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Vol. 43, No. 7 Feb. 14-20, 2013

'2/7).' #/.#%2. With the death of another gay man in Queens deemed a homicide, officials react to the recent string of potential hate crimes. By Megan Montalvo ‌ Page 4.

Residents Plan Fundraiser For Slain Child

Teens Speaks After Violent Arrest

Queens Rabbi Detained In Israel Returns

PAGE 5

PAGE 8

PAGE 16

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Page 2 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com


www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 3

Queens Deadline

Pols Seek Debate On Mayoral Control By JOE MA RV ILLI With Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s tenure coming to an end, legislation has been introduced in the State Legislature to reduce mayoral control of New York City schools. Assemblyman David Weprin (DFresh Meadows) and State Sen. Velmanette Montgomery (D-Brooklyn) met with dozens of parents, educators, United Federation of Teachers representatives and community education council members at City Hall on Feb. 3 to push their respective bills to adjust how the Dept. of Education handles appointments. The Weprin/Montgomery bills would create an independent City Board of Education. The board would have the ability to appoint the Schools Chancellor and have some control over the educational policy of the City. The pieces of legislation introduced are numbered as A792 and S.1406, respectively. The Board of Education would have 13 members, selected in a different manner. Rather than direct mayoral appointments, the choices would be split between several entities. Each Borough President would continue to appoint one member to the board. As a requirement for selection, each member would need to have a child in the NYC public school system. The City Council would appoint four members. One of them would be a college or university representative, one would be a member of a parent organization, one would be a member of a Parents Educational Council and one member would be appointed at large. The Mayor would continue to have

Mayor Mike Bloomberg, eating with students at Queens Vocational and Technical High School. Some elected of ficials are looking to start a dialogue on mayoral control of the schools as Bloomberg approaches the end of his time as mayor. influence on the board, and would select the remaining four members. Each appointee would have to be a New York City resident and at least one of them would be required to have a child in the NYC public school system. “Control of our schools must be put back in the hands of educational professionals who have a deep understanding of our children’s needs,” said Montgomery. Weprin reasoned that the moment for the bill’s introduction was appropriate, given that Bloomberg is in his final

year as mayor and mayoral control is up for renewal in June 2015. He hopes that the bill will add a level of input from parents that is currently lacking. “There’s really no credible input,” he said. “There’s an example in Staten Island where they took a position about having security guards in the schools. The Chancellor and the Mayor said it was dead on arrival. What is the point of having these panels if the Mayor disregards what they say from the getgo?” Although the legislation would modify

the Dept. of Education, it would still technically fall under mayoral control. The difference is that there would not be just one party making all the decisions. Weprin said he feels there is still room for discussion on how to adjust mayoral control, particularly with the public’s involvement. “I certainly think this year is the year to have the appropriate conversation and dialogue,” Weprin said. “Senator Montgomery and I would like to have public hearings on this. Then we’ll take it from there.” The New York City Parents Union is backing the bills, angrily deriding the current system in place. “The Parents Union is fed up and we are doing something about it by working with legislators in passing legislation that will finally empower parents and communities,” President Mona Davids said. State Sen. Toby Stavisky (D-Flushing), who is a member of the New York City Education Subcommittee, said she would back the legislation if it came to a vote but also thinks that the revamp should come after hearings and testimonies. “It’s a question of blending the best practices for New York City. The only way to do this is through public hearings,” she said. “We need to solicit expert testimonies from both the academic world and governmental world.” In response to the bill, the Mayor’s Office said, “This measure has failed time and time again, and we are confident it will follow suit this year.” Reach Reporter Joe Marvilli at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125, or at jmarvilli@queenstribune.com.

Commission OK’s 3rd Council Map By LUIS GRONDA While the City Districting Commission has approved the third version of new City Council lines last week, controversy still exists over the proposal. In Queens, residents of communities in Flushing and neighborhoods in South Queens, including Woodhaven, Richmond Hill and South Ozone Park, have voiced displeasure with the proposals. In the new map, Woodhaven will remain split between the 30 and 32 districts, represented by Council members Elizabeth Crowley (D-Middle Village) and Eric Ulrich (R-Ozone Park) respectively, with Ulrich taking in the western part of the neighborhood next to Brooklyn and a number of streets after Atlantic Avenue, while Crowley has the rest of that area in her district, which includes Forest Park. The Woodhaven Residents’ Block Association had petitioned the commission to put them in a single district and

has expressed disappointment that it did not listen to their request. “The Districting Commission did the wrong thing, pure and simple,” WRBA Communications Director Alexander Blenkinsopp said. “They took a community that has shown that it is united and they instead split us apart.” He added that many Woodhaven residents will continue to have the same problem of their votes being diluted due to the split between the two districts. Many people who attended WRBA meetings often complained about not knowing who represents them in the City Council depending on what street they live on. In the Broadway-Flushing, North Flushing border, the Commission drew the majority of North Flushing into the 20th Council district, represented by Councilman Peter Koo (D-Flushing), but leaves a few spots in Whitestone in Koo’s district, while the majority of that neighborhood is in Councilman Dan

Halloran’s (R-Whitestone) 19th District. Halloran, although admitting that the lines the Commission drew are not exactly what the area wanted, called the new map a good compromise that benefits both neighborhoods. “When the Commission wanted to divide Broadway-Flushing in half, the community turned out in force to oppose being moved into a district with very different zoning and interests. They were heard,” Halloran said. “This latest proposal keeps Broadway-Flushing united and protects its character.” But Paul Graziano, a North Flushing resident and an independent urban planning consultant, disagrees with Halloran, saying that too much of Northern Flushing is in District 20 and more of it should have been in the 19th District. He said that Northern Boulevard serves as the cut-off point for Flushing North and it has more in common with a place like Whitestone, that is mostly single family homes, as opposed to the

southern part of Flushing, which are majority apartment complexes. Graziano noted that he is also concerned with unbalanced populations in the two districts, with many people in the 20th District unaccounted for in the U.S Census. Richard David, the executive director of the Indo-Caribbean Alliance, said that while they are disappointed that all of Richmond Hill is not in one district, he called the map a “sign of progress.” The new map shifts the 28th District, represented by Councilman Ruben Wills, westward and puts a larger part of Richmond Hill in that district. “The way Richmond Hill is right now, it’s more united than ever before,” David said, cautioning that it will still have similar problem as Woodhaven with a portion of Richmond Hill remaining in Ulrich’s district. Reach Reporter Luis Gronda at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or at lgronda@queenstribune.com.


Page 4 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Dromm Addresses Recent Murders

Photo courtesy of Facebook

Photo by Ira Cohen

By MEGAN MONTALVO One week after David Rangel, a Flushing public school teacher, was found strangled to death in his Jackson Heights apartment on 91st Street, another middle-aged gay man was found dead after being murdered in a similar fashion at an Elmhurst motel. In the case of the first murder, Rangel, 53, is believed to have met his assailant at an online dating site, and in the second murder, homicide detectives are continuing to investigate the death of Joseph Benzinger of Middle Village, whose body was discovered strangled in his room on Feb. 10 at the Crown Motor Inn on Queens Boulevard. Benzinger was 54. Due to an outpouring of concerns within the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities, Councilman Daniel Dromm (D-Jackson Heights), who is openly gay, held a press conference on Feb. 12 in front of the motel. “The lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities are deeply concerned about these two recent murders,” Dromm said. “It is an eerie coincidence that both of these murders took place within a week of each other and involved gay men.” Although investigations are still underway, Dromm confirmed that the NYPD had shared with his office that in both murder cases, the men were strangled, there was no forced entry and there was some surveillance video. “I don’t know if there is a connection

or not, but that is something that I asked the police department to consider, and it is something that they are taking into consideration,” Dromm said, adding that “it is a possibility, but there are many possibilities.” Another possibility that concerns Dromm is that both murders may be

Councilman Danny Dromm speaks outside the Crown Motor Inn in Elmhurst to address the recent murder of Joseph Benzinger, an openly gay man who was found dead in the motel. The murder came one week after the death of David Rangel (inset) of Jackson Heights. hate crimes. He has confirmed that the hate crimes task force is also involved with the investigations. “People need to be safe,” he said. “There are still killers on the loose.” Rangel and Benzinger’s murders come after the death of Charles Romo, an openly gay man who was found strangled to death in his apartment in Hamilton Heights on Jan. 28, and nearly four months after Lou Rispoli, a gay

community activist, was murdered while out on an evening walk in his Sunnyside neighborhood. While none of the perpetrators of these crimes have been captured, the Councilman said he remains confident the NYPD will work quickly and justly and encouraged members of the LGBT to use extra caution when meeting someone online. “If you meet online, meet in a public place,” Dromm said. “Go to your favorite café and make sure the waiter sees who you are with. If you meet someone in a bar, let the bartender know who the person is.” As an added step of encouragement, Ejeris Dixon of the New York City AntiViolence Project also joined Dromm in creating awareness of safety measurement available. “The New York City Anti-Violence Project has noticed this string of murders and violence against LGBT people when they’re trying to meet people online,” Dixon said. “We are here to offer our services, our safety tips and our community organizing programming as a way to address this violence and prevent it from happening in the future.” Anyone with information about the deaths is encouraged to call the NYPD Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS. For more information of the AntiViolence Project, call (212) 714-1141 or visit www.avp.org. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queenstribune.com.


www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 5

Sunnyside Remembers Slain Boy

Photo by Ira Cohen

Photo courtesy of Facebook

By MEGAN MONTALVO said. “Dave and Francine were and When a lone gunman took the lives of are still good friends. We helped plan 20 little children and six adults at Sandy Ben’s baby shower, and we went to Hook Elementary School in Newtown, his funeral. We just love them so Connecticut on Dec. 14, no one could much.� Though the family left the neighimagine the tragedy would hit so close borhood for Newtown when Ben was to home in Sunnyside. Within days of the incident, locals 7 months old, the bond they shared worked together to hold a candlelight with the community never wavered. Sunnymoms, a group of young vigil for the Wheelers, a former Sunnyside family who lost their 6-year- neighborhood mothers who regularly meet for celebraold son, Ben, in the tions and play dates, shooting. was founded by Among the 200-plus Francine Wheeler and residents present at the still operates to this vigil was Councilman day through local parJimmy Van Bramer (Dents, such as Hitts and Sunnyside), who said his wife. that before the WheelIn an effort to help ers moved to Newtown, the Wheelers recover Ben’s mother, Francine, from the tragedy, Hitts was an active member said that he plans to More than 200 people attended a candlelight vigil in December in honor of Sunnyside Gardens h o l d a f u n d r a i s e r Benjamin Wheeler, a vic tim of the Newtown, Conn., tragedy and former Park, and Roger Hitts, Ben Wheeler wherein all proceeds Sunnyside resident. A group of neighborhood parents have planned a a close friend of the famwill be given to the fundraiser to help the Wheeler family. ily. “The Wheelers are such good people,� Ben Wheeler Fund. The event has been scheduled for Hitts said. “By holding a fundraiser in at $25. Children under the age of 6 are Hitts said. “It was absolutely devastating Feb. 23, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., at his honor, we are really trying to remem- free, and the cost for children 6 and to hear about the loss of Ben.� According to Hitts, the first time he Sunnyside Community Services, located ber the joy he brought to so many people older is $5. To learn more, email Kim while helping his family recover from Brown at kbrownn@aol.com or visit and his wife had met the Wheelers was at 43-31 39th St. In addition to featuring a rotation of such a sad loss. We will never forget w w w . f a c e b o o k . c o m / in Sunnyside Gardens Park. After noticBenjaminWheelerFund. ing that the Wheelers’ eldest son, Nate, local bands playing songs by the Beatles, Ben.� Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo For those who are interested in atwho is now age 9, were close in age to Ben’s favorite band, the evening lineup his daughter, Hitts said they became will also include food, drinks, a raffle, a tending the fundraiser, wristbands for at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or food and drinks will cost $15 each, and mmontalvo@queenstribune.com. magic show and face-painting. close friends. “What happened to Ben was tragic,� a wristband for both will be discounted “Our kids grew up together,� he

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Page 6 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Edit Page In Our Opinion:

Think Of The Children The New York City school system is failing our children. While conversations continue on about how to improve the system, discussions between the teachers, elected officials and Mayor Mike Bloomberg have been nothing more than political arguments that remove the education of our children out of the equation. City schools have suffered because of the political machinations of the Mayor, the teachers unions and elected officials, all of whom have forgotten that the main purpose of our school system is to educate children and prepare them for a better future. While the debate continues over whether mayoral control should be changed or eliminated, we hope that someone steps in to advocate for the children affected by these political decisions. When Gov. Cuomo took office, he said that he would be a champion for the children when it came to education. As the dialogue over how to fix our schools carries on, we hope that Cuomo lives up to his word.

