Issuu on Google+


Page 2 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com


Queens Deadline

MTA To City Kids: Take A Hike By DOMENICK RAFTER The Metropolitan Transit Authority released its Final Proposed Budget for 2010 Wednesday, and it includes painful cuts to address a $383 million gap the MTA said was caused by budget cuts in Albany, a fall in state’s income tax projection, and the failure to appeal the Transit Workers Union Local 100 arbitration. Since the MTA is required to balance their budget, the $383 million gap would have to be closed somehow. They have decided to eliminate two train lines that serve Queens and multiple bus lines as well as free bus and train passes for students. The cuts the MTA is suggesting include service cuts, including the elimination of the W and Z lines and numerous local bus routes and elimination of the Rockaway/Broad Channel residents rebate program, layoffs,

scaling back the Access-A-Ride program, and charging students, who currently get free or discounted MetroCards. The cuts were met with stiff opposition. Some say the cuts to student MetroCards could affect the ability for many students to get to school and could force students to transfer to closer schools or for families to leave the City completely. Jackson Heights-area politicians protested the decision, saying the MTA could raise the money to prevent these cuts by leasing local commercial property at the 74th Street/Roosevelt Avenue subway station. “It is absolutely shameful that the MTA is considering throwing students under the bus before pursuing revenue from these valuable properties,” said Councilman-elect Danny Dromm (D-Jackson Heights). “The MTA has neglected the Jackson Heights

EDC Gives Bus Tour Of New Boro Projects

Immigration Bill Has Earned Amnesty Terms By DOMENICK RAFTER U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-Kew Gardens) joined 89 other members of the House of Representatives, including other members of the Queens delegation, to introduce the Comprehensive Immigration Reform for America’s Security and Protection Act to the floor of the House on Dec 15. T he issue is of real impor t a nce to Queens, where nearly half the population is foreign-born. Queens has one of the largest populations of undocumented immigrants in the countr y. Weiner is the only member of the New York City delegation to sit on the Immigration subcommit tee of the House Judiciary Commit tee, the committee that will handle the bill. The bill is also being cosponsored by U.S. Reps Joe Crowley (D-Jackson Heights), Nydia Velazquez (D-Ridgewood) and Greg Meeks (D-Jamaica). Weiner said that the bill is important not only for those who will be affected, but to all Americans because of the effect immigration has on the economy “Even if they don’t know a single person who will be impacted by this bill, they will be a lot better off because of how intertwined the economy is with immigration,” said Weiner, “To pull out of economic doldrums, we must have immigration reform” Weiner admits that opponents will use the economy to derail the bill. “Some will say this isn’t the time to do it because the economy is on the ropes,” said Weiner. “Immigrat ion, in an orderly, smar t way, is the key to growth” Weiner point s out that New York Cit y’s economy is proof of the importance of immigration in our society. “One of the reasons we have been a thriving economic center is because we understand, probably bet ter than anyone else in the country, how immigrat ion tie s to eco-

nomic prosperity” Weiner said. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Illinois), is expected to be taken up by both Houses of Congress early next year. Gutierrez said the bill will include some key provisions, including securing the borders, establishing a verification system, and transitioning most of the undocumented immigrants into legal resident status. The bill would force undocumented immigrants to pay a $500 fine, get fingerprinted, pass a background check, and for those who have not been found guilty of any other crime, earn a six-year work visa by attending English classes and paying ta xes. After six years, immigrants would be allowed to apply for resident status, which will put them on the road to citizenship. Also, the bill would allow those who are being deported to argue their case s in court. Gutierrez said the only way to fix the immigration problem would be for undocumented immigrants to feel safe coming forward and not fear retribution, such as prison or deportation. “We can’t remedy compressive immigration reform with 12 million people living in the shadows,” he said. Some immigration activists have expressed concern about the Obama administration’s stance on the issue after the administration refused to stop raids on undocumented immigrants earlier in the year. Weiner said he expects the White House to be fully behind the bill. Secretar y of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano, who dealt with the issue head on as Governor of Arizona from 2003-2009, will serve as the liaison from the administration to Congress on the issue. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 3

