village library. Register. COMPUTERS Tu e s d ay, J u l y 2 4 a t t h e Ozone Park librar y. Register. BASIC COMPUTER Wednesday, July 25 at the Windsor Park library. Register. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Wednesday, July 25 computer assistance at the Far Rockaway library. 327-2549. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesday, July 25 at the South Ozone Park library at 1. WRITING GROUP Wednesday, July 25 at the Seaside library at 3. METRIX LEARNING Wednesday, July 25 at the Far Rockaway library at 10:30. INTRO EMAIL Wednesday, July 25 at the Central library. Register. DOWNLOADING E-BOOKS Wednesday, July 25 at the Flushing library at 10. RESUMES & COVERS Wednesday, July 25 at the Central library. Register. JUST WRITE Wednesday, July 25 at the LIC librar y. Learn to write cover letters, business letters, etc. at 1:30. GOOGLE DOCS Wednesday, July 25 at the Central library. Register. SWING DANCE Wednesdays, July 25, August 1 West Coast Swing Dance at the Flushing library. Register. MOCK INTERVIEWS Thursday, July 26 at the C e n t r a l l i b ra r y. 9 9 0 - 5 1 4 8 register. PRACTICE LABS Thursday, July 26 at the Arverne library at 10:30. SAVING YOUR STUFF Thursday, July 26 at the Central library. Register. MARKETING YOURSELF Thursday, July 26 at the Central library at 4. LEARN CPR Thursday, July 26 at the L a n g sto n H u g h e s l i b r a r y. Register. PUBLIC SPEAKING Thursday, July 26 at the

Briarwood library at 6:15. INTRO EXCEL Thursday, July 26 at the Central library at 6:30. E-BOOKS Thursday, July 26 e-books and digital music download at the LIC library at 6:30. BOOT CAMP COMPUTER Thursday, July 26 at the Arverne library at 10:30. INTRO COMPUTERS Thursday, July 26 at the Ozone Park library. Register. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Thursday, July 26 at the Far Rockaway library. 327-2549 register. CRAFT CLUB Thursday, July 26 at the Fresh Meadows library at 6. BASIC COMPUTER Thursday, July 26 at the Rosedale library at 6. MEDITATION CLUB Thursday, July 26 at the Bellerose library at 5:15. WRITING GROUP Thursday, July 26 meet-up writing group at the Broadway library at 6:30. KNIT & CROCHET Friday, July 27 at the Peninsula library at 12:30. INTER. EXCEL Friday, July 27 at the Central library at 9:30. KNIT & CROCHET Friday, July 27 at the Fresh Meadows library at 10:30. Bering your own material. BASIC COMPUTERS Friday, July 27 at the Auburndale librar y. Register. ONE-ON-ONE Friday, July 27 computer assistance at the Far Rockaway librar y. 327-249 register. CHESS CLUB Friday, July 27 at the Auburndale library at 3:30. COMPUTER BOOT CAMP Fridays through July 27 at the LIC library at 2. POWERPOINT Saturday, July 28 a t t h e Central library. Register. MICROSOFT WORD Saturday, July 28 a t t h e Central library. Register.

ENVIRONMENT COMPOSTING Mondays June through November at the Steinway library 6-7:30. RESOURCES FAIR Saturday, July 21 Western Queens Green Resources Fair at 1 at the Broadway library. E-WASTE RECYCLING Saturday, July 21 electronic (e-waste) recycling at 1 at the Broadway library.

ENTERTAINMENT WORLD CASINO 110-00 Rockaway Blvd., South Ozone Park. Free admission. GOLDEN DRAGON Through August 4 the Golden Dragon Acrobats perform at Queens Theatre in the Park. 760-0686, ext. 105. STAGED READING Friday, July 20 and Saturday, July 21 at 8 at Queens Theatre in the Park. 7600064. ICE THEATRE Saturdays, July 21, 28 ice dancing ensemble at 7 at World Ice Arena in flushing Meadows Corona Park. Free. DANCE CONCERT Saturday, July 21 Malcolm Low Formal Structure Inc. at 8 at Queensbridge Park. HAMMERSTEP Saturday, July 21 Hammerstep integrates traditional Irish step and tap dance with hip hop with band Deoro at 2 and again at 4 at the Flushing library. BROADWAY SONGS Saturday, July 21 Broadway and nightclub songs at 2 at the Fresh Meadows library. MUSICAL TRIBUTE Saturday, July 21 tribute to Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Bobby Darin at 2:30 at the Bayside library. FLUTE & VIOLIN Saturday, July 21 Sonic Escape presents classical and folk for flute and violin at 2:30 at the Forest Hills library. QUINTET Saturday, July 21 Bria Skonberg Quintet plays Louis Armstrong House Museum at 2. $15. JAMAICA DRUM JAM Saturday, July 21 a t t h e Central library. Register. LADIES TRIBUTE Saturday, July 21 tribute to Ella, Peggy, Doris and more at the Jackson Heights library at 3. LIVE WILDLIFE Saturday, July 21 live wildlife discovery program at 2 at Alley Pond Environmental Center. $10. 229-4000 register. JAZZ CONCERT Saturday, July 21 at Celebration Hall at the Center at Maple Grove at 8. 5231876. LIVE JAZZ & R&B Sundays, July 22, 29 live jazz and r&b 6-10 at Déjà vu, 180-25 Linden Blvd., St. Albans. PENNY SOCIAL Sunday, July 22 at Alley Pond Environmental Center. $12. 229-4000 to register.

