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Vol. 42, No. 28 July 12-18 2012

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Triple Homicide Stuns Quiet Community PAGE 3

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Bayside Soldier Naturalized At White House PAGE 4

Tourism Council Summer Series Promotes Queens Q

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This Week ..................................................................8 Police Blotter ..........................................................10 Leisure .....................................................................18 Queens Today .........................................................19 Classifieds...............................................................22 Confidential .............................................................30

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Page 2 Tribune July 12-18, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com


Queens Deadline

Deadly Shooting Rocks Neighborhood Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

When she looked outside, she saw sparks from the barrage of bullets. The July 7 incident was one of many during a bloody Fourth of July week that left 21 people dead Citywide. Councilman James Sanders Jr. (D-Laurelton) held a press conference Tuesday morning to call for an end to the violence on City streets. Last week’s shootings rattled the usually-quiet block in Southeast Queens. “In this community, the beloved people of Springfield Gardens have been assaulted big time,” Sanders said. “And the community must stand up and fight back. We can’t take this silently.” While the police have not yet given a motive for the shootings, it has been reported that that an argument over a woman sparked the shooters to follow the car to Springfield Gardens to seek revenge. “If you were arguing in a club over a young lady … what does she

By V ERONICA LEWIN Days after the July 7 shooting that left three men dead and one injured, residents in Springfield Gardens are still shocked by the violence. “Why were they bringing their problem here in this neighborhood?” asked a resident who wished to remain anonymous. Around 5 a.m. Saturday, 63 shots were fired into a doubleparked Jeep Grand Cherokee on 144th Avenue and 185th Street, killing three out of the four passengers. Police say an AK-47 was used in the attack. According to police, the Jeep was followed by two gunmen at least 11 miles from a nightclub in Brooklyn. No arrests have been made as of press time. A woman said she first mistook the early morning racket for an Independence Day celebration. “When I heard the shots, I didn’t know they were shots,” she said. “I thought they were firecrackers.”

Councilman James Sanders Jr. (r.) decries last week’s shootings in Springfield Gardens. look like? Is this Cleopatra?” the Councilman asked. Other reports have stated that three men died over a $1 million drug dispute. Sanders said the details of the crime have the characteristics of a drug related incident. Sanders held a gun buy back program in 2008, where more than

900 guns were collected in six hours. Borough President Helen Marshall allocated $50,000 for a gun buy back on June 23, where 55 firearms were turned in. The councilman called on Queens District Attorney Richard Brown to host a gun buy back program to keep weapons off the streets. “Every DA in New York City has a gun buy back program except ours. What will it take, sir? What body count will be enough?” Sanders asked. The councilman said he has been told in the past that the DA’s office does not have the funding to sponsor another gun buy back. Sanders suggested using some of the confiscated money from drug busts at John F. Kennedy and LaGuardia Airports to fund future gun buy back programs in the borough. Brown said his office will sponsor another program when necessary. “Getting guns off the street and reducing crime has always been,

and remains, a top priority of my office,” Brown said in a statement. “Gun buy back programs are just one of many strategies that we utilize to keep guns off of the street. We have used gun buy backs in the past and we will use them again when we deem them appropriate.” Brown also added the public can turn in guns anytime at their local precinct and receive $100, no questions asked. Sanders warned that the community must work together to prevent the city from returning to a time where violence ran rampant. “It harkens back to the terrible days of the 90s New York and the days we need to fight and make sure don’t come back,” he said. Where the drug gangs were using these types of weapons and we should do everything in our power not to go back to those days.” Reach Deputy Editor Veronica Lewin at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 123 or vlewin@queenspress.com.

matically on the Hudson River. All 155 passengers and the crew aboard survived, but safety and wildlife experts scrambled to prevent future bird strikes. In April, a Delta Airlines jet leaving JFK Airport ingested a bird into one of its engines, forcing it to Geese are rounded up at Jamaica Bay Mon- make an emergency landing. No one was day morning. injured. Monday’s [Interior] Secretary [Ken] Salazar geese culling coincided with their for his leadership in moving this molting period, when the geese are flightless. process forward.” “There’s no sound science beGateway National Recreation area spokesman John Warren ex- hind the roundup,” said David plained that the geese culling would Karopkin, who runs the anti-geesealso help restore the salt marsh is- killing organization GooseWatch lands in Jamaica Bay. Even if the NYC. “Aviation experts who are islands are fenced off, geese can fly members of GooseWatch NYC in and pull up the grass plantings by agree the removal of geese will have their roots. Warren said that USDA no cumulative effect on reducing agents originally planned to remove air strikes between planes and 1,000 geese but “they all didn’t birds.” Karopkin argued that bird cooperate.” Last month, Gillibrand also suc- strikes are relatively rare events, cessfully pushed to expedite the re- and not all wildlife and aviation moval of 200 geese at two landfill e x p e r t s a r e u n i t e d b e h i n d areas along the Jamaica Bay shore- Gillibrand. Dozens of bird species still line. Bird strikes entered the public consciousness in 2009 after U.S. inhabit the refuge. The National Airways Flight 1549 collided with a Transportation Safety Board, two flock of Canada geese, landing dra- years ago, made 33 recommen-

dations for reducing bird strikes, but focused on the mechanical and safety equipment standards of airplanes themselves rather than bird culling. While Don Riepi, director of the Northeast Chapter of American Littoral Society and Jamaica Bay Guardian, supported the decision to regulate the geese population, he also worried that the sudden removal of a large animal population from a wildlife refuge set a dangerous precedent.

“We’re concerned with the future,” Riepi said. “What will be the next species and the next species and the next species? While we understand Canada geese are quite numerous in the New York City area and we think as long as they’re being used as food resource, we can live with it, we’d also like to see some mitigation funding go to park for this.” Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com.

Hou Trial Date Set rized by the City Campaign Finance By WAYNE DEAN DOYLE Jia “Jenny” Hou, the former Board with the intent to increase campaign treasurer for City Comp- the matching funds provided by the CFB. troller John Liu, pleaded If convicted, Hou not guilty in Manhattan could face up to 20 years Federal Court on Tuesfor each charge. day to charges of conIn November, three spiracy, wire fraud and months before Hou’s armaking false statements. rest, the FBI arrested Judge Richard Xingwu “Oliver” Pan durSullivan set a court date ing a sting operation on for Feb. 4 – almost a year charges to commit wire after Hou was arrested. Hou, 25, of Flushing, Jia “Jenny” Hou fraud and attempting to commit wire fraud. was arrested in February Reach Reporter Wayne Dean after she allegedly participated in a scheme that used straw donors to Doyle at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125, at wdoyle@ funnel large, illegal contributions o r above the individual limit autho- queenstribune.com.

www.queenstribune.com • July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 3

By ROSS BARK AN More than 700 Canada geese were permanently removed from the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge on July 9, ridding the airways of potential bird strikes or ineffectively slaughtering defenseless animals, according to a competing version of events. U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (DNY) took credit for galvanizing U.S. Dept. of Agriculture agents to round up the birds early Monday morning and transport them upstate to a meat processing plant. There, the birds will be killed and their meat will be distributed to New York food banks. Gillibrand, who introduced legislation in May to speed up the removal of geese from the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, hailed the geese culling. The refuge lies in close proximity to John F. Kennedy Airport, where low-flying planes can potentially collide with airborne wildlife. Canada geese are the most significant avian threat to airplanes because of their sheer size, weighing up to 10 pounds. “We could not afford to sit back and wait for a catastrophe to occur before cutting through bureaucratic red tape between federal agencies,” Gillibrand said. “We are finally taking action to help reduce bird strikes and save lives. I thank

Photo by National Parks Services.

700 Geese Removed From Jamaica Bay


Bayside Soldier Naturalized At White House By WAYNE DEAN DOYLE For those who wonder if the American Dream still exists, wonder no more. Spc. Alla Ausheva of the 427th Brigade Support Battalion, originally from Russia but now residing in Bayside, came to the U.S. in March 2011 when her husband won a Green Card in the National Citizenship Lottery. Ausheva was one of three Na-

tional Guardsmen from the New York Metro area who celebrated the Fourth of July in the East Room of the White House, where they celebrated the nation’s birthday as American citizens for the first time with President Barack Obama. “It’s very exciting and a real honor, I never thought that I would be in the White House

standing in front of the president,” Ausheva said. “The president is much taller than you might think; he was so relaxed and calm and really seemed like a confident, genuine man.” This was the third time the president hosted a naturalization ceremony and told the audience, which included the families and friends of the service members, that it is one

Local Tennis League Receives $12,500 Grant

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By MEGAN MONTALVO The New York Junior Tennis League (NYJTL) has a new reason to celebrate. The tennis and education-themed community organization recently received a $12,500 grant from USTA Serves, the National Charitable Foundation of the United States Tennis Association. Based in Woodside, the NYJTL has become known for providing free programs for inner-city children. With the aid of the grant, NYJTL

plans to continue its work with the community through the development of lesson planning, which will be offered to enrollees both on and off the court. “We are just thrilled to receive this grant from USTA,” said Deborah Antoine, President of NYJTL. “We look forward to helping kids with high school admissions and test preparation.” For the fall semester, preparation is already underway. Curriculum will focus on preparing stu-

dents in sixth, seventh and eighth grades for their future career choices. “We go beyond tennis lessons,” said Antoine. “We encourage children to explore potential careers while focusing on the importance of decision making.” Parents interested in enrolling their children in the after school program can visit www.nyjtl.org Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@ queenstribune.com.

of his favorite things to do. “It brings me great joy and inspiration, because it reminds us that we are a country that is bound together not simply by ethnicity or bloodlines, but by fidelity to a set of ideas,” Obama said. “All of you did something profound: You chose to serve. You put on the uniform of a country that was not yet fully your own. You displayed the values that we celebrate every Fourth of July duty, responsibility and patriotism.” The New York National Guard Soldiers were among 25 military members who became full-fledged Americans at the ceremony, earning it through a program started after the Sept. 11 attacks that fasttracks naturalization in the military. “The way people treat you in this country when you put on the uniform is very comforting, considering I haven’t really done anything significant since my arrival,

Spc. Alla Ausheva this is a very proud moment for me,” stated Ausheva. Ausheva said she was unsure of what the future held for her. “Everything has happened so fast since I got here,” she said. “I will probably be going to school to better my English, but I do need to decide what I want to do.” Reach Reporter Wayne Dean Doyle at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125 or wdoyle@queenstribune.com.


Hospital Opens Wound Healing Center By WAYNE DEAN DOYLE New York Hospital Queens has been given a welcome boost with the addition of a Center for Wound Healing located at Silvercrest Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation 144-45 87th Ave. in Briarwood. The project, which costs approximately $500,000, will provide up to eight patients a day with specialized treatment in hyperbaric chambers. The center also treats other patients with chronic wounds who do not need hyperbaric therapy.