In Your Opinion: Track Issue To the Editor: I must take issue with Steven Aiello of Howard Beach (Viable Option, Feb 7-13, 2013). He writes that those of us who live adjacent to the tracks “had to be aware that possibly someday the track line might be utilized again.” Mr. Aiello, I’m not a stupid person. I went and looked at the house. I saw this 3 story berm in the backyard. I asked, “What’s that?” I looked into NYC records. And you know what I found? The facts. Fact: that track hasn’t been used by the LIRR since 1962 (50 years ago!), in large part because the people of Howard Beach finally had the A train. Fact: that track belongs to NYC, specifically the Department of Citywide Administrative Services. Fact: the City sold the rightof-way to the homeowners along 98th Street. Now that you know the facts, maybe you can understand how someone could think that track line might not be used again. Neil C Giannelli, Woodhaven

This initiative will be held on a monthly basis to ensure that all my constituents have easy and regular access to my office and the services we provide. Queens Office Hours sessions will be an opportunity for you to meet with my staff and ask questions without leaving your neighborhood. It’s important to me that the Queens community is being heard and supported in every way possible. During office hours, we will have staff members on hand to assist you with any issues you may have concerning federal agencies. This includes, but is not limited to: claims with the Veterans Administration, immigration, passport issues, federal student loans, IRS problems, Small Business Administration guidance, Medicare/Social Security issues, and grant support. To find out when we’ll be holding office hours next, please call my permanent district office for more details at (718) 875-1675, or email Michael.Stinson@mail.house.gov. I look forward to working on your behalf and solving problems for the Queens community U.S. Rep. Steve Israel, Melville

Office Hours

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To The Editor: Last week my office held the first installation of “Queens Office Hours.”

To The Editor: As evidence grows to demonstrate the folly of building a professional soc-

Michael Schenkler Publisher/Editor-in-Chief Queens County's Weekly Newspaper Group Founded in 1970 by Gary Ackerman Published Weekly Copyright © 2013 Tribco, LLC

Queens Tribune (718) 357-7400 E-mail Address: news@queenstribune.com 150-50 14th Road Whitestone, NY 11357 www.queenstribune.com

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cer stadium in Flushing Meadows, I would like to suggest my own backyard as an alternative. As a longtime resident of Ravenswood Houses, I would like to see my neighborhood prosper economically, creating jobs and cultural venues close to my home. Less than a year ago and only a mile away from lower Manhattan, the Brooklyn parcel known as Atlantic Yards was reborn as the Barclays Center. The basketball arena has quickly demonstrated itself as an economic engine, attracting not only the Nets basketball franchise, but also the Islanders hockey team and top headliners in the music industry. I believe that much of the arena’s success is derived from its location above a major hub for the subway, buses and a Long Island Railroad terminal. In addition, it is within a mile of downtown Manhattan and even closer to downtown Brooklyn, a burgeoning business district in its own right. It is an arena accessible to everyone from the metropolitan region. In contrast, the Barclays Center with the proposed Flushing Meadows location, tucked deep inside Queens, accessible by only one subway and railroad line, in a location that would encourage driving rather than public transit, with three highways surrounding it. Far from centers of commerce, situated atop landfill with a high water table. Now imagine Major League Soccer in Long Island City, built within proximity to four subway lines so that spectators from around the city could easily arrive to the games, leaving their cars at home. Sitting atop a rail yard, the arena would be accessible to fans from across Long Island, New Jersey and Connecticut. Located within minutes of Midtown, it would easily attract an affluent clientele that could also contribute to the hotels, restaurants and arts institutions in the surrounding neighborhoods. At the same time, being adjacent to the 7 subway line, the arena would also attract the working class fan base from the borough’s Hispanic neighborhoods. With Manhattan as a backdrop, the arena would be instantly recognizable and attract not only enough fans, concertgoers and conventioneers to make it profitable, but maybe it could even lure the Jets football team back to the bought of their origin. Game on! Eugene Krymko, Long Island City

Gun Control To The Editor: Oh that darn liberal Vatican; now they’re praising President Obama’s proposals for curbing gun violence. What’s next; two people of the same gender and in love, being allowed to marry? But I digress (or progress), that is yet another subject. Their realization of the mad “guns gone wild” scenario being insane is one more step in the growth to their enlightenment… an important one. I suppose that “Thou shalt not kill” thing had something to do with their decision. This will upset those many that enjoy the fun of killing things labeled “sport” who may feel that there is far too much breathing going on in our country and more guns mean less breathing. It may be seen as providing those worthy of remaining alive with somewhat more of that vital air. There are probably an infinite number of such irrational rationales for their love of killing. Fortunately this perverse mindset predominately though not exclusively, exists in the armpit of our country; predominately but unfortunately not exclusively as shown by some of our local Letters to the Editor. Edward Rothe, Douglaston

Dolan For Pope To The Editor: Pope Benedict XVI has just announced that he will retire on February 28, now as a Catholic and a grand knight in the Knights of Columbus, I was shocked. According to what I have read, no pope has retired since 1415, when Pope Gregory XII did so. I feel the church is facing many issues in our ever changing world. I feel though there is one Cardinal who might be up to the challenges and that is our own Cardinal Timothy Dolan. He is a relatively young cardinal who is committed to the church and its people. He is not afraid to speak out on the issues and that he urges more Catholics to do so. Here in Cardinal Dolan we have a man of God, who is not afraid of controversy and who will speak out for his religious beliefs and who has spoken out for religious freedom for all people. This is what a pope should do and who is young enough to accomplish these aims. That is why I hope when the cardinals meet in Rome that Cardinal Timothy Dolan is made a Pope for we need such a man who will be a guiding light. Frederick R. Bedell Jr., Glen Oaks Village

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www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 7

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Page 8 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

BY NATALIA KOZIKOWSK A On Feb. 12, Robert Jackson, a 19year-old Southeast Queens resident, broke his silence and made his first public statement about his controversial and violent arrest in Flushing. At a press conference in Laurelton, reporters were shown a 55-second video that appeared to show Jackson being pinned down, repeatedly punched and beaten by police officers of the 109th Precinct. After being startled his first time in front of the cameras, Jackson, who is facing charges of resisting arrest, obstructing governmental administration, possession of marijuana and disorderly conduct, opened up about the large scar on his face, which he allegedly obtained during the Jan. 8 incident near the precinct house on Northern Boulevard around noon. “When I first saw my face, I was shocked. How could someone do this to me?” he asked. “I didn’t even do anything. I was on my break from lunch. I was like, ‘Did I do anything wrong?’” The footage, which went viral on the popular urban website, WorldStarHipHop.com, was captured by a bystander on his cell phone and showed more than eight officers near the 130-pound teen, at least four of which were restraining Jackson, his face scraping against the concrete. He can be heard pleading with officers to

Photo by Ira Cohen

Teen Speaks Out On Brutal Arrest

Robert Jackson discussed his Januar y arrest in Flushing, where he claims officers violently assaulted him. “stop.” At least one other officer is seen kicking Jackson in the face. Although shaky and of poor quality, the video also appeared to show a supervisor present at the time of his arrest. The press conference, organized by Jacques Leandre, Jackson’s attorney of record and a candidate for the 31st District Council seat, was attended by some notable leaders in the Black community. “The full community is behind Mr. Jackson; we stand strong with Mr. Jackson because we understand that Mr.

Jackson is not just an individual, he is actually a whole community and this incident could have happened, and it does happen, way too often,” Leandre said. “Hopefully, we are going to bring an end to police brutality.” William Bell, the father of Sean Bell, members of the clergy and representatives from the National Action Network and the Queens National Association for the Advancement of Colored People were all on board to vocalize their disappointment in the alleged misconduct of the police officers. “I’m just appalled at this kind of service that many of our police officers are doing in our community,” said Rev. Charles Norris, pastor of the Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church in Jamaica. “We know just as there are some bad people in the community, there are some bad police officers on the police force, and they seem to consistently beat our young men.” “This is how they [the police] do it – they beat them half to death,” said a passionate Bell, who tragically lost his son in 2006 after being wrongfully shot by police officers in Jamaica. “You got to put them aside – make them accountable for it. Let’s stop protecting them.” Although Leandre refused to disclose whether or not Jackson had any priors, reports indicate he has been arrested four other times and was allegedly found to be in possession of a gun and knife during one of the arrests. He

has not been found guilty for the charge. Leandre also did not reveal the reason for the initial stop, citing the sensitivity of the case and respect for his client, but reports say the officer’s complaint said he asked the teen for identification after seeing him yelling profanities and engaging in violent behavior. Jackson then allegedly walked away, put his hands in his two jacket pockets and refused to show his hands, resisted arrest and even attempted to bite an officer. Local leaders stood firm behind Jackson and his cause, arguing he was targeted because of his race and that the violence one sees in the video of his arrest was excessive and unjustified. “It is not a question of who he was as a youngster, it’s not a question of what he was doing. We are not protesting at this particular moment the fact that he was stopped,” said Bob Law of the National Leadership Alliance. “We have an issue with black youth being stopped consistently. The crime most often is that they were walking while black.” Detective Cheryl Crispin, a spokesperson for the New York Police Department, said in an email that they are “aware of the matter and it has been referred to the CCRB [the New York City Civilian Complaint Review Board].” No additional statement was given. Reach Reporter Natalia Kozikowska at (718)357-7400 Ext. 123 or nkozikowska@queenspress.com.


www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 9

Labor Unions Support MLS Proposal By MEGAN MONTALVO After months of garnering mixed support and opposition over the proposed construction of a 25,000-seat stadium in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Major League Soccer officials are now welcoming a major endorsement backed by three local labor unions. Making their announcement on Feb. 7, representatives from the Hotel Trades Council, Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York and 32BJ SEIU cited the creation of approximately 2,100 construction-related jobs, 160 full-time jobs and 750 part-time jobs as their impetus to support the initiative. With a combined membership of more than 200,000 individuals, the unions’ endorsement marks the first organized labor support for the MLS proposal. “A Major League Soccer stadium in Queens will be good for the working men and women of New York City; it will create good jobs and enhance the park,” said Hector Figueroa, president of 32BJ SEIU. “We are committed to continuing to work with MLS and the community to make sure this is done in a way to benefit the area as a whole.” Although MLS is still in talks with City officials to finalize plans for the $300 million stadium that would take up to 13 acres in the park, the trio of unions believe that the economic benefit to the Borough’s working families and local

businesses would extend beyond construction, allowing for more foot traffic in the surrounding restaurants and retail stores during game season. “The economy in Queens is still hurting,” said Gary LaBarbera, president of the Building and Construction Trades Council. “The recession is still taking a toll on middle and lower income families, and it would be a shame for Queens to be shut out of such a tremendous opportunity for good jobs.” While the Fairness Coalition of

Queens, a coalition of community-based organizations formed to ensure that all new uses or proposed redesigns in Flushing Meadows Corona Park include a process for input from residents, as well as several local business owners in the area have presented several petitions to City Hall in an attempt to decry the supposed benefits of the stadium’s construction, which is scheduled to start in 2014, union leaders say they feel assured that once the stadium is completed, new jobs and fair wages with benefits will

Seeking A Suspect: On Feb. 7, Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer (D-Sunnyside) joined State Sen. Michael Gianaris (D-Astoria) and local residents to request the public’s help in identifying the killer of Francisco Leal, a former Queensbridge resident who was shot to death on Feb. 2. According to the NYPD, Leal’s assailant shot the 27-year-old in his chest as he stepped out of a grocer y store near 21st Street and 41st Avenue. Though officers have yet to make an arrest in connec tion to the crime, the elected officials used the event to raise awareness against gun violence and the need for tougher legislation surrounding gun crimes and restrictions in the City.

continue to mount in the Borough. “Tens of thousands of Queens residents, including many hotel workers and their families, who live in the diverse neighborhoods surrounding Flushing Meadows Corona Park are excited to support a project that will create good jobs for many New Yorkers,” said Peter Ward, president of the Hotel Trades Council. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queenstribune.com.


Page 10 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: ALIN TOP CONSTRUCTION LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/ 21/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 43-31 192 St., 2Fl, Flushing, New York 11358. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of KOKUM LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sect’y of State NY (SSNY) on 09/ 18/2012. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 29-24 Newtown Avenue, Astoria, NY 11102. Purpose: Small Business Consulting ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 185-31 MERRICK BOULEVARD LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 13921 Springfield Boulevard, Springfield Gardens, New York 11413. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ ZAMBALA MANAGEMENT LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/6/ 12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 132-35 41 st Rd., Apt. 6F, Flushing, NY 11355. General Purposes. ___________________________________ FIRST N.E.S. REALTY, LLC App. for Auth. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/ 19/2012. LLC was organized in DE on 4/19/ 2012.Office in Queens Co. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to c/o Elizabeth Sadik, 10319 68 th Rd., Forest Hills, NY 11375. Required office at 3500 S. Dupont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901.