NEW PLAYS Sunday, July 22 “The Bus Test.” Sunday, July 29 “The Perfect Bride.” “The Ladder Series: A Staged Reading Series Aimed at Getting New Plays to the Next Rung” at the Creek and Cave, 10-93 Jackson Avenue, LIC. $7. www.ThePlat formGroup.org MUSICAL TRIBUTE Monday, July 23 tribute to Sinatra, Como and Haymes at 4 at the Briarwood library. SOUL LEGENDS Monday, July 23 tribute to Sam Cooke and Marvin Gaye at the Peninsula library at 6. CHINESE PHOTOS Monday, July 23 Chinese Impressions at 6:30 at the Bellerose library. ROCK & ROLL Monday, July 23 at the Flushing library at 6:30. IRISH MUSIC Monday, July 23 at the Ridgewood library at 6:30. THE BLUES Monday, July 23 at the East Elmhurst library at 7. FULL FORCE Tuesday, July 24 at Springfield Park at 7. JEOPARDY TRIVIA Tuesdays, July 24, 31 at the Seaside library at 3:30. SWINGIN BLUES Tuesday, July 24 at the Bay Terrace library at 1:30. SINATRA Tuesday, July 24 at the East Flushing library at 2. DICKENS Tuesday, July 24 Friends of Dickens Readers Theatre at 6:30 at the Flushing library. CHESS CLUB Tu e s d a y, J u l y 2 4 a t t h e Woodhaven library at 2. LE’ANDRIA JOHNSON Wednesday, July 25 at Springfield Park at 7. IRISH MUSIC Wednesday, July 25 at 2 at the McGoldrick library. GOLDEN RADIO/TV Wednesday, July 25 at the Maspeth library at 2:30. TAMIA Thursday, July 26 at Springfield Park at 7. BOBBY DARIN Thursday, July 26 tribute to Bobby Darin, Neil Diamond and Paul Anka at 2 at the Bellerose library. GREEN FILM Thursday, July 26 Green film and Q&A at the Astoria library at 6. GAME DAY Thursday, July 26 at the Woodhaven library at 4. OPEN MIC Thursday, July 26 at 6 at the East Elmhurst library. HIP-TO-HIP THEATRE

Thursdays, July 26, August 16 at 7:30 at the Voelker Orth Museum. 729-5867. AMER. ANIMATION Thursday, July 26 Origins of American Animation at 6 at the Seaside library. SAM COOKE Thursday, July 26 tribute to Sam Cooke, Drifters and Ray Charles at 6 at the Woodhaven library. FOREST PARK Thursday, July 26 Wondrous Stories at 7:30. Sunday, July 29 Queens Symphony Orchestra presents “ L a Trav i a t a ” a t 5 . F o re st Park Bandshell. CHICAGO SOUL Thursday, July 26 at the Lefrak City library at 6:30. HISTORICAL NY Thursday, July 26 Historical NY on Film at 6:30 at the Seaside library. THEATER Friday, July 27 Power of the Trinit y at 8 at Springf ield Park. HERE’S TO THE LADIES Friday, July 27 tribute to Ella, Peggy, Doris, Billie and more at 1:30 at the North Hills library. PASSPORT FRIDAYS Friday, July 27 Egypt. Dance and music program begins at 6:30, films at 8. Queens museum of Art. 592-9700. BINGO Friday, July 27 at 3:30 at the Queens Village library. POW WOW Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 27, 28, 29 34 th Annual Thunderbird American Indian Mid-Summer Pow Wow at the Queens Count y Farm Museum, 7350 Little Neck Parkway, Floral Park. $10 adults, $5 child re n . 3 4 7 - FA R M . Pe r f o r mances Friday 7-10, Saturday 12-5 and 7-10 and Sunday 12-5. JAMAICA DRUM JAM Saturday, July 28 a t t h e Central library at noon. Register. ROCK & ROLL Saturday, July 28 a t t h e Flushing library at 2. GERSHWIN Saturday, July 28 a t t h e Forest Hills library at 2 and 4. CHICAGO BLUES Saturday, July 28 a t t h e Cambria Heights library at 3. SALTWATER FISHING Sunday, July 29 at the World Fair Marina, Pier 1 at 11. 760-3141. FAMILY STAGE Sunday, July 29 SummerStage Kids Queens at Springfield Park at 4.