to at tract major retailers that have not considered South Jamaica in the past. “In New York, it’s easie st to get residential development and commercial will follow,” he said. The van stopped by what used to be the count y’s Family Cour t, now a hollowed out shell of itself. The building is being redone to include 346 units of housing, 70 percent of which will be defined as affordable. The City took pains to keep the facade of the building. “It preserves the historic fabric of the area,” Pinsky said. He acknowledged the City’s doling out of nine-figure sums during an economic downturn sounds jarring, but the City’s tendency to pull investments during a downturn in the past caused missed oppor tunities for growth when the economy swung up again. “It’s part icularly prudent to make these investments now,” Pinsky said. When discussing Willets Point, among other projects that represent a shift away from the nuts-and-bolts jobs to a consumer and information economy, Pinsky was quick to point out that manufacturing jobs aren’t bleeding from the City. “There w ill remain a ver y impor tant industrial a nd distribution sector. It’s important for our economic diversity. I think there are going to be changes, but they have to adapt. It’s about making sure those adaptations occur.” The tour ended with Hunter s Point South in Long Island City. As par t of the Queens West project, the 30-acre plot of housing, parks and represents the EDC’s crown jewel for future development. “This is what we hope will be a model for development going forward,” Pinsky said. “It reflects our belief that retail follows residents.” Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 357-7400, Ext. Seth Pinsk y leads a tour of Queens EDC projec ts. 127.

By JOSEPH OROV IC In an effort to ratchet up goodw ill and change perceptions, the Economic Development Corporation’s President Seth Pinsky led a cadre of reporters by van, highlighting some of the agency’s major projects in the borough. “Queens has the opportunit y to be the center of the future economy we think will come to define the City,” Pinsky said. The tour touched upon various projects in Jamaica, Flush ing, College Point and Long Island City. Ranging from a swimming pool to the controversial redevelopment of Willet s Point, Pinsky said a similar process overrides the majority of the EDC’s work. “Get land use right, get the infrastructure investment and in time induce private sector investment,” he said. The tour started at the Sutphin Boulevard LIRR underpass, a dank and dark stretch Pinsky admitted felt “understandably foreboding.” The area is currently being redone to create 5,000 square feet of retail space. The project is part of IMAX, a $100 million slew of redevelopment work in South Jamaica. The grander scheme includes a widening of subway exits and easing pedestrian traffic at the intersection of Sutphin Boulevard and Archer Avenue. Through a bit of acquisitions and the inclusion of bus layover areas, Pinsky said the ultimate goal is

community by failing to lease these properties,” he said. “The MTA must focus on all revenue opportunities before they talk about any service cuts or massive fare increases for students.” “The MTA needs to review their operational policy every time they feel the need to make cuts, because it is not working. If it’s not the hard working men and women Student MetroCards may soon be histor y. of this State that is usually affected, then it is our senior popu- they have,” said Assemblyman Michael lation. Now, they turn their darts on our DenDekker (D-Jackson Heights). students, making it much more difficult for Still, the MTA insists the cuts are necesthem to get to and from school,” said sary to keep their promise from earlier in the Assemblyman Jose R. Peralta (D-Jackson year not to raise fares. Heights). “The MTA needs to look deep “Given the ongoing downturn in the into their reserve fund and find appropri- broader economy and the resultant ecoate sources of funding. The funding situa- nomic crisis facing the State, we have tion turns even more confusing when suit- worked to balance the budget while mainable funding sources – like the ones at the taining our commitment to riders not to 74th Street Station – are available, yet they i n c r e a s e f a r e s i n 2 0 1 0 , ” s a i d G a r y are not included in the financial equation.” Dellaverson, Chief Financial Officer of the “Before the MTA starts to implement any MTA. service cuts at all, it should check all available Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at financial resources such as the leasing of drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 357MTA property and all other revenue sources 7400, Ext. 125.


