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Vol. 42, No. 1 Jan. 5-11, 2012

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Vol. 41, No. 10 March 10-16, 2011

Vol. 41, No. 35 Sept. 1-7, 2011

Vol. 41, No. 28 July 14-20, 2011

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Business owners, workers and even the area’s lone resident came out in full force to blast the Economic Development Corp.’s plan to develop the dilapidated ‘Iron Triangle.’ By Joseph Orovic…Page 18

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In Sudden Shift, Family Shelter Kicks Out Kids

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Queens Dems stood united at Borough Hall Monday to kick off the special election campaigns for two vacant Assembly seats. A special election will be held Sept. 13 for those seats and the Ninth Congressional District seat vacated by disgraced Congressman Anthony Weiner. See Coverage…Pages 3, 18

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

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Diners, Drive-Ins & Ben’s Best PAGE 22

50 PLUS LIFESTYLES

Seniors Do Battle To Keep Centers PAGE 15

Deadline...................................................................3 Editorial ...................................................................6 Not 4 Publication ....................................................8 This Week ..............................................................10 Closeup .................................................................10 Focus ..................................................................... 11 Police Blotter ........................................................12 Trib Pix...................................................................20 Leisure ...................................................................22 Queens Today .......................................................24 Classifieds.............................................................28 Confidential ...........................................................38

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Colombian Fest Is Postponed Due To Finances

Applicants Beat Jobs Available 10-1 At Casino

Seniors Helping To Provide Aid To Seniors

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Vol. 41, No. 42 Oct. 20-26, 2011

Queens was spared from devastation as Hurricane Irene crashed into our shores, weakened by having slapped states to our South, yet finding a surge to destroy counties north of us.

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SEE COVERAGE INSIDE: Electeds Praise Response…Page 3 Flood Waters Surge…Page 3 Not All Are Spared…Page 3 Visit

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A Street Of Devastation…Page 4 Opinion Split On Preparation…Page 5 Shelters Put To Use…Page 11 Tracking The Storm’s Tale…Page 14

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Vol. 41, No. 49 Dec. 8-14, 2011

Vol. 41, No. 46 Nov. 17-23, 2011

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As the diverse people of the Occupy Wall Street movement begin to unite, a unity of purpose and possible political agenda are beginning to take shape. By Jason Banrey…Page 14

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Aqueduct Casino Sets Open Date For Oct. 28

After Koch Flap City Gives Boro Rename Input

Local Newspaper Racist Cartoon Draws Rep’s Ire

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Patricia Dolan (r.) takes Borough President Helen Marshall on a tour of the restored Willow Lake at Flushing Meadows Corona Park, the reopening of which was one of countless accomplishments in her decades-long civic career.

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Queens civic and government leaders are mourning the sudden death of Queens Civic Congress President and longtime community leader Patricia Dolan who was hit by a car and killed Tuesday night on her way to a Community Board meeting. By Brian M. Rafferty…Page 3

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Fairway Opens Massive Market, First In Queens

LIC Hotel Growth Leads City Charge In Tourism Boom

Occupy Queens A Stark Contrast To City Protest

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Huntley Staffer, Niece Charged In Fraud

Halloran Rep Rips Story In Village Voice

Holocaust Tales Kept Alive For Next Generation

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Queens Comes Together After Firebomb Attack

Cuomo Proposes Convention Center For Queens

Whitestone Dog Takes Second In Contest

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As the historic institution continues to be phased out due to low graduation rates, students protest the inequity with the other schools that share their home. By Veronica Lewin … Page 3

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Page 2 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com


Queens Deadline

Police Make Arrest In Queens Bombings Tribune Photos by Ira Cohen

BY VERONICA LEWIN For the past 24 years, Rahima Naim has been a member of the Imam Al-Khoei Islamic Center and when she was a child she attended the Al-Iman School located inside. She now sends her four and five-year-old sons to attend school at Al-Iman, with their safety being her priority. Two days after homemade firebombs were thrown at her place of worship, Naim said her sense of security has been shattered, and she is devastated by the event. “Whoever did this needs to get punished for it,” Naim said. “That’s not right. You’re burning somebody’s house down, you’re trying to take lives away of innocent people. That’s not what we’re taught in Islam.” On Tuesday, police arrested Ray Lazier Lengend, 40, of 89-04 215th St., and charged him with five counts of criminal possession of a weapon (possession of an explosive), one count of arson as a hate crime and four counts of arson. Four Molotov cocktail attacks Sunday night in Jamaica within a two-mile radius have Naim and other residents dismayed. A little before 8 p.m. on Jan. 1, a Molotov cocktail was thrown at a deli located at 179-46 Hillside Ave. Minutes later, a homemade firebomb was thrown at the home of Christians Monty and Sonia Burnett on 107th Avenue, severely damaging the house. The Islamic Leadership Council of Metropolitan New York

Above: Mayor Michael Bloomberg, at podium, speaks to reporters about the firebombings that took place on New Ye a r ’ s D a y. Lef t : Bloomberg met with Imam Maan Al-Sahlani (r.) and community leaders Tuesday morning.

announced Tuesday that they will be offering a donation to help repair the Burnetts’ home. Around 9 p.m. Sunday, firebombs were thrown at the door of the Imam Al-Khoei Islamic Center, located at 89-89 Van Wyck Expressway., while about 80 people were inside. The building sustained minor dam-

age and no one was injured. The final attack occurred at a home on 88-20 170th St. that housed a Hindu temple. Lengend also confessed to a Nassau County attack that took place a little before 10 p.m. on Jan. 1. Police said the defendant picked his targets due to personal grievances. It is alleged he targeted the mosque because he was not allowed to use the bathroom there. According to police, the suspect was thrown out of the Hillside Avenue deli on Dec. 27 for attempting to steal milk and a Starbucks Frappuccino. It is alleged Lengend used glass Starbucks Frappuccino bottles in at least three of the attacks Sunday night. “We don’t know what the motive was, but in New York City we have no tolerance for violence and certainly no tolerance for discrimination,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Tuesday before the arrest. Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Ray Kelly met with Iman Maan Al-Sahlani Tues-

day morning to discuss Sunday night’s attacks. The meeting preceded a press conference, where clergy, faith-based organizations and elected officials came out to show their unity with the Muslim community and denounce the attacks. “Our group is here today to show, here in America, we are one family,” said Al-Sahlani of the Imam Al-Khoei Islamic Center. “If one gets hurt, all of the family gets hurt.” Al-Sahlani thanked everyone for their support following the attacks. Queens has seen more than its share of bias crimes in recent months. Last November, swastikas were painted on a synagogue in Jackson Heights and at the Queens Library’s Jackson Heights and East Elmhurst branches. A 40-year-old Jackson Heights man was arrested in connection with the vandalism. On Nov. 23, community and religious leaders signed an updated version of the 1657 Flushing Remonstrance, a pledge for tolerance. Borough President Helen Marshall, who signed the pledge, said she was almost too upset about Sunday’s events to speak at the press conference. “This is the most diverse county in the United States of America. Everyone has to be welcomed, especially this wonderful community,” Marshall said. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Queens native, issued a statement following the homemade firebomb attacks. “Attacks such as this have no place in our open and inclusive society and we must do all we can to ensure New York remains a safe and tolerant place for all,” Cuomo said. The governor asked State Police Superintendent Joe D’Amico and Deputy Secretary For Public Safety Liz Glazer to assist with the investigation. Because of Sunday’s Molotov cocktail attacks, the Council of Peoples Organization has advised all of their affiliated places of worship to heighten their security inside and outside of their buildings, including installing surveillance if necessary. Reach Reporter Veronica Lewin at vlewin@queenspress.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 123.

Former Parkway CEO Admits To Bribery

Monty and Sonia Burnett’s home following Sunday night’s attack.

By DOMENICK RAFTER The former CEO of Parkway Hospital admitted this week to bribing former State Sen. Carl Kruger (D-Brooklyn), becoming the latest person to head to prison in a tangled web of scandal that brought down Kruger as well as David Rosen, the former CEO of MediSys, the company that operates several Queens hospitals. Aquino, who before his arrest had been trying to lobby community leaders for support to reopen the shuttered Parkway Hospital in Forest Hills, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to paying $60,000 to Adex Management Inc., a company in which Kruger had an interest. Half that money went to a sham consulting company controlled by another defendant, Michael Turano, who had a close relationship with Kruger. Aquina admitted in his plea that these payments were meant to influence Kruger to use his power as a State Senator to help keep Parkway Hospital open, which nevertheless closed in 2008. Kruger resigned in December and pleaded guilty to two counts of conspiracy and Turano pleaded guilty to one count on Dec. 20, 2011. “Robert Aquino was all too willing to

make sure a bribe was paid to preserve his job as CEO of a hospital. Like others in this case, he chose to fight his battle with money under the table rather than to play by the rules,” US Attorney Preet Bharara said. Aquino, who was indicted along with the other suspects in March 2011, could face five years in prison and a fine of $250,000 when he is sentenced. Rosen, who headed Medisys, the operator of Jamaica and Flushing Hospitals, was convicted in September for his involvement in the scheme to bribe Kruger and former state Assemblyman Anthony Semenerio, and is scheduled to be sentenced this Friday, while another suspect; lobbyist Richard Lipsky pleaded guilty to corruption and bribery charges on Wednesday. Charges against one other suspect indicted in the scheme, Solomon Kalish, who owned Adex Management Inc. are pending. Another state legislator, Assemblyman William Boyland (D-Brooklyn), was acquitted last year of corruption charges in connection with the case. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400 Ext. 125.

www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 3

Imam Al - Khoei Islamic Center in Jamaica.


Cuomo Eyes Mega Conv. Center By DOMENICK RAFTER If Gov. Andrew Cuomo has his way, the world's largest convention center could be coming to Queens. In his State of the State address Wednesday, the governor proposed a 3.8 millionsquare-foot convention center at Aqueduct Racetrack near the Resorts World New York City Casino. The center would be more than a million square feet bigger than Chicago's McCormick Place convention center- currently the country's largest- and nearly four times the size of the Jacob Javits Convention Center. "The Jacob Javits Convention Center on Manhattan's West Side is obsolete and not large enough to be a top tier competitor in today's marketplace," Gov. Cuomo said. He announced the State would be partnering with Genting, the parent company of Resorts World New York City, to undertake the $4 billion project. He says it will generate tens of thousands of jobs and create new economic activity and would include 3,000 new hotel rooms at the site. "This will bring to New York the largest events, driving demand for hotel rooms and restaurant meals and creating tax revenues and jobs, jobs, jobs," he said. Genting Americas Senior Vice President of Development Christian Goode praised the plan and said his company looked forward to working with Cuomo to build the center. "Genting Americas is extremely excited about this opportunity to partner with Gov. Cuomo to build the largest convention center in the country," he said. "It's a great time to invest and grow in New York, and we are thrilled to be able to play a role in creating

jobs and increasing tourism." State Sen. Joe Addabbo Jr. (D-Howard Beach) said a convention center and hotels were always talked about as something that could be built on the site along with the casino. He added that he was waiting for more details in the governor's plan, which he admitted he only found out about Wednesday morning. "What the governor did today was put

the idea on the map," he said. "I think we should move forward in a very cautious manner." Addabbo said he would speak to constituents who live near the track about the plan and further discuss the job impact, and impact on traffic and safety with the governor, Genting and the community. The current property includes the casino building, NYRA's grandstand and the

racetrack, which multiple sources confirm will not be affected by the governor's plans. Development could occur in the parking lots, on vacant land south of the track near North Conduit Avenue and at the site of Home Depot store on Rockaway Boulevard. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400 Ext. 125.

Sullivan Ousted As BID Head By ROSS BA RK AN Gregg Sullivan, the former executive director of the Bayside Business Improvement District, wants his job back and wants to know why exactly he lost it. Sullivan was recently ousted from his position because he was "too outspoken," in his own words. The gregarious Sullivan is known for pushing to make Bayside's main thoroughfare, Bell Boulevard, a top destination for shoppers. He introduced several street fairs and sought to expedite the process of repaving parts of the boulevard. He had also been axed just after releasing the annual Bayside BID report, in which he trumpeted the improvement of Bayside's business sector in a scuffling economy. "We have philosophical differences," Sullivan said of himself and the other BID members. "My approach is that the BID should be all-inclusive, all of the stakeholders should be included in operations of the BID and the

decision-making of the BID. We should be completely transparent financially and otherwise." Vice chairman Pat Perulli refused to comment on Sullivan's firing, simply saying "He's a great guy, I've got nothing to say," before hanging up the phone. Sullivan said he irked BID members, including chairman Jim Riso, who thought Sullivan was too outspoken about internal board matters. For six months, Sullivan was on probation and could not speak about any of the "inner workings" of the BID. Sullivan said he followed the terms of his probation. He also said he asked for an additional clause to his contract, one that would have his "needs as an executive responded to in a timely matter." This was not adhered to, he said, and this is the biggest point of contention between himself and the board. However, he maintains he would like to be reinstated and speak with board members about what he specifically did wrong.

"There were a bunch of meetings, board meetings I requested, financial and governance meetings," he said. "There was a differing of our opinions and approaches. I was requesting governance that would help me perform my duties. They were ignored. I don't know why." Sullivan said he owes the BID a debt of gratitude and still thinks it is an effective organization. Whether he is reinstated or not, he plans to pursue his plan to create a documentary of Bayside businesses and individuals. He calls this project "one of the greatest contributions to the revitalization of Bayside." Sullivan has worked in the film industry and for CBS News. "I still believe the Bayside BID can make the greatest contribution to Bayside in years," he said. "Nothing had taken place here for years, it was on the decline until I came in and reopening the streets." Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at rbarkan@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127.

Page 4 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Waste Equals Opportunity Waste is no longer something to get rid of, it’s a resource. As North America’s leading recycler, Waste Management processes over 8 million tons of paper, glass, plastic and metal each year – enough to fill the Empire State Building more than 12 times. By 2020, our goal is to nearly triple the amount of materials we recover through the use of innovative technologies that capture more of the value in waste. To learn more, visit www.thinkgreen.com.


Waste Facility Raises Air Travel Concerns from College Point completely. By DOMENICK RAFTER "I do think it's still close [to the airDespite getting the approval of the Federal Aviation Administration, local leaders port]," he said. "They may be an inch out and concerned residents are still worried that of it or a foot lower than the requirement, a waste transfer facility proposed in College it's still too close. There's an awful lot of Point will threaten air travel into and out of shoreline in the City of New York, every borough but the Bronx is an island. Why busy LaGuardia Airport. The waste transfer station would be do they need this one piece of space at the end of a major airport's located on Flushing Bay runway?" at 31st Avenue and 122nd Ackerman warned that Street in College Point, the plant would be in vioonly about 1,500 feet “There’s an lation of FAA rules if the across the bay from one of awful lot of Port Authority were to LaGuardia Airport's main adopt updated air traffic runways. The Dept. of shoreline in the systems. Sanitation said the design city of New York, control Ken Paskar of Friends of the transfer station of LaGuardia Airport said w o u l d k e e p a n y t r a s h ever y borough the problem is more than movement behind closed but the Bronx is just birds, which is trouble doors and away from open enough. air and placed on closed an island. Why single colleccontainers to be put on do they need this tion"Every truck in Queens will barges. They claim this have to descend into one would prevent the facil- one piece of particular point in ity, and the garbage, from space at the end Queens," he said, noting attracting birds, but opthe toll it would take on position to the facility is of a major highways like the Van still strong more than half airport’s Wyck Expressway and loa decade after it was first runway?” cal roads like College proposed. Point Boulevard and 20th The FAA did nix the —U.S. Rep. Avenue. plant due to height restricGary Ackerman "I'd rather see a biltions in 2006, but later lion dollars invested in backed down from its opways to reduce solid position, as did the Port Authority, after the City moved the facility's waste in the city of New York, and new tower out of FAA clearance. The agency technology to improve our recycling progave the green light to the plant earlier this gram," he added. Ackerman said he recognized that the site year. U.S. Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-Bayside) said he would rather see the facility moved was far from residential or commercial areas,

but he was more willing to fight that battle. "I'd rather have people upset but safe," he explained. The facility is not far from the spot where U.S. Airways Flight 1549 was struck by a flock of birds three years ago, forcing the pilot to make a dangerous landing in the

Hudson River. Flight 1549 was outbound from LaGuardia to Charlotte, N.C. when it was struck by a flock of birds near the Whitestone Bridge. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400 Ext. 125