“The addition is very important because currently, close to five million people in the U.S. suffer from chronic wounds and the number is on the rise,” said Allison Fleming, a spokesperson for NYHQ. People most likely to suffer from chronic wounds include the elderly, diabetics and obese people, and patients receiving radiation. Stephen Mills, president and CEO of NYHQ, noted that one in six diabetics will suffer from chronic foot ulcers and 60 percent of bed-

ridden patients, especially the elderly and those in long-term care facilities, suffer from pressure ulcers. “As these populations grow, so will the number of chronic wounds,” Mills said. “Opening this center means patients can receive a higher level of wound care near where they live and work.” The new center addresses the need for more aggressive wound treatment using advanced techniques, including Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy. The therapy is rec-

ommended for people with hard to treat chronic wounds including pressure ulcers, diabetic ulcers and radionecrosis. The new center is open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Reach Reporter Wayne Dean Doyle at (718) 357-7400, Ext. Officials cut the ribbon on the new NYHQ 1 2 5 , o r w d o y l e @ Center For Wound Healing at Silvercrest queenstribune.com. Center for Nursing & Rehabilitation.

Queens Businesses Get Achievement Awards Two Queens entities this week were presented with 2012 New York City Neighborhood Achievement Awards, which honor organizations, businesses and individuals that have enhanced City neighborhoods by fostering economic opportunity. Queens Theatre and the Long Island City-based Brooklyn Grange Farm were two of the 17 businesses honored by Deputy Mayor Robert

Steel and Small Business Services Commissioner Robert Walsh on July 10. “It’s the 300 vibrant neighborhoods that make New York City so unique, and each year the Neighborhood Achievement Awards spotlights the remarkable small businesses, individuals, and organizations helping to strengthen neighborhoods in all five boroughs,” Walsh said.

“New York’s network of diverse and thriving neighborhoods is the engine that powers the City’s economy,” Steel added. The Queens Theatre, located in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, received the Cultural Award. The award honored the theater’s commitment to hosting diverse performances and cultural services, which reach more than 100,000 people each year. The theater’s mission is

to provide quality and diverse performing arts activities that are geographically and economically accessible to the 2.2 million residents of Queens. Brooklyn Grange Farm in Long Island City, the world’s largest rooftop farm, was presented with the Queens Small Business of the Year Award. The farm produces 15,000 pounds of organically-grown produce on 40,000 square feet of roof-

top space. Brooklyn Grange connects and educates New York City residents, especially youth, with a food system from which they are increasingly alienated. Brooklyn Grange is expanding to more rooftops around the City, with the newest location in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. For information about the Dept. of Small Business Services, visit www.nyc.gov/sbs.

www.queenstribune.com • July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 5


Edit Page In Our Opinion:

End The Violence The tragedy in Springfield Gardens over the weekend that resulted in the deaths of three men and left one injured was only one incident during a particularly violent week in New York City. During the Fourth of July week, the City saw 77 people shot. Calling it a bad week would be an understatement, but reaction to the multiple shootings could set the powder keg off even further. Councilman James Sanders was one of many elected officials this week to call for an end to violence on City streets. He added to that by calling on Queens DA Richard Brown to join the City’s other boroughs in holding regular gun buyback events. While these programs – along with other City measures – have lessened some of the crime in New York, it seems like it will never go away completely. As the old saying goes, “It takes a village to raise a child.” In this case, it takes every member of our diverse communities to come together and try to break a culture of violence that dates back further than most of us can remember. We can take away the weapons, but without creating a culture of understanding, where violence becomes unnecessary, what good will that do?

In Your Opinion:

Page 6 Tribune July 12-18, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

One More Time To The Editor: Here we go again. Every 5-10 years a commercial sports developer rediscovers Flushing Meadows Corona Park, with its expansive Beaux Arts to be a prime location for a spectacular venue. In the 80s it was the Grand Prix, in the 90s the USTA expansion, rock concert amphitheater, World’s Fair III and recently the Olympics and afootball stadium. As the geographic center of the city on a vehicular and mass transit hub adjacent to LaGuardia Airport, it already has three major stadiums with insufficient parking. But the ideas for the private use of public park land keep coming. Robert Moses created the land for the 1939 World’s Fair, out of a salt marsh that had become the world’s largest ash dump. After the 1964-65 World’s Fair, it took 25 years and a dynamic Borough President and Parks Commis-

sioner to fund and implement a capital plan that transformed it into the premiere recreation and cultural facility worthy of a Flagship Park. Now it is the second heaviest used park in the City and the recreational backyard for the park starved immigrant communities of western Queens and the surrounding neighborhoods with numerous soccer, cricket, volleyball and baseball fields, along with picnic, boating, and biking areas, plus five prestigious cultural institutions. If the proposed soccer stadium could not be built in Central, Prospect, Van Cortlandt, or Hudson River Park’s then it cannot be built here. There are other suitable locations that are not on park land, such as Willets and College Point industrial areas. The 1964 World’s Fair ‘Unisphere’ has become the icon of the park and is used in advertisements globally to sell anything you

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can imagine, however the Park itself is not for sale. Arne Abramowitz Flushing Meadows Corona Park Administrator 1986-93

Save The Parkland To The Editor: The consideration of a proposal by Major League Soccer (is this a non-profit organization?) to usurp eight acres of New York City parkland represents an abhorrent exercise of authority by morally corrupt city officials to rape Queens parkland! Where are the payoffs going? Willets Point is a prominent example of this ingrained corruption of the Bloomberg Mayoralty. In his time, Parks Commissioner Gordon Davis wanted to sell Kissena Golf Course and Clearview Golf Course to bring in money to “save the parks.” This travesty was fortunately avoided. I have a suggestion - why not have MLS buy out the Willets Point area owners for a fair market value of their properties instead of New York Mayor Bloomberg invoking eminent domain to seize the properties? Everyone might find this acceptable except the Mayor and we can retain our public park. Benjamin M. Haber of Flushing expressed all of my other opinions in his “Keep The Parks” letter. Charles Curry, Fresh Meadows

No Sur prise To The Editor: “AG: Development Corps. Lobbied Illegally” (July 5) should come as no surprise to those in the know at City Hall and the NYC Council. New York City prospered and successfully grew prior to creation of the NYC Economic Development Corporation and its predecessor, the NYC Public Development Corporation. In many instances, projects supported by these government corporations have been heavily subsidized by taxpayers, commonly known as corporate welfare. Between direct government funding, low interest below market rate loans and long term Veronica Lewin, Deputy Editor Marcia Moxam Comrie, Contributing Editor Reporters: Harley Benson, Wayne Dean Doyle, Ross Barkan, Megan Montalvo Interns: Asia Ewart, Cristina Foglietta Photographers: Ira Cohen, Michael Fischthal, Lee Katzman

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tax exemptions — the bill to taxpayers in the end can be greater than the so-called public benefits. There is also a relationship between Pay for Play campaign contributions from developers to elected officials looking for favorable legislation, private property condemnation under eminent domain, building permits, public infrastructure improvements, along with direct and hidden subsidies. In some cases, city and state development corporations actually compete against each other attempting to outbid each other in offering potential investors the best deal. This translates to the highest subsidies at taxpayers’ expense. Don’t forget the conflict of interest for senior staff from municipal regulatory and permitting agencies. Too many leave in the twilight of any Mayoral administration to become employees or consultants to the same developers they previously oversaw. Some developers try to purchase the support of local community groups by making so-called voluntary donations. They also make promises for capital improvements, which after the major project is completed don’t always appear. Other commitments for creation of permanent new jobs and tax revenues frequently do not meet expectations. New York City Urban Land Use Review Process (ULURP) including excessive zoning, land use, environmental reviews and historic preservation rules and regulations have stifled financial investments from the neighborhood homeowner along with small and medium sized businesses. These would support economic development, the creation of jobs and expansion of our tax base which is essential to fund municipal services. It has generated a cottage industry of highly compensated lawyers, lobbyists and public relations people who know how to navigate this maze of rules and regulations that even a Ph.D would have difficulty understanding. Larry Penner Great Neck Gerry Laytin Director of Advertising and Marketing Shelly Cookson Corporate Advertising Account Executives Donna Lawlor Elizabeth Rieger Shari Strongin

Ronald Bakman Merlene Carnegie Joseph DelliCarpini Tom Eisenhauer

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Tireless Advocate To The Editor In our current economic climate, members of the City Council must make difficult decisions as they develop and approve the city budget. This budget season, District 26 City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer has once again shown himself to be a tireless advocate for the needs of our community. Thanks to Council Member Van Bramer, Speaker Quinn and other members of the City Council, all 10 afterschool programs in the district will be able to continue providing critically important services to children and working parents. Were it not for the work of Van Bramer, many of these programs would have been forced to close. He has ensured that over 1,700 students will have a structured place to go after school where they can discover and develop their talents and build upon school-day learning. Additionally, the Council Member successfully advocated to restore funding to senior centers, case management services, libraries, and a myriad of other human services and arts programs in Queens. On behalf of Sunnyside Community Services and the thousands of people we serve, I salute Van Bramer and his excellent staff for the work they’ve done on behalf of the community. Judy Zangwill Executive Director Sunnyside Community Services

Lost Icon To The Editor We have once again lost another icon of the television and movie industry. Ernest Borgnine was a very talented actor and a true gentleman. His long and distinguished acting career spanned more than 60 years, from movies such as his memorable award winning performance as Marty in McHale’s Navy and beyond. He will be sorely missed. Our deepest sympathy to his wife, family and friends. John Amato Fresh Meadows Mitch Kronenfeld: Classified Manager Classified Ad Representatives: Nadia Hack, Peggie Henderson, Fran Gordon, Susan Jaffe, Marty Lieberman, Chris Preasha, Lorraine Shaw, Sheila Scholder, Lillian Saar

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Queens This Week

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Woodhaven Girl Walks For Ar thr itis Woodhaven native Cheyanne Campo is not giving up. Physical pain will not keep her from her goals. Campo, 10, raised close to $600 for the Arthritis Foundation and participated in the organization's annual Arthritis Walk on June 23 in Manhattan. What makes that feat special is that Campo herself has been stricken with juvenile arthritis since she was three years old. "On the back of the T-shirt, it says 'Walking for a Cure' so they can find a cure for kids like me with juvenile arthritis and anyone else, because it's hard for us to do activities sometimes, especially during the winter," Campo said. "When I get sick, my knee bothers me with the rest of my body." Juvenile arthritis causes pain and swelling in her knees and other joints. Juvenile arthritis is an umbrella term that refers to various autoimmune and inflammatory conditions that can develop in children ages 16 and younger. Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan, where Campo receives her medical services, raised nearly $20,000 for the Arthritis Foundation. Dr. Emma Jane MacDermott, Campo's rheumatologist, said medical advances have enabled many young patients to live longer. "When a child is diagnosed with juvenile arthritis, many parents are worried and upset," Dr. MacDermott said. "They are thinking about a future for their child full of problems, and we really like to reassure parents that's not the case. A lot of parents worry that their children shouldn't be in sports, they won't be able to take part in physical activity, and that's often not the case." Although her knees occasionally hurt, Campo had little time to rest. She was busy getting ready for the Arthritis Walk, recruiting family and friends. They wore T-shirts that said "Team Cheyanne" during the 3.5-mile walk. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com . -Ross Barkan