Unique Solution For Locating Bedbugs By LORI GROSS When Jeremy Ecler left his old job to begin his business eight and a half years ago, he didn’t know it would involve lett ing insects suck blood from his arm. Ecler and his two dogs, run The Bedbug Inspectors, Ne w York’s only i ndependent bedbug dog inspection team. He had the idea to star t h is own company of bedbug-sniffing dogs after working in another pest control company, which had to outsource to other companies with in-house dogs. The advantage of having an indepen-

dent inspection team, Ecler said, is they have no stake in whether or not bugs are found, since they leave the elimination of the bugs to separately-hired pest removers. Sometimes they do contract out for pest removal, but the dogs’ noses are not compelled by profit. Canine inspectors have a 98 percent accuracy rate in locating live bedbugs, according to a University of Florida Study. Human inspectors, who use sight instead of their olifactor y sense, have a 17-30 percent rate of accuracy in detecting live bugs and viable eggs, according to Ecler.

Bedbugs are a growing problem in Queens, to the point where a Web site, bedbugregistr y.com, keeps a running tally of the crit ters, w ith a map that shows the extreme densit y of reports i n the Astoria, Sunnyside and Jackson Heights neighborhoods. Also, Assemblyman Mike Gianaris (D-Astoria) got a bill passed through the Assembly to require schools to notify parents when bedbugs are found on their premises. Ecler keeps bedbugs enclosed in his own home to keep the dogs’ sense of smell sharp. For frugality’s sake, he places 50 of the crit-

PA Puts LGA Plans On Hold

Page 4 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

By KAITLYN KILMETIS The Port Authority’s $6.3 billion budget for 2010 takes extreme measures to grapple with financial constraints incurred by the current recession. In order to maintain zero increase in operating expenses for the second consecutive year, the PA will cut 150 positions citywide, enact a 20 percent reduction in overtime and a reduction in external consultants by 32 percent. The agency stated its 2010 staff of 6,977 people would be at a 40year low. The PA will also close the Ramada Plaza Hotel at JFK International Airport. The budget report states that given significantly lower air traffic and need for substantial renovation, keeping the Ramada Hotel open would have resulted in losses of $1 million per month. Lastly, Port Authority will extend certain

capital project past the end of the current 10-year capital plan in 2016. Most pressing for the borough is the replacement of LaGuardia Airport’s Central Terminal Building. In the 2010 budget, PA set aside $21 million towards planning for the modernization of the Central Terminal Building at La Guardia Airport and Terminal A at Newark Liberty International Airport. The money is allotted towards planning for the projects while future funding opportunities are determined. A large bulk of the 2010 budget, $1.6 billion, is being set aside for the massive World Trade Center redevelopment project. Other large expenditures include $504 million for the ARC Tunnel project, $180 million towards advancing the JFK flight delay reduction program and $175 million devoted to new PATH rail car purchases and signal system.

Port Authority Chairman Anthony R. Coscia said during difficult economic times, the PA has had to make challenging choices to ensure it’s living within its means. “Making these choices meets our commitment to spend the public’s money wisely and allows us to move forward on the region’s most critical infrastructure needs,” Coscia said. Port Authority Executive Director Chris Ward added that it was necessary to reprioritize PA initiatives as well as reign in operating expenses. “The Port Authority is not recessionproof and we have been forced to defer some important capital projects due to the historic economic downturn.” Reach Reporter Kaitlyn Kilmetis at kkilmetis@queenstribune.com, or (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128.

ters, one at a time, on his arm to feed, for three minutes each; else he’d have to wait for replacement bugs from one of the pest removal companie s his dogs inspect for, or pay $3 per bug. His t wo “w o rk i ng dogs,” Cr user, a poggle, and Freedom, a beagle, were trained by retired sheriffs and DEA agents, and live at home with Ecler. Also in the mix are Elcer’s pet dog, a basset-yellow lab mix, who spends the day taking it easy. Bedbugs can cause itchy welts like mosquito bites for some people, though not all. Ecler says he’s been to a couple’s home where two slept in one bed, but only reacted to the bites. A 12-inch area of Ecler’s arm is still marked from bug feedings. “You can see them gett ing fat ter when they feed on your blood. As you’ve seen they’ve had a good meal off you, you just take them off,” he said. The most traumatic thing about living with bedbugs, some people find, is the anxiety caused by being bit ten in t he night by bugs that can be seen by the naked eye – one four th the size of a penny, by Ecler’s measurement. But it’s a resolvable problem. Ecler charges about $350 for the average house or apartment – but said he’s willing to work with people, and especially answer anyone’s questions. Bug removal, which his company does not do, is typically $500-$2,500. For more information of The Bedbug Removers, visit thebedbuginspectors.com, or call (917) 455-6865. Reach Reporter Lori Gross at lgross@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 124.