City Pays Out $567K In Boro Snow Claims By DOMENICK RAFTER Gabe Nakashian's parked Lexus was hit by a snowplow on 72nd Avenue in Douglaston, as was Nubia Martinez's BMW in East Elmhurst. Ana Herrera was hit by a Sanitation truck going in reverse on 41st Avenue in Elmhurst; Alethia Cassimy received eight stitches in her lip after also being hit by a truck on Guy R. Brewer Boulevard in Rochdale. These four women were among 224 borough residents who filed claims and received settlements from damages during the City's cleanup from the Dec. 26, 2010, blizzard, according to City Comptroller John Liu. As of Jan. 1, 620 claims to the city in damages related to the blizzard have been filed and settled citywide, and the city has paid out over $1.8 million. The highest percentage of claims settled was in the borough of Queens, and more than $567,000 in dam-

ages have been paid to borough claimants for such damages as cars or pedestrians being hit by Sanitation trucks. The largest claim paid out in Queens was to Cassimy, who received $45,000 after a Sanitation truck hit her on Dec. 30, 2010 on Guy R. Brewer Boulevard near 137th Avenue in Rochdale. Cassimy had sued the city for $5 million, but instead received the settlement. The largest settlement citywide was for $150,000 to a claimant in Brooklyn. That borough accounted for almost half of the $1.8 million paid out citywide. Scott Seiber, spokesman for Liu, said some claims are still being settled, but he could not confirm how many more settlements are in the works. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400 Ext. 125

More than 200 Queens residents received damage claims in connection with the treacherous snowstorm of 2010. www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 5


Edit Page In Our Opinion:

Queens Values Its Diversity The residents of Queens came together again this week in another show of unity after an attack that raised concerns for the safety its people. The result was more proof that the borough stands firm behind its pledge against hate and intolerance. In November, Queens officials came together to support an updated version of the Flushing Remonstrance, a 354year-old document that made the borough the birthplace of religious freedom and tolerance in the Western Hemisphere. On that day in November, officials reaffirmed the commitment to that freedom and declared again that Queens will celebrate the differences that define us and not let them divide us. While the actions of the man who threw Molotov cocktails at buildings in Queens may not be considered hate crimes – the suspect is alleged to have acted in response to personal grievances – the response of the community to Sunday night’s events show once again that the citizens of Queens will stand together in dire circumstances to declare our unity in trying times. As we move forward into the new year, we must continue the dedication to tolerance and understanding, no matter the circumstances. As was stated in the pledge signed in November: “Every man, woman and child of this county, this city, this state and this nation, regardless of ideology, history or philosophy, is our brother and our sister. Together we face an open future free from hate, bigotry, fear and persecution.”

In Your Opinion:

Page 6 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Remembering Pat To The Editor: I feel it is safe to say that all of us involved in community life appreciate the enormous contributions of Pat Dolan. As someone who knew Pat Dolan, I was very unhappy that a temporary foot injury prevented me from attending memorial services for her. I was pleased to read the welldeserved testimonials from many of the civic leaders, editors and her personal friends honoring her that appeared in our local community papers. Pat Dolan was not a close personal friend. I became acquainted with her as a leader of the Doug-Bay Manor Civic Association. I certainly want to add my appreciation for her enormous contribution and her lifelong devotion to our community residents’ quality of life. There is, however, an aspect to Pat Dolan that I want to highlight. As the founder and chair of the Center for the Women of New York, I want to pay tribute to Pat Dolan as a strong feminist, a role that she

would not necessarily claim. She was, however, a definite role model of a strong woman leader. Pat was independent, articulate, fearless of elected government authority figures, intolerant of hypocrisy and inefficiency. I am not aware that she was involved in any organization devoted to women’s rights. She did come to visit me when I had the first building at 401 Murray Ave. at Ft. Totten. She came without an appointment and announced in a “no nonsense” tone of voice, “I came to see what is going on here!” I welcomed her and gave her a tour of the building, introduced her to our volunteers and staff and described our programs and activities. She seemed satisfied with what she saw and left. I did not work with her directly until years later when she was head of the Queens United Civic Association. I took the initiative to ask her to join with the Center for the Women of New York and the Coalition to curb sex trafficking in Queens. I sent a formal letter describing the horrific incidents of

Michael Schenkler Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

sex trafficking in Queens. Because of our large immigrant population and the presence of international and national airports and railroads, Queens was becoming one of the major areas for smuggling and kidnapping of young women from around the world and nation! The first initiative was to stop the advertising of sex partners that was taking place in the local community newspapers. We started with the free English language Queens community newspapers. The Village Voice, the free subway daily, AM New York and one daily Queens paper did not cooperate, but all the others agreed to our request that they voluntarily stop and refuse to accept any ads that demean and serve to entrap women in illegal sexual activities! At first, Pat did not see the connection between her concentration on issues on zoning and illegal apartments and the issue of sex trafficking. I explained that neighborhoods that catered to these activities were allowing acts that were not only illegal but were ugly blights in the community and a real danger to the health and safety of the residents and especially women and young girls! She was involved in a very heavy agenda for the fall and winter months but promised to add it to the items for consideration and discussion. The Coalition which includes the Queens Chapter of the United Nation’s Committee on Elimination of Human Trafficking, has been continuing its program on developing consciousness raising and education of the general public on this issue and will broaden its outreach into ethnic communities. I really believe that given the time to study the issue, Pat Dolan would have provided the leadership for civic associations and community boards to help stop the sex slavery scourge that is taking place under our very eyes. Queens is fortunate in having many of its citizens take an active interest in the health, freedom and safety of its residents. We honor Pat’s memory and hope that her legacy will inspire others to step up and try to carry on her values and example. Ann J. Jawin, Chair, Center for the Women of New York

Sewer Issues To The Editor: In breaking ground with a $50 million dollar infrastructure initiative consisting of sewers for the Willets Point purported redevelopment, Queens Borough President Helen Marshall lauded the expan-

Marcia Moxam Comrie, Contributing Editor Reporters: Harley Benson, Domenick Rafter, Veronica Lewin, Ross Barkan, Jason Pafundi

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sion of the city’s sewer network saying “it will address long standing issues.” The issue she was talking about was that the lack of a proper infrastructure (no sewers) did not permit for the essential drainage of run-off water causing contamination of the area (Ground Breaks On Willets Point- Queens TribuneDec. 8-14,2011). Notwithstanding the lack of sewers in Willets Point, Ms. Marshall as well as her predecessor Claire Shulman, sat idly by for years and years and watched the City collect sewer rent from Willets Point property owners for non-existent sewers and did not lift a finger to assist the thousands of workers now being displaced by what will be an enormous taxpayer subsidy to Mayor Bloomberg’s fat cat real estate friends. She made no objection to the City making a mockery of the time-honored understanding that eminent domain was to be used for public purposes and not to subsidize real estate developers. She willfully watched the area fall into structural disrepair and then mislabeled as being financially substandard. The real issue she should have addressed was not the lack of infrastructure but her culpability as well as that of the far too many myopic politicians the taxpayers of this city are saddled with, which hopefully in the future term limits will address. Ms. Marshall’s failure to address the real issue and to regally cloak herself as some sort of public official extraordinaire qualifies her for admission to The Chutzpah Hall of Shame. Benjamin M. Haber, Flushing

Real Trouble To The Editor: As we approach the election year of 2012, with the national economy in virtual shambles and our government in a state of political armageddon, the candidates for the Republican nomination for President are not looking so good. Both Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney are not doing so well in the polls, with all of their political excess baggage, and that is a very serious issue. Who will be able to run against and defeat President Obama? Seventy five percent of the American people are fed up with our Con-

gress also. We need Divine intervention and The Wizard of Oz-this nation is in very serious trouble folks! Happy Holidays to all! John Amato, Fresh Meadows

Tricky Letters To The Editor: “Journalistic Jargon: Learning To Speak To A Reporter” (Michael Schenkler – Dec. 8) should be included in the curriculum of any college journalism class. Allow me to add another trick of the trade used by elected officials and their official mouthpieces they use when dealing with reporters and newspapers. Check out the frequent letters to the editor and guest Op-Ed articles that appear in weekly newspapers. Too many under the public officials name are known by original writers as “cut and paste” robo letter classics. I, like many of your ordinary regular readers continue to be grateful that the Queens Tribune offers me an opportunity to express my views, along with others of differing opinions. Thanks to you, ordinary citizens have the freedom to comment on the actions and legislation of elected officials. We do this on a voluntary basis on our own time and dime on timely topics of the day. Public officials use taxpayer dollars to promote their views, via mass mailings of newsletters, news releases, letters to the editor and guest opinion page columns. In many cases, they are produced or written by campaign or office staffers paid for by taxpayers. The rest of us have limited time to submit a letter. Why not save your scarce space in your excellent Letters to the Editor section for original submittals by your readers as opposed to canned promotions cleverly submitted by elected officials? Elected officials submit these so called letters to the editor as part of their own public relations campaign. It is an ongoing effort to raise their own individual name identification with voters. They hope it will assist them in winning another term in office or promotion to higher public office down the road. Why not ask them to take out a paid advertisement instead? Larry Penner Great Neck

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Ed Koch Commentary: Interesting Court Decisions A really interesting decision of a federal appeals court in Atlanta, Ga., was repor ted in the Times of December 28, 2011. An employee at a Tyson chicken plant sued the company, alleging racial discrimination and seeking damages for the act of a plant manager who “called adult black men working there ‘boy’” The Appeals Court, in a 2-to-1 decision, initially overturned the trial court’s finding in favor of the plaintiff, stating that “the uses [of boy] were conversational and non-racial in context.” But there was such an uproar against the appeals court’s reversal amongst law yers, civil rights leaders, and other federal judges that a year later the appeals court sua sponte (on its own) changed it s decision a nd re stored t he $365,000 judgment in favor of the plaintiff, but rejected the $1 million punitive damage award. In its original decision, the appeals court said: “The use of ‘boy’ when modified by a racial classification like ‘black’ or ‘white’ is evidence of discriminator y intent. But the use of ‘boy’ alone is

not evidence of discrimination.” However, the U.S. Supreme Court disagreed, sending the case back to the appeals court, with the following admonition, according to the Times, “‘The speaker’s meaning may depend on various factors including context, inflection, tone of voice, local custom and historical usage,’ the justices said in an unsigned opinion.” The Times reported that “that admonition was rejected by the 11th Circuit panel last year. Then it was embraced this month though with little enthusiasm,” a reference to the reversal by the appeals court of its earlier decision. Ultimately, justice was done in this case. *** In Illinois, as in New York City, the Catholic Charities organization is an arm of the Catholic Church. Catholic Charitie s renders social services, e.g., adoption, foster care, etc., under contract and for fees comparable to those paid non-religious organizations. Illinois, according to the Times of Dec. 12, 2011, specified that all vendors providing services to the

state “must consider same-sex couples as potential foster care and adoptive parents if they want to receive state money.” The Roman Catholic Bishops in Illinois “have shuttered most of the Catholic Charities affiliates in the state rather than comply with a new requirement.” When I was mayor and before the City Council at my request in 1986 enacted a law that prohibited the private sector from discriminating against gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgendered with respect to employment, housing and education, I directed that all private sector organizations doing business with the city end all discrimination in employment based on sexual orientation. John Cardinal O’Connor and the Salvation Army responded that if the cit y bound them to follow these rules, they would cease entering into contracts with the city to provide social ser vice s to ch ildren, t he homeless and the poor. I replied that the regulations covered every vendor, religious and non-religious alike. Both the Roman Catholic

Church and the Salvation Army sued the city on the basis of a state law that exempted them from state mandates that violate their religious teachings. They won, and we were never faced with their ending their services. If the city had won the case, would you, the reader of this commentary, have imposed the nondiscrimination policy or provided a religious exemption? *** According to The New York Times of Dec. 24, 2011, South Carolina enacted legislation that would “require voters to present photo identification.” The Times reported that the Justice Depar tment blocked that law saying it would “dispropor t ionately suppress turnout among eligible minorit y voter s.” The Justice Department cited South Carolina’s own submit ted data that “there were 81,938 minority citizens who are already registered to vote and who lack such identification, and that these voters are nearly 20 percent more likely to be ‘disenfranchised’ by the

change than white voters.” Whenever a state or municipality seeks to impose preconditions on qualifying for a benefit, e.g., food stamps or housing vouchers, it generally faces opposition based on the belief that it is racist to impose any such preconditions. I have always believed that there is nothing wrong, and certainly it is not racist to require fingerprinting to qualify for some government benefits, particularly where significant fraud is present in the program. However, I agree with the Just ice Depar tment t hat Sout h Carolina’s proposed picture ID requirement as a precondition to voting is not necessary. I just don’t’ believe that fraud at the polls is a significant problem. The significant problem is that in the U.S. eligible voters, particularly in primaries, simply don’t go to the polls. To impede and reduce the vote further based on the desire to reduce or eliminate a fraud that really doesn’t exist, makes no sense. Mayor Koch was a member of Congress from New York from 1969 through 1977.

Page 8 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Beating the Third Term Blues: Others Measure the Carpet By HENRY STERN The imminent approach of the mid-point of Mayor Bloomberg’s third (and presumably last) term makes this an appropriate time to review his tenure and to scan the prospects of his successor who will be sworn in on Ja n. 1 2014 - unle ss Henry something unexpectedly happens before that day. Tradition and experience have cast a cloud over mayoral third terms. Public officials inevitably accumulate enemies over their tenure. There is no necessary correlation bet ween competence and popularity. The better the mayor, the more s/he will attempt to accomplish, and the greater the chance of failure. The more often a mayor rocks the boat, the more opportunities for the passengers and crew to jump ship. There is also historic inevitability in the rise and fall of politicians and dynasties. Parties and movements lose popularit y over time as the public tires of them. CREATING A VACANCY The mayoralty of New York City is determined on a quadrennial cycle. The mayoral election follows by one year the presidential election and precedes by one year the gubernatorial contest. The last time a federal and a non-judicial statewide election coincided was 1950. One incumbent, Democratic Sen. Robert F. Wagner Sr., author of The National Labor Relations Act and The Social Securit y Act (fat her of Mayor Wagner), had been seriously ill for

several years, rarely participating in Senate business. He was first elected in 1926 and his fourth term was set to expire in Ja nuar y 1951. Wagner was not expected to seek re-election. What he did, guided by other Democrats, was to re sign i n late June Stern 1949, when the vacancy would be filled by a special election to be held on Election Day. To hold a state-wide election on the same day as the New York City mayoral election would bring out a larger number of city voters, predominantly Democrats, thereby helping the Democrats win other races. The strategy worked, with former Democratic Governor Herber t Lehman defeating John Foster Dulles, the Republican who Governor Thomas Dewey had appoi nted to fi l l out the re st of Wagner’s term, by a small plurality in the November general election. TEN YEARS ON Mayor Bloomberg has continued to function in a competent and professional manner. He is not beloved by the public, partly because of env y of h is great p er sonal wealth and influence, partly because of a handful of infelicitous remarks (usually quickly corrected), and to some extent because ordi nar y people do not believe the mayor has high regard for them and their concerns about municipal government. The Mayor has a national role to play as an honest, moderate reformer, and is well regarded by elites. T his approval wane s, however, as the pol lster climbs

down the ladder. The mayor’s achievements in public health, in environmental protection, in governmental integrity, in expanding parks and recreation programs while diminishing staff - deserve recognition. Commissioner Kelly is justly well regarded, and the absence of successful terrorist attacks cannot be attributed to a change of heart by al-Qaeda. The murder rate has declined sharply, although some offenses have begun to tilt upwards. The mayor’s wars on cigarette smoking and unlicensed guns deserve par ticular praise. He has turned his causes into national crusades, which have had varying degrees of success. He is not afraid to think of the larger picture, and the latest figures on extended life expectancy in New York City support his approach. I am not persuaded by some of the proposed remedies, such as congestion pricing, which particularly disadvantage the middle class while having limited effect on the rich, to whom the fees would be a trifle. And the jury is still out on the rejected mid-Manhattan stadium, although the six dead blocks it would have created seem increasingly a high price to have paid for adding thousands of private vehicles to the midtown traffic mess. The interests of the Dolan and Johnson families should have been distinguished by the Council from the city planning and traffic questions involved. The problem with construction issues like the stadium is that you can’t really be sure of the merits until you build the facility, and

by then you cannot undo what has been done. Mario Cuomo’s rejection of the Shoreham nuclear plant on Long Island is a conspicuous exception to that rule. As usual in politics, the occasional flaws in the record attract the most at tent ion - t he $700 million CityTime corruption scandal, the appointment of Cathie Black as schools chancellor, and the handling of the snowstorm the day after Christmas last year. But these must be judged as aberrational, compared with thousands of mayoral appointments, promotions and contracting decisions made pursuant to law and on the merits. And when compared with the performance of the City Comptroller, the Mayor is a beacon of light and learning. We often appreciate public

officials more after they have left office. We believe that Mayor Bloomberg’s reputation will grow over the years, as memories of his inappropriate term extension fade. Anyway, does anyone believe that New York City would have been bet ter off w it h Ant hony Wei ner as Mayor? Somet ime s Providence protects us from acts of folly, but we cannot always rely on chance to protect us from humiliation and chaos. The last observation we would make is that, at this point, the lineup of candidate s seeking to succeed to the mayoralty is undistinguished. And we haven’t heard the bad parts yet about what they have done or failed to do. Are these the best out of eight million? StarQuest@NYCivic.org

Not 4 Publication.com by Dom Nunziato


 



          



                 



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Page 10 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com


Tribune photos by Veronica Lewin

Queens This Week

State Sen. Tony Avella (l.) stands with residents who are fed up with the City's delay in curb repairs.