Lincoln Center Comes To Queens Locals no longer need to make the trek into Manhattan to catch world class performances at the prestigious Lincoln Center. Beginning July 14, the best of music and dance is coming to Queens with the launch of a free performance series hosted by Lin-

coln Center Local. Several branches of the Queens Library will be the new temporary homes for classically-trained performers throughout the summer. "We expect this to be something that we are going to see a lot of people enjoy," said Library President Thomas Galante. "Being able to bring the performances out to the people of Queens for free is a great opportunity." The Broadway branch at 40-20 Broadway in Long Island City will host the inaugural performance this Saturday and will feature a choreographed flamenco number in "The Resurgence of Spanish Dance" starting at 2 p.m. Dozens of residents along with Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer (D-Sunnyside) have already made plans to attend the performance. "I like flamenco; I love the costumes, the music and the rhythm to it," said Van Bramer. "I think a lot of the families will love it too." As a resident who avidly used the library's amenities since his childhood, Van Bramer said he believes the incentive of the no-cost performances will open a new door to the arts world for many children in the community. "It's so important for all young people, regardless of money to see these shows," said Van Bramer. "It really stimulates their mind." Following the initial performance in LIC this month, Grammynominated Musical Ensemble DEORO is scheduled to perform at the Flushing branch on July 21 at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Broadway Star Teri Dale Hansen will be singing hit songs by the Gershwin Brothers at the Forest Hills Branch on July 28 at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. For a complete list of performance times and dates, visit www.aboutlincolncenter.org Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queens tribune.com. -Megan Montalvo

Condo, Co-op Costs Causing Concer n Queens officials joined forces with co-op and condo owners to apply pressure on the state legislature to ensure the extension to property tax abatements. New legislation drafted by State Sen. Tony Avella (DBayside), and Assemblyman David Weprin (D-Little Neck) reiterated the importance of funding and tax breaks for property owners. As it stands, co-op and condo owners face the prospect of more than

$400 million in tax increases. "It seems bizarre that these coop's and condos are in the same tax bracket as two and three bedroom family homes, there is no justification to treat these (co-op's and condo's) any other way," Weprin said. Assemblyman Ed Braunstein (DBayside) said increases were not on the horizon. "Co-op and condo owners should not worry that they will see an increase in their taxes in the near future. The Mayor's office has indicated that they will administratively continue the current tax abatement until the State Legislature reconvenes later this year to pass a new plan which provides even more relief to middle class co-op owners," Braunstein said. An agreement on legislation was reached that will cut taxes for the vast majority of condo and co-op owners who pay a disproportionate share of the City's property tax burden. In the short term, the City has issued tax bills for the current fiscal year based on the current tax abatement rates. President of Bay Terrance Community Alliance Warren Scheiber emphasized the importance of affordable middle class housing. "Maintenance abatements allow us to continue making improvements such as new windows and roofs, which are needed," he said. Reach Reporter Wayne Dean Doyle at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125 or wdoyle@queenstribune.com. -Wayne Dean Doyle

Glen Oaks Little League Remembers Star The Glen Oaks Little League kicks off this spring with the help of the Steven J. Petillo Field of Dreams Foundation. Glen Oaks is no ordinary little league baseball team, however. "We want to reach out to parents of special needs children who want to play baseball and also show that Glen Oaks Little League can give them (special needs children) the opportunity to do so," organizer Jodi Aronoff said. According to Aronoff, Steven was no ordinary little boy. "He was a 9-year-old superstar who loved baseball." Steven was killed on Aug. 16, 2010, while his family was heading on vacation to Busch Gardens, Va. The vehicle in which Steven was traveling careened out of control on Interstate 95 after being hit by a reckless driver, sending the vehicle down and embankment. Steven died instantly when the

vehicle collided with a tree on the way down the embankment. He was buried in his baseball uniform, along with an autographed baseball that New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez sent the family after hearing about the crash. Any individual interested in contacting the Glen Oaks Little League should email Jodi Aronoff at Baseballmom414@yahoo.com. Reach Reporter Wayne Dean Doyle at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125 or wdoyle@queenstribune.com. -Wayne Dean Doyle

Summer Program Introduces Dragonflies The dragonflies, in all their bizarre glory, came alive in Queens. New York City public school girls were introduced to the various types of dragonflies in Forest Park's lush surroundings yesterday, learning how to catch and identify them. The young women participated in City Park Foundation's Green Girls Summer Institute. Green Girls Summer Institute is a program that focuses on enriching scientific knowledge and addressing environmental justice issues through field trips and community service projects in City Parks. The dragonfly education was held at Forest Park Drive, off Woodhaven Boulevard. Susan Stanley, a research ecologist with the Natural Resources Group - a team of scientists that helps research and maintain the resources of the City's parks taught the students that dragonflies are among the fastest insects in the world. With names like Comet Darner, Wandering Glider, Great Pond Hawk and Widow Skimmer, dragonflies are a remarkable and overlooked species in New York City's ecosystem. The insects also stay in an aquatic larva stage for a year or more and then molt into a dragonfly and live as adults for a month or two. Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com. -Ross Barkan

Richmond Hill Seeks Business Distr ict As Richmond Hill evolves as an economic and social hub, it is seeking to create a Business Improvement District (BID) to further spur entrepreneurship in the area. Behind the push for a BID is the Richmond Hill Economic Develop-

ment Council. The RHEDC is a not-for-profit organization that strives to improve the economic conditions for businesses and shoppers in Richmond Hill. Serving as a liaison between the community and governmental and elected officials, the RHEDC is in the process of creating a BID, a public private partnership composed of business owners and commercial tenants who deliver services such like sanitation, marketing programs, capital improvements, and beautification for the area. All are funded by a special assessment paid by property owners within the district. Vishnu Mahadeo, RHEDC's executive director, views the establishment of a BID as a great economic opportunity for Richmond Hill. "I think before the end of the year we should have a BID," Mahadeo said. "We're in the process of holding public meetings and we're now doing tax assessments." The BID would run along Liberty Avenue through Richmond Hill's commercial heart, bordered by Woodhaven Boulevard and the Van Wyck Expressway. Any commercial, retail or industrial area can apply to create a BID. BIDs must be approved by Community Boards, the City Planning Commission, the City Council and the Mayor. For Mahadeo, the creation of a BID would bring Richmond Hill one step closer to gaining the political representation the neighborhood believes it deserves. Community leaders have been very vocal about obtaining a City Council district of their own. Richmond Hill is divided among several Senate, Assembly and Council districts; the redistricting process that the City Council will undergo next year gives South Asian community leaders hope that someone from their own community can represent them in the City Council. "We are the stepchild of any political entity," Mahadeo said. "Funding is very scarce, if any at all. Funding is not coming to Richmond Hill. We are dealing with the reality of life." Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com. -Ross Barkan

Send Queens This Week News and Photos to: Queens Tribune 150-50 14th Rd. Whitestone, NY 11357


Queens Focus PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE Local students received degrees during spring 2012 commencement ceremonies at Cornell University in Ithaca. They include: Flushing: Neerja Balaji, Bachelor of Science in industrial and labor relations; Gloria Lu, Bachelor of Science in electrical and computer engineering; Diwakar Gupta, Artium Baccalarius in biological sciences; Michelle Chau, Bachelor of Science in biological engineering, Ariel Brown, Artium Baccalarius in sociology. Whitestone: Xin Xin Wang, Bachelor of Science in human biology, health and society. Xueyou Lim of Flushing has enrolled at Clarkson University in Potsdam for the fall 2012 semester. Egzone Sulejmani of Flushing earned a perfect 4.0 grade

point average during the spring 2012 semester at SUNY Oneonta and has been named to the college’s Provost List. Local students were named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at SUNY Oneonta. They include: College Point: Cynthia Restrepo. Flushing: Mathew Frankel, Samantha Pepe, Joseph Prio, Joshua Slifkin. Whitestone: Angela Amedeo, Derek Casanas, Danielle Davaros. Bo-hyun Moon of Flushing was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 term at Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, Conn. Anna Di Re of Flushing was

named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Loyola University Maryland in Baltimore.

Scholarship Winners:

George Mirisis of Malba was named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Metropolitan Campus in Teaneck and Hackensack, N.J. Nicole Giacopelli of Flushing graduated and was named to the Honors List for the spring 2012 semester at Fairleigh Dickinson University’s College at Florham in Madison, N.J. Local students were named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2012 semester at SUNY Brockport. They include: College Point: Meagan Maclaren, with honors; Dami Ho. Kelvin Chen of College Point was a member of a team of Binghamton University students selected as second-place winners in the National Federal Aviation Administration’s Design Competition for Universities.

Two high achieving Queens College students have received scholarships to help them prepare for business careers. Pictured (from left) are Flushing resident Laura Burke, Sue Henderson, chief operating officer and vice president of institutional advancement; and Nadia Abbasi of Bangladesh. Burke was the first recipient of the Queens Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hank Auffarth scholarship. Abbasi was awarded a Queens College Business Forum scholarship.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice of Formation of Rockaway Yummy LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/03/2012. Office location: Queens County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 16057 Rockaway Blvd, Jamaica, NY 11434. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/25/12, bearing Index Number NC-000303-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Aastha (Last) KalraMalhotra My present name is (First) Aastha (Last) Kalra aka Aastha Malhotra My present address is 8514 Little Neck Parkway, Floral Park, NY 11001-1014 My place of birth is India My date of birth is June 01, 1981 __________________________________ MITCHELL MARCUS CONSULTING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/31/12. Of-

fice location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 7535 210th St., Apt. 3E, Oakland Gardens, NY 11364. General Purposes. __________________________________ DENTAL TEAM LLP a domestic LLP, filed with the SSNY on 5/22/12. Office Location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLP may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLP, 23-91 Bell Blvd., Ste. LL1, Bay Terrace, NY 11360. Purpose: Dentistry __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 4/12/12, bearing Index Number NC-000187-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Maria (Middle) Eugenia (Last) De LeonRamirez My present name is (First) Maria (Middle) Eugenia (Last) Romero Ramirez, aka Maria Eugenia

Romero De De Leon, aka Maria Eugenia De De Loen, aka Maria Eugenia De Leon, aka Maria E. Deleon, aka Maria E. Deleon-Ramirez My present address is 35-63 169 th Street, 2nd Fl., Flushing, NY 11358 My place of birth is Colombia My date of birth is March 13, 1960 __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/29/12, bearing Index Number NC-000373-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Martin (Middle) Hyo Don (Last) Ahn My present name is (First) Hyo (Middle) Don (Last) Ahn aka Hyodon Ahn My present address is 43-68 160 th St., Flushing, NY 11358. My place of birth is Korea My date of birth is October 20, 1979 __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/28/12, bearing Index Number NC-000367-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the

Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Mohaany (Middle) Netram (Last) Ketwaroo My present name is (First) Mohiny (Middle) Netram (Last) Ketwaroo aka Mohani Ketwaroo Netram My present address is 104-42 1 2 8 th S t r e e t , S o u t h R i c h mond Hill, NY 11419 My place of birth is Guyana My date of birth is March 03, 1961 __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County, on 27 day of June, 2012, bearing Index Number 346/ 12, a copy of which may be examined at the office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York, grants the Petitioner the right to assume the name of Vivienne Pham; the Petitioner’s present address is 4251 Hunter Street, Apt. 3B, Long Island City, New York 11101; the Petitioner’s date of birth is December 31, 1984; the Petitioner’s place of birth is Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam; the Petitioner’s present name is Minh Loan Thi Pham a/k/a