Nearing Collapse, OTB Seeks Help mediately among the state, racing industr y and other bodies along with declining wages contributed to OTB’s bankruptcy filing, a statement read. Frucher said OTB would continue to operate normally during the bankruptcy procedure and that the agency is not, under any circumstances, looking for a taxpayer bailout. “We have never taken a single dollar from ta xpayers in our history and our pla n does not request a single tax dollar to transform N YC OTB into a power ful, sustainable economic engine.� Frucher said OTB has more than 50 stand alone branches throughout the five boroughs and operates eight restaurant locations, including four in Queens; Blackstone’s in Elmhurst, O’Neill’s in Maspeth, the Irish Circle in Rockaway Park and Austin’s Steak and Ale House in Kew Gardens. At the OTB branch in Ozone Park, the crowd did not tell a story of a busine ss that is under water. T here were lines at each self-service terminal and at each bet ting window. The crowd was packed in for the Friday night races from local tracks like Yonkers and the Meadowlands as well as tracks from around the c o u n t r y l i k e Po mp a n o i n Florida and Remington Park in Oklahoma. Some OTB customers pointed out that the problem with the OTB’s declining wages may stem from a problem facing the entire sport: lack of interest among OTB is betting that legislative reform will get it back younger people. “Look around you,� one in the black.

Tribune Photo by Domenick Rafter

By DOMENICK RAFTER New York Cit y Off-Track Bet ting filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 9 of the US Bankruptcy Code this month. Under the filing, OTB will develop a new business plan designed to bring the company back to profitability. In a statement, OTB blamed the New York Legislature’s revisions to the state’s racing laws for its financial problems. “NYC OTB took the serious step of filing a Chapter 9 case, after careful deliberation, with three principal objectives in mind – creating a sound basis for future operations, using the business model to access capital in the financial markets without any taxpayer support a nd paying all it s obligations,� said Meyer “Sandy� Fr ucher, chairman of N YC OTB. OTB blamed the New York Legislature’s revisions to the state’s racing laws for its financial problems. The funding formula put in place, which seeks to divide revenue im-

patron said pointing to the crowd of older men. “The average age of the guys in here can’t be under the age of 50� “We definitely do get an older crowd in the OTB parlor,� said Collen Larusso, a manager at Austin’s Steak and Ale House. “We do occasionally get some younger guys, and Long Island Rail Road employees, but the majority are older men� Other patrons say OTB provides them wit h a much more comfor table place to watch races and place bets. On one chilly Sunday afternoon, the Ozone Park OTB is packed with two dozen-plus racing fans watching a live race at Aqueduct Racetrack, less than a mile away.

“It’s warm and comfortable in here,� said one racing fan, who chose OTB over the openair grandstand at Aqueduct. “On nice days, I can go to Aqueduct, but on days like today, I can come here and do the same thing.� OTB said it is hoping the Legislature can change the racing laws so that OTB can get a bigger slice of the wagering dollars and have a chance to stay afloat, even as revenues decline. Frucher warned that if changes are not made to the law by the state legislature, OTB could be forced to shut down completely. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125.

29 Seek Chance To Remake Willets Pt. By JOSEPH OROVIC Nearly 30 companies want a hand in redeveloping Willets Point. The City’s Economic Development Corporation received 29 responses for its Request for Qualifications from possible developers for the Iron Triangle’s makeover. “We’re ver y happy w ith t he level of interest and response,� said EDC President Seth Pinsky. “These developers are clearly eager to play a role in t h is impor ta nt project.� The companies seeking consideration range across the City, with several located in Queens, as well other boroughs, Pinsky

said, adding that many have done work around the City. The subsequent RFP issued in 2010 will focus on the first stage of Willets Point redevelopment. The plan covers about 18 acres of land and will include retail and parking space, as well as 2,000 units of housing, office space, and a school. The EDC has also begun designing infrastructure work, including sewer and water work needed to begin the redevelopment process. Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127.