Off His Rocker John Rocker is at it again. The former Atlanta Braves pitcher who made headlines in New York for saying he wouldn’t want to play in the City regularly because he wouldn’t want to have to ride on the 7 train is back in the public eye – and it seems like he hasn’t learned his lesson. With a new column on a conservative website, New York’s least favorite pitcher makes another attack on immigrants, going on an extended rant on how immigrants don’t assimilate as well as previous generations have. With such an extensive immigrant population, we here at QConf

Models Of Queens

Queens remembers John Rocker think it’s safe to say that John won’t be adding Queens to his “Must Visit” list anytime soon.

P Diddy Goldilocks

Once upon a time there was a rapper named Sean Combs (PDiddy) who lived in a mansion in East Hampton. One afternoon a crazed fan named Quamine Taylor broke into P-Diddys home. Taylor saw food on the table, and decided to try it. Taylor ate Sean Combs’s fried chicken, it wasn’t too hot. Then Quamine Taylor tried Combs’ Dutch Masters cigars and drank a can of orange soda. “My goodness I’m sleepy,” Taylor said entering Mr. Diddy’s bedroom. Taylor then sat on Sean Combs’s bed, which was just right and Taylor fell asleep there. In a short while

Sean Combs returned home. “Someone’s been eating my fried chicken!” said Sean Combs. Turns out, Mr. Quamine is a stalker who was apprehended by Police in Combs home not once, not twice, but for the third time. Not quite the fable in real life is it?

Elena Karavassilis Oakland Gardens Height: 5’4" Weight: 113lbs. Stats: 34-26-36 Even years away from the modeling world couldn’t stop Elena’s love of conquering the catwalk. She first got into modeling at age five, when she joined the John Robert Powers agency. This didn’t last long, and Elena didn’t pick up modeling again until she was sixteen. “A friend told me to audition for Shortstack. I got it, and I’ve been with them for about a year now. It felt good to start up [modeling] again,” she said. A large part of Shortstack that appealed to Elena was their goal to work with shorter girls and change the conventional ways of modeling. “When I was younger, I really liked the idea of modeling. But, I was never tall enough. My friend suggested Shortstack because of their work with shorter girls. It was very accepting.” Starting up one of her passions again has Elena

For The Birds

Water Sports As two QConf contributors strolled along 14th Road in Whitestone for a coffee run, we stumbled upon this makeshift water fountain. Apparently, a local resident decided to get a little crafty and attach a hose to siphon water from the hydrant. The hose spanned half a block and sprawled across several fences. Well, that’s one way to save money on your next water bill.

Beep Beep!

The Queens Zoo’s new roadrunner.

Taking leave of his usual home in the American Southwest, a road runner is now calling the Queens Zoo home. The zoo’s new resident can reach a running speed of up to 25 miles per hour, the fastest running speed of any flighted bird. It’s brown and white plumage acts as camouflage from its predators. The camo may come in handy, considering the zoo has a coyote exhibit not too far away. The Queens Zoo has yet to specify whether the coyote exhibit has received any packages from Acme.

QConfidential: Who We Are QConf is edited by: Michael Schenkler. Contributors: Ross Barkan, Steve Ferrari, Veronica Lewin, Marcia Moxom Comrie, Megan Montalvo, Wayne Dean Doyle, Mike Nussbaum. Email: Conf@QueensTribune.com

Confidentially, New York . . .

www.queenstribune.com • July 19-25, 2012 Tribune Page 31

Right before a press conference on July 10 to address street cleaning in Woodside, Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer had a little SNAFU of his own. Bird poop had apparently plummeted from the heavens and struck his jacket. Jacket off, Van Bramer still got the show on the road, and is now leading the charge to clean up bird droppings in Western Queens. One unfortunate Jimmy Van Bramer accident didn’t have anything to do with his long crusade against the feathered menaces though, and the residents of Western Queens can feel good knowing Van Bramer is keeping their streets clean. That’s nothing to poo poo.

looking to the future very confidently. “I’d love to try and pursue modeling as a career. It’s just so much fun to do every day,” she says eagerly. The upcoming Benjamin N. Cardozo High School senior, aside from exploring colleges, adds swimming, basketball, and reading to her list of interests when she isn’t modeling. Hanging out with friends in Astoria and Bay Terrace shows love for her home borough. “I like that Queens isn’t too busy. Everything is close to me, and my family and friends are here; what more could I want?” And what advice does Elena have for models on the rise? “Just go out and try everything! I thought I couldn’t model because I was short, but I found what was right for me. Don’t let anything hold you back.”


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Queens Tribune Epaper  

Queens Tribune Epaper 071912

Queens Tribune Epaper  

Queens Tribune Epaper 071912

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