Cert. of Org. filed with SSDE, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of M&M Tax Services LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 8/27/12. Office loc: Queens. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to 93 05 97 Ave, Ozone Park, NY, 11416. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF QUEENS U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE TRUST 2007-2 ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE-BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2, Plaintiff, Against CONRAD JONES, et al. , Defendant(s) Pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale duly entered 3/ 28/2012, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Queens County Supreme Court, 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY in Courtroom #25 on 2/22/ 2013 at 10:00 am premises known as 2288 Jaydee Court, Far Rockaway, NY 11690 a/ k/a 2288 Jaydee Court, Far Rockaway, NY 11691. ALL that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the borough and County of QUEENS, City and State of New York. Block 15663 Lot 37 Approximate amount of lien $610,504.04 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment Index #29127/2009 Matthew M Lupoli, Esq., Referee. Kozeny, McCubbin & Katz, LLP, 395 North Service Rd., Ste 401, Melville, NY 11747 Dated: 1/16/2013 File Number: 12792JVR

assignees, lienors, creditors, successors-in-interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through JOHN BEDOYA, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective wives, or widows of his, If any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to Plaintiffs; NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT AUTHORITY TRANSIT ADJUDICATION BUREAU; CRIMINAL COURT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK; NEW YORK CITY PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU; NEW YORK CITY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on the plaintiffs attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Queens County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: October 15, 2012 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Bernice D. Siegal, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated December 18, 2012, and filed with supporting papers in the Queens County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a tax lien covering the property known as 118-18 154th Street, Borough of Queens, New York and being a parcel of land designated as

Block 12208 and Lot 44. The relief sought is the sale of the subject property at public auction in satisfaction of the tax lien. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $5,052.94, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorneys fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the property. Anthony J. Iacchetta Phillips Lytle LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 2382000 ___________________________________ 57-38 VAN DOREN LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/4/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 59-05 55 th Dr., Maspeth, NY 11378. General Purposes. ___________________________________ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE Index No. 15549/2012 Date Filed: 01/10/2013 U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to Lasalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007OA3 Trust, Plaintiff, against Naipaul Ramlochan, if he be living or if he be dead, his spouse, heirs devisees, distributees and successors in interest, all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; Washington Mutual Bank, State of New York; and “JOHN DOE”, said name being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, and any parties, corporations or entities, if any, having or claiming an interest or lien upon the mortgaged premises, Defendant(s). PROPERTY ADDRESS: 109-29 142nd Street, Jamaica, NY 11435 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or a notice

of appearance on the attorneys for the Plaintiff within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure $356,160.00 not to exceed negative amortization amount up to 110% of the original principal amount and interest, recorded in the QUEENS County Office of the City Register on March 15, 2007 in CRFN: 2007000139823 covering premises known as 109-29 142nd Street, Jamaica, NY 11435. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. Plaintiff designates QUEENS County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the County in which the mortgaged premises is situated. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: October 23, 2012 John A. DiCaro,

Esq. Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 250 Mile Crossing Boulevard, Suite One, Rochester, NY 14624 (585) 247-9000 Our File No. 11-009751 Premises known as 10929 142nd Street, Jamaica, NY 11435. All that certain property situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York. Block: 11928 Lot: 41 ___________________________________ Notice of formation of Volonakis, Bedevian & Loucas, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/24/2012. Office loc: Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to: 5-44 47 th Ave, 3 rd Flr, LIC, NY 11101. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ ALPHA ARSENAL LLC, a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 12/10/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 104-20 Queens Blvd., Ste. 1B, Forest Hills, NY 11375. General Purposes. ___________________________________ HASNY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/11/ 12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 69 Horatio St., Apt. 2F, NY, NY 10014. General Purposes. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 15618 LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/ 28/12. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2018. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 15618 Crossbay Boulevard, Howard Beach, New York 11414. Purpose: For any lawful purpose.

___________________________________ STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT QUEENS COUNTY SUMMONS AND NOTICE Index No. 10466/12 NYCTL 2011-A TRUST AND THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND CUSTODIAN, Plaintiffs, vs. The heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators,

You Can E-Mail Your Legal Copy to legals@queenstribune.com To Place Your Legal Advertisement or call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 149


www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 11

NYPD Releases Stop-and-Frisk Totals By LUIS GRONDA The NYPD released a detailed report last week on the number of stop-andfrisks made by police officers throughout the City, with the highest Queens incidents coming from the 115th Precinct. The report is the most up-to-date numbers on stop-and-frisks, which has been a divisive issue in the City. Supporters of the measure say that it helps curb the crime rate, while people opposed to it say that it can lead to discrimination against minorities. The numbers complied are from 2011 and are broken down by each police precinct and race. The NYPD started producing stop-and-frisk reports in 2002. In 2011, police stopped and questioned 685,724 people, which is an increase of almost 1,400 from last year’s report. Out of the 16 police precincts in Queens, the 115th Precinct, which covers Jackson Heights, North Corona, East Elmhurst and LaGuardia Airport, had the most stop-and-frisks last year with 18,156. Robbery was the leading reason for stopping people in that precinct with just over 37 percent. Broken down by race, nearly 84 percent of those people stopped within that precinct identified themselves as Hispanic and about 65 percent of those people resided in an area that is patrolled by the 115th.

Second on that list, according to the report, is the 103rd precinct, which patrols Jamaica, Hollis and Hollis Park Gardens, with 17,152. The chief reason for stops in that command was also robbery, with just under 35 percent, and African-Americans accounted for 73 and a half percent of the stops in that precinct. Finishing third in the Borough is the 109th Precinct, which patrols parts of Flushing, Whitestone, College Point, Malba, Beechhurst and Bay Terrace, with 12,864. Robbery was the main reason for the stops in the 109th and African-Americans also made up the highest percentage of stops with just over 47 percent. Citywide, Brooklyn’s 75th Precinct topped the list, with 31,100 incidents. The three precincts with the lowest number of stop-and-frisks are the 112th, 111th and the 100th Precincts. The 112th Precinct, which covers Forest Hills and Rego Park, had 3,407 stops that year, the 111th, patrolling several neighborhoods, including Bayside and Douglaston, had almost 4,700 stops in total, and finally, the 100th Precinct, which is responsible for much of the Rockaway peninsula, including Belle Harbor and Breezy Point, had a little over 5,000 stop-andfrisks for the time period covered by the report. The New York Civil Liberties Union,

a non profit civil rights organization, has been one of the main opponents of stop-and-frisk, saying that it raises concerns over racial profiling and privacy rights. It also released a stop-and-frisk phone application, which allows people to video and voice record a search conducted by a police officer and send

it in to the NYCLU. The NYPD has defended the measure in the past saying that it has been part of the reason for the City’s declining crime numbers in recent years. Reach Reporter Luis Gronda at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or at lgronda@queenstribune.com.

Advertorial:

National Court Reporting And Captioning Week Business Informatics Center, a court reporting school based in Valley Stream, will encourage its student population to get involved with National Court Reporting and Captioning Week, Feb. 1723, by engaging in a grassroots effort to promote the profession and educate local communities about the value of stenographic skills. The awareness week is a nationwide effort organized by the National Court Reporters Association to highlight the contributions of court reporters and captioners and to showcase career opportunities. The week will be marked with promotional events and presentations at high schools about career opportunities, along with community demonstrations. “Court reporting is consistently

ranked as one of the top career options as it offers both flexibility and significant income potential,” Constance Brown, president of Business Informatics Center, said. “Court reporters and captioners are able to begin a career without a traditional four-year college degree, and these highly trained professionals experience the continuous professional growth associated with an in-demand career.” Business Informatics Center was founded in 1983 and provides upwardly working adults and recent graduates with legal and business career preparation. The college also offers adult education courses in computer applications. For information, visit www.thecollegeforbusiness.com or www.ncra.org.

Camellia

House Weekend Sat. & Sun., February 23rd & 24th . 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park No parking fee / In the Camellia House & Coe Hall Mansion

Camellia House FREE WEEKEND ACTIVITIES 10:00am 11:00am 12:00pm 1:00pm 2:00pm 3:00pm 3:30pm 4:00pm All Day

Camellia Greenhouse & Coe Hall Open Lecture: Vincent Simeone talks about camellias Saxophone Duo performance by Chamber Players Int’l Lecture: Vincent Simeone talks about camellias Saxophonist Duo by Chamber Players Int’l Lecture: Vincent Simeone talks about camellias Saxophonist Duo performance Chamber Players Int’l Camellia House closes How to paint camellias watercolor demonstrations (Roberta Erlagen) Camellia Plant Sale provided by Martin Viette Nurseries

WEEKEND ACTIVITIES AT COE HALL 10:00am – 4:00pm / $10 entrance fee / Members & children free Ukelele music with Josh Kekoa Cho, Children’s Crafts, Mad Hatter’s Tea Party, Bingo for Children, and The Great Gatsby movie showing in the Buffalo Room. Mad Hatter’s Tea Party & Storytelling with Jonathan Kruk & Andrea Sadler.

12:00pm, 1:30pm, & 3:00pm Magic of Robert Austin Gift Shop & Perwinkles Café at the Hay Barn/Visitors Center 11:00am – 4:00pm

INFORMATION: (516) 922-8678 or (516) 922-8682 or jlavella@plantingfields.org PLANTING FIELDS ARBORETUM STATE HISTORIC PARK

1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay, NY 11771 For more information: www.plantingfields.org


Page 12 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Compiled by STEVEN J. FERRARI

Borough-Wide ROBBERY PATTERN: The NYPD is seeking the public’s assistance identifying two individuals wanted for three robberies in the confines of the 103, 106 and 113 Precincts. The first incident occurred on Dec. 29, 2012, at approximately 1:10 p.m. The suspects entered a Quality Inn, located at 138-68 94th Ave., Jamaica, displayed a handgun and demanded money from the clerk. The suspects fled with money and an iPad. The second incident occurred on Feb. 4 at 6:30 p.m. The suspects entered a Howard Johnson, located at 153-95 Rockaway Blvd., Jamaica, displayed a handgun and demanded money. The suspects fled with an undetermined amount of cash. The third incident occurred on Feb. 5 at 1:30 a.m. The suspects entered a La Quinta Inn, located at 111-26 Van Wyck Blvd., Ozone Park, armed with a handgun and demanded money. The suspects fled with an undetermined amount of cash. In all three incidents, the suspects fled the scene in a silver Audi. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by visiting nypdcrimestoppers.com or texting their tips to CRIMES (274637) then enter TIPS577. All calls are strictly confidential. 105th Precinct BANK ROBBERY: The NYPD is asking the public’s assistance identifying the suspect wanted for a bank robbery. On Jan. 9 at 9:15 a.m., the suspect entered the Capital One Bank, 145-15 243rd St., Rosedale, approached the teller and demanded money. The teller complied and the suspect fled with an undetermined amount of money. There were no reported injuries. The suspect is described as a Black male, between 5-foot-6 and 5-foot-9. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by visiting nypdcrimestoppers.com

or texting their tips to CRIMES (274637) then enter TIPS577. 106th Precinct ROBBERY ARREST: The NYPD has arrested two individuals in regards to a robbery on Jan. 31. On Feb. 7, police arrested Barshaan Morrison, 17, and Thomas Williamson, 17, both of Jamaica, on charges of robbery and criminal possession of a weapon. The two were sought in connection to an incident on 111th Street, where the two allegedly pinned a victim against a tree and demanded the victim’s phone. 107th Precinct BANK ROBBERY: The NYPD is asking the public’s assistance in identifying and locating the following suspect wanted in connection with a bank robbery. On Jan. 11 at approximately 3 p.m., the suspect entered Sovereign Bank, 150-28 Union Turnpike, Flushing, approached a bank teller and passed a note demanding money. After receiving money, the suspect fled the location. There were no reported injuries. The suspect is described as a Black male, 40 years old, 200 lbs., 5-foot-7, with brown eyes, last seen wearing a black cap and a brown waist-length jacket. Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by visiting nypdcrimestoppers.com or texting their tips to CRIMES (274637) then enter TIPS577. 109th Precinct INVESTIGATION: On Feb. 7 at approximately 12:25 a.m., police responded to a 911 call of an aided male. Upon arrival, officers observed Guang Zhe Jin, 49, of Flushing, unconscious and unresponsive within the residence with an apparent stab wound to the chest. EMS also responded to the location and pronounced him dead at the scene. There have been no arrests and the investigation is ongoing.