Pham Thi Minh Loan a/k/a Minhloan Shu. __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/4/12, bearing Index Number NC-000281-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Tammy (Last) Luo My present name is (First) Jian (Middle) Ou (Last) Luo My present address is 15272 Melbourne Avenue, Apt. #2A, Flushing, NY 113671412 My place of birth is China My date of birth is December 22, 1982 __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/11/12, bearing Index Number NC-000300-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Rafael (Middle) Arman (Last) Zaman My present name is (First) Rafael (Middle) Zaman (Last) Ryan (infant)

My present address is 7052 Broadway, 1 st Fl., Jackson Heights, NY 11372 My place of birth is Queens, NY My date of birth is November 14, 2011 __________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 6/18/12, bearing Index Number NC-000323-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Monica (Last) Shah My present name is (First) Monica (Middle) Atul (Last) Ghadia aka Monica Ghadia My present address is 34-46 91 st Street, Apt. #33H, Jackson Heights, NY 11372-9200 My place of birth is Hoffman Estate, IL. My date of birth is February 20, 1988 To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 149 or E-Mail Your Copy to the Tribune at: legals@queenstribune.com

www.queenstribune.com • July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 9

LEGAL NOTICE


Compiled by STEVEN J. FERRARI

105th Precinct HOMICIDE: At approximately 4:45 a.m. on June 30, police responded to a 911 call of a male shot in front of 212-14 104th Ave., Queens Village. Upon arrival, police observed the victim, Travis Adams, 24, of Queens Village, with two gunshot wounds to the torso and one gunshot wound to the shoulder. EMS responded and transported the victim to a hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival. There have been no arrests at this time and the investigation is ongoing. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers’ website at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

Page 10 Tribune July 12-18, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

109th Precinct SEXUAL ABUSE: On July 7, police arrested Joel Grubert, 49, of Brooklyn, in connection with two sexual abuses that took place on June 23 at the Flushing branch of the Queens Library. Grubert was charged with sexual abuse and endangering the welfare of a child after he allegedly approached a 6-year-old and a 9-year-old and touched them inappropriately. 112th Precinct SEXUAL ASSAULTS: The NYPD is asking the public’s assistance in ascertaining the whereabouts of two suspects wanted for incidents of sexual abuse, rape and robbery. At approximately 3:29 a.m. on May 19, a 19-year-old female was entering her home in Forest Hills when the first suspect, armed with a knife, grabbed her, pulled her into a walkway and sexually abused her. The suspect also removed money and the victim’s cell phone and fled the location. The second incident occurred at approximately 3 a.m. on May 28. The second victim, a 17-year-old female, was walking in front of her home in Forest Hills when the first suspect, again armed with a knife, approached her, put his hand over the victim’s mouth and dragged her into an alley. The suspect then raped the victim and fled the location. The victim was treated and released from a local hospital. The third incident occurred at approximately 2:37 a.m. on June 3. The victim, a 22year-old female, was entering her home in Forest Hills when the suspect, armed with a knife, demanded her property. The victim complied and the suspect, after being seen by a witness, fled the location with the victim’s belongings. There were no reported injuries. A fourth incident occurred at approximately 2:30 a.m. on June 22. The fourth victim, a 20-year-old female, was walking in front of 97-11 Horace Harding Expressway in Corona when a second suspect walked up behind her and sexually abused her. The victim hit the second suspect with a shopping cart and the suspect fled. The primary suspect then ran up to the victim, threw her to

Ibrahima Ragis, left, and a second susp e c t a r e wa n t e d i n c o n n e c t i o n to sexual assaults in the 112th precinct. the ground and attempted to rape her. The victim fought back and the suspect fled. The victim was brought to an area hospital where she was treated for bruising and lacerations to her body. The first suspect has been identified as Ibrahima Ragis, 20, an African-American male. He is described as being 5-foot-5 and 160 lbs. The second suspect is described as an African-American male, between the ages of 18 and 20, 5-foot-9 and 150 lbs., wearing only dark blue basketball shorts. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers’ website at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential. 113th Precinct Homicide: At approximately 5 a.m. on July 7 in front of 185-4 144th Ave., Jamaica, police responded to 911 call of shots fired. Upon arrival, police observed two unidentified African American males with multiple gunshot wounds inside a double-parked gray Jeep Grand Cherokee. A third unidentified African-American male was discovered on the street by the rear passenger door with several gunshot wounds about the body. EMS responded and pronounced all victims dead at the scene. There have been no arrests and the investigation is ongoing. The identifications of all victims are pending. 115th Precinct FATAL ACCIDENT: At approximately 8:44 p.m. on July 3, at the intersection of Astoria Boulevard and 88th Street in Corona, NYPD responded to a 911 call of a motorcycle accident. Upon arrival, responding officers discovered a motorcycle and an automobile that had been involved in the collision. A preliminary investigation determined that a 2001 Honda motorcycle was traveling eastbound on Astoria Boulevard when it struck a 2008 Honda Accord traveling westbound on Astoria Boulevard to southbound 88th Street. EMS also responded to the scene and pronounced the motorcycle operator, identified as Americo Nunez-Persio, 17, of Corona, dead at the scene. There is no criminality suspected, but the investigation is ongoing.


Queens Student Receives Prestigious Award Beinecke Scholarship, which will help in funding her pursuit of a Master’s degree in English Literature at Oxford University once she graduates in 2013. Only awarded to twenty students in the United States each year, the scholarship helps to pay for graduate studies in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, giving recipients $4000 prior to beginning their graduate studies, and $30,000 throughout the course of their studies. Gildea admitted to being awestruck when she discovered she had won. “It was mixture of surprise and excitement. I knew that all of my hard work had paid off when I got the news,” she said. The scholarship is obtained through nomination, and Gildea never imagined she would win it. Her constant work with English professors in the CUNY system and drive to research literary greats led Queens College student Tara Gildea was awarded the Beinecke Scholar- to her winning the award. ship. Gildea always knew she

By ASIA EWART What began simply as assisting a professor in some research escalated to an event that would open

many doors for Tara Gildea. A senior next year at Queens College Macauley Honors College, she has recently been awarded the rare

wanted to work in the field of English. Working with Professor Carl Rollyson of Baruch College, and eventually spending a summer in England, helped her to specifically pinpoint what she wanted to do. “He was writing about a poet and needed help with research. This was the summer after my freshman year. I found research statements, and also worked with transcripts. I’ve always loved English, and helping Professor Rollyson was a lot of fun.” Her work with authors and poets continued one year later, from July to August 2011, when she studied abroad at Oxford University. “I’ve always wanted to study at Oxford, and I finally got my chance. I took a class focusing on the works of Jane Austen, as well as British Detective Fiction. [Jane Austen] really fueled my interest in women writers. The British university system also helped me to think on my feet. I met with my professors one on one, once a week. It’s a lot more personalized and open-minded.” Gildea’s passion for English and hard work has brought her to where

she is today. A childhood of reading many books and an ever curious mind has motivated her all of her life to get to where she is today. She admits to only scarcely knowing about the Beinecke Scholarship before receiving it, but nonetheless is over the moon about furthering her education. Possibly more excited than Gildea about her scholarship win is her parents, who put a great emphasis on education. Her father is an Irish immigrant, and to hear of his daughter having this opportunity made him very proud. “My parents were so happy and so excited for me. They’re very big on education, and they were just ecstatic when I told them,” she said. With her last year of college beginning this fall, Gildea is preparing for the future now. Using the scholarship money, she plans on applying to Oxford for graduate school. Persuing a doctorate in English is also on her mind. “I would love to go back to Oxford. I’m keeping my fingers crossed.” Reach Intern Asia Ewart at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 124 or email intern@queenstribune.com

www.queenstribune.com • July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 11


LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: DUMANCIC REALTY LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/03/99. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 10 Merritt Lane, Bayville, New York 11709. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________

“JOHN DOES” and “JANE DOES”, said names being fictitious, parties intended being possible tenants or occupants of premises, and corporations, other entities or persons who claim, or may claim, a lien against the premises, Index No.:23563/08 D/O/F: 12/21/11 SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS THE BASIS OF VENUE IS THAT THE PROPERTY IS SITUATED IN QUEENS COUNTY Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Amended Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your Answer, or, if the Amended Complaint is not served with this Supplemental Summons, to serve a Notice of Appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorneys within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, where service is made by delivery upon you personally within the State, or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the amended complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The following notice is intended only for those defendants who are owners of the premises sought to be foreclosed or who are liable upon the debt for which the mortgage stands as security. YOU ARE HEREBY PUT ON NOTICE THAT WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. The amount of the Debt: $437,092.38 consisting of principal balance of $417,000.00 plus

interest of $14,998.93, escrow/impound shortages or credits of $3,202.06; Broker’s Price Opinion, inspection and miscellaneous charges of $471.35; attorney fee $925.00 and title search $495.00. Because of interest and other charges that may vary from day to day, the amount due on the day you pay may be greater. Hence, if you pay the amount shown above, an adjustment may be necessary after we receive the check, in which event we will inform you. The name of the creditor to whom the debt is owed: U.S. BANK, N.A. Unless you dispute the validity of the debt, or any portion thereof, within thirty (30) days after receipt hereof, the debt will be assumed to be valid by the herein debt collector. If you notify the herein debt collector in writing within thirty (30) days after your receipt hereof that the debt, or any portion thereof, is disputed, we will obtain verification of the debt or a copy of any judgment against you representing the debt and a copy of such verification or judgment will be mailed to you by the herein debt collector. Upon your written request within 30 days after receipt of this notice, the herein debt collector will provide you with the name and address of the original creditor if different from the current creditor. Note: Your time to respond to the supplemental summons and amended complaint differs from your time to dispute the validity of the debt or to request the name and address of the original creditor. Although you have as few as 20 days to respond to the supplemental summons and amended complaint, depending on the manner of service, you still have 30 days from receipt of this supplemental summons to dispute the validity of the debt and to request the name and address of the original creditor. TO THE D E F E N D A N T S : MOHAMMED MOLLAH: If you have obtained an order of discharge from the Bankruptcy court, which includes this debt, and you have not reaffirmed your liability for this debt, this law firm is not alleging that you have any personal liability for this debt and does not seek a money judgment against you. Even if a discharge has been obtained, this lawsuit to foreclose the mortgage will continue and we will seek a judgment authorizing the sale of t h e m o r t g a g e d p r e m i s e s. Dated: December 19, 2011

s/Mitra Paul Singh, Esq. Mitra Paul Singh, Esq. ROSICKI, ROSICKI & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 51 East Bethpage Road Plainview, NY 11803 Phone: (516) 714-2585 The original summons was filed on 9/24/08. THIS IS AN ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE ENCUMBERING THE REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS 1 BROADWAY, HOWARD BEACH, NEW YORK AND FOR UNJUST ENRICHMENT. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of 2 Iris Lane LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/12/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 45-25 47 th St., Woodside, NY 11377. Purpose: any lawful activity. __________________________________ Notice of Formation of Radiant Lotus, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY SSNY on 5/15/12. Office location: Queens County. Princ. office of LLC: 240-52 69th Ave. #3, Little Neck, NY 11362. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Radiant Lotus, LLC. at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of NAV 291 L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/21/2012. Office Location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 5777 80 St., Middle Vlg, NY 11379. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ To the heirs at law, next of kin, and distributees of HERMAN SCHROEDER deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of EnergyReset, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) ON 04/10/2012. Office location: Queens County Principal Office of LLC: 199-85 Keno Ave, Holliswood, NY 11423 SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail pro-

cess to: c/o EnergyReset, LLC at the principal office of the LLC Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ El Chamo LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/1/12. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o John Cheserie, 2519 33 rd Ave. Ste #1, Astoria, NY 11106. Purpose: General __________________________________ 65-86 TERRACE COURT LLC, a domestic LLC currently known as 65-86 LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/29/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 59-05 59 th Dr., Maspeth, NY 11378. General Purposes. ___________________________________