Weathering Curbs Irk Homeow ners

Flushing Nurses Plan Picket With negotiations breaking down, the nurses of Flushing Hospital said they will picket today, Jan. 5, outside of Flushing Hospital Medical Center on Parsons Boulevard. Registered nurses at the hospital have said they are fed up with hospital management's negotiating tactics, and are taking their fight public. At stake, according to spokesman Mark Genovese of the New York State Nurses Association, are payments to the nurses' health and pension plans. The registered nurses union at the hospital seeks an extension of an interim agreement that would continue contributions to the nurses' pension programs and health benefits; after 90 days, health coverage would expire. Hospital CEO Robert Levin has not signed

Santa Stars:

Santa Claus recently visit e d t h e S TA R S Yo u t h Center in Howard Beach to spend time with the kids there.

Turner Honors Jew ish War Veterans U.S. Rep. Bob Turner (R-Middle Village) was the guest speaker at the recent Kew Forest-Woodside-Irwin Loitz Post No. 250 meeting, which meets monthly at the Rego Park Jewish Center. "We owe so much to the patriotic Americans who have worn and are wearing the uniforms of our nation's armed forces," Turner said. "Soldiers from all races, religions, and backgrounds have made great sacrifices while serving our country." During his visit, Turner updated the group on a number of legislative issues regarding veterans, as well as those specific to Jewish veterans, including the William Shemin Jewish World War I Veterans Act. "Many Jewish soldiers have died or been wounded in combat. While many have been recognized for their service by being awarded combat medals, there are still many who served during WWI that

have not been considered for the highest military decoration awarded by our government - the Medal of Honor," Turner continued. It wasn't until 2001 that Congress passed a bill, The Leonard Kravitz Jewish Veterans Act, to ensure that for the first time Jewish veterans of World War II had the opportunity to be recognized with the Medal of Honor for their valuable service. However, the bill excluded Jewish veterans of World War I. Turner also spoke about his recent visit to Arlington National Cemetery to view the newly installed memorial honoring Jewish chaplains for their service during WWII. For many years there were only two monuments honoring chaplains of the WWII - one honoring Catholic chaplains, and the other honoring Protestant chaplains. In October of this year, a memorial was put in place that honors the Jewish rabbis who served as well. "I was recently able to view the new memorial," the Turner told the crowd. "It is a long overdue testament to Jewish clergy who worked shoulder to shoulder with their compatriots to protect our faiths and our shores." Turner, a member of the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs, held a Teletown Hall Conference Call with constituents on veterans affairs, co-hosted a veterans small business forum, and has met with numerous veterans groups at local outposts. "It was terrific," former Queens County Commander of the Jewish War Veterans Kenneth Brown said. "The members of the post appreciated his talking about current veterans affairs legislation in Washington, D.C. They found it very informative. They loved it."

Send Queens This Week News and Photos to: Queens Tribune 150-50 14th Rd. Whitestone, NY 11357

www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 11

Whenever it rains in Bellerose, residents on 242nd Street have to deal with flooded driveways. While rising water tables are often to blame, this time it is a lack of infrastructure. Caroline Vereline has lived in her Bellerose home for 54 years and said the curbs outside her home have not been replaced since the homes were built. Pools of water seep into her driveway causing slow damage to her private driveway. Flushing resident William Bica said some of the homes near his 163rd Street residence lack curbs altogether, making it difficult to parallel park. State Sen. Tony Avella (D-Bayside) held a press conference with concerned residents Dec. 30 on 242nd Street in Bellerose to address the Dept. of Transportation's curb repair policy. "I can't even remember a time when the city actually put out concrete with stones in it," Avella said. "That's how old this curb is." If someone injures themselves or their vehicle due to shoddy infrastructure, the individual can file a claim with the city to be reimbursed for damages. Avella said the city is wasting money paying claims for incidents involving damaged curbs instead of fixing the curb and preventing accidents. Many residents complained about how they cannot schedule curb repairs themselves because the curbs are city property. Vereline said she called the DOT three times to complain about the vanishing curbs outside of her home before giving up. "I think this is really disgusting that this is the city and we can't get our curbs done," Vereline said. She said she hopes she is still alive when the City gets around to replacing the curbs on her street. Avella said some residents are apprehensive to call and complain about curbs because of fear of punishment. It is alleged when a homeowner calls about disappearing curbs, the DOT will issue a sidewalk violation in retaliation for complaining. Avella took this point as a rallying cry. "It's almost like the city is saying to homeowners and property owners throughout the city, 'don't you dare complain, because if you do, we're going to hit you with a sidewalk violation." According to Avella, there is currently a 23-year backlog on DOT curb repairs. Avella said he is working towards reducing the

delay on repairs. Requests for comment to the DOT were not returned as of printing. To report rundown curbs outside of your home, call 311. Reach Reporter Veronica Lewin at vlewin@queenspress.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 123. —Veronica Lewin

an interim agreement. The contract for 350 nurses expired on Dec. 31. "We know it's about control and is intended to intimidate nurses," Genovese said of the hospital management's refusal to sign an interim agreement. "They're trying to use it as a bargaining chip so we'll cave in in negotiations." The picket will occur during the nurses' scheduled breaks. If an interim agreement is signed, it would guarantee health and pension benefits for six additional months after the contract's expiration. He also said the nurses would be unwilling to accept pension benefit concessions that would "cost each nurse $150,000 in lost lifetime pension benefits." According to the Bureau of Labor, registered nurses nationally earn on average $67,720 a year. While Genovese has been publicly adamant about the demands of the nurses, hospital management has been much more tightlipped about the negotiations. "In negotiations with nursing union, we are hopeful for a resolution," said Michael Hinck, a spokesman for the hospital. "As far as any specifics regarding issues, we don't necessarily get into details of that nature." Reach Reporter Ross Barkan at rbarkan@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127. —Ross Barkan


Center Gives Toddlers Time For Nature By DOMENICK RAFTER Three-year-old Jordan brought his mother a smorgasbord of food for breakfast: some corn, a waffle, a banana. The only problem, of course, was the food was all plastic, just some of the toys found in the brightly-colored room at the Alley Pond Environmental Center that hosts Toddler Time, a special nature-themed class for children ages 2 and 3 held six days a week at the center in Douglaston. At the height of the holiday season, only three kids were at this Saturday’s Toddler Time; Jordan and his mom, Elaina and her dad and Freddie and his mother and aunt. On this specific chilly Saturday morning, the kids wait for class to start where they will learn about animal migration- a perfect topic for this time of year. Toddler Time runs for 90 minutes and features time allotted for play- when the kids and parents have the opportunity to interact with each other. The children play with the toys in the room, with each other and with their parents while they trickle in. Playtime is followed by Circle Time, where the children sit in a circle and learn about the topic for the day- either through a story or through some other kind of interactive activity. On this day, Christine Schnurr, one of Toddler Time’s instructors and head of Early Childhood programs at APEC, is reading about migration to Jordan, Elaina and Freddie, who then get to play with bird feathers and listen to the calls of common birds. Even the moms are intrigued. Freddie’s mom points out the call of a bird she often hears in her yard. After a snack, the children go out for a walk, weather permitting. They witness migrating Canadian geese resting in the low tide in Alley Pond- a perfect addendum to the migration lesson. “They’re taking a rest before heading south,” Schnurr tells the kids, who seem more interested in the arbitrary objects they found along the walk. The outside trips, though sometimes prevented by weather, are key to Toddler Time, Schnurr said. “It’s one thing talking about something,” she explained. “it’s another thing when the weather’s nice, we can go outside and get some water from the pond and we can see some tadpoles, grab some duckweed and say ‘this is what the ducks eat,’ This is what it feels like. It’s real. We can get outside and have them experience what I’m talking about.” Back at the center, the kids get to meet an animal. Today, the star of the show is Sasha the parakeet who perches herself comfortably on Freddie’s mom’s shoulder, angering her son but intriguing little Elaina. The kids get to meet a dove as well. Schnurr said the natural curiosity of children makes them interested in the animals at the center, but they can also be apprehensive and meeting them allows them to conquer that fear before it sets in.

Page 12 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

New Year Baby:

Nina Love McConnell-Honore, a girl that weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces, was the first baby born in 2012 at New York Hospital Queens. The newborn joins her parents Rose Honore and Duane McConnell and Aamin, her 12-year-old brother. “I feel great, I feel special and so does she,” Honore said. “She is sweet, quiet and lovely. That’s why her middle name is Love.” The hospital presented the family, from St. Albans, a $1,000 savings bond and a congratulatory basket of flowers.

“Even at a young age, some kids are very hesitant,” Schnurr said. “We want them to get the idea that they can touch and they won’t get hurt.” Back in their playroom, the children finish out their day with a craft. On this day, the kids get to make Cheerio strands to hang outside so migrating birds can grab a bite on their way to Florida. Toddler Time is one of four programs for children which includes Wee Sprouts, for children age 18-24 months, Fledglings for children ages 3 and 4, and Sunny Bunnys for 4 and 5 year olds. For more information about Toddler Time and other programs, visit alleypond.com. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 357-7400 Ext. 125.

Parents and children interact during Toddler time at the Alley Pond Environmental Center.


Business, Banking & Real Estate

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Fraud Drives Prices Up On Car Insurance By DOMENICK RAFTER Insurance fraud is causing Queens drivers to pay far more for insurance than they should. New findings from an Insurance Research Council study of personal injury protection claims closed in 2010 show that claims for medical expenses, lost wages, and other expenses related to injuries from auto accidents in the New York City area have risen 70 percent in the last decade, far more than the 49 percent increase in medical care inflation over that same timeframe. Queens drivers pay 167 percent more in auto insurance than the national average, according to Fraud Cost NY, a coalition of Queensbased civil groups and officials pushing legislative changes in Albany to help curb insurance fraud. “Without real reform in Albany, the criminals will keep gouging the people of Queens and across New York. We need sensible reforms that continue real protections for New Yorkers who are hurt in accidents, but undercut the criminals who feed on the current system,” said Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. (D-Astoria), who along with Councilmen Dan Halloran (RWhitestone) and Peter Koo (R-Flushing) is pushing for a series of legislative changes in Albany. Those changes include requiring medical providers to submit disputed no-fault claims to arbitration, modifying the “30-day rule” to allow more time to investigate suspicious claims and eliminate the “preclusion” of an insurer’s defenses to a claim for non-substantive technical errors, placing tougher penalties on those violating already-existing anti-fraud laws and requiring health care providers to submit evidence that the services billed were medically necessary, priced according to the fee schedule as required by the no-fault law and provided by a properly licensed practitioner. “In these difficult budget times, Albany can help

Page 14 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

2012 Money Resolutions

1. Have a clear, concise financial goal for 2012. It isn’t good enough to say, “I want to have my credit card paid down and more money in the bank.” Instead, you should say, “I have the balance on my credit card paid down to $0, over $5,000 in my savings account, and a fully funded IRA.” 2. Prioritize Your Debts. Not all debt is created equal. Make a list of your liabilities and organize them by the annual interest rate. 3. Open an IRA. Your financial planner or accountant should be able to tell you whether a traditional or Roth IRA is better for you. 4. Enroll in an Automatic Savings Plan. Call your financial advisor and tell him/her you want a certain amount of money withdrawn from your checking or savings account each month. 5. Review your Retirement Plans at Work. Make sure that your contributions are as large as you can afford. 6. Close Unnecessary Accounts. Imagine your bank charges you $8 each month for your checking account. In 30 years, that $8 will have added up to more than $2,880! 7. Collect Your Change. Any time you make purchases with cash, only spend whole dollar amounts. 8. Give Money. It is a powerful and effective way to change other people’s lives for the better while giving you a better sense of freedom financially. 9. Keep Track of Your Spending. There are many personal finance software packages available that can teach you a great deal. 10. Read a Financial Book Each Month. The printed word is amazing in that it allows you to communicate directly with brilliant financial minds. 11. Manage Expectations. Whenever we do even a little bit better than the averages with a little less risk, we are doing very well. 12. Remember It’s not What You Make, It’s What You Keep. Despite all the hype, our federal state, and local tax burdens will probably not become smaller.

working families save money by cracking down on criminals who milk the no-fault system for their advantage,” Halloran said. He labeled the difference a Queens driver pays in insurance versus the national average a “fraud tax.” In the meantime, law enforcement officers have been pursuing those committing fraud. In September 2010, then-Attorney General Andrew Cuomo brought felony

charges against seven medical professionals and a secretary for their role in running a corrupt medical mill in Queens. A year later, 12 people, including at least six from Queens, were indicted by Queens D.A. Richard Brown on charges of scheming insurance companies out of more than $45,000 in bogus claims. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 357-7400 Ext. 125.


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Initiative Helps Businesses Start Faster Mayor Mike Bloomberg and City Council Speaker Christine Quinn recently announced that a total of 546 restaurants have opened using the services of the New Business Acceleration Team, a City Council initiative first announced in Quinn's 2009 State of the City address. Bloomberg and Quinn made the announcement at Tacos Tulcingo in Jackson Heights, the 500th restaurant the New Business Acceleration Team helped launch. The initiative allows restaurants to go through the City's permitting processes more quickly and speeds up the process of opening a new restaurant from six months to four. Created in March 2010, the New Business Acceleration Team works hand-in-hand with qualifying businesses to schedule and coordinate review appointments and required inspections from City agencies, including the New York City Fire Dept., the Health Dept. and Dept. of Buildings, among other relevant agencies. By helping provide new restaurants with the answers and services they need from City government, businesses are able to open their doors faster - and in the process, create jobs for New Yorkers sooner than planned and generate additional revenue for the City. "Helping new restaurants open faster is good for the entire city - because the sooner they open, the sooner they can create jobs," Bloomberg said. "That's exactly why we partnered with the City Council to create the New Business Acceleration Team. By streamlining the process and making it easier to work with City government, we're encouraging

businesses to open, create jobs and generate additional economic activity in all five boroughs." "The Council conceived NBAT in response to a persistent problem restaurateurs told us about: the disproportionate amount of time it took to open a new business," Quinn said. "We knew that by working with the owners and better coordinating government, we could fix this problem and reduce opening times - and we did. The great news is that under the new NBAT model, we have helped more than 500 restaurants open two months more quickly. That's two months more of salaries being paid, revenue being generated and jobs being created per restaurant." More than half of the 546 restaurants assisted are located outside Manhattan. The new restaurants have created more than 6,000 new jobs for New Yorkers, including immigrants and those who are just starting up the economic ladder. By helping businesses, on average, open their doors 72 days sooner, the New Business Acceleration Team's accelerated openings have also generated $9 million in additional tax revenue and $50 million in additional sales revenue. Under the New Business Acceleration program, every application for a new restaurant is assigned a case manager who guides the restaurant owner through the entire process. The case manager is on hand to make sure every restaurant owner navigates the permitting process as efficiently as possible. Inspections typically the most time-consuming part of opening a restaurant - are conducted by a coordinated team of inspectors from

the Dept. of Buildings, the Fire Dept., the Dept. of Environment Protection and other relevant agencies. "It's a joy to welcome Modesto Ramirez's Tacos Tulcingo to Jackson Heights. Taco Tulcingo is now the 500th restaurant to open its doors thanks to the New Business Acceleration Team Program, which has been such an effective public-private partnership between small business owners and the City of New York," U.S. Rep. Joe Crowley (D-Jackson Heights) said. "Mr. Ramirez's story is a truly American story. He arrived in New York seeking a better life for his family; he worked hard and is now open-

ing his own restaurant, becoming his own boss, and living the American Dream. It's great to have him and his business in our community." "The NBAT is an important partnership which provides important services to entrepreneurs looking to open a business in this great City," Councilwoman Julissa Ferreras (D-East Elmhurst) said. "We need to continue providing this kind of support to our entrepreneurs, so they can open their doors, create jobs and achieve their own American Dream." To learn more about the New Business Acceleration Team program or how to participate, visit nyc.gov or call 311.