www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 13

Queens This Week

When it comes to Black History Month, Queensborough Community College is celebrating with a song in its heart. “Black Stars of the Great White Way! A Chapman Roberts Concept” will hit the stage at the school for a one-performance only extravaganza on Feb. 17 at 3 p.m. in the Queensborough Performing Arts Center. Created by Broadway choral director/arranger Chapman Roberts, “Black Stars of the Great White Way!,” is a show filled with Broadway showstoppers paying tribute to some of the most wellknown performers in history, such as Louis Jordan, Eubie Blake, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, Fats Waller, Sammy Davis Jr. and Nat King Cole. For such a compilation, Roberts certainly seems like the right man for the job, as he has had a long, successful career dealing with Broadway and Black culture. He made his Broadway debut in the original staging of the musical “Hair” and has since gone on to appear in such hits as “Hello Dolly” and “Jesus Christ Superstar.” Moving behind the scenes, Roberts was responsible for arranging original productions of “Eubie,” “Smokey Joe’s Café” and “Bubbling Brown Sugar,” of which the latter two won Grammys. Given that it takes place on a Queens campus, it makes perfect sense to include one of the Borough’s well-known actors, Keith David. Raised in East Elmhurst, the actor has made notable appearances in multiple mediums during his career, including film (“Requiem for a Dream,” “Crash”), television (“ER,” “Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson”), theater (“Jelly’s Last Jam”) and video

Snow Removal Program Helps Seniors For seniors who were stuck in the snow over the weekend during snowstorm Nemo, there was a volunteer program ready and waiting to help. State Sen. Tony Avella (D-Bayside) used the blizzard that buried Queens in six inches to a foot of snow to continue his “Snow Removal for Seniors” program. Having launched in January of 2012, the volunteer series is made of able-bodied volunteers of all ages who come together during snowstorms to clear out the sidewalks of North and Eastern Queens’ elderly population. For the project, Avella has partnered with the Shin Kwang Church in Bayside, who provided two volunteers that joined up with the 18 helpers who put their names in for the program through the Senator’s Queens office. Volunteers are matched with seniors living in their vicinity who sign up for the program ahead of time.

Keith David and Norm Lewis will perform in “Black Stars of the Great White Way! A Chapman Roberts Concept” at Queensborough Community College on Feb. 17.

New Murals: The Theresa Lang Children’s Ambulatory Center at New York Hospital Queen unveiled their new kid-friendly murals on Feb. 7. Funded by the Starlight Children’s Foundation and painted by artists from Splashes of Hope, the paintings represent the first major design overhaul of the center’s lobby area. It follows a painting project that took place on the center’s upper levels. The murals have the theme of zoo animals doing wholesome things in Flushing. NYHQ has worked with the Starlight Foundation for the past 17 years. Theresa Lang Children’s Ambulatory Center is located at 56-45 Main St., Flushing, with its own entrance of 141 st street. Snow was removed from nearly 100 homes throughout Bayside, Whitestone, College Point, Fresh Meadows and Little Neck. “I want to thank all the volunteers who went out this weekend and helped a senior in need. Seniors are some of the most vulnerable members of our community and I am glad that I, with the help of volunteers, was able to alleviate the burden for seniors of having to dig out of a snowstorm,” Avella said. “However, as more and more seniors sign up for the program, we are in need of even more selfless volunteers. These se-

Photo by Joe Marvilli

Black Hist. Month Broadway Stars At QCC

games (“Halo 2”). For his QCC performance though, David will display his vocal chops and his love for Nat King Cole. Norm Lewis, known for his successful run as Javert in “Les Miserables” during its 25th Anniversary celebration, will be on hand to perform some songs from that musical as well as numbers from Steven Sondheim. Ted Levy, who received an Emmy for his role in “Precious Memories,” will pay a tribute to Sammy Davis. The audience will also get a chance to see “Afro Feet” dancer Omar Edwards show off his moves. Other performers will include Frank Owens, Larry Marshall, Andre DeShields, Longineu Parsons and 14 year old piano prodigy Julius Rodriguez. Tickets are $35 and can be bought at www.qcc.cuny.edu/qpac/ blackStarPress.asp. For more information, call (718) 631-6311. Reach Reporter Joe Marvilli at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125, or at jmarvilli@queenstribune.com.

niors need our help, and I encourage as many volunteers as possible to participate in this beneficial program.” In addition to the opportunity to do a good deed, student volunteers will receive up to 10 hours of community service credit for their efforts. Both volunteers and senior citizens who wish to sign themselves up for snow removal can contact Avella’s office at (718) 357-3094. Reach Reporter Joe Marvilli at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125, or at jmarvilli@queenstribune.com.

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County, on the 15 day of January, 2013, bearing the Index No.: 990/12, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 8917 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York 11435, grants the Minor the right to: Assume the name of (First) Mehrab (Last) Ahmed. Minor’s present name is (First) Ruhan (Middle) Amin (Last) Ahmed. Minor’s present address is 141-33 82 nd Drive, Briarwood, NY 11435. Minor’s place of birth is Queens, New York Minor’s date of birth is November 19, 2001. ___________________________________

(Last) Rahman My present name is (First) Oreeda (Last) Faraza (infant) My present address is 34-43 60 Street, Woodside, NY 11377 My place of birth is Queens, NY My date of birth is December 21, 2009 ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: THE BENNINGTON, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/14/ 13. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Ciampa Organization, 136-26 37 th Avenue, Flushing, New York 11354. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________

LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to 2 1 - 3 8 3 1 st S t , # B - 1 G , Astoria, NY 11105. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ FAIRVIEW NURSING CARE CENTER, LOCATED AT 69-70 GRAND CENTRAL PKWY. FOREST HILLS NY 11375 A PARTICIPANT IN THE MEDICARE AND MEDICAID PROGRAMS DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE IN ITS POLICIES REGARDING ADMISSIONS, EMPLOYMENT OR THE PROVISION OF SERVICES BECAUSE OF RACE, CREED, COLOR, AGE, GENDER, SEXUAL ORIENTATION, DISABILITY, SPONSORSHIP, MARITAL STATUS, CITIZENSHIP OR NATIONAL & ETHNIC ORIGIN OR SOURCE OF PAYMENT.

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 1/24/13, bearing Index Number NC001057-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Oraida

Notice of Formation of Murphy Art Conservation, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 12/19/12. Office loc: Queens. SSNY is designated as agent of

You Can E-Mail Your Legal Copy to legals@queenstribune.com To Place Your Legal Advertisement or call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 149


Page 14 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

QJCC HOPES TO GET MEALS PROGRAM REFUNDED By LUIS GRONDA Seniors in Queens who rely on having their daily meals delivered to them could have to find another way to get the food that they need. The Forest Hills-based Queens Jewish Community Council is in danger of losing its City Meals-onWheels program due to a loss of funding. The program has been delivering hot meals, such as meat, fish or chicken, to elderly residents throughout the Borough for the past five years. According to Cynthia Zalinsky,

executive director of the QJCC, the Meals On Wheels program was scheduled to be discontinued earlier this month, but received a reprieve until March 31 to come up with the money. Zalinsky said that the program serves seniors that have an average age of 87.5 and a major reason that they need the food delivery is because it is hard for them to commute at their age. “I would be concerned about mal-

nutrition,” she said. “This is a lifesustaining program for them.” Zalinsky said that they are now pleading to the public and reaching out to elected officials to help them money for the program. She added that while the program is expensive for them to have, she feels that it must continue for the elderly that need the food on a daily basis. “We just have this moral obliga-

tion to them and we can’t stop this program,” Zalinsky said. The program at the QJCC is called Project CHAIM (Committed to providing the Homebound Aged and Infirmed with Meals). Chaim is the Hebrew word for life, Zalinsky said. If you want to know more about the program or are interested in helping, please call the QJCC at (718) 5449033. They are located at 119-45 Union Turnpike in Forest Hills. Reach Reporter Luis Gronda at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 127 or at lgronda@queenstribune.com.

DON’ T LET MYTHS RAIN ON YOUR RETIREMENT Do you dream of the day you can retire, but are not sure how to get there? You are not alone. Many people find it easier to avoid reality when it comes to planning for retirement. “That can lead to big mistakes in their retirement income planning,” says Zachary Gipson, vice president of retirement and wealth planning at USAA. Here’s a look at five common myths that could derail your expectations for income when you retire. Myth 1: You won’t be around long enough to go through your money The reality: Life expectancies are at record highs in the United States, so it is important to acknowledge that you or a family member may spend as many years in retirement as you did working. According to a 2010 report by the National Academy of Social Insurance, for a 65-year-old married couple, there’s a 48 percent chance that one spouse will live to age 90. To help stretch your money, consider incorporating immediate and deferred annuities into your planning. Created to provide guaranteed, lifelong income in retirement, they can also offer guaranteed growth while you’re saving for it, Gipson explains. A long retirement extends your exposure to one of financial planning’s most subtle enemies: inflation. As you invest, it is important to seek a mix of assets that guard against the declining value of the dollar and that is in line with your risk tolerance and goals. Myth 2: You should get out of stocks when you retire The reality: Stocks can help provide the long-term growth you need to make your assets last longer since your retirement could span several decades. You’ve probably heard you should reduce your investment risk as you age. But with traditional pensions being replaced by 401(k) plans, you are wholly responsible for making

asset allocation decisions. As Gipson puts it, “Everyone now has to be a pension fund manager with their own money, and most people just aren’t equipped to do that.” Gipson agrees with the notion of dampening portfolio risk at retirement, but that does not mean getting rid of stocks entirely. Rather, regularly reviewing, and if necessary, rebalancing your portfolio based on your risk tolerance can lock in gains from strong-performing asset classes and allow you to buy those that underperform at cheaper prices. Myth 3: You can just keep working The reality: Counting on being able to work as long as you want is dangerous, Gipson says. Employers are feeling pressure to cut costs, and with high unemployment, finding work is always a challenge. A disability also could force you to stop working prematurely. Many people think they can simply work longer if they do not have enough money to retire. According to a recent survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute, 74percent of workers plan to work at least part time during their retirement years, and Schaffer notes working in retirement has become a necessity for many. Good planning does not rely on good fortune. Rather, your plan should both keep you from having to work the rest of your life and deal with the consequences of unexpected surprises that prevent you from earning a paycheck. Myth 4: An inheritance will bail you out The reality: You may be hoping for an inheritance as a potential retirement boost. But hope is not a strategy, and counting on an inheritance can create big problems if it does not come through. Many people who expect to inherit money never do so, Gipson says. And even for those who do inherit money, it is often too little or comes too late to make a difference in their

retirement planning, he adds. The safer thing to do is to treat an inheritance as an unexpected bonus rather than relying on it. Myth 5: Your taxes will be lower in retirement. The reality: Big government deficits make future tax increases much more likely. Also, taking money out of retirement accounts, such as traditional IRAs and 401(k)s, creates tax-

able income that can push you into higher tax brackets. One suggestion Gipson offers is to consider converting part of your eligible retirement assets to a Roth IRA. By doing so, you will pay taxes now, but you will create a tax-free pool of money to tap in retirement. Diversifying with both Roth and traditional IRAs is a possible way to handle future tax uncertainty.