TRUST 2007-2 ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2 Plaintiff, AGAINST CONRAD JONES, et al. Defendant(s) Pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale duly entered March 28, 2012 I the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Queens County Supreme Court, 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY 11435 on 8/10/ 2012 at 11:00 AM premises known as 2288 JAYDEE CT., FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11690 a/k/a 2288 JAYDEE CT., FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11691. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the BOROUGH AND County of QUEENS, City and State of New York. Block 15663 and Lot: 37 Approximate amount of judgment $610,504.04 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment. Index # 29127/2009 Matthew M. Lupoli, Esq. Referee, Law Offices of Jordan S. Katz, P.C. - 395 North Service Road, Suite 401, Melville, NY 11747 JSK 12792 Dated: June 27, 2012 __________________________________

DENT SHIELD LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. Of State of NY 04/17/2012. Off Loc.: Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to THE LLC C/O Suchart Smatkitboriharn, 9307 49th Avenue, Elmhurst, NY 11373. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. ___________________________________

Page 12 Tribune July 12-18, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Notice of Formation of Portia Properties IV LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/20/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Frank G. Messina, Esq., 40-06 Warren Street, Elmhurst, NY 11373. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ F MARTO REALTY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/24/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 7008 70 th St., Glendale, NY 11385. General Purposes. ___________________________________ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS U.S. BANK, N.A, Plaintiff, -againstMOHAMMED MOLLAH; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE AND MORTGAGEE OF RECORD; ADVISORS MORTGAGE GROUP LLC; TARIQ REZA; AMERICAN EXPRESS CENTURION BANK; NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ADJUDICATION BUREAU; NEW YORK CITY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD; NEW YORK CITY PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; BANGLA ESTATE, INC., BASHIR RAHMAN,

Notice of formation of Tool Time Home Improvement, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on 4/06/2012. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against THE LLC Post Office Box 200187 South Ozone Park, N.Y. 11420. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of KMC GROUP LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on April 9, 2012. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to 217-35 Peck Avenue, Hollis Hills, NY 11427. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT- COUNTY OF QUEENS U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE

Notice of Formation of 10834 REALTY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/18/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 66-11 99 th St., #2C, Rego Park, NY 11374. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ TAXI REAL ESTATE SERVICES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/9/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 25-11B 41 st Ave., Long Island City, NY 11101. General Purposes.

To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 149 or E-Mail Your Copy to legals@queenstribune.com


Traffic Nightmare

Queens Highways Rank As Most Congested

borough mysteriously vacant. As early as 1939, there were proposals to build subway lines as far east as Little Neck Parkway. Investment in highway construction at the expense of public transportation ensured these lines would never be built.

By ROSS BARKAN Decades ago, when Flushing Meadows was still acrid marshland and Robert Moses was sculpting a new topography for Queens, urban planner Lee Koppelman fought a losing battle to keep Queens’ roadways from appearing prominently in a place like INRIX’s traffic scorecard, which analyzes the most congested highway corridors in the country. bers. A 3.1 mile stretch, heading north, from the Belt Parkway to Main Street, should take three minutes to drive without delays during afternoon peak hours. Instead, the drive is 13 minutes and cars crawl at an average speed of 14 mph, ranking fourth on the list. Southbound from the Long Island Expressway to Linden Boulevard is the eighth most congested corridor. The 6.2 mile drive is a daunting 20 minutes long during after noon peak hours. Without delays, it would be 7 minutes long. The average driving speed is 19 mph.

‘Disasterville’ The irony of INRIX’s latest report is that traffic is actually dropping across the country. Fuel prices that were once rising, relatively few jobs created in urban areas and the completion of stimulus projects resulting in less road construction are cited as reasons for a 30 percent drop nationwide. Queens, however, is not necessarily like the rest of the nation. A 2009 report from the New York Metropolitan Transportation

Master Plans

Tribune photo by Ira Cohen

Cars and trucks crawl on the Van Wyck Expressway through downtown Jamaica.

A lack of a north-south subway line that r uns through Queens is one culprit for the Van Wyck’s congestion. It is already beyond its intended capacity: drivers can either jam the Van Wyck or escape to jam Woodhaven Boulevard, another north-south route, even more. Trucks and buses must use the Van Wyck alone to travel to JFK Airport because Moses blocked commercial traffic from his parkways. Traveling from New Jersey or any point outside of the City, tr ucks must rumble over the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge to the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and LIE before cutting south on the Van Wyck because they are barred from the Belt Parkway. Koppelman quickly learned that his plan to r un express buses on the City and Long Island’s parkways was impossible because Moses had purposely designed hundreds of overpasses far too low for trucks or buses to pass beneath them without ripping off their roofs like sardine cans. Widening the entire length of the three-lane Van Wyck is not possible without taking away crucial service roads, though lanewidening is currently taking place near the ongoing reconstruction of the Kew Gardens Interchange. Begun in 2010 and expected to be completed in 2016, officials hope the reconstruction will be a cure for congestion caused by the confluence of the Van Wyck, Jackie Robinson Parkway, Union Tur npike and Grand Central Parkway. To save the Van Wyck from traffic jams ad infinitum, former City Traffic Commissioner “Gridlock” Sam Schwartz — he coined the term — proposed lifting those numerous overpasses and opening the parkways to commercial traffic. Diluting truck traffic on the Van Wyck could also lessen delays because inclines between the Belt Parkway and Rockaway Boulevard exits and steeper crests as the ex-

www.queenstribune.com • July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 13

Koppleman was among a growing group of young planners who foresaw the ocean of brake lights that New York’s famous highways would become if drastic changes, like a complete revamping of a deficit-ridden public transit system, were not implemented. They never were. Any Queens resident with access to an automobile probably knows that driving vertically through the borough in a timely fashion is almost impossible. The most striking aspect of the dreaded Van Wyck Expressway, spanning south from John F. Kennedy Airport up to Northern Boulevard in Flushing, is not necessarily the per petual gridlock that makes it the only highway to show up twice in INRIX’s latest list of the country’s top 10 most congested highway corridors. Most startling, perhaps, is the lack of bleating car horns. Automobiles crawling down the Van Wyck’s 9.3 miles understand that honking a horn is completely pointless. There is simply nowhere to go. INRIX tells its story in num-

Council estimated that by 2035, the travel time index — the ratio of peak period travel time to “free-flow” travel time — of Queens roadways would grow by 14 percent during morning peak hours. During afternoon peak hours, the percentage of congested lane miles would grow by more than 50 percent. Automobile culture, instilled more than a half century ago, still reigns supreme. “Queens is automobile-oriented, even to this day,” said Koppelman, who retired as executive director at the Long Island Regional Planning Board in 2006 after four decades of service. “If it weren’t for subways, the City of New Yor k would be disasterville.” Koppelman battled with Moses, New Yor k’s master builder of highways, br idges and parks, over the implementation of mass transit to offset the debilitating congestion on Queens and Long Island’s roadways. Moses, ideologically opposed to public transportation, thwarted Koppelman’s vision of a rapid transit commuter rail running down the middle of the Long Island Expressway. Moses also quashed proposals for a subway extension along the Van Wyck, built between 1947 and 1963, and a commuter rail link to Westchester that would have traveled across the BronxWhitestone Bridge. A subway map of Queens leaves half the

pressway passes through downtown Jamaica force large trucks to slow, backing up automobiles throughout the corr idor. Schwar tz admitted the Belt Parkway would need to be widened at certain points to accommodate new commercial traffic. Jeffrey Zupan, senior fellow for transportation at the Regional Plan Association, believed that extending the Clearview Expressway via tunnel to the Belt Parkway, as originally intended, would unclog the Van Wyck arter y. Beginning at the Throgs Neck Bridge and petering out at Hillside Avenue, the Clearview represents a crucial gap in the traffic grid for Zupan. The RPA, notably, predicted in the 1930s that building additional highways could not solve the City’s traffic problem alone. A more feasible plan, Zupan said, could be to eventually design a subway car that would run on the AirTrain’s tracks. Connecting JFK Aiport and Jamaica, the AirTrain subway route could pull vehicular traffic from the Van Wyck if subways from Jamaica also ran to JFK Airport. The long dor mant Rockaway Beach Branch of the LIRR, linking Rego Park and Ozone Park and continuing south, could save both the Van Wyck and Woodhaven Boulevard from growing congestion if it were ever revived. Brian Ketcham, a transportation engineer known for defeating the Koch-era Westway, saw a ticking traffic bomb in the potential development of Willets Point. A traffic interchange built for the proposed shopping malls, along with other attractions , could dump between 1,000 and 3,000 additional vehicles an hour on the Van Wyck, l ower ing average vehicular speeds to as little as 5 mph, according to Ketcham’s calculations. With lanes a foot narrower than the standard 12 feet, the Van Wyck is especially vulnerable to any uptick in traffic. Any traffic salvation comes at a cost that the cash-strapped MTA likely cannot pay. All traffic experts agree a vastly improved subway system could save Queens from its gridlock woes, but with the MTA committed to finishing the Second Avenue subway line and building a LIRR extension to Grand Central Station, Queens’ roadways will likely remain clogged. When the MTA approved its latest budget in 2011, it had a $68 million deficit. “Funding for transportation in New York State for highways, and MTA, is in deep trouble,” Zupan said. “It’s a real problem.” Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or rbarkan@queenstribune.com.


Keep Cool Inside As summer heats up, air conditioning baking or dishwashing until the evening bills can rapidly rise. As homeowners feel on hot days. the heat, many are looking for ways to save * Use ceiling fans to circulate air to help and stay cool. make the house more comMany U.S. consumfortable without over-users strive to conserve ening the air conditioning. ergy at home. Forty* Seal air conditioning seven percent of Ameriducts and insulate ducts cans say they try to conthat run through unserve energy all or most heated basements, crawl of the time, according spaces and attics. to researchers at Iconoculture. * Install white window shades or miniOne way to help lower utility bills in the blinds. Mini-blinds can reduce solar heat gain summer and year-round is to replace drafty by 40 to 50 percent, according to the American or leaky old windows with new, energy- Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. efficient products. If you like energy savings, but dread According to ENERGY STAR, replacing cleaning blinds, consider Pella Designer single-pane windows with ENSeries windows and doors ERGY STAR qualified windows with optional between-thecan save $126 to $501 a year on glass blinds or shades. Since utility bills depending on your they’re between glass, they location. accumulate less dust and dirt Cool Tips than traditional roomside Once energy-efficient winwindow treatments. Plus, dows are properly installed they can be closed when you in your home, try these inexare away to keep the heat pensive, easy ways to help out and opened when you keep your house cool: are home to let the light in. * Provide shade for east With their outstanding enand west windows. ergy-efficiency and built-in * When possible, delay White window shades can window treatments, it’s a heat-generating activities like keep your home cool. winning combination.