Worst Landlords Put On Watch List As part of an announcement of the latest additions and features to the New York City Worst Landlords Watch List, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio recently announced the five worst buildings in Queens. The list is topped by 107-04 150th St., cited for 209 violations, and 89-06 138th St., 135 violations, both represented by Allen Affordable Housing Development. Other properties on the list include: 1821 Cornelia St., 101 violations, Roseman, Beerman & Beerman LLP, landlord; 307 Beach 70 St., 92 violations, landlord is Gowrie Seegulam; and 106-19 177th St., 91 violations, land-

lord is Diana Alleyne. The watch list website, www.landlordwatchlist.com, now includes an updated list that tracks whether violations are on the rise or are being repaired. The site also includes a list of 176 buildings recently removed from the watch list because violations like lead paint, infestations and mold have been addressed. All entries on the watch list have a minimum of two hazardous housing code violations per unit, including lack of heat or hot water, lead paint, toxic mold or broken plumbing.


Compiled by ROSS BARKAN

103rd Pct. BUTT GRAB: The NYPD is asking the public’s assistance in locating and identifying the following individual wanted in regards to a sexual assault On Friday, Dec. 23, at approximately 11:15 a.m., the individual walked behind the victim and then grabbed her buttocks. The suspect then fled in an unknown direction. The suspect, a black man approximately 5-feet-10 to 6 feet, was last seen wearing a blue American Eagle vest with a black sweatshirt. Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-(800)-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at www.nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

suspect approached a 38-year-old man in the staircase of 74-45 Yellowstone Blvd. displayed a firearm and demanded money. The suspect removed a wallet containing money and credit cards and fled the location in an unknown direction. The victim did not sustain any visible injuries as a result of this incident. The suspect is described as a Hispanic man between the ages of 25 and 30, approximately 5-feet-8 and 160 lbs. and was last seen wearing a black hooded sweatshirt with a white adidas logo on the front, blue jeans and black sneakers with a white trim. Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

104th Pct. EXPRESSWAY FATALITY: On Jan.1 at approximately 5:07 a.m., police responded to a motor vehicle accident on the eastbound Long Island Expressway at the intersection of Maurice Avenue. Upon arrival, police observed an unidentified person, unconscious and unresponsive and subsequently pronounced dead. Upon further investigation, police determined that a 2007 Mitsubishi Galant, operated by a 28-year-old Hispanic man, was traveling eastbound on the Long Island Expressway at Maurice Avenue when it struck a 2011 Lincoln, operated by the victim, which was located within zebra striped markings between the roadway. The driver of the Galant was arrested at the scene and transported to Elmhurst Hospital where he is listed in stable condition. Alexis Marillo, a 28-year-old man, has been charged with manslaughter, vehicular manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, DWI, and reckless driving.

113th Pct. SEXUAL ASSAULT: The NYPD is asking the public’s assistance in locating and identifying the following individual wanted for a sexual assault. On Dec. 24 at approximately 8:40 p.m., the individual followed a 47-year-old woman off a bus near 140th Avenue and Coombs Street and then sexually assaulted her. The individual then fled in an unknown direction. The suspect is a black man, 18 to 24 years of age, 5-foot-8 to 6 feet tall. He was last seen wearing a dark colored coat, dark colored pants, white sneakers, and a black backpack. Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-(800)-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at www.nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

112th Pct. GUNPOINT ROBBERY: The NYPD is asking for the public’s assistance in identifying and locating the following individual wanted in connection with a gunpoint robbery. On Dec. 21 at 4:30 a.m., an unknown

115th Pct. MISSING MAN: The NYPD is asking the public’s assistance in ascertaining the whereabouts of Jorge Galves Calixto, 20, a Hispanic man who lives at 109-24 115th St. On Thursday Dec. 29, family members and a friend of the missing man reported to police that the missing was last seen by his friend on Dec. 21 near 93rd Street and Ditmars Boulevard. During that time, the friend reported that he and the missing person were assaulted by a group of approximately five men for unknown reasons and that during the assault he was robbed and fled the location. Anyone with information in regards to this missing, or the robbery, is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 800577-TIPS. The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers Website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or texting their tips to 274637(CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

YOU DON'T HAVE TO REVEAL YOUR IDENTITY TO HELP SOLVE A CRIME.

www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 17

109th Pct. MISSING GIRL: The NYPD is seeking the public’s assistance in locating Alma Trevino, a 14-year-old Hispanic girl, who was last seen at approximately 10:40 p.m. near 58-41 Lawrence St. on Jan. 1. She is between 5-foot and 5-foot-2 and was last seen wearing a blue jacket, blue jeans, and blue sneakers. Anyone with information in regards to this missing person is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-(800)-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at www.nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.


Keeping Stories Alive

Adopt-A-Family

Assemblymember Rory Lancman (D-Hillcrest) recently presented awards to students who have documented the stories of local Holocaust survivors, keeping their stories alive for future generations. The ceremony was held at the Kupferberg Holocaust Center at Queensborough Community College, where the students presented their work.

The Sutphin Boulevard Business Improvement District recently held its second annual Adopt-A-Family Holiday Luncheon at the Harvest Room in downtown Jamaica. Executive Director Simone Price hands out some pizza to eagerly-awaiting attendees, including Scott Frazier, Nushana Ragland, Alexandria Salazar, Arcelio Perez and Maria Salazar.

Handing Out Toys

pix

Queens Events Edited By Harley Benson Senator Toby Ann Stavisky (D-Flushing) joined Dr. Hari Shukla and the South Asians of New York Civic Association for holiday season toy distribution.

Holiday Gifts

Page 18 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Looking On

Councilman James Gennaro watches as Mayor Michael Bloomberg signs into law one of the bills he worked on. Behind him are (l. to r.) Councilwoman Gale Brewer, city Director of Long-Term Planning and Stability David Bragdon, Councilwoman Margaret Chin and Councilman Stephen Levin.

Civic Congress

U.S. Rep. Bob Turner (NY-09, right), Belle Harbor Property Owners Association Treasurer Peter Larkin (left), and Belle Harbor Property Owners Association President Hank Lori at the Queens Civic Congress Legislative Reception.

U.S. Rep. Gregory Meeks joined singer, songwriter and star of VH 1’s Love and Hip Olivia Longcott, Nicole Bell, the Dr. Maria Hubbard CEO of Greater Bethel Community Development Corporation and local leaders distributed holiday gifts, home furnishings and clothing to single mothers and grandparents raising their grandchildren in Southeast Queens and Far Rockaway at York College in Jamaica, N.Y. Photo by Nat Valentine.

Santa Claus and guest speaker Councilman Ruben Wills hand out dessert.

Bowling Over Funds

Sponsors and members of social service agencies that helped organize the luncheon included Erica Perez, case planner for Safe Space; Maria Sylvester, case aide for Safe Space; Councilman Ruben Wills, Wesner Pierre, NYC Dept. of Youth and Community Development’s Beacon Program; Simone Price, executive director of the Sutphin Boulevard BID; John Fordell, branch manager at Capital Bank; Karym Price, Catholic Charities staffer; Santa Claus, Benasha Shine, director of the Healthy Families program at Safe Space; and Berkley Semple, director of the school program at Safe Space.

The Ozone Park Kiwanis recently held a fundraiser at Cozy Bowl.

The holiday luncheon attendees gather together for a quick picture.


LEGAL NOTICE

upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to:792794 Elmont Road, Elmont, NY 11354. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 129-17 91 AVE, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/15/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 129-17 91st Avenue, Richmond Hill, New York 11418. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK File No. 2007-4374 By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: NEDELJKO IVKOVIC, if living and if dead, to his heirs at law, next of kin and distributees whose names and places of residence are unknown, and if he died subsequent to the decedent herein, to his executors, administrators, legatees, devisees, assignees and successors in interest whose names and places of residence are unknown and to all other heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of IVANA IVKOVIC the decedent herein, whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot after due diligent inquiry be ascertained ATTORNEY GENERAL being the persons interested as creditors, legatees, devisees, beneficiaries, distributees, or otherwise in the Estate of IVANA IVKOVIC, deceased, who at the time of her death was a resident of 219-82 64 th Avenue, Borough of Queens, City and State of New York 11364. Send Greeting: Upon the petition of MIRA RIERA, residing at 794 New Dover Road, Edison, New Jersey 08820. You and each of you are hereby cited to show cause before the Surrogate’s Court of Queens County, held at the Queens County Building, 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York 11435 on the 2 nd day of February 2012, at 9:30 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why the account of proceedings of MIRA RIERA, as Administrator of the Goods, Chattels and Credits which were of the Estate of IVANA IVKOVKIC, deceased, should not be judicially settled; a copy of which is attached; why an Order should not be made; 1. Removing the restrictions contained in the Limited Letters of Administration issued to the petitioner; 2. Authorizing the petitioner to collect the proceeds of a settlement referred to hereinabove in the amount of $700,000.00 against DAVID RAFAEL RIVERA, PATRICK G. TORNEY, ALYSSA G. TORNEY, JOSEPH PORTNOV and the CITY OF NEW YORK, and of said sum the amount of $400,000.00 being allocated to the cause

LEGAL NOTICE of action for the wrongful death of said decedent, IVANA IVKOVIC and the sum of $300,000.00 being allocated to the cause of action for personal injuries sustained by said decedent, IVANA IVKOVIC, during her lifetime; 3. Dispensing with the filing of a bond in respect thereto; 4. Authorizing the petitioner, MIRA RIERA, to pay to IROM, WITTELS, FREUND, BERNE & SERRA, P.C., thirty-three and onethird (33-1/3%) percent of the gross recovery herein (after deduction of disbursements), the sum of $226,262.97, as and for their legal fee (of which sum the amount of $129,286.67 is being allocated to the cause of action for the wrongful death of the decedent and $96,976.30 is being allocated to the cause of action for personal injuries sustained by the decedent during her lifetime) for their services rendered in the underlying cause(s) of action and in this proceeding (or such legal fee as is fixed by the Court), together with reimbursement of disbursements in the amount of $21,211.07 (of which sum the amount of $12,120.00 is being allocated to the cause of action for the wrongful death of the decedent and $9,091.07 is being allocated to the cause of action for personal injuries sustained by the decedent during her lifetime), totaling in all the sum of $247,474.04; 5. Discharging and releasing the petitioner, MIRA RIERA, from all responsibility and liability with respect to the matter herein, the aforementioned causes of action and the proceeds thereof, upon compliance with terms of the Decree to be entered herein; 6. That NEDELJKO IVKOVIC, be barred from sharing in the proceeds herein, and that he be disallowed from any recovery had herein, in accordance with §4-1.4 of the Estates, Powers and Trusts Law of the State of New York, it having been established that he abandoned the decedent herein, as all reasonable attempts to locate the present whereabouts of NEDELJKO IVKOVIC, having been unsuccessful. 7. That of the settlement proceeds herein, MIRA RIERA, the petitioner herein, be paid $8,263.84 in reimbursement of payment by her (in full) of the funeral bill of the Frederick Funeral Home, Inc., for the funeral services of the decedent herein; 8. That of the settlement proceeds herein, MIRA RIERA, the petitioner herein, be paid $25,000.00, as and for her compensation (statutory commissions) as Administrator of the Estate of the decedent herein (of which sum the amount of $14,285.00 is being allocated to the cause of action for the wrongful death of the decedent and the amount of $10,715.00 is being allocated to the cause of action for personal injuries sustained by the decedent during her lifetime; 9. Authorizing the payment of $419,262.12 to

LEGAL NOTICE MIRA RIERA, as surviving parent (as approved by the Court) of the decedent of which sum the amount of $244,288.33 is allocated for the wrongful death of the decedent herein and the amount of $174,973.79 is allocated to the recovery in the cause of action for personal injuries sustained by the decedent during her lifetime; 10. That upon payments as hereinabove mentioned by the said defendants or defendants’ insurance companies, MIRA RIERA, as Administrator of the Goods, Chattels and Credits which were of the Estate of IVANA IVKOVIC, deceased, be permitted to execute and deliver to the said defendants, DAVID RAFAEL RIVERA, PATRICK G. TORNEY, ALYSSA G. TORNEY, JOSEPH PORTNOV and the CITY OF NEW YORK, full, final and complete release(s) in the claims against them arising out of the aforesaid causes of action, together with any other papers necessary to effectuate said compromise; and 11. The judicial settlement of the account of MIRA RIERA, as Administrator of the Estate of IVANA IVKOVIC, deceased. Dated, Attested and Sealed, DEC 14 2011 HON. PETER J. KELLY Surrogate, Queens County Margaret M. Gribbon Chief Clerk IROM, WITTELS, FREUND, BERNE & SERRA, P.C. Attorneys for Petitioner OFFICE AND P.O. ADDRESS 349 East 149 th Street Bronx, New York 10451 (718) 6650220 This Citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not obliged to appear in person. If you fail to appear it will be assumed that you consent to the proceeding, unless you file written objections thereto. You have a right to have an attorney at law appear for you. ___________________________________ Name of LLC: Santos Bay Logistica USA LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 11/17/11. Office loc.: Queens Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name; Cesare LLC, Articles of Organization filed with New York’s Secretary of State (NYSS) on 7/23/08. Office location: c/o 147-03 5 th Ave., Whitestone, NY 11357. NYSS designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail copy of process of LLC, to: J. James Carriero, Esq., 108-54 Ditmars Blvd, North Beach NY 11369. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. ___________________________________ GNR LUCKY CHARM LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/7/ 11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

served. SSNY shall mail process to: Michele Trotti, 13823 10 th Ave., Whitestone, NY 11357. General Purposes. Latest date to dissolve 12/1/ 2050 ___________________________________ CREATING A BETTER WORLD LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/9/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 7026 Groton St., Forest Hills, NY 11375. General Purposes. ___________________________________ 144-02 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/9/11, Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 144-02 69 th Rd, Flushing, NY 11367. Purpose: General. ___________________________________

process to the LLC, 64-05 77th Street, Middle Village, New York 11379. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ VAGCO REALTY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/18/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 10-18 148th St., Whitestone, NY 11357. General Purposes. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that a license number 1259787 for Restaurant Wine-license, has been applied for by the undersigned to sell same at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at SOUP KITCHEN ASSOCIATES LIMITED dba Bistro 33 located 21-76 21 st Street, Astoria NY 11105 for on-premises consumption ___________________________________ CITATION File No. 20063313 SURROGATE’S COURT, Queens COUNTY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: To the heirs at law, next of kin, and distributees of FLORENCE T. MOSER, deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence; and to Public Administrator of Queens County, and the Attorney General of New York State.” A petition having been duly filed by Eugene Doyle who is/are domiciled at 102-12 164 th Avenue, Hamilton Beach, New York 11414 YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, New York, on February 16, 2012, at 9:30 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Florence T Moser, aka Florence Moser, Florence Horn lately domiciled at 99-40 Davenport Court, Hamilton Beach, New York 11414, United States admitting to probate a Will dated April 22, 2005 (and Codicil(s), if any, dated), a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Florence T Moser deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that: x Letters Testamentary issue to Eugene Doyle Dated, Attested and Sealed, DEC 14 2011 HON. PETER J. KELLY Surrogate /S/ MARGARET M. GRIBBON Chief Clerk Henry C. Tanck Print Name of Attorney Law Offices of Vollmer & Tanck, P.C. Firm 350 Jericho Turnpike Suite 206 Jericho, NY 11753 Address (516) 8700335 Telephone NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you.