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Page 16 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Detained In Israel

Queens Rabbi Held After Western Wall Prayer By JOE MARVILLI When Rabbi Robyn Bodzin visited Israel earlier this week, she had no idea she would be detained for praying at the Western Wall in a traditional prayer shawl. Once she saw a group of activists praying in protest against ultra-Orthodox rulings, she knew she had to join in. Bodzin, a rabbi at Flushing’s Israel Center of Conservative Judaism, was one of 10 women detained by Israeli police on Feb. 11 for praying at the Western Wall in Jerusalem. They were wearing the tallit, a prayer shawl traditionally used by men, and is not allowed to be worn by women at the holy site, according to the ultra-Orthodox establishment, which has the backing of Israel’s Supreme Court. The incident was the latest example of clashes between the ultraOrthodox dominance in Israel and the struggle for equality from a portion of the country’s female population. For Bodzin, Monday started normally. “I got up, I looked at my agenda, spent some time with God and part of that involves a prayer shawl,” she said. “It’s the beginning of the Hebrew month of Adar. At the start of every month, women join together in prayer at the Western Wall.” When she arrived at the wall though, she found a group of about 200 protestors, most of whom were women, protesting the inequality that only men may pray at the wall wearing the tallit. Several male supporters joined the women in prayer as well, including a couple of Israeli paratroopers who reclaimed the Western Wall, also known as Kotel, during the Six Day War in 1967. Many of the activists present were part of the Women of the Wall group, whose main mission is to protest against the inequality at the Western Wall. Men and women both pray at the wall, but in separate sections and under rules set by the Western Wall Heritage Foundation, a body appointed and funded by the government. The Western Wall is one of the most sacred sites in Israel and of the Jewish faith in general, as it is what remains of an ancient wall that surrounded the Second Jewish Temple, which was destroyed in 70 A.D. The wall was constructed in 19 B.C.E. After raising their voices in prayer for about 40 minutes, the group started to move, but Bodzin and nine others were stopped and taken in by Israeli police for questioning at around 7:45 a.m., local time. Their passports were taken, but they were not told why they were being detained. “I was taken in for an interrogation. That’s the words they used,” Bodzin said. “They asked if I’d known what I had done wrong and I said

Activism in Queens

Rabbi Robyn Bodzin (left photo) holds up her finger to show the ink used when her fingerprints were taken during her detainment. She is pictured above with some of the other detained women. that I hadn’t done anything wrong because I was a rabbi, and I had a right to pray with a prayer shawl.” During the questioning, Bodzin was told that she was being detained for violating regulations of holy places and behaving in a way that may violate public safety. “I’m not sure what that could possibly mean,” the Rabbi said. “Were they expecting a mosh-pit with all 200 of us? What’s with that word ‘may’?” When Bodzin and the other detainees were processed, they turned the act into a form of protest against the situation. “We were fingerprinted in the first station. The police officers wanted us to wash our fingers off and we wouldn’t do it. We wanted proof,” she said. While they were not charged with anything, the Israeli police spokesman mentioned that the women were barred from returning to the wall for 15 days. As a result of the detainment, Bodzin missed meetings with high-level Israeli diplomats, including Pr ime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s chief-of-staff. She did note though that the officials were made aware of why she was unable

The prayer book used by the Women of the Wall protest group. to attend the meetings. After she was released, the group met with U.S. Ambassador to Israel Dan Shapiro, who was sympathetic to their cause. After the incident, Bodzin mentioned that she was enthused to have protested with the Women of the Wall movement, stating her support for them. “If I ever find myself in Israel on the first of the month, I will stand in solidarity with these women,” she said. While this is the first time such an occurrence has happened to her out of the more than a dozen trips she has taken to the country, Bodzin emphasized her love for Israel and her belief that things will change for the better. “We can dream and hope for an Israel that has a much stronger sense of equality,” Bodzin said. “She’s still a young country. She’s only turning 65 this year. Think of where the United States was at 65. I would never turn my back on her.” Since she returned from Israel, Bodzin has received a large amount of suppor t from her family and friends for her role in the protest. “Frankly, given the Rabbi’s beliefs and her desire to act on her beliefs, it came as no surprise and we’re very proud of her,” Sam Wise, vice president of the Israel Center of Conservative Judaism, said.

Given her record of social involvement in Queens, it is not shocking that Bodzin participated in the peaceful protests at the Western Wall. Bodzin’s fight for equality already had a definitive statement when she became the first female rabbi in Queens. She is now in her fourth year as the spiritual leader of the ICCJ. “Israel Center found me at the same time as I found them, and it was a match made in heaven,” she said. When she is not guiding her own synagogue community, Bodzin spends some her time with Queens Congregations United for Action, an interfaith grassroots federation that moves to support policy change towards improved public schools, violence-free neighborhoods, access to good jobs, adequate and affordable health care, decent housing for all and more. Two weeks ago, her interfaith efforts led her to the White House with another group of faith leaders. They had meetings with both President Barack Obama’s office and Vice President Joe Biden’s office to persuade them to expand the proposed gun violence legislation to include gun education in inner-city America. Her synagogue has also shown strong support for another divisive domestic policy issue: gay marriage. Bodzin noted that it was about a year ago when she presided over a samesex marriage ceremony between two men. “We absolutely support the Marriage Equality Act,” she said. “These are our basic principles of equality and inclusion. That’s what I stand for.” In addition, the ICCJ sprung to action after Superstor m Sandy, heading down to the Rockaways to volunteer as well as donate needed items. “My synagogue alone must have taken down more than 25 car loads of supplies that we donated,” the Rabbi said. Bodzin feels that her social activism makes up a main component of her mission as a spiritual leader and a human being, which is to help those in need and fight to improve the world. “One of my goals in life is to leave it better than I found it,” she said. “That’s what I see a big part of my job being: loving people, teaching and caring.” For more information on the Israel Center of Conservative Judaism, visit www.iccj2004.org. You can also follow Rabbi Bodzin online at twitter.com/shrobyn. Reach Reporter Joe Marvilli at (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125, or at jmarvilli@queenstribune.com.


www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 17

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice of Formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: 24-27 Steinway Street LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/27/2012. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: THE LLC, 24-27 Steinway Street, Astoria, NY 11103. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ SOLE DI CAPRI LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/24/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Amparo Proano, 108-75 51 st Ave., Queens, NY 11368. General Purposes. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of Orr & Orr Contracting LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/23/12. Office loc: Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to: PO Box 6224, Long Island City, NY 11106. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ WERBA REALTY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/21/12. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 66-45 Fresh Pond Rd., Ridgewood, NY 11385. General Purposes. ___________________________________ HH & FF, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 01/ 03/2013. NY Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to THE LLC 8 6 - 3 3 6 2 nd A V E N U E , REGO PARK NY 11374. General Purposes. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT: QUEENS COUNTY. ASTORIA FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN, Pltf. vs. ABDUL R A H I M GURMOHAMED, A/K/A ABDUL R. GURMOHAMED, et al,

Defts. Index #7903/09. Pursuant to judgment of foreclosure and sale dated May 23, 2011, I will sell at public auction in Courtroom #25 of the Queens County Supreme Court, 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY on Friday, Feb. 22, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., prem. k/a 92-32 213th St., Queens Village, NY. Said property located at a point on the westerly side o f 2 1 3 th S t . ( f o r m e r l y Hendrisksen Avenue) distant 175 ft. northerly from the corner formed by the intersection of the westerly side of 213 th St. with the northerly side of 93 rd Ave. (formerly Vandergraw Avenue); being a plot 100 ft. x 25 ft.. Approx. amt. of judgment is $71,968.54 plus costs and interest. Sold subject to terms and conditions of filed judgment and terms of sale. JOSEPH J. RISI, Referee. DEUTSCH & SCHNEIDER, LLP, Attys. for Pltf., 79-37 Myrtle Ave., Glendale, NY. File No. LC-154- #82218 ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of Szul Management, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 1/7/13. Office loc: Queens. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to 4 3 - 2 8 4 2 ND S t , # 2 R , Sunnyside, NY 11104. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ JOTRUX GROUP, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11/ 7/12. Office in Queens Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 164-01 Jamaica Ave Jamaica, NY 11432. ___________________________________ 2298 H.Z. LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/3/13. Office in Queens Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 6941 Ingram Street Forest Hills, NY 11375. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF MEETING: Notice is hereby given that the Annual Meeting of the members of FLUSHING CEMETERY ASSOCIATION will be held at the office of the Cemetery, 163-06 46 th Avenue, Flushing, Queens County, New York on Friday, March 15, 2013, at

10:00A.M. for the purpose of electing Trustees, approving the renewal of its policy of indemnification insurance for its Trustees, Officers, and Employees and the transaction of other business as may properly be brought before the meeting. Dated: January 31, 2013 JOAN H. CORBISIERO, Secretary ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: DMG EXPRESS LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/23/ 13. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 24-25 21st Street, Astoria, New York 11102. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 1/24/13, bearing Index Number NC001053-12/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Derrick (Middle) Rudolph (Last) Cardoz My present name is (First) Derick (Middle) Santan (Last) Cardoz aka Derrick Rudolph Cardoz, aka Derick R Cardoz, aka Derick Rudolf Cardozo, aka Derick Cardoz, aka Derick A Cardoz My present address is 70-25 Yellowstone Blvd, Apt 9y, Forest Hills, NY 11375 My place of birth is India My date of birth is November 25, 1972 ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of Omni Specialties Services LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/13. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 29-16 120 th St., Linden Hill, NY 11354. Purpose: any lawful activity. ___________________________________ HLI Logistics, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/ 24/11. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corpora-

tion Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ Fresh Meadow Mechanical Plumbing, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/ 18/12. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ 4 J’s Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/ 5/08. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that a license (serial #1268711) for wine and beer has been applied for by the undersigned to sell wine and beer on-premises at a tavern under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 124-20 Liberty Ave., 2 nd Floor, S. Richmond Hill, NY. Hooka Paradise Restaurant & Lounge Inc. dba Sammy’s Sports Bar. __________________________________ SUMMONS NYCTL, 2011-A TRUST AND THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND CUSTODIAN FOR NYCTL 2011-1 TRUST, Plaintiffs, -againstJOSEPH ALESSANDRO; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; CITY OF NEW YORK ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD; CITY OF NEW YORK PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU; “JOHN DOE #1” through “JOHN DOE# 100”, the last 100 names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiffs, the persons or parties intended being the owners, tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, and if any of the aforesaid individual captioned defendants, if any, be dead, their respective heirs-at-law, next of kin, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors,

creditors, and successors in interest, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by, or through any of the aforesaid individual captioned defendants, if any, if they be dead, whether by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise, including any right, title or interest in and to the real property described in the complaint herein, all of who and whose names and places of residence are unknown to the plaintiffs, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action, to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with the summons, to serve notice of appearance, on the plaintiffs’ attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the date of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York), and in case of failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Plaintiffs designate Queens County as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject property. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the tax lien holder who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lost your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the tax lien holder will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (TAX LIEN HOLDER) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: July 25, 2012 LEVY & LEVY Attorneys for Plaintiffs 12 Tulip Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 487-6655 BY: JOSHUA LEVY, ESQ. File No. 1633832 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by

publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Robert J. McDonald a Justice of the Supreme Court, Queens County dated Jan. 8, 2013 and filed with the complaint and other papers in the Queens County Clerk’s Office, Jamaica, NY. The object of the action is to foreclose a tax lien and to recover the amount of the tax lien and all of the interest, penalties, additions and expenses to real property k/ a Block 3538, Lot 22. Dated: Jan. 25, 2013. LEVY & LEVY, Attys. For Pltf. #82279 HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE New York State Law requires that we send you this notice about the foreclosure process. Please read it carefully. Summons and Complaint You are in danger of losing your home. If you fail to respond to the summons and complaint in this foreclosure action, you may lose your home. Please read the summons and complaint carefully. You should immediately contact an attorney or your local legal aid office to obtain advice on how to protect yourself. Sources of Information and Assistance The State encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies, and nonprofit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877BANK-NYS or visit the Department’s website at www.banking.state.ny.us. Foreclosure rescue scams Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services.


Page 18 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Lunar Kick-Off

Delegate Assembly

Assemblyman Ron Kim addresses a crowd at Queens Crossing in Flushing to celebrate the kick off of Lunar New Year. The Flushing Lunar New Year Parade will take place at 11 a.m. on Feb. 16 and will begin between Union Street and 39th Avenue. Photo by Ira Cohen.

Legislative Breakfast

Assemblywoman Nily Rozic addresses the Queens Jewish Community Council Delegate Assembly during a meeting held at New York Hospital Queens on Sunday. Photo by Ira Cohen.

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Subway Request U.S. Rep. Grace Meng addresses the Jewish Community Relations Council’s Legislative Breakfast, held at the UJA Federation of New York’s headquarters in Manhattan. Photo by Ira Cohen.

Pinning Ceremony

Queens Borough President Helen Marshall pinned Queens pin on Ambassador Shigeyuki Hiroki, Consul General of Japan, during his visit to Borough Hall, Thursday, Feb. 7. Ambassador Hiroki, who visited the Rockaway Peninsula after Superstorm Sandy, talked about common problems and how to cope in the wake of natural disasters.