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HOME IMPROVEMENT


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www.queenstribune.com • July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 15

Remodeling projects have increased in popularity over the past few years as homeowners have decided to improve on what they have, rather than take a risk in the real estate market. Whether you’re hoping to sell your home or create a more enjoyable living space, tackle home improvement projects that make a big impact and add value. One of the top return-on-investment remodeling projects is updating a bathroom. Bathroom updates even outweigh kitchen projects in terms of getting back what you spend, according to CNN Money. And, if you take a cost-conscious approach and do Replacing outdated tiles can give your bathroom a the project yourself, your investnew life. ment return will be even better. Renting tools is a key way you can cut costs tool for most DIY warriors to own, but and bring new life into your bathroom. you can easily rent one to make the job There are plenty of remodeling tasks quick and inexpensive. that are easily accomplished by renting Add personality with paint. Another tools, versus the cost of buying expensive simple fix that can be done is adding a new tools or hiring someone else to do the paint color. It’s an easy, quick and cheap work. project and can totally Bring new life to your change the look and feel of bath with these tips: the room. Opt for one of Replace old tile. Outyour favorite colors or dated tile is a common scour interior design problem that makes bathwebsites and magazines to rooms look old. Replacfind a trendy color that gets ing it with fresh new tile your attention. that is in style will instantly Change hardware. give the room a modern Some faucets and cabinet look. Tiling is a DIY hardware clearly show project that anyone can their decade of origin. tackle, with the right Switching out old hardware tools. Rent the necessary is relatively simple and a items like a tile stripper, a great way to make a dratile saw and a mortar matic change in the look of mixer to keep your your room. project costs down. These projects set the Refresh the ceiling. stage for creating a new Ceilings can become dingy Bathroom updates can easily feel for your bathroom. over time, and you might be done yourself. Make the revived space a not suspect them as the reality by choosing a decoculprit that’s making your room feel dull. rating theme and accessories that You’ll notice a dramatic change if you complement it. Items like window treatliven it up with fresh new texture and ments, throw rugs and wall art make the paint. Texture sprayers are an unusual room feel more complete and stylish.

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Quick And Easy Ways To Revive The Bathroom


Explosive Night

Family Rally

Citi Field was lit up with fireworks after the July 3 Mets-Phillies game. The post-game display went along with a musical presentation celebrating the Mets’ 50th anniversary. Photo by Ira Cohen.

Assemblywoman Aravella Simotas and State Sen. Jose Peralta rally on July 9 with Long Island City residents in support of family leave legislation in the State Legislature. Photo by Ira Cohen.

Outstanding Work

Chinese Night

pix

Queens Events Edited By Harley Benson

Page 16 Tribune July 12-18, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

The Rotary Club of South West Queens presented a check to Our Lady of Grace Ministry of Care and Service for their work providing food and other items to people in need. Pictured (from left) are Stuart Schneiderman, immediate past president of RCSWQ; Jeanie Rouvolo, volunteer director of OLGMofCS; and Frances O. Scarantino, past president of RCSWQ.

Serving Up Dancers Yu-Xia Liu (left) and Qing-Feng Li performed before Saturday’s New York Mets game at Citi Field and were honored during Chinese American Heritage Day ceremonies. Photos by Ira Cohen.

Starks Support

A sponsored day of golf at Leewood Golf Club, in Eastchester, in support of the Lowell School in Bayside. Pictured (from left) are Dean Tischfeld; New York Knicks great, John Starks; Norman Sherman, and Peter Wunsch, the winning bidder of the “priceless” golf outing foursome that was auctioned off at Lowell’s “Love for Lowell” annual benefit in March. Credit: Leewood Golf Club.

Mets outfielder Mike Baxter (right), a native of Whitestone, last week was honored by Councilman Dan Halloran. Photo by Ira Cohen.


Village of Great Neck Plaza

YOU ARE A STAR! Great Neck Plaza KARAOKE CONTEST (On Bond Street)

Thurs. July 19 • 8:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. $ CASH PRIZES $

PROMENADE NIGHT

Thurs. July 19 – Bond St. • 6:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.

Call 516-829-1301 or visit www.ShopGreatNeck.com for more information

www.queenstribune.com • July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 17


Leisure

Golden Dragon Acrobats Return To Queens By TAMMY SCILEPPI Featuring thrilling, all-new acrobatic acts and a brand-new cast, the exotic Golden Dragon Acrobats touring troupe has returned to the Queens Theatre in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, wowing audiences with a 25-centuries-old time honored tradition. This extra-special, five-week summer engagement is now in full swing — through Aug. 4 — after a sold-out run in December. Did you know that many of the Chinese acrobatic acts we enjoy seeing today — like the ones performed by the Golden Dragon troupe at the Queens Theatre — have evolved over thousands of years? Ancient Chinese folklore describes clever peasants — farmers and village craftsmen, who had no work during the long winter

months — spending their idle time joyfully learning and improving their newly found skills as acrobats, jugglers, rope dancers and hand balancers. They came up with this imaginative, organic ar t form and practiced with common objects found around their homes and farms: cups and saucers, plates, tables, chairs, pitchforks — even forming human columns and pyramids with their own bodies. Surprisingly, the whole concept was considered a great way to improve one’s societal position. The modern day Golden Dragon Acrobats company is known for its at tent ion to art ist ic detail and a commitment to the highest production values — unparalleled in a now-perfected art form. Showcasing award-winning acrobatics, audiences are treated to

Golden Dragon Acrobats return to Queens Theatre. a breathtaking and spellbinding experience, replete with dramatic theatrical techniques, dazzling costumes and wonder ful traditional dance set to ancient and contemporary music.

World famous impresario Danny Chang and choreographer Angela Chang have teamed up to present a summer extravaganza that rivals the acrobatic feats of strength and agility that were popu-

lar during the annual Chinese harvest celebrations of the ancient Han Dynasty. “We are delighted to welcome the Golden Dragons back to Queens. Their per forma nce during the holidays captivated our audience, young and old, and brought hundreds of new families to our beautiful theater,” said Ray Cullom, ar tistic director of Queens Theatre. “We’re doubly thrilled that the troupe chose Queens Theatre for the debut of this brand new company of art ists. Ticket s for the show, running through Aug. 4, cost $32 with a Family 4 Pack priced at $100. Special discounted rates are available for summer camps and other groups. Tickets are on sale online or on the phone. For information or to purchase tickets, call (718) 760-0064 or visit w ww.queenstheatre.org.

Page 18 Tribune July 12-18, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

New Place, Same Queens Council Launches Great Taste Summer Promo Series are ready for consumption. I, hungry as always, was prepared to be my glut tonous American self and Danny graciously obliged. We led off with some luscious appetizers, shrimp dumplings and barbecued spare ribs. Danny bestowed his brilliant spinach and minced chicken soup for us, and we heartily slur ped it all up. Finding good soup in New York Cit y can be a Sysphean task: Danny shoves that rock right up the hill. Lake Tung Ting shrimp, GenDanny’s Szechuan Garden has been a Howard Beach staple eral Tso’s ch icken, beef w it h for three decades, so much so shrimp and sautéed string beans that the father of my dining com- made up our filling main course. panion, Craig J. Heed, could New lunch specials include shredfondly recall visiting the Chinese ded pork with garlic sauce and baby shrimp with garlic restaurant on Cross Bay Boulevard long RESTAURANT sauce, all cooked to great lengths to make you beg before his son emerged for more. Somewhere, in this world. Recently, Craig’s father was smilDanny moved to a new ing about the return of location on 156th Avhis prodigal son to enue and Cross Bay Danny’s Szechuan, Boulevard, leaving his where generations of legendar y 164th AvHeeds learned about fine enue location. Don’t Asian dining. panic, Danny brought Danny’s finisher was the same great food with him when he went on the the fried rice in pineapple, the exotic sort of dish you only move. As the Howard Beach faithful dream of eating until it’s in front know, Danny doesn’t only serve of you. I took some home beup Chinese food. A Japanese cause great food should come smokeless hibachi grill ensures all home with you. –Ross Barkan of your favorite Japanese choices Danny’s Szechuan Garden 156-40B Cross Bay Boulevard Howard Beach, NY (718) 738-6500 HOURS: Monday to Thursday 11:15 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday 11:15 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Saturday 1 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. CREDIT CARDS: Yes, all major

REVIEW

By MEGAN MONTALVO Our fellow residents in Queens already know just how fun our borough is, but when it comes to attracting tourists, Manhattan seems to be the reigning king. The Queens Tourism Council is steadily working to make sure Queens takes the title. On July 10, local officials and business owners joined the Queens Tourism Council to announce the launch of the “Real Culture/Authentic Flavor” promotion. Funded by a grant from the NYC & Company Foundat ion, the promotion w ill run until Nov. 30 and is designed to showcase events at the best cultural, dining and shopping venues throughout the borough.

“Queens is a really wonder ful borough with immigrants from all over the world,” said Councilman Peter Koo (D-Flushing). “You save a lot of money by coming to Queens; if you come here, you see the whole world.” In addition to inviting out-oftowners, the tourism council says t hey also look forward to at tracting locals from all five boroughs. “There are so many programs and events you can find right here in Queens,” said Assemblymember Grace Meng (D-Flushing). “There is no need to go any where else.” Social media campaigns designed around the “Discover Queens” and “Queens, New York” Twit ter feeds and Facebook pages will notify visitors of events as they

unfold in conjunction with the six month promotion. Officials said they hope the venture will also inspire an economic multiplier effect for local eateries. “The future of jobs is in tourism,” said Koo. “We anticipate that this promotion will help to strengthen the employment condit ion in Queens.” A long li neup of live per formance s, art exhibitions, outdoor film screenings and science fairs are already in the works. Date and admission information is available online at www.discoverqueens.info and www.itsinqueens.com. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@ queenstribune.com

Promenade Night Returns The Great Neck Plaza Business Improvement District and the Village of Great Neck Plaza will host an evening of fine dining and enter tainment on July 19. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in the BID’s first karaoke competition. The first place winner of the contest will receive a $250 prize, with $150 going to second place and $100 to third. The evening of outdoor café-style

dining will run from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. In addition, guests will be treated to the music of Sal Vivo and the BID’s first karaoke competition, which will run from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. All stores in Great Neck Plaza are within walking distance of the LIRR’s Great Neck train station, and the Plaza features more than 1,600 convenient parking spaces on-street, in municipal parking fields and garages.

The Great Neck Plaza BID’s mission is to foster and promote a positive and vital business community through various initiatives including consumer awareness programs, media/adver t ising campaigns a nd sponsorship of many events. For information, call (516) 8291301 or visit w w w. s h o r g re a t n e c k . c o m o r w w w. facebook.com/ greatneckplaza.