Name of LLC: PenNink Paisley Design LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 11/23/11. Office loc.: Queens Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. __________________________________ NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT: QUEENS COUNTY. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF CIT MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-1, Pltf. vs. LINTON BRADSHAW, et al, Defts. Index #21471/10. Pursuant to judgment of foreclosure and sale entered Nov. 16, 2011, I will sell at public auction in Courtroom #25 on Feb. 3, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. at the Queens County Supreme Court, 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, NY prem. k/a 22711 113 th Ave., Queens Village, NY. Said property located on the northeasterly side of 113 th Ave., distant 80 ft. easterly from the corner formed by the intersection of the easterly side of 227 th St. and the northerly side of 113th Ave., being a plot 105 ft. x 40 ft. Approx. amt. of judgment is $493,795.02 plus costs and interest. Sold subject to terms and conditions of filed judgment an d terms of sale. WILLIAM J. FAY, Referee. COHN & ROTH, Attys. for Pltf., 100 East Old Country Rd., Mineola, NY. #80731 ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: KILBAH, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/27/11. Office location: Queens county. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of

www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 19

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: HERMES B NY LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/27/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 149-36 19 th Avenue, Whitestone, New York 11357. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of KITY HOME MAINTENANCE LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on 10/19/ 2011 office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for services of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC at 160-64 20 th Ave, Whitestone NY 11357. Purpose: Debris cleaning. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of Diomi Designs LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on Aug 17 2011. Office located in Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC 27010 Grand Central Pkwy, Floral Park, NY 11005. For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 195 ST LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/07/97. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2017. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o George Subraj, 8805 Merrick Boulevard, RM L 3, Jamaica, New York 11432. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of HCRD Enterprises LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/ 9/10. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Howard Smolen Esq., 360 Great Neck Rd., Great Neck, NY 11021. Purpose: any lawful activities. ___________________________________ 400 JAY SCUTTI BLVD LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/22/ 11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 216-16 28 th Rd., Bayside, NY 11361. General Purposes. ___________________________________ Notice of formation of Liquor World LLC, a limited liability company (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 08/05/2011. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC

LEGAL NOTICE


Year In Review:

Page 20 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Members of Willets Point United protest the redevelopment plans.

Students protest inequities between students in front of the Jamaica High School building. the kids, and that’s not good,” Mayor Mike Bloomberg said. “We’ve got to focus on what’s good for the kids.”

Willets Worries Throughout the year and through various stages of the process, the redevelopment of Willets Point has been a source of consternation for local officials. The groundbreaking ceremony held Dec. 1 was the culmination of a year of legal maneuvering and protests against the process, which was developed to improve the area’s infrastructure, including the construction of a sanitary sewer main and reconstruction of a storm sewer and outfall. Throughout the year, the civic group Willets Point United has opposed various parts of the plan, including the use of eminent domain to obtain land for ramps off the Van Wyck Expressway and, it claims, a failure by the Economic Development Cor p. to make documents available in time for public discourse.

Bypass Completion After a decade of discussion, the Dept. of Transportation finished the needed roadwork and directional changes in West Maspeth, which rerouted truck traffic that had been using Grand and Flushing Avenues, creating a traffic nightmare and dangerous conditions for pedestrians along the two busy thoroughfares. The five-way intersection connecting Maspeth Avenue, Maurice Avenue, 58th Street, 57th Place and 56th Terrace was “normalized” when work was completed in October: 58th Street between 55th Drive and the intersection is now a oneway southbound while Maurice Avenue is one-way northbound along the same length.

Postal Problems Facing a loss of revenue, the federal government announced over the summer they would consider closing 3,700 post offices across the country, including 35 in the City. Post offices in Ar ver ne, Astoria, Holliswood, Rockaway Beach

Queens residents gather to call for the resignation of U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner after he was caught in a sex scandal.

Tribune Photos by Ira Cohen

the curriculum and raise test scores. At the end of the three years, each of the schools would be re-evaluated. Not so lucky was Jamaica High School. In February, the Panel for Educational Policy decided the 119-year-old institution would be one of 12 schools in the city that would be phased out. It was the second time since 2009 the panel had decided to close the school, but this time there was no legal action taken to save the institution. Students and alumni were saddened by the decision. “I am saddened by the fact it will cease to exist,” Kenneth Suzan, a 1989 graduSchool’s Out Forever? At the end of the 2010-11 school year, ate, said. “It’s a part of my history…an six Queens high schools were an- impor tant par t of my upbringing in nounced as having the opportunity to “re- Queens.” As the 2011-12 school year started, start” under President Barack Obama’s School Improvement Grant. John Adams, students at Jamaica High School grew Richmond Hill, Grover Cleveland, August uneasy with the inequities they saw, Martin, William C. Bryant and Newtown sharing the building with students attend– all schools which have appeared on the ing other well-funded charter schools. In “Persistently Lowest Achieving” list – re- December, State Sen. Tony Avella (Dceived a reprieve from closure when the Bayside) joined students outside the Dept. of Education announced the building to protest the lack of programs schools would reopen as char ter and resources available to Jamaica High schools, run by a non-profit organization School students. “They have dreams and they have chosen by the state legislature. The decision gives the schools and their part- careers they want to go onto. And obviner organizations three years to revamp ously the mayor and the chancellor are saying, ‘we don’t care,’” Avella said. Speaking of the chancellor, Dennis Walcott, Deputy Mayor for Education and Comm unity Development and a Southeast Queens native, took over as New York City Schools Chancellor in April, replacing Cathie Black, who was appointed to the position in November 2010. Many officials were opposed to Black’s appointment, citing her lack of experience with the school system as too big a detriment to overcome. “We both agreed the Assemblyman David Weprin and Bob Turner shake hands at a debate before the special election for story had really become about her and away from former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner’s seat.

Compiled by STEVEN J. FERRARI As cities across the country took part in the Occupy movement, sparking a movement unseen for decades prior, Queens was experiencing its own feeling of unrest. Political discord and protests over political, fiscal and educational decisions were reoccurring themes during the previous 12 months. Even Mother Nature got into the act, as the borough experienced a hurricane, was shaken by an earthquake and then lived through a warm opening to winter.

2011:


and Rosedale were all considered for closure. In November, USPS announced it would close the Queens Processing and Distribution facility in College Point, relocating some jobs to a facility in Brooklyn and combining the coverage area. The consolidation was part of a nationwide plan to cut costs. The USPS said the plan would save $30.8 million. “FedEx doesn’t have the constitutional mandate to be here. UPS doesn’t have a constitutional mandate to be here. The Postal Service does have a constitutional mandate to be here,” Councilman Dan Halloran said. Outcry from local officials including U.S. Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-Bayside), State Sen. Toby Stavisky and Assemblywoman Grace Meng (D-Flushing) led to a temporary reprieve, however. Shortly after Thanksgiving, the USPS announced that no action would be taken until May, giving the federal government a sixmonth window to find a way to keep the facility open. The announcement led to cautious optimism from local officials. “Hundreds of families in Queens can breathe a sigh of relief, but only temporarily,” Stavisky said.

Political Payback? Exit one of the most progressive Democrats in Congress, enter a neophyte Republican. An embarrassing sex scandal led to the resignation of U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner, a popular Democrat who many believed was being groomed for big things in the party. After news broke that Weiner had sent lewd pictures of himself to a woman who was not his wife, Democrats and Republicans alike began calling for his resignation, and he agreed, stepping down two weeks later. Weiner’s resignation led to a special election for his seat. Weiner’s 2010 opponent, retired Republican media executive Bob Turner, took on and defeated Assemblyman David Weprin (D-Little Neck) in September. Some saw Turner’s election as a referendum on the Obama administration, with many Jewish voters in the district upset with the president after he announced his support of negotiating a

peace deal between Israel and the Palestinian Authority – a precursor for the creation of a Palestinian state. Weprin’s support of marriage equality was also an issue, upsetting many Orthodox Jewish voters in Brooklyn. Turner said his campaign was about getting frustrated voters to send that message. “It was people like us who got off their couch and said ‘I’m as mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore,’” he said.

Tribune Photos by Ira Cohen

A YEAR OF PROTEST Republican Rift Not everything went smoothly this fall for local Republicans, as the New York State Board of Elections in September received copies of two different sets of bylaws from groups calling themselves “The Republican Par ty of Queens County.” One group boasted Phil Ragusa as chair man; the other cited To m Ognibene as its head. A court decision sided with Ragusa’s group, but Queens County Republicans still found themselves split as they decided which 2012 presidential candidate to back.

Nature’s Revenge

Mayor Mike Bloomberg surveys the damage left by Hurricane Irene in Southeast Queens.

Pat Dolan (r.) walks with Borough President Helen Marshall shortly before her death in an automobile accident.

Remembering Pat

spent decades crusading for improvements to quality of life, services and needs of the people of Queens. “She was the epitome of a civic leader and the definition of a community leader,” Borough President Helen Marshall said.

In November, Queens lost one of its hardest-wor king civic leaders when Patricia Dolan was hit by a car as she crossed Hillside Avenue near 198th Street. She was pronounced dead upon arrival at Jamaica Hospital. Dolan, 72, was President of the Queens Civic Congress, President of the Kew Gardens Hills Civic Association, President of Flushing Meadows Corona Park Conservancy and co-founder of 200+ Friends of NYC Parks, which has since grown to more than 1,000 in number. A tireless fighter for the people and neighborhoods of Queens, Dolan had

After being detained for months in Egypt under charges of spying for Israel, Ilan Grapel, 27, was freed from custody with the help of U.S. Rep. Gar y Ackerman. Grapel, a Hollis Hills native, was accused of being an agent of the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad. The Emor y University Law Student and graduate of Johns Hopkins University went to Egypt on his American passport to work with a non-governmental organization on a legal aid program dealing with the resettlement of African refugees.

state of affairs right now,” Councilman Jim Gennaro (D-Fresh Meadows) said. “I had no expectation that on Tuesday afternoon at 5 o’clock I would be happy.”

Homecoming

State Sen. Toby Stavisky and Assemblywoman Grace Meng join other elected officials from around the borough on Dec. 9 to protest the proposed closure of the U.S. Postal Service’s Processing and Distribution facility in College Point.

www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 21

Just a week after the borough was slightly shaken by an earthquake, residents began to batten down the hatches in preparation of Hurricane Irene, which made its way up the Eastern seaboard at the end of August. By the time Irene hit Queens, the storm had lost some steam, but it still packed enough of a wallop to knock out hundreds of trees in the borough and knock out power for thousands. Despite the damage done by the storm, elected officials praised the City’s quick response. Just months after many criticized the Bloomberg administration for its handling of last Christmas’s snowstorm, officials applauded the Mayor’s Office of Emergency Management, Con Edison, and the Parks Dept. for the swift response to the felled trees in the borough, and customers left without electricity. “I was really worrying about the devastation that had been wrought by the storm, that we would still be in a very bad


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Page 22 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

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Leisure

Whitestone Pooch Takes Second In Challenge By JASON PAFUNDI Whitestone resident Donna Nolan and Baxter, her five-year-old Jack Russell terrier, placed 2nd in the Small Dog Agility competition at the Purina Incredible Dog Challenge. She and her dog will appear on the televised version of the event, airing 5 p.m. Jan. 14 on NBC. The competition took place at Purina Farms in St. Louis in October. Nolan and Baxter, who was four-years-old at t he time, earned a spot by finishing second in the

same event at the Eastern Regional competition held in Atlanta in April. Purina paid for Nolan’s trip to Atlanta and St. Louis and, according to Nolan, “put on an incredible event.” “They go out of their way to make all of the competitors and the spectators have a really nice weekend,” she said. “We had time for warm-ups, a luncheon, and then a ver y nice dinner w ith a comedy show and a highlights video from the previous year.”

Dine Like A Duke

REVIEW

with her Jack Russell terrier, Baxter. Nolan, who has no children and works at Belmont Raceway, said she would like to see Baxter become a “big star like Eddie from Frasier” but said that that would require almost a full-time dedication. “He has the at t itude to be t hat goo d, but it’s just a mat ter of get t ing a n opportunit y and almost giv ing up ever y t hi ng else,” she said. “But I’m not making that his life or my life’s ambition to [become a star].” Originally, Nolan’s husband called the dog Batman because of the black pattern on his face that looked like the caped crusader’s mask. Nolan said that one day the name just evolved into Baxter. Baxter and his owner competed at an indoor event last week and fared well. Nolan said she expects to continue competing throughout 2012 and would love a return trip to the Purina national finals, where she hopes Baxter finishes one spot higher than last year. Nolan said that not only does she enjoy the competition, but she really enjoys the added bonding with her dog. “It’s a lot of fun for you, fun for your dog, and you get to interact with your dog all the time,” she said. “It’s a great th ing.” Re a c h Re p o r te r J a s o n Paf u n d i a t jpafundi@queenstribune.com or (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128.

Louisville Hands Red Storm Loss At MSG In their first Big East game of the season at Madison Square Garden, the St. John’s Red Storm offense sputtered in a 73-58 loss to the Louisville Cardinals. The 10th ranked Cardinals held St. John’s to 5-35 shooting in the first half. “Ever y thing looks bet ter when you make shots,” said Red Storm coach Mike Dunlap, who is serving as head coach in Steve Lavin’s absence due to prostate cancer surger y. St. John’s scored only 18 points in the first half on 14 percent shooting, surprising for a team that put up 91 in a win two games before. St. John’s led 8-2 early, but Louisville dominated the rest of the first half. With the game tied at 10, the Cardinals went on a 194 run and led at halftime 29-18. Rick Pitino’s famous full-cour t press defense gave the Red Storm trouble. “The press does things you don’t notice,” Pitino said. “It doesn’t neces-

sarily turn you over, it doesn’t necessarily create good oppor tunit ies for you, but what it does it takes your legs out shooting the ball. We knew they had a short bench, we knew they were young, so we wanted to try and exploit that. They’re very talented young people, which is going to prove well in the future.” D’Angelo Harrison led the way for St. John’s scoring a game-high 24 points and pulling down eight rebounds while Moe Harkless added a dozen. The five other Red Storm players added 22 combined points. St. John’s trailed 69-43, its biggest deficit of the night, put t ing a mild scare into the Cardinals with an 11-0 run, before running out of steam. The Cardinals outscored St. John’s 44-40 in the second half, which was more uptempo than the 29-18 first half. St. John’s fell to 7-7 overall and 1-2 in Big East play.

www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 23

seen at many Italian eateries, but it’s the perfect meal for a summer, or autumn day, and one for a lover of sweet, fruity flavors. Somet ime s t he dish ca n be tar t, but Ducale’s recipe delivered just enough fruity essence to give the dish its signature flavor without going overboard. When biting down on a slice of chicken, be sure to top In Queens, one can say Italian eateries it with a slice or two of apple and a few are a dime a dozen, but in Whitestone, raisins for the full effect. If the Duke was going capture our taste where there is no shor tage of places to enjoy the cuisine of that boot-shaped coun- buds, he’d have to do it with something simple. And he did. tr y, there is one place that Initially, one of us was hesitant stands out. RESTAURANT about ordering a dish that reIl Ducale, which means “of quired too much effor t from the the duke” in Italian, is more chef. So he stuck with an Italian than just an eating experience; staple of mine (or at least what he it’s almost like a mini tour of believed to be an Italian staple) and Italy in itself. Inside is the orchoose the chicken parmesan with nate dining room decorated a side of spaghet t i. with floor to ceiling frescos of The side of spaghet t i was just the Italian coastline that almost as any other, so he immediately makes you feel you are eating directed his fork towards to perky on a top of a cliff in Amalfi, on a beachfront in Reggio Calabria, the wa- poultry. A generously carved cutlet lay beter splashing up against the patio, or on a neath a melting muddle of mozzarella h i l l t o p o v e r l o o k i n g t h e A d r i a t i c i n cheese mesmerizing him. Whether it was because he had not eaten Ancona, watching the ferries disappear out in a long (long) time or that this was over the horizon. But get ting lost in the ambience is only after only having a bowl of dr y cereal for the beginning. For anyone who has ever breakfast that morning, he was sold. Awaiting her first real meal since breakbeen to and eaten in Italy, Ducale’s cuisine is even more of a throwback than the fast, our allergy-prone guest’s plate arrived paintings of the red roof shorefront vil- just in time. The Chicken Francese came lages. You will feel as if you’re eating meals on a plat ter-sized dish w ith three generously sized chicken breasts. Each golden made specifically for a duke. For star ters, we dove into a mixed se- brown morsel had just the right amount of lect ion of shellfish, ricotta rolled-up in egg- crispiness. The sauce had the per fect hint of lemon and herbs, and there was plenty plant and stuffed mushrooms. Three out of four of us enjoyed the to spare. After the heaping side of lightly mixed platter. To our delight, one of our sauced pasta, there wasn’t much room for companions suffered from a shellfish al- desser t, but that didn’t stop us from splitlergy which meant there was an extra item ting one. Given the Italian-ness of the meal’s profor each. Thank God for delicious allerceedings, tiramisu felt mandator y. Wit h gens. The shrimp was the table’s favorite. As cappuccinos and espressos, which could they swiftly disappeared from the plate, we hold their own against any warm brew silently moved on to the stuffed clams while served at a café, we washed it back, reour shellfish-free friend sat waiting in env y star ting our engine s. The fluffy lady fingers making up the for the main courses to arrive. The lightly breaded baked clams melted like but ter tiramisu’s central layers remained firm, deon our taste buds, comparable to some of spite soaking up a sizable amount of coffee. the best we’ve ever tried. With just a bit of Where others often crumble under the presroom in our bellies we stuffed the rolled- sure of a fork, this tiramisu retained its shape up ricot ta eggplant s down and sat sat is- and consistency, the bitterness of the coffee mixing with a sweet cream to give a balfied while waiting for the next course. One by one, our waiter placed our anced and refreshing finale to our meal. It seems the ownership picked a deservplates before us, one chicken dish after ing name. Il Ducale truly is Whitestone’s another and fit ting to our personalities. The Pollo Normandi, chicken breast s Duke of Italian cuisine. Viva Ducale! marinated with diced apples, raisins and —Queens Tr ibune Staff cognac cream sauce, is a dish not often IL DUCALE RISTORANTE 12-53 150th St., Whitestone (718) 767-4699 CUISINE: Italian HOURS: Noon- 11 p.m., 7 days DELIV ERY: Yes CREDIT CARDS: All major