On Feb. 7, John Catsimatidis, a GOP Mayoral candidate, joined Arthur Rosenfield of the Astoria Chamber of Commerce and other local leaders in Long Island City to ask the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to rethink its plans for shutting down 7 line subway service for both weekends of the Asian Lunar New Year. Citing service disruptions that have negatively impacted passengers traveling between Manhattan and Flushing within the past five years, Catsimatidis called the MTA’s decision to continue the disruption through Flushing’s Lunar New Year parade, which will be held at Main Street on Feb. 16, disrespectful to the Asian community and “wrong.”


www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 19


Page 20 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Leisure

QC Students Curate Dutch Art Exhibit went with was how Dutch art contributed to the modern world as well as how it evolved from focusing on religion to covering secular material. One of the biggest events that facilitated this change was the Protestant Reformation. Due to this shift, religious iconography was less impor tant than it had been in past. Rather, there was a sense to try and humanize spiritual figures instead of enthroning them. This new at titude created more stor y telling a nd more humanizat ion in ar t, which eventually ended with some of the genres of today like landscape, por traiture and still life. A burgeoning middle class also generated a fresh approach to art, as it became something that many people, not just the rich, could collect. As a result, ar tists started to choose specializations and carve out their own space in the growing market. This transition is displayed in the museum by looping around the room, moving from iconography to secularism. “We brainstormed various major points that were par t icularly poignant to our presentation and the purpose to this exhibition,” Heather Simon, an art education student, said. “Once we agreed upon each section, we had to

Right At Home the right contrast of sweet and salty and the fresh pieces of lobster in it made our taste buds tingle. We went with seafood appetizers and sampled Clinton’s calamari and their baked clams. The clams were done well and served with a unique flavored sauce that gave it that lit tle extra kick to make it just right. The calamari was also done well – fried just right and served with a homemade marinara sauce. For our main course, Jessica and I When my friend Jessica and I split two dishes – the walked through the doors of Chicken Florentina and the Clinton Restaurant, we RESTAURANT Shrimp Fra Diavolo, served knew there was something with mussels and clams. I special about it. The familywas blown away by the owned establishment, which Chicken Florentina, which had been passed down for featured a vast number of inthree generations, had such gredients like scaloppini, a warm ambiance and made mushrooms and proscuit to. us feel right at home. I have had the dish before, The first thing we nobut I’ve never tasted so many ticed about the place was its different flavors that enatmosphere. There was just something about it that reminded Jes- hanced the dish the way it did at sica, a full-blooded Italian, about her Clinton. The Shrimp Fra Diavolo, one of grandmother’s cooking. The pleasant staff and their warm Jessica’s favorite dishes, was also desmiles also set the mood for a great licious. It was just the right amount dinner, even before we reached our of spicy and the clams and mussels served with the meal were a good fit. seats. Like in a traditional Italian home, It is also important to note the shrimp, we began our meal with warm bread and all of Clinton’s seafood, tasted and some soup. We both tried our ver y fre sh and was served w ith origihand at the lobster bisque, and it was nal flavors. -Natalia Kozikowska a creamy delight. The bisque was just The Clinton Restaurant 09-17 Clintonv ille St., Whitestone, N Y, 11357 (718) 746-4800 Sun.-Mon.: Noon to 10 p.m.; Tue.-Thu.:Noon to 11 p.m.; Fri.Sat.: Noon to Midnight; CUISINE: Italian DELIV ERY: No C R E D I T C A R D : Ye s , V i s a , MasterCard, Discover

REVIEW

move around pieces to figure out how best to tell a cohesive stor y.” For the exhibit, Simon worked on “Roses and Tulips in a Vase” by Otto Marseus van Schreik, “The Poor Common Ass (Tyranny, Usur y, and Hypocrisy)” by Peter Flotner a nd “Untitled” by Roemer Glass. She is scheduled to graduate with a Master s in Ar t Educat ion i n Spring 2014. Simon also wrote the wall An ivor y cane from the 17th centur y is passage for another section of part of the latest Godwin-Ternbach exthe exhibit, which deals with hibit. early print culture in Dutch society. Located on the balcony, the dis- Dutch products in modern mass culture play goes into depth about the different can be found upstairs as well. “Re-forming the Image in Northern types of printing techniques. There is also a section titled “The Dutch in Europe in the Dutch Golden Age” will Queens,” which includes a map of the run at Godwin-Ternbach until April 27. Reach Reporter Joe Marvilli at Borough with the original Dutch names laid out over neighborhoods and natural (718) 357-7400, Ext. 125, or at landmarks. A section on the influence of jmarvilli@queenstribune.com. Photo by Joe Marvilli

By JOE MA RV ILLI While many of the ar t exhibits at Queens College are attended by students or feature their work, the latest project on campus was actually created and curated by the students. “Re-forming the Image in Nor thern Europe in the Dutch Golden Age” is the latest display in the GodwinTernbach Museum, having been created by the college’s Art Histor y and Dutch Art seminar students. Wh ile the museum often curates its own exhibits, the tradition of student curating stretches back to its beginning. “That was why the museum was founded. For the students to be able to have hands-on experience with the art work,” Amy Winter, Director and Curator of Godwin-Ternbach, said. “It’s truly an experiential education for the students.” While the 11 students received assistance and guidance from their professor, Christopher Atkins, the final say on the subject, theme and organization fell to them. All of the works displayed came from the museum’s own collection, including such well-known names as Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn and Albrecht Dürer. The overriding theme the students

Krypton Neon Offers Rare Course By MEGAN MONTALVO It’s a bird, it’s a plane – No, it’s a neon sign. Kr ypton Neon, that is. For the month of March, Kenny Greenberg, owner of the LIC-based, Superman-inspired neon sign studio, Krypton Neon, will be offering a rarelyscheduled workshop where avid ar tist s and wannabe’s alike can create signs. “I began my business by making signs for local stores,” Greenberg said. “Through the years, I’ve had the opportunit y to create stage work for movies and Broadway plays as well. I’ve always called myself an enabler for artists. I help make the concept come to life.” In addition to creating the lightning effects for the production of “Young Frankenstein,” Greenberg, along with his glass-blowing partner, Tom Unger, has also created neon designs that have appeared in films such as “Men in Black” and “The Producers.” Although the shop is often flooded with work, Greenberg, who once worked as a school administrator, said that he wanted to begin offering handson courses to fulfill his love of interacting with people. Before moving to its current location at 526 46th Ave. in Long Island City, the 32-year-old neon studio was situated close to one of the neighborhood’s most heavily traveled streets: Vernon Boulevard. “When the shop used to be on Vernon, I would always enjoy when people would randomly walk up and become interested in what I was working on. Now, I’m sure that we are more

productive because we are not out in public view, but I do miss being able to interact with people,” Greenberg said with a chuckle. Pursuing his interest to once again connect with the public, Greenberg began offering sign-making workshops in 2011 and has since tried to schedule additional ones ever y year. “It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “Whether you are a beginner or have taken one of our workshops before, everyone get s to enjoy something that I get to do every day. It’s an amazing experience.” While the upcoming classes for 2013 had initially been scheduled for Feb. 1617 and March 16-17, Greenberg said that he will be pushing back the dates in light of the recent blizzard. The new dates will be posted to Kr ypton Neon’s we b s i t e , w ww.neonshop.com, w ithin the coming weeks. Of the two courses offered, The Neon Experience I gives newcomers a taste of all aspects of neon by acting as the star t ing point for those who want to learn how to make neon and learn how neon can be used in their own projects while the Neon Experience II will build on the intro course and allow part icipant to take their glass bending skills to the next level. Both courses will take place over two days, costing $395. For more information, contact Greenberg directly at info@neonshop.com or call (718) 7284450. Reach Reporter Megan Montalvo at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 128 or mmontalvo@queenstribune.com.


www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 21


Dining & Entertainment

Page 22 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Today SECTION EDITOR: REGINA VOGEL

Send announcements for your club or organization’s events at least TWO weeks in advance to “Queens Today” Editor, Queens Tribune, 150-50 14 Road, Whitestone NY 11357. Send faxes to 357-9417, c/o Regina or email to queenstoday@ queenstribune.com Yearly schedules and advanced notices welcome!

SENIORS AARP TAX HELP Mondays, February 18, 25, March 1 Pomonok library at 11:30. MEN’S CLUB Mondays 10-noon Men’s club for those over 65 at the Central Queens Y in Forest Hills. 423-0732. DUPLICATE BRIDGE Mondays Lunch, lesson and congenial play. Pride of Judea. 423-6200. STAY WELL Mondays at the Central library at 10 and Wednesdays at 10:15 at the East E l m h u r st l i b ra r y. Le a r n how special exercise and relaxation techniques make a difference in your life. COMPUTER BASICS Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Email and the Internet classes for seniors at the Rosenthal Prince Street Senior Center in Flushing. 559-4329 to register. BASIC COMPUTERS Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 class at 10 South Ozone Park library. AARP TAX HELP Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Windsor Park library at 1. NUTRITION CLASS Wednesdays through March 27 Nutrition and Health classes for seniors 2-4. 657-6500, ext. 1581. STARS Wednesdays Senior Theatre Acting Repertory Hollis library at 11:15. BRIDGE Wednesdays Reform Temple of Fore st Hills. 261-2900. TAX HELP Fridays, February 22, March 1 Pomonok library at 11:30. STARS Fridays Senior Theater Acting Repertory at the Queens Village library at 11.

TEENS BUKHARIAN LOUNGE Central Queens Y in Forest Hills. 268-5011, ext. 202. CHESS CLUB Saturdays Flushing library at 2. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays, February 18, 25 Douglaston library 3. LAPTOPS Mondays-Thursdays Hollis library at 3. SCRABBLE CLUB Tuesdays, Februar y 19, 26 East Flushing library 3:30. BOOK BUDDIES Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Hillcrest library 4. CHESS FOR ALL Tuesdays, Februar y 19, 26 Rosedale library 4. KNIT & CROCHET Tuesdays, Februar y 19, 26 Rochdale Village library 5. OWN JEWELRY Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 design and create your own jewelry at the Central librar y. Register. TEEN JEOPARDY Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 round 2 at the Flushing library at 4. FAMILY ART Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 family art workshop at the LIC library 4. TEEN ZONE Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Queens Village library 4. COMPUTER CLASS Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Woodside library 5:45. GAME DAY Wednesdays Howard Beach library at 4. CHESS Wednesdays at 3:30 Queens Village library. FLUSHING ANIME Thursdays, February 21, 28 Anime Club Flushing library 4. GREEN VIDEOS Thursday, February 21 Astoria library 4:30. DRAMA POSSE Thursday, February 21 Hillcrest library 4:30. DRUM WORKSHOP Thursday, February 21 at 4 at the Queens Village librar y. SHSAT Thursday, February 21 SHSAT practice test at the Central library. Register. BLACK HISTORY Thursday, February 21 Black History through Poetry and Quilting at the Hollis library 4:30. CHESS CLUB Thursdays Rochdale Village library 4:30. TEEN MOVIES Fridays, February 22, March 1 Central library 3:30.

FUN WII Friday, February 22 Hollis library 3:30. BOOK BUDDIES Fridays, February 22, March 1 Douglaston librar y. Register. HAPPY HOUR Friday, February 22 Flushing library 4. BOOK BUDDIES Friday, February 22 Fresh Meadows library 4. WII GAME DAY Fridays, February 22, March 1 Poppenhusen library 4. TEEN ZONE Friday, February 22 Queens Village library 4. CROCHET & KNIT Friday, February 22 Langston Hughes library 4:30. GREEN VIDEO Friday, February 22 Steinway library 4:30. GAME DAY Fridays, February 22, March 1 Woodhaven library 4:30. KNIT & CROCHET Friday, February 22 Langston Hughes library at 5. WII FRIDAYS Fridays at the Hollis library at 3:30. GAME DAY Fridays at 4 at the Sunnyside librar y. LUNAR NEW YEAR Saturday, February 23 starting at 10 at the Flushing library. ANIME Saturday, February 23 Final Fantasy with the Anime Anthropologist at the Flushing library at 2.

PARENTS PSYCHOLOGICAL CTR Family and child therapy, parent management training and more. 5700500 sliding scale. KIDS KORNER Weekdays Central Queens YM-YWHA in Forest Hills. For K-6. 2685011, ext. 203. ANIBIC Association for Neurologically Impaired Brain Injured Children, Inc. sponsors programs for those through adulthood. 423-9550.

THEATER OUR TOWN March 1-9 “Our Town” at Queensborough Communit y College. 6316311. KILLING KOMPANY mystery dinner shows. 1888-SHOOT-EM


Dining & Entertainment

www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 23

Queens Today YOUTH QUEENS LIBRARIES Many branches of the Queensborough Library offer toddler and preschool programs and more. Contact local branches. WINTER WILDLIFE Saturday, February 16 for those 8-12. $21. Alley Pond Environmental Center. 229-4000 to register. CHESS CLUB Saturdays at the Flushing library at 2. MATH HELP Saturdays for grades 48 Flushing library at 10. SCIENCE LAB Saturdays Central library at 11. CHESS CLUB Saturdays Flushing library at 2. FAMILY STORY TIME Mondays, February 18, 25 preK-2 at the Auburndale library at 4. AFRI-AMER DANCE Monday, February 18 African-American Dance at the Laurelton library at 4. Limited space. Also on Thursday, February 21 Fa r Ro c k a wa y l i b r a r y. Limited space. CRAFT KIDS Mondays Flushing library at 3. BEGIN CHESS Mondays at 3:30 Windsor Park library. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays Douglaston library at 4. BOOK BUDDIES Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Hillcrest library 4. CHESS FOR ALL Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Rosedale library 4. YEAR OF SNAKE Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Flushing library 2:30. LANYARD MANIA Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Far Rockaway library at 4. FAMILY ART Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 LIC library at 4. AFRI-AMER. HISTORY Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 African-American History “Guess Who” test at the McGoldrick library at 5. CHESS FOR ALL Tuesdays, Februar y 19, 26 Rosedale library at 4. CRAFT Y TUESDAYS Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Forest Hills library 3:30. BOOK BUDDIES Tuesdays, Februar y 19, 26 Windsor Park library. Register. KNIT & CROCHET Tuesdays at 5 Rochdale Village library. ARTS & CRAFTS Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Auburndale library ages 5-12 at 4.