)HJOLSVYVM:JPLUJL+VJ[VYVM 1HZ 6Z[LVWH[OPJ4LKPJPUL :JPLUJL/VUVYZ;YHJRc_ H`LHY[YHJRSLHKPUN[V):HUK+6+LNYLLZ H[5@:*(:KP]PZPVUVM;V\YV*VSSLNLHUK ;V\YV*VSSLNLVM6Z[LVWH[OPJ4LKPJPUL

&(57,),&$7(352*5$06 ‹+4?+PNP[HS4LKPH(Y[Zc_ ‹+LZR[VWHUK>LI7\ISPZOPUNc_

6[OLY7YVMLZZPVUHS6WWVY[\UP[PLZ

$662&,$7($1' %$&+(/25'(*5((6 Â&#x2021;%86,1(660$1$*(0(17$1' $'0,1,675$7,21Â&#x2021;62&,$/6&,(1&(6 Â&#x2021;36<&+2/2*<Â&#x2021;63(&,$/('8&$7,21 Â&#x2021;+80$16(59,&(6Â&#x2021;&20387(56&,(1&( Â&#x2021;'(6.723$1':(%38%/,6+,1* Â&#x2021;/,%(5$/$576$1'6&,(1&(6 Â&#x2021;+($/7+6&,(1&(6$1'025(

1<6&$6 5L^@VYR:JOVVSVM*HYLLY HUK(WWSPLK:[\KPLZ HKP]PZPVUVM7RXUR&ROOHJH

.YHK\H[LHUK7YVMLZZPVUHS7YVNYHTZH[;V\YV*VSSLNL Â&#x2039;3H^Â&#x2039;)\ZPULZZ4HUHNLTLU[ Â&#x2039;4LU[HS/LHS[O*V\UZLSPUN Â&#x2039;,K\JH[PVUHUK7Z`JOVSVN`Â&#x2039;:VJPHS>VYR Â&#x2039;0UZ[Y\J[PVUHS;LJOUVSVN`Â&#x2039;0UMVYTH[PVU:`Z[LTZ

  -69,:;/033:c[O:[YLL[

 _ -3<:/05.c9VVZL]LS[(]L 6[OLYZP[LZHYLSVJH[LKPU4HUOH[[HUHUK)YVVRS`U

5@:*(:

^^^[V\YVLK\U`ZJHZ 7RXUR&ROOHJHLVDQHTXDORSSRUWXQLW\LQVWLWXWLRQ

www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 5

Â&#x2039;7YL3H^Â&#x2039;7YL4LKPJHSÂ&#x2039;7YL+LU[HS


Edit Page In Our Opinion:

This Can Be Fixed Every now and then MTA fares go up. We get charged another quarter on our Subway rides. The bridge tolls go up by 50 cents. Every now and then service gets dropped from a bus every 12 minutes to one every nine minutes. These are the costs of life in the Big City. But now the MTA will charge students, who for decades have gotten a free ride on City transit, half fare starting next year and full fare the year after because – oops, we had less money than we thought we would. The Legislature can fix this. The education budget can be modified, through hard work and due diligence, to keep the fares free for our kids who use the buses and subways to get to school every day. For some reason, though, we’re not holding our breath.

Page 6 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

In Your Opinion: Eminent Domain To The Editor: An adverse court ruling in the Willets Point matter should not deter efforts at seeking to preserve the livelihood and families of the hundreds of workers who will be displaced by this outrageous give away of private property for the benefit of private real estate interests. (Willets Foes See Lawsuit Tossed Out Queens Tribune Dec. 10, 2009). If a student in any class from the sixth grade through college was asked about eminent domain, I am sure there would be a uniform response that government has the right, indeed the duty, to take private property for just compensation, to accomplish a public purpose. Pressed as to define a public purpose, reference would be made to public works, as for example, a government building; a roadway; public transportation facilities; bridges and works of a similar nature. When asked if it included taking private property to be turned over to a private for profit real estate developer, the answer would be NO WAY. I am sure the general public would respond the same way. In a 5 to 4 decision The United States Supreme Court in the Kelo v. City of New London case, ignoring the public's decades old understanding of eminent domain, ruled that a municipality (actually politicians more interested in fat cat real estate developers than the poor and middle class) could exercise eminent domain, take private property, and turn it over to a private real estate developer, on the dubious theory that it would increase the economic viability of an area, and the little homeowner be damned. Parenthetically it should be noted that while the Kelo homeowners were forced to leave their homes, the projected development notwithstanding the passage