In addition to the small dog agility, there are events in freestyle flying discs, Jack Russell hurdles race, speed and catch and the extremely popular dog diving. Nolan said training a dog to compete in any of these events is similar to training a dog to do anything at home. She even compared training a dog to teaching — if a student is not having fun in the classroom, they are less likely to learn. She said that if the dog is not having fun during its training, it will not learn or reDonna Nolan member the skills it is practicing. “It’s very much like training a dog in the house or even a child at school,” she said. “You are teach ing your dog cer tain behaviors, and if they aren’t enjoying the lesson, they won’t learn it.” At the national competition, Baxter finished behind Primo, a five-year-old male Papillion from Phoenix. At the regional event in Atlanta, Baxter was second behind Zuri, a four-year-old Shetland sheepdog from Houston. Nolan, who used to do horse show jumpi ng when she was younger, has been competing in agility challenges since 2003 and has two other Jack Russell’s, a 17-year-old and also one of Baxter’s brothers. “You know how sometimes you see something and you think it’s fun and then it just fades away, well I just got totally addicted to [the agility sport],” she said. “I think it’s the greatest.” Baxter, according to Nolan, is not just an athletic, competitive dog. He does modeling and acting — he even has his own agent. He has appeared in commercials for Macy’s and Hasbro and had a par t on an episo de of the short-lived hospital drama “Mercy.” “I always tr y to train him to do new things, and recently I’ve star ted to train him to bring me the mail,” she said. “He’s ver y good and is mult i-talented.”


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today SECTION EDITOR: REGINA VOGEL

Send typed announcements for your club or organization’s events at least TWO weeks in advance to “Queens Today” Editor, Queens Tribune, 150-50 14 Road, Whitestone NY 11357. Send faxes to 357-9417, c/o Regina. IF YOUR ORGANIZATION MEETS ON A REGULAR BASIS, SEND ALL DATES FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR.

Page 24 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

MEETINGS PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturdays, January 7, 21 public speaking and effective communication 1012:15 at the Elmhurst Hospital Center Conference Room. 424-9754. ACADEMY CHARTER Monday, January 9 Central Queens Academy Charter School will hold a Board of Trustees meeting 7-9:30 at Google, 111 8 th Avenue, 4 th floor. 212-381-5460. CATHOLIC VETS Mondays, January 9, February 13, March 12 American Mart yrs Catholic War Veterans Post 1772 in Bayside. 468-9351. VFW 4787 Mondays, January 9, 23, February 13, 27 Whitestone V F W C o m m u n i t y Po s t meets. 746-0540. LIONS CLUB Tuesdays, Januar y 10, February 14, March 13 Lions Club of Ravenswood at 6:30 at Riccardo’s by the Bridge, 21-01 21 st Avenue, Astoria. MEN’S CLUB SOCCER Tuesday evenings at the Forest Hills Jewish Center 89:30. 263-7000. CHAMBER Wednesday, January 11 the Forest Hills Chamber of Commerce meets at Garcia’s at 9 for breakfast. UNITED 40S Thursdays, January 12, February 9, March 8 United Forties Civic Association, Inc. meets at 7 at St. Teresa P a r i s h C e n t e r , 5 0 - 2 2 4 5th Street, Woodside. JEFFERSON DEMS Thursdays, January 12, February 9, March 8 Jefferson Democratic Club meets 7:30 at the Clearview Golf Course Clubhouse. ILION BLOCK Fridays, January 13, February 10, March 9 Ilion Area Block Association meets t the African Center for Community Empowerment, 111-92A Farmers Blvd., St. Albans at 7:30. CAMBRIA HTS LIBRARY Saturday, January 14 Friends Board of Directors of Queens Library at Cambria Heights meet 4-5:15. P-FLAG Sundays, January 15, February 19, March 18 P-FLAG, a support group for parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays, meet in Forest Hills. 271-6663.

ENTERTAINMENT MOVING IMAGE Through March 4 Jim Henson Screenings and Programs. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35 th Avenue, Astoria. 777-6800. $15. ACROBATS Through December 31 Golden Dragon Acrobats at Queens Theatre in the Park. 760-0064. PIANO & ORCHESTERA Saturday, January 7 Tchaikovsky and Liszt: Two Romantic Masterpieces for Piano and Orchestra featuring concert pianist Dr. Albert Zak and more at the Flushing library at 2. XMAS MUSIC Sunday, January 8 music for the Christmas Season at 11 at St. Josaphat’s Church, 2 1 0 th S t r e e t a n d 3 5 th A v enue, Bayside. Free. Angelus Choir and guest soloists. SUNDAY CONCERT Sunday, January 8 Alva Anderson Quartet performs jazz at 3 at the Central library. OPEN MIC POETRY Mondays, January 9, February 13, March 12 Barnes & Noble, 176-60 Union Turnpike, Fresh Meadows at 7:30. FILM SCREENING Monday, January 9 screening of “Karen Cries on the Bus” with English subtitles at the Fresh Meadows library at 2. JUDEO-SPANISH Monday, January 9

TALKS LOST SYNAGOGUES Sunday, January 8 join the Queens Historical Societ y for “The Lost Synagogues of the Bronx and Queens” with Ellen Levitt 2:30 at Kingsland Homestead in Flushing. $8 non-members, $5 members. 939-0647, ext. 14. WINDSOR PARK Monday, January 9 “Dreams of Joy” discussed at 2 at the Windsor Park library. SEASIDE Monday, January 9 “Lush Life” discussed at 6:30 at the Seaside librar y. HILLCREST Tuesday, Januar y 10 “Loving Frank” discussed at 2 at the Hillcrest library. SOCIAL MEDIA Wednesday, January 11 Social Media for Businesses at the Central library. 9905102 to register. GLENDALE Thursday, January 12 “The Forgotten Garden” discussed at 6:30 at the Glendale library. WINDSOR PARK Thursday, January 12 “Things Fall Apart” discussed at 6:30 at the Windsor Park library. AMERICAN DOCUMENTS Saturdays, January 14, February 11, March 10 What do you know about our important American documents 1pm at the Greater Astoria Historical Societ y, 35-20 Broadway, 4 th floor, LIC. $5.

Alhambra: Judeo-Spanish music with songs in Ladino and Yiddish at 6:30 at the Flushing library. BINGO Tuesdays at 7:15 at American Mart yrs Church, church basement, 216-01 Union Tu r n p i k e , B a y s i d e . 4 6 4 4 5 8 2 . Tu e s d ay s at 7:15 (doors open 6) at the Rego Park Jewish Center, 97-30 Queens Blvd. 459-1000.$3 admission includes 12 games. SCRABBLE Tuesdays at the Fresh Meadows library at 1 and at the East Flushing library at 3:30. CHESS Tu e s d ay s a t 4 : 3 0 a t t h e Rosedale library and at 4 at the LIC library. RHY THM & BLUES Thursday, January 12 Etta to Smokey at the North Forest Park library at 6:30. WARRIORS MOVIE Thursday, January 12 screening of the Warriors of Qiugang with English subtitles at 6:30 at the Woodside library. GUATEMALA Friday, January 13 international tour of the Municipal School and Dance Company of Guatemala at the Corona library at 4. CON BRIO ENSEMBLE Saturday, January 14 Con Brio Ensemble performs virtuoso masterpieces for violin, oboe and piano at 2 at the Flushing library. KING TRIBUTE Saturday, January 14 tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. starting at 11:30 at the Central library. STEAM OF LIFE Saturday, January 14 “Steam of Life” film at the Steinway library at 1. WORLD OF MUSIC Saturday, January 14 at the Ridgewood library at 2. OPEN MIC Sunday, January 15 Open Mic for Poets at the Central library at 2.

PARENTS WONDERSTRUCK Thursday, January 12 art programming for families with children affected by Autism at 5 at the Peninsula library. 634-1110 to register. S TORY T I M E Thursday, January 19 family story time at 4 at the Auburndale library.

RELIGIOUS LOST SYNAGOGUES Sunday, January 8 join the Queens Historical Societ y for “The Lost Synagogues of the Bronx and Queens” with Ellen Levitt 2:30 at Kingsland Homestead in Flushing. $8 non-members, $5 members. 939-0647, ext. 14. MEN’S CLUB Saturday, January 14 Men’s Club Shabbat at the Forest Hills Jewish Center. 2637000.


EDUCATION/GAMES/CRAFTS make your resume stand out when using Microsoft Word at the central library. 9905102 to register. BECOME A CITIZEN Thursdays, January 12, 19, 26 at the Rego Park library at 5:30. MAH JONGG Thursdays, January 12, 19, 26 learn American Mah Jongg at 6 at the North Forest Park library. COMPUTER BASICS Thursday, January 12 at the Glen Oaks library. Register. INTERMEDIATE COMP. Thursday, January 12 brushup class at the LIC library at 10. FED. JOB RESUME Thursday, January 12 Crafting Your Best Federal Job Resume at 4 at the Central library. SOCIAL MEDIA Thursday, January 12 Social Media for Bookworms – learn how to use social media websites to write re-

views and more at the LIC library at 6.. GENEALOGY Thursday, January 12 genealogy for beginners at the Steinway library at 6. BASIC COMPUTER Fridays, January 13, 20 at the Auburndale library. Register. CHESS & CHECKERS Fridays, January 13, 20 at the Astoria library at 3:30. INTRO EMAIL Friday, January 13 at the Poppenhusen library at 10. INTRO MICROSOFT Friday, January 13 at the Central library. 990-5102 to register. BOOT CAMP Fridays through January 27 Computer Boot Camp at the LIC library at 2. SMARTPHONES Saturday, January 14 i n formative session on e-readers, smart phones and other devices at 2 at the LIC librar y.

HEALTH YOGA CLASSES Saturdays 10-11 and Sundays 9:30-10:30 workshops on Yoga. Other classes include meditation, Ayurvedic, yoga philosophy, Sanskirt language. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Jackson Heights. 646-912-1885. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS 7 days a week. 962-6244. BLOOD DRIVE Sunday, January 8 9-1:30 at Temple Tikvah, 3315 Hillside Avenue, New Hyde Park. 516-746-1120. MARIJUANA ANONYMOUS Sundays 7-8:30 at Zion Episcopal Church, 143-01 Northern Blvd., entrance on 44 th Avenue, room 5, Little Neck. WAITANKUNG Sundays at 2. Waitankung is a great total-body workout. Join these ancient Chinese exercise classes in the Flushing Hospital/Medical Center auditorium on 45 th Avenue between Parsons and Burling. Free. Jimmy 7-10pm 347-2156 information. TAI CHI Mondays and Thursdays at 11 at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1695. NICOTINE ANONYMOUS Mondays 6:45-8:00 at the Center for Tobacco Control, 2 2 5 C o m m u n i t y D r i ve , Great Neck. 516-510-7826. RECOVERY INT’L Mondays at 5:45 and Thursdays at 3:30 Recovery Int’l is a support group for anxiet y, fear, depression at the Forest Hills library. 241-2220. TAI CHI Mondays and Thursdays at 11 at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1695. $5 a class. ALZHEIMERS Tuesdays, Januar y 10, 24, February 14, 28 Caregiver Support Group in Forest Hills. 592-5757, ext. 237. GAM-ANON Tuesdays Free Synagogue of Flushing and Zion Episcopal Church. Wednesdays All

Saints Episcopal Church in Bayside, First Presbyterian Church in Forest Hills, Church on the Hill in Flushing and United Methodist Church in Middle Village. Thursdays Free Synagogue of Flushing and Zion Episcopal Church. Call 1-877-6642469. CAREGIVERS SUPPORT E ve r y Tu e s d a y We ste r n Queens Caregiver Network in Sunnyside. 5:30-6:30. 784-6173, ext. 431. CAREGIVERS SUPPORT Every Tuesday 3:30-4:30 at the Selfhelp Clearview Senior Center, 208-11 26 th Avenue, Bayside. 631-1886. WELL SPOUSES Wednesdays, January 11, February 8 Well Spouses or Partners of the Chronically Ill and Disabled meet at St. Charles Rehab Center, 201 IU Willets Road, Albertson at 7. Free. Donation. 516-8298740. ZUMBA Wednesdays the Sisterhood of Bay Terrace Jewish Cent e r , 1 3 - 0 0 2 0 9 th S t r e e t , Bayside, will hold Zumba Fitness classes from 7:30-8:30. $8 members, $10 others. 428-6363. OA Fridays 6:30-8:30 at Unit y Center of Flushing, 42-11 1 5 5 th S t r e e t . S a t u r d a y s 10:30-noon at Resurrection Ascension, Feely Hall, 851 8 6 1 st R o a d , R e g o P a r k . Beginners meeting except the last Friday of each month, which is a writing meeting. CO-DEPENDENTS ANON. Fridays 10-11:45 at Resurrection Ascension Pastoral C e n t e r , 8 5 - 1 8 6 1 st R o a d , Rego Park. Women only. FITNESS PARTY Saturday, January 14 fitness part y 7:30-9:30 at the Central Queens YM-YWHA. Workouts, strategies and tips. $5 advance, $8 at the door. Reservations 2685011.

www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 25

HENNA PAINTING Saturday, January 7 henna hand painting workshop at the Broadway librar y. First come, first served at 2. LINKEDIN Saturday, January 7 learn how to use the website LinkedIn to look for employment, network and keep up with colleagues.LIC library at 2. Bring electronic copy of resume. PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturdays, January 7, 21, February 4, 18 learn to communicate effectively at Elmhurst Hospital. 646-4367940. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Saturday, January 7 at St. Mel’s in Flushing. $45. 631360-9720. SEWING CLASSES Saturdays 11-3 at Maria Rose International Doll Museum in St. Albans. 2763454. START OWN BUSINESS Monday, January 9 Starting Your Own Business at 6 at the Flushing library. INTRO COMPUTER Monday, January 9 Introduction to Computers at the Central library. Register 9905102. CRAFT CLUB Monday, January 9 learn crafts at 1 at the LIC library. RESUME WORKSHOP Monday, January 9 at the Arverne library at 5:15. BEGIN CROCHET Monday, January 9 at the Arverne library at 6. WRITING RESUMES Monday, January 9 at the Central library. Register 9905102. INTRO COMPUTERS Tuesday, Januar y 10 at the McGoldrick library. Register. INTRO EMAIL Tuesday, Januar y 10 at the Queens Village library. Register. BASIC COMPUTER Tuesday, Januar y 10 at the LIC library at 11. KINDLE TUTORIAL Tuesday, Januar y 10 at the Mitchell-Linden library. Register. INTRO COMPUTERS Tuesday, Januar y 10 at the Maspeth library at 1. RESUME WORKSHOP Tuesday, Januar y 10 at 1:30 at the LIC library. LEARNING LAB Wednesday, January 11 brief orientation about Learning Express Library, NY Wired and other online learning opportunities at the LIC at 1:30. DO THE HUSTLE Wednesdays, January 11, 18, 25 dance class to learn the American Hustle at 6:30 at the Flushing library. RESUME WRITING Wednesday, January 11 at 4 at the Arverne library. CREATE EMAIL ACCT. Wednesday, January 11 learn to create an email account at the Central library. Register. INTRO COMPUTERS Wednesday, January 11 at 10:30 at the Windsor Park library. Limited space. MICROSOFT RESUMES Wednesday, January 11

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT Page 26 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Today