PRESCHOOL STORY Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Maspeth library 12:30. CRAFTIVITIES Wednesday, February 20 East Flushing library. Register. COLORING TIME Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Far Rockaway library 4. NOCTURNAL HIKE Wednesday, February 20 for those 7 and up. $13. Alley Pond Environmental Center. 229-4000 to register. CHESS Wednesdays at 3:30 Queens Village library and 4:30 Poppenhusen library. GAME DAY Wednesdays Howard Beach library at 5. CRAFTERNOONS Wednesdays at the Ridgewood library. Register. YOUNG LEADERS Wednesdays and Fridays Young Leaders Institute of Laurelton at the Laurelton library at 3:30. PRE-SCHOOL STORY Thursday, February 21 Bellerose librar y. Register. DRAMA POSSE Thursday, February 21 Hillcrest library 4:30. KIDS CRAFT Thursday, February 21 Ages 4+ at 3:30 Howard Beach library. PRESIDENT CRAFT Thursday, February 21 Richmond Hill library 4. BLACK HISTORY Thursday, February 21 Black History through Poetry and Quilting at the Hollis library at 4:30. READING COMP. Thursdays, February 21, 28 McGoldrick library at 5. LUNAR NEW YEAR Thursday, February 21 for those 5-10. $16. Alley Pond Environmental Center. 229-4000 to register. ORIGAMI FUN Thursday, February 21 Steinway librar y. Register. ZUMBA FOR KIDS Thursday, February 21 Lefrak Cit y library. Register. GAME ON Thursdays at the Central library at 3:30. CROCHET & KNIT Friday, February 22 Langston Hughes library 4:30. GAMES Fridays, February 22, March 1 video and board games Rochdale Village library 4:30.

GAME DAY Friday, February 22 Woodhaven library 4:30. CHESS FOR KIDS Friday, February 22 W i n d s o r Pa r k l i b ra r y. Register. PRESCHOOL CRAFT Friday, February 22 W i n d s o r Pa r k l i b ra r y. Register. BOOK BUDDIES Fridays, February 22, March 1 Douglaston lib ra r y. Re g i s te r . A l s o Fresh Meadows library 4. KIDS ACTIVITIES Fridays at 3:30 Briarwood library. CRAFT TIME Fridays at 3 at the Ozone Park library. GAME DAY Fridays at 3:30 Queens Village library. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays Briarwood library at 4. East Flushing Register. Ozone Park at 3. GAME DAY Fridays Windsor Park at 4. CHESS CLUB Fridays Auburndale library at 3:30 and W i n d s o r Pa r k l i b ra r y. Register. LUNAR NEW YEAR Saturday, February 23 starting at 10 Flushing library. ANIMAL CARE Saturday, February 23 for those 8-12. $21. Animal Care Trainee. Alley Pond Environmental Center. 229-4000 to register. PET SHOW Saturday, February 23 for those 5-6. $21. Alley Pond Environmental Center. 229-4000 to register.

FLEA MARKETS RUMMAGE SALE Sunday, February 17 103 and Monday, February 18 9:30-noon at Te m p l e Ti k va h o f N ew Hyde Park, 3315 Hillside Avenue.

TALKS CENTRAL Wednesday, February 20 “Kindred” discussed at the Central library at 11:30. QUEENS VILLAGE Wednesday, February 20 “Freedom” discussed at the Queens Village library at 2. MASPETH Thursday, February 21 “The Chosen” discussed at the Maspeth library at 5:30.


Dining & Entertainment

Page 24 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Today EDUCATION/GAMES/CRAFTS JOB SEARCH Saturday, February 16 Job Search Strategies and Resume Writing Far Rockaway library at 2. MICROSOFT WORD Saturday, February 16 Central library. Register. FLOWER ARRANGE. Saturday, February 16 flower arrangements at the Fresh Meadows library at 11. MICROSOFT EXCEL Saturday, February 16 Central library at 2. CITIZENSHIP Saturdays, February 16, 23 Pathway to US Citizenship at the Forest Hills library at 3. TANGO WORKSHOP Saturdays in February and March at Thalia Spanish Theatre in Sunnyside. 729-3880. GENEALOGY WORK. Sunday, February 17 Queens Historical Societ y presents a Genealogy Workshop 2:304:320 at the Kingsland Homestead in Flushing. $5 members, $8 others. 939-0647, ext. 14 to register. METRIX LEARNING Mondays, February 18, 25 Central library. Register. 990-8625. BRIDGE Mondays e x c e p t h o l i days 12-4 at Pride of Judea in Douglaston. Lesson & play $10. Partners arranged. 423-6200. ADULT CHESS Mondays and Thursdays Queens Village library at 5:30. SMALL BUSINESS Tuesdays, Februar y 19, 26 Central library. 9908625. MICROSOFT EXCEL Tuesdays, Februar y 19, 26 LIC library at 10. INTRO WORD Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Flushing library. Register. BEGIN COMPUTERS Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Baisley Park library at 11. COMPUTER BASICS Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Queens Village librar y. Register. FEDERAL JOB Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Federal Job Searching at the Far Rockaway library. 327-2549. GET YOUR YARNS OUT! Tuesdays after evening Minyan at 8, knitters, c r o c h e t e r s , needlepointers, and others meet at the Forest Hills Jewish Center. 2637000, ext. 200. INTRO COMPUTERS Wednesday, February 20 Hollis library. 465-7355. INTRO EXCEL

Wednesday, February 20 Pomonok library. Register. COMPUTER BASICS Wednesday, February 20 Windsor Park library at 11:30. COMPUTER CLASS Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Woodside library at 5:45. WATERCOLOR Wednesdays all techniques and subjects at the National Art League.9691128. MOCK INTERVIEWS Thursdays, February 21, 28 Central library at 9. LEARN CHINESE Thursdays, February 21, 28 North Forest Park library at 6. COMPUTER QUICK TIP Thursdays, February 21, 28 Central library. 9908625. GREETING CARDS Thursday, February 21 Far Rockaway library at 1:30. DIGITAL PHOTO. Thursday, February 21 Central library. Register. JOB SEARCH Thursday, February 21 Online Job Search Strategies at the Flushing library. Register. FIND WORK Thursday, February 21 Overcoming Obstacles to Finding Work at the LIC library at 5. LEARN TO DRAW Thursday, February 21 Hillcre st librar y. Register. METRIX LEARNING Fridays, February 22, March 1 Central library. Register 990-8625. CROCHET & KNIT Friday, February 22 learn how to crochet or knit at the Langston Hughes library at 4:30. INTRO WORD Friday, February 22 Hillcrest library at 11. MICROSOFT EXCEL Friday, February 22 Central library at 9:30. COMPUTER BASICS Friday, February 22 Auburndale library at 11. INTRO EXCEL Friday, February 22 Hillcrest library. COVER LETTER Friday, February 22 cover letter workshop at the LIC library. Register. FIND EMPLOYMENT Friday, February 22 Overcoming Obstacles to Finding Employment at the LIC library at 2:30. KNIT & CROCHET Fridays Fresh Meadows library at 11. CHESS CLUB Fridays at 3:30 at the Auburndale librar y.

Queens Today DANCE ISRAELI FOLK Mondays 7:15-9:45 at Hillcrest Jewish Center, 182-02 Union Turnpike. $10 session. 380-4145.

MEETINGS GARDENING CLUB Saturdays Steinway library court yard at 4. P-FLAG Sundays, February 17, March 17 P-FLAG, a support group for parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays meet in Forest Hills. 271-6663. ORATORIO SOCIETY Mondays at 7:45 at Temple Beth Sholom in Flushing. 279-3006. Auditions required. COMMUNITY SINGERS Mondays Communit y Singers start rehearsals for their spring concert at 8 at Messiah Lutheran in Flushing. 658-1021. KNIT & CROCHET Tu e s d a y, F e b r u a r y 1 9 Windsor Park library at 2. TALK OF THE TOWN Tuesdays, Februar y 19, March 5, 19 public speaking in St. Albans at 7:15. 640-7092. AMER. LEGION 131 Tuesdays, Februar y 19, March 19 American Legion McKee Post 131 meets at 10-20 Clintonville Street, Whitestone at 8. 7674323. BEREAVEMENT Tuesdays, Februar y 19, March 19 Bereavement Support Group at Holy Family in Fresh Meadows. 7:30. 969-2448. GLEE CLUB Tuesdays Bayside Men’s Glee Club rehearses at 7:30 at All Saints Episcopal Church, 214-35 40 th Avenue, Bayside. 9616852. MEN’S CLUB SOCCER Tuesday evenings Forest Hills Jewish Center 89:30. 263-7000. FM CAMERA Tuesdays Fresh Meadows Camera Club. 917-6123463. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesdays, February 20, 27 South Ozone Park library at 1. FH SYMPHONY Wednesdays the Forest Hills Symphony Orchestra rehearses at the Forest Hills Jewish Center. 516-785-2532. FDR DEMS Thursdays, February 21, March 21 FDR Democrats meet at 7:30 at Chabad Center in Bayside. 460-8285.

ENTERTAINMENT WORLD CASINO 110-00 Rockaway Blvd., South Ozone Park. Free admission. JEWISH LOVE SONGS Saturday, February 16 Fresh Meadows library at 2:30. TRUMPET Saturday, February 16 Music From the Mind of the Trumpet at 3 at the Central library. HUBBARD TRIBUTE Saturday, February 16 Tr i b u t e t o t r u m p e t e r Freddie Hubbard at the Cambria Heights library at 3:30. FLAMENCO VIVO Saturday and Sunday, February 16-17 Carlota Santana at Queens Theatre in the Park. 7600064. NU URBAN CAFÉ Saturdays live jazz, r&b, open mic 8-midnight. Free. 188-36 Linden Blvd., St. Albans. 917817-8653. BLACK STARS Sunday, February 17 Black Stars on the Great White Wa y at Queensborough Communit y College. 6316311. MUSIC OF RAVEL Sunday, February 17 new musical at St. Joseph’s in Astoria. 917460-4289. STAMP SHOW Sundays, February 17, March 17 Bayside Stamp Show at the Ramada Hotel in Bayside 10-4:30. Free admission and parking. 645-7659. SALSA Mondays Resorts World Casino holds Monday Night Salsa events. Lessons 7:30. 110-00 Rockaway Blvd., South Ozone ark. 215-2828. Free. BINGO Tuesdays 7:15 American Mart yrs C h u rc h in Bayside. 464-4582. Tuesdays 7:15 (doors open 6) Rego Park Jewish Center. 459-1000. $3 admission includes 12 games. SCRABBLE CLUB Tuesdays, Februar y 19, 26 East Flushing library at 3:30. SCRABBLE Tuesday s Fresh Meadows library at 2. CHESS Tuesdays 4 Rosedale library. SCRABBLE CLUB Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Forest Hills library at 2. SOUTH ASIA ON FILM Wednesdays through April 25 at 4:30 at the G o d w i n - Te r n b a c h M u -

seum at Queens College. 997-4747 for titles and other info. AFRO TANGO Fridays through March 17 Fridays through Sunday A f ro Tango at Thalia Spanish Theatre in Sunnyside. 7293880. NU URBAN CAFÉ Fridays live jazz and r&b 9-midnight. Free. 188-36 Linden Blvd., St. Albans. 917-817-8653. GAME DAY Fridays 4:30 Woodhaven library. GAME PLAYERS CLUB Fridays 2 Hillcrest library. LUNAR NEW YEAR

Saturday, February 23 starting at 10 at the Flushing library. LATIN AMERICAN LOVE Saturday, February 23 Love Songs from Latin America at 3 at the Jackson Heights library. SNOWFLAKES Saturday, February 23 Science of Snowflakes includes a nature hike and live animal demonstration. Alley Pond Environmental Center. 2294000. $24 adults. BEAUTY OF BALLET Sunday, February 24 School of American Ballet at 1 and 3 at Queens Theatre in the Park. 7600064.