Queens Today SECTION EDITOR: REGINA VOGEL

Send typed announcements for your club or organization’s events at least TWO weeks in advance to “Queens Today” Editor, Queens Tribune, 150-50 14 Road, Whitestone NY 11357. Send faxes to 357-9417, IF YOUR ORGANIZATION MEETS ON A REGULAR BASIS, SEND ALL DATES FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR.

ENVIRONMENT RESOURCES FAIR Saturday, July 21 Western Queens Green Resources Fair at 1 at the Broadway library.

FLEA MARKETS OUTDOOR FLEA Sunday, July 22 Outdoor Flea Market 10-5 at the Free Synagogue of Flushing, 4160 Kissena Blvd., Flushing.

Queens Today MEETINGS

LIBRARY DIRECTORS Saturdays, July 14, August 11, September 8 Friends Board of Directors of Queens Library at Cambria Heights meet at 4. SUNNYSIDE WRITERS Monday, July 16 Sunnyside Writers Group at 6:30 at the Sunnyside librar y. POETRY WRITING Monday, July 16 Poetry Writing Workshop at the Wo o d h a ve n l i b r a r y. 8 4 9 1010 register. AMERICAN LEGION Tuesdays, July 17, August 21, September 18 Post 131 meets at 8 at 10-20 Clintonville Street, Whitestone. 767-4323. BEREAVEMENT Tuesdays, July 17, August 21, September 18 Bereavement Support Group at Holy Family in Fresh Meadows. 7:30. 969-2448. PUBLIC SPEAKING Tuesdays, July 17 learn the art of public speaking at 7:15 in St. Albans. 640-7092. DIST. ED. 26 Tu e s d a y, J u l y 1 7 a n n u a l meeting 7-8. August 8 at

ENTERTAINMENT

MS74, 61-15 Oceania Street, Bayside, room 121. TOASTMASTERS Wednesdays, July 18 learn the art of public speaking at t h e Vo i c e s o f R o c h d a l e To a st m a s t e r s C l u b i n J a maica. 978-0732. FLUSHING CAMERA Wednesdays, July 18, August 1, 15, 29 Flushing Camera Club at Flushing Hospital. 479-0643.

TALKS AUTHOR TALK Monday, July 16 “Images of America: Rockaway Beach” with Vivian Rattay Carter at 6 at the Seaside library. BOOK CLUB Wednesday, July 18 adult book club to read and discuss books at 2 at the Poppenhusen library. NIGHT BOOK CLUB Thursday, July 19 at the Seaside library at 6. LITERARY SOUP Thursday, July 19 at 6:30 at the Queens Village library.

Ella, Peggy, Doris and others at the Poppenhusen library at 5. GAME DAY Thursdays, July 19, 26 at the Woodhaven library at 4. DAUGHTRY Friday, July 20 Daughtry plays Citi Field following the Mets-Dodgers 7:1 game.

$28. 507-TIXX. PASSPORT FRIDAYS Friday, July 20 Cuba. Dance and music program begins at 6:30, films at 8. Queens Museum of Art. 592-9700. GAME DAY Fridays, July 20, 27 at the Seaside library at noon.

TEENS FREE E BOOKS Sunday, July 15 at the Central library. 990-5148. CRAFT CLUB Monday, July 16 craft club Broadway library at 12:30. MOVIE MONDAYS Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Flushing library at 2. SUMMER READING Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the St. Albans library at 2. EFFECTIVE TEENS Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens Pomonok library at 3. YU-GI-OH! Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Seaside library at 2. READING PROGRAM Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the St. Albans library at 2. HARRY POTTER BOOK Mondays, July 16, 30 at the Woodhaven library at 2. NH GAZETTE Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 North Hills Gazette newsletter North Hills library. Register. MOVIEMAKERS CLUB Mondays, July 16, 30 at the Woodhaven library at 4:40. Ages 8-15. CHESS CLUB Mondays, July 16, 30 at 6 at the Bayside library. SUMMER READING Tuesdays, July 17, 24 at the Hillcrest library at 2. DREAM IT Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 East Elmhurst library at 2:30. MASTER MINDS Tuesdays, July 17, 24 at the LIC library at 2:30. Brain teasers, puzzles, games. TEEN TUESDAYS Tuesdays, July 17, 31 at the Bay Terrace library at 3. JEOPARDY TRIVIA Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Seaside library at 3:30. TEEN GAMING Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 Fresh Meadows library at 4. ORIGAMI Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Seaside library at 4. CHESS CLUB Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Woodhaven library at 2. SHSAT Tuesday, July 17 Specialized high school admission test at the Central librar y.

Register. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesdays, July 18, 25 South Ozone Park library at 1. ANIME SUMMER Wednesday, July 18, 25 at the Flushing library at 2. ROLE PL AYING Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Bayside library at 3. FREE E-BOOKS Wednesday, July 18 at the Douglaston library at 4. ACING INTERVIEWS Wednesday, July 18 at the LICD library at 1:30. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesday, July 18 South Ozone Park library at 1. POETRY EVENT Wednesday, July 18 2 : 3 0 Bellerose library and Friday, July 20 2:30 Lefrak Cit y. MOCK INTERVIEWS Thursdays, July 19, 26 at t h e C e n t r a l l i b r a r y. 9 9 0 5148 register. READING CLUB Thursdays, July 19, 26 Flushing library. Register. MASTER MINDS Thursdays, July 19, 26 at the LIC library at 2:30. Brain teasers, puzzles, games. GAME TIME Thursdays, July 19, 26 North Hills library at 3:30. TEEN SPACE Thursdays, July 19, 26 at t h e W i n d s o r Pa r k l i b ra r y. Space limited. 3:30. TEEN GAMING Thursdays, July 19, 26 Fresh Meadows library at 4. GAME DAY Thursdays, July 19, 26 at the Woodhaven library at 4. CHESS CLUB Thursdays, July 19, 26 Flushing library. Register. GAME TIME Thursdays, July 19, 26 at the Bayside library at 3. ROCKS & CRAFTS Thursday, July 19 at the Pomonok library at 3. ONLINE TEST PREP Thursday, July 19 online test prep LIC library at 6:30. GAME DAY Friday, July 20, 27 at the Seaside library at noon. BOOK BUDDIES Friday, July 20 Bayside library at 4.

www.queenstribune.com • July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 19

GOLDEN DRAGON Through August 4 the Golden Dragon Acrobats perform at Queens Theatre in the Park. 760-0686, ext. 105. CELEBRATE JAMAICA Saturday, July 14 celebrate the communit y from 2-8 with free medical screenings, US citizenship information, ESL classes, music lessons, tutoring and more. Jamaica Performing Arts Center, 15310 Jamaica Avenue. 5580040. ASTRONOMY Saturday, July 14 summer sky astronomy program at Alley Pond Environmental Center. $12. 229-4000 register. 8-10pm. STEEL BAND Saturday, July 14 Steel Impressions perform Caribbean rhythms at 2 at the Flushing library. SPANISH DANCE Saturday, July 14 a t t h e Broadway library at 2:30. PIANO RECITAL Saturday, July 14 a t t h e Forest Hills library at 2:30. LIVE JAZZ & R&B Sundays, July 15, 22, 29 live jazz and r&b 6-10 at Déjà vu, 180-25 Linden Blvd., St. Albans. NEW PLAYS Sunday, July 15 “Long Distance Drunk.” Sunday, July 22 “ The Bus Test.” “The Ladder Series: A Staged Reading Series Aimed at Getting New Plays to the Next Rung” at the Creek and Cave, 10-93 Jackson Avenue, LIC. $7. www.ThePlat formGroup.org PLANET MUSIC Sunday, July 15 “Grupo C h o n t a . ” F l u s h i n g To w n Hall. 463-7700, ext. 222. MUSICAL TRIBUTE Monday, July 16 musical tribute to soul legends Sam Cooke and Marvin Gaye at 6 at the Baisley Park library. COWBOY DRAMA Monday, July 16 Wild Flower: A Modern Day Cowboy Drama at 6:30 at the Flushing library. JEOPARDY TRIVIA Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Seaside library at 3:30. CHESS CLUB Tuesdays, July 17, 24 at the Woodhaven library at 2. MUSICAL TRIBUTE Wednesday, July 18 tribute to the music of Bobby Darin, Neil Diamond and Paul Anka Whitestone library at 3. SINATRA TRIBUTE Thursday, July 19 at the Mitchell-Linden library at 2. LADIES TRIBUTE Thursday, July 19 tribute to


Queens Today

Queens Today

Page 20 Tribune July 12-18, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

YOUTH ANIMAL CARE Saturday, July 14 or Sunday, July 29 at Alley Pond Environmental Center. 2294000. For ages 8-12. FISH Sunday, July 15 Adventures Hour – Fish at Alley Pond Environmental Center. 2294000. For ages 18-36 months with parental participation. BABY & ME Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Bayside library at 10:30. READ TO ME Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Fresh Meadows library at 10:30. ANT FARM IN CIT Y Monday, July 16 at the Woodside library. Monday, July 16 at the Sunnyside library. Register. DINOSAUR STORY TIME Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Seaside library at 1:30. SUMMER READING Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Hillcrest library at 2. SUMMER READING Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at t h e L e f ra k C i t y and Briarwood libraries. Register. SUMMER READING Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Arverne and Auburndale libraries at 3. READER BOYS Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the St. Albans library at 2. MAKE & TAKE CRAFT Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Central library at 3. HARRY POTTER BOOKS Monday, July 16, 30 at the Woodhaven library at 2. Ages 8-15. BOOK CIRCLE Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Ridgewood library at 3. READ TO A DOG Monday, July 16 at the North Hills library. Register. CRAFT CLUB Monday, July 16 at the Broadway library at 12:30. PUPPET MUSICAL Monday, July 16 “Mouse in the Cit y” at 2 at the Queens Village library. Ages 3-13. THEATRICKS Monday, July 16 at the Hollis library. 5 and up at 4. MOVIEMAKERS CLUB Monday, July 16, 30 at the Woodhaven library at 4:30. WII GAMES Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at 3 Windsor Park library. CHESS CLUB Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Bayside library at 6. PJ STORY TIME Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Central library at 7. READ TO ME Tuesdays, July 17, 24 at the

Glen Oaks library. For those 3-5 at 10:30. PAPER CROWN Tu e s d ay, J u l y 1 7 a t t h e Middle Village library. Register. EXPLORING PLANTS Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Astoria library at 1:30. READING CLUB Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Astoria library at 2. STORY & CRAFT Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Central library at 2. SUMMER READING Tuesday s, July 17, 24, 31 for those in grades 1-3 at the Maspeth library at 2. MYSTERY BOOK CLUB Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Seaside library at 2. SUMMER READING Tuesday s, July 17, 24, 31 St. Albans librar y. Register. ARTS & CRAFTS Tuesday s, July 17, 24, 31 North Hills library. Register. READ TO ME Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Cambria Heights library at 2:30. Pre-school-K. SUMMER READING Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Arverne library. Grades 4-6 at 3. ORIGAMI Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at 4 at the Seaside library. READ TO A DOG Tuesday s, July 17, 24, 31 Douglaston librar y. Register. CHESS CLUB Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Woodhaven library at 2. KIDS CAN COOK Tu e s d ay, J u l y 1 7 a t t h e Astoria librar y. Register. ECO ORIGAMI Tu e s d ay, J u l y 1 7 a t t h e Broadway library. Register. READING CLUB Tuesday s, July 17, 24, 31 Douglaston library. Register. COOKING CLUB Tuesdays, July 17, 31 at the Pomonok library at 3. Ages 6 and up. STORY & CRAFT Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Central library at 3:30. Tickets available at 1. READ TO ANNIE THE DOG Tuesday, July 17 Windsor Park library. Register. READ TO ME Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Auburndale library at 10:30. 18-36 month olds. FAMILY FUN TIME Wednesdays, July 18, 25 Broadway library at 10:30. SUMMER READING Wednesdays, July 18, 25 Cambria Heights library at 10:30. FILM FEST Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Central library at 10:30.