Queens Today YOUTH

TEENS HENNA PAINTING Saturday, January 7 henna hand painting workshop at the Broadway library at 2. First come, first served. CHESS CLUB Every Saturday at the Flushing library at 2. LAPTOP USE Weekdays at 3 at the Laurelton library. HOMEWORK HELP Weekdays at the LIC library at 3. CALLIGRAPHY Monday, January 9 learn calligraphy at the Windsor Park library at 4. Space limited. TEEN STUDY Mondays through Thursdays at the Lefrak Cit y library at 4. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at the Douglaston/ Little Neck library at 4. TEEN CHESS Mondays at 6 at the Bayside library. BOOK BUDDIES Tuesdays, Januar y 10, 17 at the Hillcrest library at 3:30. BINGO Tuesday, January 10 teen bingo at the Flushing library at 4. HOMEWORK & GAMES Tuesday s, Wednesday s and Thursdays homework help and teen gaming at the Fresh Meadows library at 4. LIC CHESS CLUB Tuesdays at the LIC library at 4. BOOK BUDDIES Tuesdays at the Windsor Park library at 4. CROCHET & KNIT Wednesdays, January 11, 18 at the Far Rockaway library at 2:30. LANYARD MANIA Wednesday, January 11 at the Briarwood library. Register. ZUMBA FOR TEENS Wednesday, January 11 at the St. Albans library. Register. RESUME WRITING Wednesday resume writing for young adults at 4 at the Arverne librar y. GAME DAY Wednesdays at the Howard Beach library at 4. GAME DAY Wednesdays at the St. Albans library at 4. CHESS Wednesdays at 3:30 at the Queens Village library. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesdays at the South Ozone Park library at 1. KNITTING CLUB Wednesdays at the Bayside library. Register. ANIME CLUB Thursdays, January 12, 19 Flushing Anime Club at 4 at the Flushing library. DRAMA Thursday, January 12 Action Racket Theater teaches the basics of theater arts at the Auburndale library at 4. FIRST CHOICE COLLEGE Thursday, January 12 Getting Into Your First Choice School at the Broadway library at 3:30. DRAMA POSSE

Thursdays, January 12, 19 at the Hillcrest library at 3:30. KARAOKE NIGHT Thursday, January 12 for teens at the Arverne library at 5:30. TEEN THURSDAYS Thursdays at the Bay Terrace library at 3. CHESS CLUB Thursdays 4-5:30 at the Douglaston/Little Neck library. CHESS CLUB Thursdays at the East Flushing library at 5. CHESS & CHECKERS Fridays, January 13, 20 chess and checkers club at 3:30 at the Astoria library. HAPPY HOUR Fridays, January 13, 20 Te e n H a p py H o u r a t t h e Flushing library at 4. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays crafts at the Briarwood library at 4. YOUNG REFORMERS Fridays, January 13, 20, 27 Young Reformers Group at the Laurelton library. Register. PRACTICE SAT Friday, January 13 at the Astoria library at 3. GREEN COMIC BOOK Fridays, January 13, 20 make a green comic at the Woodside library at 3:30. BOOK BUDDIES

Fridays, January 13, 20 at the Fresh Meadows library at 4. CROCHET CLUB Friday, January 13 at the McGoldrick library at 4. TEEN ASTROLOGY Friday, January 13 — at the Seaside library at 4. CHESS CLUB Fridays at the Auburndale library at 3:30. CHESS TUTORIAL Fridays at the Woodside library at 4. GAME DAY Fridays at the Woodhaven library at 4:30. GAME PLAYERS CLUB Every Friday at 4 at the Hillcrest library. TEEN FRIDAYS Fridays at the Seaside library at 4. BOY SCOUT TROOP 1 Every Friday Men 12-17 who are interested in fun, friendship and adventure are invited to join Boy S c o u t Tr o o p 1 F l u s h i n g / Bayside 8-10 at Redeemer Lutheran Church, 36-01 Bell Blvd. M.L. KING TRIBUTE Saturday, January 14 tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King starting at 11:30 at the Central library. OPEN MIC Sunday, January 15 at the Central library at 2.

SENIORS STAY WELL Mondays at the Central library at 10. Learn how special exercise and relaxation techniques make a difference in your life. AARP 4158 Tuesdays, Januar y 10, February 14, March 13 North Flushing chapter 4158 meets at noon at the Church on the H i l l , 1 6 7 - 0 7 3 5 th A v e n u e , Flushing. New members and visitors welcome. CAREGIVERS Ever y Tuesday Caregivers Support group at 3:30-4:30 at the Selfhelp Clearview Senior Center, 208-11 26 th Avenue, Bayside. 631-1886. CHAIR EXERCISE Tuesdays low impact chair exercise at 11 at the Flushing-Fresh Meadows Jewish Center. $5. 357-5100. STARS Wednesdays, January 11, 18 Senior Theater Acting Repertory meets at 10:30 at the Hollis library. KEW GARDENS Wednesdays, January 11, 25 Line Dancing Class at noon. Wednesday, January 18 special dance class at 11, ballroom dance at noon. Monday, January 23 Men Only workshop at 10. Mondays Falun Gong (to purif y mind and body) at noon, comedy writing 2:30-3:30. Wednesdays Spanish conversation at 10 and Building muscle and strength at 11. Kew G a r d e n s C o m m u n i t y Center, 80-02 Kew Gardens Road, suite 202. COMPUTER BASICS Wednesdays, January 11,

18 computer basics for older adults at the Central library. 990-0769. HOWARD BEACH Wednesdays mah jongg at 10 and Zumba Gold 1:302 : 3 0 . 1 5 6 - 4 5 8 4 th S t r e e t . 738-8100. STAY WELL Wednesdays at 10:15 at the East Elmhurst library for exercise and other health related programs. WOMANSPACE Wednesdays Womanspace, a discussion group devoted to issues concerning women, meets 1-3 at the Great Neck Senior Center, 80 Grace Avenue. New members welcome. AARP 29 Thursdays, January 12, February 9, March 8 AARP 29 meets at noon at Grace House, 155-02 90 th Avenue, Jamaica. DEFENSIVE DRIVING Thursday, January 19 AARP Driver Safet y Program at the Auburndale library. 641-3911 to register. STARS Fridays, January 13, 20, 27 Senior Theater Acting Repertory meets at 10:30 at the Queens Village library.

THEATER KILLING KOMPANY Friday, February 3 “Murder by Marriage” at Riccardo’s in Astoria. The Killing Company performs mystery dinner shows. 1-888-SHOOTEM for information.

APEC PROGRAMS January, February and March Alley Pond Environmental Center will hold Toddler time Nature Programs, Sunny Bunnies and Fledglings (for those 3-4). 2294000. FAMILY STORY TIME Saturday, January 7 at the Flushing library at 11. SCIENCE LAB Saturdays at the Central library at 11. MATH HELP Saturdays at the Flushing library at 10. BOOST HOMEWORK HELP Weekdays at 3 at the Cambria Heights library. HOMEWORK HELP Saturdays 10-noon teen tutors available at the Bayside library. CHESS CLUB Every Saturday at the Flushing library at 2. S TORY TIMES Saturdays at 11 and Tuesdays at 10:30 weekly story times at Barnes & Noble, 1766 0 Un i o n Tu r n p i ke , F re s h Meadows. CHINESE FUN Monday, January 9 at 4 at the Queens Village library. Traditional Chinese fun with dancing, storytelling, face painting and more. CRAFT KIDS Monday, January 9 at the Flushing library at 3. MEDITATION Monday, January 9 at the Bayside library. Register. ANIMALS Monday, January 9 at the East Flushing library at 4. LITTLE TOT TIME Monday, January 9 at the Hillcrest library at 4. LEGOS Monday, January 9 at the Ridgewood library at 4 and at the LIC library at 6:15. BOOST MATH Monday, January 9 at the Central library at 4:30 and McGoldrick library at 5. ORIGAMI Monday, January 9 Origami for a Snowy Day at the Hollis library. Register. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at 4 at the Douglaston/Little Neck lib ra r y. B r i n g n e e d l e s a n d yarn. HOMEWORK HELP Mondays 3:30-5:00 teen tutors available at the Bayside library. ARTS & CRAFTS Tuesday, Januar y 10 at the Auburndale library at 4. BOOK BUDDIES Tuesdays, Januar y 10, 17 at the Hillcrest library at 3:30. SPONGE PAINTING Tu e s d a y, January 10 sponge painting at the Briarwood librar y. Register. ANIMALS Tuesday, Januar y 10 One World, Many Animals at the McGoldrick library at 4. Interactive live animal program. Wednesday, January 11 at the LIC library at 4. BOOK BUDDIES Tu e s d ay s , J a n u a r y 1 0 , 1 7 Windsor Park library at 4. DR. KING Tu e s d a y, Januar y 10, Wednesday, January 10 and

Thursday, January 11 BOOST program about the Letters to Dr. King at 4:30 at the Central library. BOOST WORD Tu e s d ay s , J a n u a r y 1 0 , 1 7 BOOST Word of the Week at the McGoldrick library at 5. CHESS CLUB Tuesdays LIC library at 4 and the Rosedale library at 4:30. STORY TIME Wednesday, January 11 East Elmhurst Story time at 11:30. GO GREEN Wednesday, January 11 at the Sunnyside librar y. Friday, January 13 at the Steinway library and Wo o d s i d e l i b ra r y. P re schoolers go green with a musical story time. Register. STORY HOUR Wednesdays, January 11, 18 story hour at 10:30 at the Baisley Park library. FAMILY COLORING Wednesdays, January 11, 18 family coloring and story time at 10:30 at the Bay Terrace library. HAPPY HAPPY STORY Wednesdays, January 11, 18 story time LIC library at 10:30. PLAY-DOH PART Y Wednesday, January 11 Fresh Meadows library at 3:30. WORLD STORIES Wednesday, January 11 Stories From Around the World at the Auburndale library at 4. LIBRARY BUDDIES Wednesdays, January 11, 18 Auburndale library at 4. LANYARD MANIA Wednesday, January 11 at the Briarwood library. Register. PAPER ICE SKATE Wednesday, January 11 decorate and stuff a paper ice skate at the East Flushing library. Register. CRAFT Wednesday, January 11 craft at 4 at the Windsor Park library. CALENDAR Wednesday, January 11 make your own calendar at the Pomonok library at 4. BOOST HEALTH Wednesdays, January 11, 18 BOOST health and science at 5 at the McGoldrick library. CHESS Wednesdays at the Queens Village library at 3:30. KNITTING Every Wednesdays at the Bayside library at 4. KNIT & CROCHET Wednesdays at the South Ozone Park library at 1. TOPS TRUMP CARD Every Wednesday tournament at the LIC library at 4. GAME DAY Wednesdays at the Poppenhusen library at 4. CAMPFIRE SONGS Thursday, January 12 make logs and imaginary campfire at the Poppenhusen library at 4. WINTER CRAFT Thursday, January 12 at 4 at the Seaside library. BOOST READING Thursdays, January 12, 19

BOOST Reading Buddies at 5 at the McGoldrick library. CRAFT TIME Every Thursday at 3:30 at the Ozone Park library. BOY SCOUTS Thursdays Boy Scout Troop 138 meets at 7:30 in the basement at 192-15C 64 th Circle, Fresh Meadows. For those 11 and older. 4542391. COLOR & CRAFT Fridays, January 13, 20 Kids Coloring and Craft at 11 at the Queensboro Hill library. CHESS & CHECKERS Fridays, January 13, 20 at the Astoria library at 3:30. ACTIVITY TIME Fridays, January 13, 20 at the Briarwood library at 3:30. LIBRARY BUDDIES Fridays, January 13, 20 at the Auburndale library at 4. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays, January 13, 20 at the East Flushing library. Register. BOOK BUDDIES Fridays, January 13, 20 at the Fresh Meadows library at 4. CROCHET CLUB Friday, January 13 at the McGoldrick library at 4. GIRL SCOUTS Fridays, January 13, 20 at the Central library at 4:30. BOOST GAME Friday, January 13 at the McGoldrick library at 5. TODDLER CRAFT Fridays at the Briarwood library at 10:30. READ TO ME Fridays at the Briarwood library at 3. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays at 2 at the Queens Village library. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays LIC library at 2. GAME DAY Fridays at the Queens Village library at 2. FLASH FRIDAYS Every Friday at 3 at the Ozone Park library. GAME PLAYERS Every Friday at the Hillcrest library at 4. CHESS CLUB Fridays at the Auburndale library at 3:30. GAME DAY Fridays at the Rochdale Village library at 4. GAME TIME Fridays Windsor Park library at 4. CHESS TUTORIAL Fridays at 4 Woodside library. ARTS & CRAFTS Fridays at 4 at the Briarwood library. TWEEN ZONE Fridays at the LIC library at 2:30 for those in grades 5-8. BOOST GAME DAY Fridays at the Central library at 4:30 and at 5 at the McGoldrick library. DR. KING Saturday, January 14 tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. starting at 11:30 at the Central library. S TORY T I M E Saturday, January 14 Picture Book Storytime for 5-8 year olds at 1:30 at the Broadway library.


LEGAL NOTICE

this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. If the United States of America is named as a Defendant in this action, it only, shall have Sixty (60) days to answer the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure $245,000.00 and interest, recorded in the office of the Clerk of the County of Queens on August 7, 2006, in CRFN: 2006000444976, covering premises known as 106-08 27 th Avenue, in Flushing, New York (Block 1665, and Lot 4). The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. The Plaintiff also seeks a deficiency judgment against the Defendant(s) Konstantinos Evirpiotis for any debt secured by said Mortgage which is not satisfied by the proceeds of the sale of said premises. TO the defendant, Konstantinos Evirpiotis, the foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. James A. Rios of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, and filed on December 14, 2011, with the complaint in the County of Queens, State of New York. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: Mineola, NewYork December 23, 2011 William M. Roth Cohn & Roth By: William M. Roth Attorneys for Plaintiff 100 E. Old Country Road Mineola New York 11501 (516) 747-3030 Help for Homeowners in Foreclosure New York State Law requires that we send you this notice about the foreclosure process. Please read it carefully. Mortgage foreclosure is a complex process. Some people may approach you

LEGAL NOTICE about “saving” your home. You should be extremely careful about any such promises. The State encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. There are government agencies, legal aid entities and other non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about foreclosure while you are working with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 877-BANKNYS (877-226-5697) or visit the Department’s website at www.banking.state.ny.us. The State does not guarantee the advise of these agencies. ___________________________________ SUMMONS SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, COUNTY OF QUEENS, Index No. 27820/ 2011, date Purchased 12/12/ 11, GRAYBAR ELECTRIC COMPANY, INC, Plaintiff, vs. 2115 BRIDGE PLAZA NORTH ASSOCIATES, a New York Partnership, Defendant. To the above-named Defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to serve upon Plaintiff’s attorney an answer to the complaint in this action within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York. In case of your failure to answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The basis of the venue designated is the location of subject property, which is in Queens County. Dated: New York, New York, December 9, 2011, by Jeffrey Schreiber, Esq., Meister Seelig & Fein LLP, 2 Grand Central Tower, 140 East 45 th Street, 19 th Floor, New York, New York 10017, (212) 655-3500, attorneys for plaintiff. Notice To Defendant 2115 Bridge Plaza North Associates, a New York Partnership: the foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon. Allan B. Weiss of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 14 th day of December, 2011 and filed with the complaint in the offices of Queens County Clerk. This is an adverse possession action brought pursuant to Article 15 of the New York Real Property Actions and Proceedings Law (“RPAPL”) through which Plaintiff, which, since 1951, has used in its business, and been in continuous and uninterrupted, open and notorious, adverse and exclusive possession of a certain parcel of real property located in the Borough of Queens (as described in more detail below), and has paid the real estate taxes for the parcel, seeks a judicial determination that it is the record owner of that parcel. Alternatively, Plaintiff seeks, under Article 15 of the RPAPL, to quiet title

LEGAL NOTICE of the ownership of the property in question arising from the existence of inconsistent property descriptions in the last two deeds in the chain of title. The property subject to this action is a certain parcel of land located in the County of Queens, City and State of New York and designated on the tax map of the City of New York as Block 411, Lot 56, being a triangular-shaped parcel of property of approximately 22.54 feet, by 13.98 feet, by 19.01 feet, or less than200 square feet. ___________________________________ WHITESTONE GROCERY SHOPPING CENTER, LLC, a foreign LLC, filed with the SSNY on 12/7/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o BlumbergExcelsior Corporate Services, Inc., 62 White St., NY, NY 10013. General Purposes. ___________________________________ NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF QUEENS, MID-ISLAND MORTGAGE CORP., Plaintiff, vs. REGINALD FENTON, ET AL., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly filed on December 07, 2011, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Queens County General Courthouse, Courtroom 25, 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY on January 27, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., premises known as 166-03 Nadal Place, Jamaica, NY. All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York, Block 10194 and Lot 31. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 24930/ 2010. Nora Constance Marino, Esq., Referee We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Stagg, Terenzi, Confusione & Wabnik, LLP, 401 Franklin Avenue Suite 300, Garden City, NY 11530, Attorneys for Plaintiff ___________________________________ CGI INTERNATIONAL LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/26/ 11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13 th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. General Purposes. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 11/21/11, bearing Index Number NC-001115-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Ankush (Middle) Kumar (Last)

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Vermani My present name is (First) Ankush (Last) Kumar fka Ankshu Radha Kumar My present address is 61-15 98 Street Apt 12K, Rego Park, NY 11374 My place of birth is Queens, NY My date of birth is August 04, 1991 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 12/15/11, bearing Index Number NC-001185-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Jennifer (Middle) Julia (Last) Maskell My present name is (First) Jeffrey (Middle) Lewis (Last) Maskell aka Jeff L Maskell My present address is 6308 Booth St, Rego Park, NY 11374 My place of birth is Middletown, NY My date of birth is February 08, 1963 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 12/22/11, bearing Index Number NC-001203-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Rex (Last) Grasso My present name is (First) Robert (Middle) William (Last) Grasso aka Robert W. Grasso, aka Robert Grasso My present address is 34-38 41 st Street, Apt. #2A, Long Island City, NY 11101 My place of birth is Glen Ridge, NJ My date of birth is November 30, 1966 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 12/8/11, bearing Index Number NC-001144-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Michael (Last) Doobraj My present name is (First) Chandrika (Middle) Michael Anthony (Last) Doobraj My present address is 87-72 146 Street, Jamaica, NY 11435 My place of birth is Guyana My date of birth is November 22, 1985 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 12/19/11, bearing Index Number NC-001189-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Anthony (Last) Izzo My present name is (First) Anthony (Last) Sharifi (Seniority) Jr. aka Anthony Sharifi My present address is 150-48 15 th Drive, Whitestone, NY 11357 My place of birth is Manhattan, NY My date of birth is January 21, 1982 ___________________________________ Notice of Formation of Lamuz Enterprises, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY SSNY on 10/5/2011. Office location: Queens County.