HEALTH DOMESTIC VIOL. 24 hour Domestic Violence Hotline. 657-0424. 12 WAITANKUNG Sundays 2-5. Total-body workout. Flushing Hospital/Medical Center. Free. Jimmy 7-10pm 347-2156. SCHIZO. ANON. Sundays in Rego Park. 896-3400. GROUP NUTRITION Mondays at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1695. TAI CHI Mondays and Thursdays 11-12 at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1695. $5. CAREGIVERS SUPPORT Tu e s d a y s We st e r n Queens Caregiver Network in Sunnyside. 5:156:30. 784-6173, ext. 409. Also, 3:30-4:30 Selfhelp Clearview Senior Center, 208-11 26 th Avenue, Bayside. 631-1886. SHAPE UP NYC Wednesdays, February 20, 27 aerobics for adults at the Central library at 4. First come. NUTRITION TALK Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Corona library at 5:30. GENTLE YOGA Wednesdays, February 20, 27 Woodside library. Register. OA Wednesdays Overeaters Anonymous Howard Beach library at 11. MASSAGE THERAPY Wednesdays and Fridays half and one hour massages at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1695. SHAPE UP NYC Thursdays, February 21, 28 body sculpt fitness at the Lefrak Cit y library at 5:30. First come.

SHAPE UP NYC Fridays, February 22, March 1 Dance Fitness for Adults at the Richmond Hill library at 5.

ENVIRONMENT FOOD WASTE DROPOFF Saturdays 10:30-noon at the Sunnyside library and 1-3 at the Broadway librar y. GARDENING CLUB Saturdays help with our vegetable and shade garden at the Steinway library at 4.

MISCELLANEOUS IMMIGRATE SERVICE Saturdays 10-1 at Council Member Leroy Comrie’s district office. 776-3700 to schedule appointment. REHEARSALS Saturdays, Sacred Music Chorale of Richmond Hill begins rehearsals at St. John’s in Richmond Hill. www.richmondhillny.com/ Art sSMC. FH VAC The Forest Hills Volunteer Ambulance Corps needs volunteers. 7932055.

EXHIBIT NAL Through March 2 Small and Big Works exhibition at the National Art League, 44-21 Douglaston Parkway. Free admission. SHANGAA February through May Shangaa: Art of Tanzania at Queensborough CC. 631-6396.


www.queenstribune.com • Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 27

Queens Focus

Local students were named to the Dean’s List for the fall 2012 semester at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Conn. They include: Little Neck: Kathleen Derienzo, Jennifer McCabe, Margaret McCabe. Oakland Gardens: James D’Elia, Ariana Filagrossi. Kathleen Modica of Little Neck was named to the Dean’s List for the fall 2012 semester at Siena College in Loudenville. Lindsay Davenport of Oakland Gardens was named to the President’s List for the fall 2012 semester at Siena College in Loudenville. Local students were named to the Dean’s List for the fall 2012 semester at the University of Connecticut. They include: Floral Park: Dipa Patel. Fresh Meadows: Alvin Cheung, Andrea Kam. Local students were named to the

New Lions: Photo by John Scandalios

PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE Dean’s List for the fall 2012 semester at SUNY Brockport. They include: Bellerose: Mathew Carrion. Hollis Hills: Morgan Hasson. Arverne: Sarah Ayalew. Local students have received scholarships to attend Berkeley College. They include: Fresh Meadows: Adam Farnesa. Glen Oaks: Diego Barreto. Queens Village: Andre Pottinger. Local students were named to the Dean’s List for the fall 2012 semester at SUNY Oneonta. They include: Fresh Meadows: Gia Nigoghossian. Oakland Gardens: Gil Fire. Julie Chu of Oakland Gardens was named to the Dean’s List for the fall 2012 semester at Wake Forest University in Winston Salem, N.C. Local students received degrees during fall 2012 commencement ceremonies at SUNY New Paltz. They include:

Lions Club International District Governor Clarence Higgins of District 20 K-1, which encompasses Brooklyn and Queens, recently visited the Rego Park-Forest Hills Lions Club to swear in new members.

Breezy Point: Christopher Ferro, Bachelor of Arts, communication studios. Floral Park: Jason Greenberg, Bachelor of Science, computer engineering. Little Neck: Joshua Koopersmith, Bachelor of Arts, communication media. Queens Village: Robert Fogel, Bachelor of Science, computer engineering. Richmond Hill: Christina

Real Estate houses sold

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Chamorro, Bachelor of Arts, psychology; Thomas Garafola, Bachelor of Arts, communication studies. Rockaway Park: Daniel Paskoff, Bachelor of Arts, adolescence education: social studies. Christopher O’Connor of Bellerose was named to the Dean’s List for the fall 2012 semester at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts.

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Page 34 Tribune Feb. 14-20, 2013 • www.queenstribune.com

Leave it to Astoria to produce a self-taught cook worthy of garnering attention from celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain. As of last week, one of the neighborhood’s most aspiring restaurateurs, Diane DiMeo, 46, earned a spot on ABC’s new show “The Taste” by joining the Bourdain team with her savory dish of cumin lamb with fig and scallions. Though she was one of the more blunt contestants on the show, DiMeo said that her no-nonsense approach to operating in a male-dominated profession is the only way to be respected and “more like a man.” “You have to be able to walk in and basically say ‘It’s my way or the highway,’” she said. While we can’t wait to

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Model Of Queens

Getting A 'Taste'

Astoria's Diana DiMeo is a featured contestant on ABC's "The taste."

check out the seafood restaurant she plans to open in Astoria once the show is over, we just hope she can make it far enough in the season to really represent.

Evelyn Rueda Home: Maspeth Age: 18 Height: 5’5” Weight: 100 lbs Photos by John Scandalios

Auction Bop A legendary Queens-born rocker is about to have many of his personal possessions up for sale. An auction featuring the belongings of Joey Ramone, the lead vocalist/guitarist for The Ramones who died in 2001, will take place this month in Manhattan. According to reports, among the items that people can bid on is a nearly 100 album vinyl collection from bands such as Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix and Lou Reed. Other items collectors can try to get include a leather jacket that Ramone owned and wore, two guitars that he used

and even his passport. All of the possessions in the auction came from Joey’s family and comes with a certificate of authenticity, if you win one of the items. Ramone, who’s real name was Jeffry Hyman, was born in Forest Hills and attended Forest Hills High School along with three original members of the band. Together, they wrote and performed famous songs such as “Blitzkreig Bop,” “I Wanna Be Sedated” and “Rockaway Beach.” The sale will start on Feb. 14 and run for seven days on the auction website, www. rrauction.com.

What's That Smell? An assistant principal has found himself in a stinky situation after intentionally setting off a stink bomb at his school. Paul Goldberg, the assistant principal at William H. Car junior high school in Whitestone, is reportedly getting the boot after a safety agent told officials he saw

him in the act. The 25-year teaching veteran denied the malodorous allegations and claimed that the prank accusation was made by one of his “enemies.” Perhaps Mr. Goldberg was confused and thought he was a junior high school prankster for the day.

Who We Are @ QConf QConf is edited by: Steven J. Ferrari. Contributors: Luis Gronda, Natalia Kozikowska, Joe Marvilli, Marcia Moxom Comrie, Megan Montalvo, Mike Nussbaum, Mike Schenkler.

Email: Conf@QueensTribune.com

Unlike many models, Evelyn Rueda of Maspeth, did not know she wanted to go into the industry. Instead, the Ecuadorian native kept an open mind, allowing fate to do the rest. Rueda came to America when she was 11 years old, but it wasn’t until she participated in the 2012 Miss Ecuador beauty pageant that she became intrigued with modeling. “Everything started with the beauty pageant and

from there, it opened doors for me,” she said. “I had new opportunities to meet people in the business.” Only in the first year of her modeling career, Rueda has already been on multiple photo shoots and even did a runway show for the fashion label Dear John. “I would love for this to be a full-time job,” she said. “I love the camera; I love the way the camera flashes.” When she is not modeling, Rueda enjoys hanging out in

her hometown in Queens. Her favorite places to go to are Astoria and Jamaica. She also enjoys going to Forest Hills to catch a movie with a friend. When asked if she had any advice for girls who were looking to get into modeling, the Rookie said it was important to be flexible and keep an open mind. “I would say that try to your best and do everything you can to get in there. Try every direction,” she said.

Peanut Butter Explosive Time! A former New Yorker got into a sticky situation at LaGuardia Airport after making a bomb joke about his jar of peanut butter to a TSA agent. Now, he’s suing the worker for $5 million. Frank Hannibal was going through security when TSA screener Edwin Sanchez noticed a layer of oil on top of his jar of Crazy Richard’s gourmet peanut butter. Hannibal sarcastically mentioned that the airport was going to confiscate his explosives. The TSA agent didn’t appreciate the joke. Instead of getting on a plane, Hannibal spent the next 25 hours in the slammer. One of the worst parts of his experience, he said, was the poor quality of his prison food: peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. For a self-styled peanut butter snob like Hannibal, those sandwiches are no laughing matter. So what happened to this all-natural peanut butter that got Hannibal into trouble? “I ate it,” he said. That might not have been a great idea. It could be considered That must have been some tampering with evidence! good peanut butter.


www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ Feb. 14-20, 2013 Tribune Page 35


The Development of Nanjing and Jianye District Economic Development Nanjing is one of Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most important commercial, cultural, and industrial centers. The city has a history spanning nearly 2,500 years, and in recent years has seen rapid development. It is located in the center of the Yangtze River Delta region, Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most prosperous and vibrantly developing region, and is the capital city of Jiangsu, the most economically developed provHexi New Town CBD ince in China. Jianye District is located in the southwestern Nanjing city. Jianye became the main part of Nanjing Hexi New Town area, covering more than 80 square kilometers in the cutting edge area of riverside exploration and cross-river development in Nanjing. On behalf of the Jianye District Government of Nanjing, China, there will be two major events. On February 16th, a Nanjing Youth Olympic Photo Exhibition will be held in Crossing Art Gallery, Queens Crossing, Flushing. On February 19th, guests are invited to attend the China Investment Promotion Luncheon with the Hexi New City Investment Promotion Council and the Jianye District Government of Nanjing. The Director of Jianye District of Nanjing, Mr. Yajun Feng, Director of Culture & Education Department, Vice Director of Foreign Affairs Office in Nanjing and their colleagues have set New York as one of their stops. The goal is to strengthen the economic and trade relations between the US and China. This will be a great opportunity to learn and understand current and future business, economic, and trade opportunities in Nanjing.

World Trade Center Nanjing

NYOG â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Nanjing Youth Olympic Games The idea for the Youth Olympic Games was introduced by International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Jacques Rogge in 2001. On July 6, 2007, IOC members at the 119th IOC session in Guatemala City approved the creation of a youth version of the Olympic Games. It is held every four years in staggered summer and winter events. Nanjing is proud to become the second city to ever host the Youth Olympic Games. The motto of the Nanjing Games is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Olympics for the young, by the young.â&#x20AC;? It is hoped that the Games will: s"OOSTSELF UNDERSTANDING ACTIVEPARTICIPATIONANDCREATIVITYINYOUNGPEOPLEBOTHINTHESPORTSARENAAND in everyday life; s0ROMOTEUNDERSTANDING BUILDUPFRIENDSHIPS ANDHELPYOUNGPEOPLETOUNDERSTANDANDAPPRECIATEREsponsibility in a mature way; s!DVOCATEFAIRCOMPETITIONANDCONCERNFORHEALTHANDTHEENVIRONMENT s'IVEYOUNGPEOPLEENHANCEDSELF CONlDENCEANDASENSEOFTHECIVILIZATIONTHEYWILLINHERIT h(EARTTO Heartâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hand in Handâ&#x20AC;?! The Nanjing 2014 Summer YOG will encompass all 28 sports and will be held from August 16th to 28th. The Nanjing Youth Olympic Games Organizing Committee (NYOGOC) will work together with the IOC to gather the best youth athletes from around the world and build a creative platform for them. This YOG will focus on discussions about education, Olympic values, social challenges, and cultural diversity to make it a high level international sporting event. NANJINGLELE is inspired by a unique natural feature of the host city known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rain-Flower Pebbleâ&#x20AC;? (also translated as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Riverstoneâ&#x20AC;?). The design of the mascot takes the typical shape and appearance of this stone but in a creative and artistic way, highlighting the colors from the emblemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s palette. The word â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;leleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; represents the sound of stones colliding together and is pronounced like the Chinese word meaning happiness or joy. The Tennis Center Nanjing Olympic Sports Centre Asian Youth Games Asian Youth Games (English: Asian Youth Games) OCA consists of one multi-sports games, currently held once every four years. November 14, 2010, the 29th OCA Congress convened in Guangzhou Garden Hotel, Prince Ahmad Al-Fahad Al-Sabah, President of the Olympic Council of Asia, International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge and the OCAall the members of the Council, the Executive Committee to attend. The General Assembly adopted a resolution of the 2013 Asian Youth Games held in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China. The mascot for Asian Youth Games is Chinese Shu ape AYO round. The Chinese Shu ape was discovered in Jiangsu Province, and it is one of the oldest known primate species.


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