EDUCATION/GAMES/CRAFTS READ TO ME Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Fresh Meadows library at 10:30. SUMMER READING Wednesdays, July 18, 25 Lefrak Cit y library. Register. DREAM BIG Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the LIC library at 10:30. Toddlers and Pre-K. TODDLER STORY TIME Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Maspeth library at 10:30. Ages 1-3. READ TO ME Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Glendale library at 11. TODDLER TIME Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Queens Village librar y. Register. WE DREAM & WISH Wednesday, July 18 at the East Elmhurst library at 11:30. 18 months-3 years. READING CLUB Wednesdays, July 18, 25 Fresh Meadows library at 1. WACKY WEDNESDAY Wednesdays in the summer at 1 Whitestone library. Ages 1-12. READING CLUB Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Queens Village librar y. Register. READER BOYS Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the St. Albans library at 2. BOOK CLUB K-2 Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Woodhaven library. READING CIRCLE Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the North Hills library at 2:15. SUMMER READING Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Cambria Heights library at 2:30. Grades 1-3. BULETIN BOARD CLUB Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at t h e Au b u r n d a l e l i b r a r y. Ages 8-12 at 3. CRAFT FUN Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at t he Bay Terrace librar y at 3. ROLE PLAYING CLUB Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Bayside library at 3. DREAM BIG Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the LIC library at 3.Grades 1-5. SUMMER CRAFT Wednesday, July 18 at the Windsor Park library. Register. BOARD GAMES Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Auburndale library at 4. GAME DAY Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Howard Beach library at 4. ARTS & CRAFTS Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Seaside library at 4.

INTERMED. EXCEL Saturday, July 14 Central library. 990-5148 register. KNIT & CROCHET Saturdays, July 14, 21, 28 Peninsula library at 10. FREE E-BOOKS Sunday, July 15 Central library. 990-5148 register. METRIX LEARNING Sunday, July 15 at 12:30 at the Central librar y. Saturday, July 21 at the Far Rockaway library at 10:30. POWERPOINT Monday, July 16 at the Central library. 990-5102. COMPUTER BASICS Monday, July 16 at the Glen Oaks library. Register. CRAFT CLUB Monday, July 16 Broadway library at 12:30. JOB SEARCH Monday, July 16 at the Central library. 990-5148. BORROW E-BOOKS Monday, July 16 at the Steinway library at 6:30. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Douglaston library at 4. INTRO COMPUTERS Monday, July 16 Flushing library at 10. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 assistance at 1 at the Far Rockaway library. COMPUTER BOOT CAMP Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Far Rockaway librar y. 327-2549 register. BALLROOM DANCING Mondays, July 16, 23, 30 at the Forest Hills library at 6:30. METRIX LEARNING Monday, July 16, Friday, July 20, at 1 at the Central library. INTRO POWERPOINT Tu e s d a y, July 17 McGoldrick library. Register INTRO COMPUTERS Tu e s d a y, J u l y 1 7 O z o n e Park library. Register. GUITAR LESSONS Tu e s d a y, July 17 Woodhaven librar y. Register. INTRO WORD Tuesdays, July 17, 24 at the Central library. 990-0769. BASIC COMPUTER Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 at the Rosedale library at 10:30. BASIC COMPUTER Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 Arverne library at 10:45. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 assistance at the Far Rockaway library. 327-2549 register. SMALL BUSINESS WORK. Tuesdays, July 17, 24, 31 small business workshops at t h e C e n t ra l l i b r a r y. 9 9 0 -

5148 register. LEARN & CREATE Wednesday, July 18 Terrarium workshop. 2-3:30 at Vo e l ke r - O r t h M u s e u m i n Flushing. $4. 359-6227. INTRO INTERNET Wednesday, July 18 at the Central library. 990-0769. JOB SEARCH Wednesday, July 18 at the Far Rockaway library at 10:30. ACING INTERVIEWS Wednesday, July 18 at the LIC library at 1:30. BUSINESS CARDS Wednesday, July 18 at the Central library. 990-5176. BASIC COMPUTER Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at t h e W i n d s o r Pa r k l i b ra r y. Register. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Wednesdays, July 18, 25 computer assistance at the Far Rockaway library. 3272549. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesdays, July 18, 25 South Ozone Park library at 1. WRITING GROUP Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Seaside library at 3. FREE E-BOOKS Wednesday, July 18 at the Douglaston library at 4. WEST COAST SWING Wednesday, July 18 learn to dance West Coast Swing at the Flushing library. Register. ADVANCED INTERNET Thursday, July 19 at the Central library. 990-5176. CIVIL SERVICE Thursday, July 19 civil service exams at 4 at the Central library. SMALL BUSINESS Thursday, July 19 at the Jackson Heights library at 6. INTRO WORD Thursday, July 19 at the Central library. 990-5148. MOCK INTERVIEWS Thursdays, July 19, 26 at t h e C e n t r a l l i b r a r y. 9 9 0 5148 register. PRACTICE LABS Thursdays, July 19, 26 at the Arverne library at 10:30. BOOT CAMP COMPUTER Thursdays, July 19, 26 at the Arverne library at 10:30. INTRO COMPUTERS Thursdays, July 19, 26 Ozone Park library. Register. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Thursdays, July 19, 26 at th e Fa r Ro c k away l i b ra r y. 327-2549 register. CRAFT CLUB Thursdays, July 19, 26 Fresh Meadows library at 6. BASIC COMPUTER Thursdays, July 19, 26 at the Rosedale library at 6.

WRITING GROUP Thursdays, July 19 26 meetup writing group at the Broadway library at 6:30. INTRO EMAIL Friday, July 20 at the Central library. 990-5148. CRIMINAL RECORD Friday, July 20 job searching with a criminal record at 10:30 at the Arverne library. KNIT & CROCHET Fridays, July 20, 27 at the Peninsula library at 12:30. KNIT & CROCHET Fridays, July 20, 27 at the Fresh Meadows library at 10:30. BASIC COMPUTERS Fridays, July 20, 27 Auburndale librar y. Register. ONE-ON-ONE Fridays, July 20, 27 computer assistance at the Far Rockaway library. 327-249 register. CHESS CLUB Fridays, July 20, 27 at the Auburndale library at 3:30. COMPUTER BOOT CAMP Fridays through July 27 at the LIC library at 2.

MORE YOUTH STORY TIME & CRAFT Wednesday, July 18 at the Arverne library at 10:30. FAMILY STORYTIME Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Bay Terrace librar y at 10:30. 18 months to 4 years. PRESCHOOL STORY TIME Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Maspeth library at 1. WEDNESDAY WONDERS Wednesday, July 18 at the Central library. Tickets at 1, program at 2. STORY TELLING Wednesday, July 18 at the McGoldrick library at 3. Ages 5-10. OUT OF THIS WORLD Wednesday, July 18 at the Pomonok library at 3. READING CLUB Wednesdays, July 18, 25 at the Sunnyside library. Register. GAME DAY Thursdays, July 19, 26 at the Bay Terrace librar y at 1:30. ROCKS & CRAFTS Thursday, July 19 at the Pomonok library at 3. KIDS CRAFT TIME Thursday, July 19 at the Howard Beach library at 3:30. Ages 4-12. WIGGLY WORM BINS Thursday, July 19 at the Broadway library at 4. Ages 6-12.


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www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ July 12-18, 2012 Tribune Page 21


Models Of Queens

Bye, Bye Ty! Smuggling drugs through customs is one thing. But a 24-foot long T-Rex dinosaur skeleton? Now that’s just out right impressive. Unfortunately for one Florida man, the Feds didn’t think so. Ty, the lovable million dollar dino skeleton that was recently seized from

a New York City auction, will soon leave his holding cell in an undisclosed location somewhere in Sunnyside to be returned to his hometown in Mongolia. Well Ty, although your stay with us was cut short, we’ll definitely miss you. No bones about it.

Words Can Be Hurtful 50 Cent, the Queens native known for his ability to string together hard hitting words, has done it again – but in a rather distasteful manner. The tough nut rapper took his anger out online, when an elated fan demanded he “release the album or get shot again. Curtis tweeted: “Yeah just saw 50 with foot in mouth your picture fool you look autistic.” The tweet has sparked a mass online outcry, which doesn’t look as if it’s going to be quelled anytime soon. The angry rapper then followed up with the killer punch line – “I don’t want no special ed kids on my time line follow somebody else,” he posted later.

Like Grease Lightning

Page 30 Tribune July 12-18, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

For years, New York City drivers have been figuring out ways to avoid tolls. One Jackson Heights man thought he finally found the solution – grease. Walter Rodriguez is accused of using grease to alter the “9” on his New

Jersey license plate to an “8,” allowing him to drive through the EZPass lane worry free. By changing his license plate, he was able to temporarily avoid $500 worth of unpaid toll violations. Maybe next time he’ll use a permanent marker?

Loving The Life A veteran and a favorite at QConf's Models of Queens, Cindy is a sexy gal from Rego Park who has been modeling for close to a decade. Cindy says she loves every minute of being a model, enjoying the travel and the exposure. But modeling isn’t the only thing this beauty has on her plate. Cindy has an undergrad degree from St. John’s and two different Masters degrees from

Will Batman Return?

As Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes struggle with Scientology, a divorce and stalking, Counilman Peter Vallone Jr, has taken up the beauty's cause.

Actress Katie Holmes was going through a bit of a rough time recently. Shortly after the announcement that she was seeking a divorce from husband Tom Cruise and seeking custody of their child, Suri, Holmes found herself reportedly being stalked by members of the Church of Scientology. The New York City tabloids had a field day with the news, putting the 33-year-old actress on their covers and blasting the Scientologists for their stalking ways. Holmes, who starred as the love interest in the 2005 blockbuster “Batman Begins” had her own Dark Knight rise up to protect her. That man: Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. During a recent press conference, Vallone, chairman of the City Council’s public safety committee and outspoken advocate for justice, said that the NYPD should consider arresting the “thugs” that were reportedly stalking the actress. Reports of Vallone throwing on a cape and patrolling the city at night to defend Gotham have gone unconfirmed.

Cindy V. Home: Rego Park Age: 27 Height 5’ 6" Weight: 120 Stats: 36-26-36 Touro College in Manhattan, and does have a separate job where she puts her education to good use. To her, the modeling is fun, and there may be some acting in

her future. In the meantime, she enjoys going to the gym, getting out on her Rollerblades as the weather permits and shopping along Austin Street in Forest Hills. Cindy grew up in Elmhurst and bought her pad in Rego Park about five years ago. “I love living in Queens,” she said, noting the proximity from her home to the subway so she can get into Manhattan easily.

Confidentially, New York . . .


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