Princ. Office of LLC: 7014 13th Ave., Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Lamuz Enterprises, LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice of Formation: MD GOLDEN REALTY, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/ 2011. Office Loc.: QUEENS COUNTY. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 39-07 PRINCE STREET, STE. 4C, FLUSHING, NY 11354 Purpose: Any lawful activity. ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 12/22/11, bearing Index Number NC-001178-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Venkat (Middle) Ram (Last) Bommasa My present name is (First) Venkat (Middle) Ram (Last) Bommasamudram aka Venkat R. Bommasamudram My present address is 81-31 261st Street, Floral Park, NY 11004 My place of birth is Queens, NY My date of birth is March 15, 1993 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 12/22/11, bearing Index Number NC-001204-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Diego (Middle) Armando (Last) Apolo My present name is (First) Diego (Middle) Armando (Last) Apolo Cajamarca aka Diego A. Apolo My present address is 42-39 79 th Street, Elmhurst, NY 11373 My place of birth is Ecuador My date of birth is February 18, 1990 ___________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 12/12/11, bearing Index Number NC-001157-11/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) Carla (Last) Fernandez My present name is (First) Carlita (Last) Fernandez My present address is 89-14 113 Street, Richmond Hill, NY 11418 My place of birth is Dominican Republic My date of birth is October 14, 1955

To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tribune at (718) 357-7400 Ext. 149 or E-Mail Your Copy to the Tribune at: legals@queenstribune.com

www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 27

STEWART ENGINEERING SERVICES, PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/17/11. Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 12-11 Frisco Ave., Far Rockaway, NY 11691. Purpose: Engineering ___________________________________ ESLR Translations LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/ 11. Office in Queens County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 31-84 Crescent St, Astoria, NY 11106. Purpose: General. ___________________________________ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS Index No. 20595/11 Date of filing: September 1, 2011 SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE Plaintiff designates Queens County as the place of trial; venue is based upon the county in which the mortgaged premises is situate. TD BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO COMMERCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff(s), -againstK O N S T A N T I N O S EVIRPIOTIS, if living, and if dead, the respective heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignors, lienors, creditors and successors in interest, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said defendant who maybe deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and their respective husbands, wives or widows of her, if any, and each and every person not specifically named who may be entitled to or claim to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the verified complaint; all of whom and whose names and places of residence unknown, and cannot after diligent inquiry be ascertained by the Plaintiff, NEW YORK CITY PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU, CITY OF NEW YORK ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD, and “JOHN DOE #1” through “JOHN DOE #10”, the last 10 names being fictitious and unknown to the Plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the persons or parties, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the mortgaged premises described in the verified complaint, Defendant(s). TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the attorneys for the Plaintiff within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after service is complete if

LEGAL NOTICE


Queens Focus PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . . PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE ...PEOPLE . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE.. PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE . . .PEOPLE...

The Women’s Power Networking Breakfast met at Queens Borough Hall. It was all about money at the eighth Women’s Power Networking Breakfast at Queens Borough Hall in Kew Gardens on Dec. 8. Sponsored by Flushing Savings Bank, the non-food segment began with Doneath Powell and Karlene Deidrick sharing information on their employer’s free banking and financing opportunities. Then, Linda Henley, a management consultant with experience in real estate deals, corporate financing and fundraising, shared tips on how to get the best bang for a buck. Frank Dito from the Small Business Administration explained his federal agency’s loan programs to the group, which consisted of about 20 entrepreneurs in such industries as child care, music and fashion. Part of an ongoing series, the networking breakfast was organized by Darinka Maldonado from the Queens Women’s Business Center, a division of the Queens Economic Development Corporation. For information on next year’s breakfasts, go to www.queensny.org.

Page 28 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

Westminster School in Simsbury, Conn., recently announced that Alemante Tedla of Flushing and Angelo Hunt of Rosedale received academic honors for the fall 2011 term. The Francis Lewis Patriot Battalion Choir recently had their voices heard by the elderly residents of Donnelly’s Adult Home. Every Christmas the Battalion Choir goes off to spread holiday cheer at Donnelly’s Adult Home. The battalion choir began with patriotic songs like the "Star Spangled Banner" and

the "Army Song." Afterwards, they sing current popular songs followed by festive holiday songs like "Carol of the Bells" and "Silent Night." After finishing their song list, the choir takes the time to get to know the residents at the home. Major General Patrick A. Murphy, the Adjutant General, recently announced the reenlistment of members of the New York Army National Guard in recognition of their continuing commitment to serve community, state and nation as part of the Army National Guard. Master Sergeant Jessica Huff of College Point has reenlisted to continue service with the Company A, Recruiting & Retention. Specialist Maria Trinidad of Ozone Park has reenlisted to continue service with the Company C, 642d Support Battalion. Specialist Joel Reyes of South Ozone Park has reenlisted to continue service with the Company A, 642d Support Battalion. Specialist Michael Brown of Jamaica has reenlisted to continue service with the Company G, Forward Support Company Field Artillery, 427th Brigade Support Battalion. Private 1st Class Christopher Cruz of Rockaway Park has reenlisted to continue service with the 719 Transportation Company. Army Reserve Chief Warrant Officer 2 Denrick Mills has been decorated with the Army Achievement Medal. The medal is awarded to members of the US Armed Forces who, while serving in any capacity

The Francis Lewis Patriot Battalion Choir sing at Donnelly’s Adult Home.

Jewish Veterans Meet:

U.S. Rep. Bob Turner speaks to Jewish veterans at the monthly meeting of the Kew Forest-Woodside-Irwin Loitz Post No. 250. The Congressman updated the post about current veterans affairs, including the William Shemin Jewish World War I Veterans Act, which allows for the review of military service records of Jewish American soldiers who served in WWI for the Medal of Honor. with the Army, have distinguished themselves by meritorious service or achievement while serving is a combat or noncombat area. Mills received an associates degree from Queensboro Community College in 1994. The New York Lottery recently announced the names of area Lottery players who claimed a winning ticket from one of the Lottery’s live drawings Dec. 25-31. The following winners each received a cash prize valued at $10,000 or more. Jefferson Paulino of Bayside won $29,206 on the Take Five drawing Dec. 24. Paulino’s winning ticket was purchased at the Sugar Hill Express Shop, 800 St. Nicholas Ave., New York. Tarun Chillara of Floral Park won $22,816 on the Take Five drawing Nov. 28. Chillara’s winning ticket was purchased at the Hudson News at Vesey Street and West Broadway, New York. Conception Padilla of Jamaica won $10,000 on the Win 4 drawing Dec. 21. Padilla’s winning ticket was purchased at the Liberty Wines and Liquors, 106-20 Liberty Ave., Ozone Park. Andrzej Wlodarski of Ridgewood won $10,000 on the Mega Millions drawing Dec. 23. Wlordarski’s winning ticket was purchased at the Aneta, 690 Woodward Ave., Ridgewood. Ileana Sanchez of Ozone Park won $40,000 on the Mega Millions drawing Dec. 23. Sanchez’s winning ticket was purchased at the Rockaway Express at 114-02 Rockaway Blvd., South Ozone Park. Stanley Kwiatkowski of Rockaway Point won $250,150 on the Mega Millions drawing Dec. 23. Kwiatkowski’s winning ticket was purchased at the Muzi Deli Grocery, 6202 11th Ave., Brooklyn. Alexander Akujuo of Rosedale won $12,567 on the Take Five drawing Dec. 20. Akujuo’s winning ticket was purchased at the Seneca Express Grocery, 969 Seneca Ave., Ridgewood. The New York Lottery recently announced the names of area Lottery players who claimed a winning instant game ticket Dec. 25-31 and received a cash prize valued at $10,000 or more. Juan Aquilani of Jackson Heights won $25,000 on the Double The Money instant game. Aquilani’s winning ticket was purchased at the Cigar Warehouse at 28-65 Steinway St., Astoria.

Tiffany Santos of Long Island City won $25,000 on the Happy Holidays instant game. Santos’ winning ticket was purchased at the Food Choice, 3-17 27th Ave., Astoria. Army National Guard Private Beryll S. Ravinera recently graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. He is the son of Reniel Ravinera of Queens Village. Army National Guard Private Beryll S. Ravinera recently graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. He is the son of Reniel Ravinera of Queens Village. A large group of civic associations, co-op leaders and other concerned citizens in eastern Queens have organized a coalition to end the gerrymandering of their community when the new legislative district lines are drawn by the State Legislature. Community leaders from Glen Oaks, Floral Park, New Hyde Park, Bellerose, and Queens Village have come together as Eastern Queens United, demanding the Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment (LATFOR) keep their neighborhoods united in congressional and state legislative districts. “We need district lines that will unite us, not divide us. Regardless of color, nationality, religion or cultural identity, we all care about our families, our schools, our jobs, our safety and our community. This is the glue of commonality that keeps us together,” Bob Friedrich, President of Glen Oaks Village, New York’s largest garden apartment co-op with 10,000 residents, said. LATFOR is set to make recommendations to the New York State Legislature on district lines early next year, and its proposal must be voted on by the Legislature and approved by Governor Cuomo. Eastern Queens United demands that the current gerrymandering of its community between Assembly Districts 24, 26, and 33 be completely undone and united into a single Assembly District. These same areas are presently united in a single State Senate district and Eastern Queens United wants it to remain that way. Similarly, the division of this community between the 5th and 6th Congressional Districts must be resolved. A separate body will decide City Council lines in 2013, and the coalition will advocate to remain united within a single City Council district at that time.


More Weiner Trouble Just when you thought it was safe to be Anthony Weiner again… One week after his wife gave birth to a baby boy, news broke that the troubled Queens Democrat proposed a threesome with himself, texting pal Traci Nobles and another guy. Nobles’ proposal for a tell-all book details parts of the conversation, where Weiner admitted to being turned on by other guys. Not that there’s anything wrong with that… We’d suggest that the former U.S. Representative stay out of the public eye for a little while, but even when he’s trying to lay low, the news keeps coming.

When Jocelyn moved to New York City from Michigan, the Mount St. Mary freshman psychology major said she knew that she had the opportunity to do what she had always wanted. Despite some hesitation from her mother, herself a model, the 18-year-old is getting her name and face out there to begin her career. “Mom didn’t want me to get into modeling, to be part of that lifestyle,” Jocelyn said. “But I’m in New York now, so I figured I should try and go for it.” Now she’s trying to get her foot in the door. Jocelyn has started to drop her name at agencies and has recently taken to the web to develop a presence. She hopes to eventually make it into the world of runway modeling. “I’m pretty tall and graceful, so I think I have what it takes to do it,” she said. If things don’t work out, though, she said, she has school as a fallback. “I would love it for [her modeling career] to work out, but if it doesn’t, I understand,” Jocelyn said. “If nothing becomes of it, I’ll pursue psychology.” In her free time, Jocelyn said she loves to dance and is looking forward to the 2012 baseball season, so she can take a trip out to CitiField to see the Mets play. “I absolutely love the Mets,” she said. Jocelyn said that she thinks her motivations for getting into

Page 38 Tribune Jan. 5-11, 2012 • www.queenstribune.com

nounced his name at the nominations press conference on Dec. 15. After flubbing on French director Michel Hazanavicius’ name, Vergara, known for her thick Colombian accent, struggled through Scorsese’s equally ethnic name, pronouncing it more like “Marthina Scoresays” before smiling, rolling her eyes and walking off the stage in hilarious embarrassment. For a few seconds there, we thought one of our Models from Queens was nominated for a Golden Globe.

Jocelyn New York, NY Age: 18 Height: 5’10" Weight: 130 lbs. Stats: 35-27-36

Here at QConf, we get a lot of mail. Usually it’s flyers and letters to the editor, but lately we’ve been getting a lot of New York themed post cards. We always knew our Models of Queens section was popular, but we didn’t realize just how popular until we started receiving postcards from a Queens Village man. For the last two weeks, he’s been sending letters of admiration to our Models of Queens, reminding the beauties that “we are all connected.” Hey, maybe Ciara Sockwell and Terezia Revesova will read this and “hit you up on Facebook.” If not, we suggest an online dating site.

Confidentially, New York . . .

Astoria native, Martin Scorsese

New Year’s Laws

Don’t worry, pal, your gallbladder is safe.

the modeling world may differ from others. “A lot of people want into it for the glamour, so they can have people wait on them hand and foot,” she said. “But I think it would just be a lot of fun.”

Love Letters

What's In A Name? Golden Globe nominations are out, signaling the beginning of awards seasons that will end with fancy-dressed celebrities clutching tiny golden statues of naked men, and one of Queens’ biggest stars is among the nominated - at least we think. Oscar-winning (finally) director Martin Scorsese received a nomination for Best Director for his 3D adventure film “Hugo.” But the Astoria native might not have known it initially when Modern Family star Sofia Vergara an-

From A Model Family Models Of Queens

Those poor, broke Mets announced recently that they would be selling off shares of the team for $20 million a pop. The New York Times’ and former Trib writer, Richard Sandomir reported that a share in the team would come with a few perks, including a formal business card with the word “owner” and an exclusive fantasy camp. The most interesting perk, is unspecified “access” to Mr. Met. What will $20 million get you from Mr. Met? If you’re the tawdry type, probably not much. But who hasn’t pulled up to a self-service gas station on a freezing winter day and wished someone, anyone, would pump their gas? Mr. Met could slip out from your luxurious trunk (make sure to poke some air holes) and fill that Rolls Royce right up. Or, better yet, you could get Mr. Met to be your new friend. With attendance expected to fall, Mr. Met may be a lot lonelier in 2012.

Lonely

With a new year comes new laws. The State Senate recently put out a press release announcing legislation that took effect Jan. 1. Some of it makes perfect sense, like the ban on the sale of hookahs and water pipes to minors. Some laws are bound to enrage someone, like the law that will reduce the number of commercial fishing licenses and permits issued by the DEC. One law in particular, though, just seems to come out of nowhere. As of Jan. 1, the possession and sale of bear gallbladder and bile will be banned. We don’t know how many people are in possession of said items, but be warned. You may want to get rid of it.


www.queenstribune.com • Jan. 5-11, 2012 Tribune Page 39



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