of many years, never came to pass and the land remained vacant. Recently the New York State Court of Appeals, in a 6 to 1 decision, supported the use of eminent domain in the Ratner project in Brooklyn, on the same dubious economic claim, a good deal of which will be subsidized directly and indirectly by the taxpayers, and many homeowners forced out of their homes, all for the benefit of a private real estate developer. As a result of the Kelo case 35 states enacted legislation upholding the public's traditional understanding of eminent domain and prohibiting the taking of private property and turning it over to a private real estate developer. New York State was not one of those 35 states, not surprisingly given the fact The Brennan Center for Justice, a public interest center at The NYU School of Law, rated it the worst state legislature in the nation. I think the Willets Point people would be best served by a concerted grass routes effort at engaging all members of the New York State Legislature and exacting an agreement to enact legislation that will prohibit the kind of result that occurred in the Kelo and Ratner matters, under pain of which they will be opposed in any election in which they seek office. Since the taking of private property is political and not economic, it should be opposed on a political basis. I have no doubt the public will embrace and support such action. Benjamin M. Haber, Flushing

Good Bill To The Editor: I'd like to applaud Representatives Joseph Crowley, Nydia Velazquez and Anthony Weiner of Queens for joining Congressman Luis Gutierrez of Illinois in intro-

Michael Schenkler Publisher/Editor-in-Chief Queens County's Weekly Newspaper Group Founded in 1970 by Gary Ackerman Published Weekly Copyright © 2009 Tribco, LLC

Queens Tribune (718) 357-7400 E-mail Address: news@queenstribune.com 174-15 Horace Harding Expwy. Fresh Meadows, N.Y. 11365 www.queenstribune.com

Brian M. Rafferty, Executive Editor Shiek Mohamed, Production Manager Ira Cohen, Photo Editor Regina Vogel Queens Today Editor

Michael Nussbaum Executive V.P./Associate Publisher

ducing the long-awaited immigration reform bill in Congress. The Comprehensive Immigration Reform for America's Security and Prosperity Act (CIR A.S.A.P.) takes an important step towards passing just and humane legislation. The bill includes provisions that would create an earned path to legalization, reunite families separated by immigration laws and protect due process rights while promoting national security. At Queens Community House we offer free English classes to 650 hard-working New Yorkers each day who are striving to improve their lots by learning about the language, customs and government of their new country. However, these New Yorkers are being treated unfairly and denied access to resources. Many are separated from their families and struggle to support themselves as well as the people they left behind. Some have experienced the horrors of a detention center where due process rights are often abandoned. Immigrants to the US make huge contributions to both the local and global economy and yet are often stigmatized due to their legal status. In New York - including suburbs immigrants make up 28 percent of the population and are responsible for 28 percent of the economic activity. Our communities are being affected and we want to achieve real reform now. The introduction of CIR A.S.A.P. marks an important first step in the process but we need to remember that the debate is about real people, neighbors and families that make up our communities. Irma Rodriguez, Queens Community House

Who's Responsible? To The Editor: In April Gov. David Paterson and Senate and Assembly Democrats passed a $132B budget. Incumbent Ann Margaret Carrozza (D-Bayside), not surprisingly, voted for this bloated and uncontrolled spending plan. In early July, concerned citizens and taxpayer watch dog groups urged the Governor and lawmakers to meet and discuss ways to alleviate New York's high taxes, runaway spending and looming budget deficit. These pleas were ultimately ignored, and New York's deficit swelled from $2.2B to $3.2B as the state's revenues continued to decline dramatically. For months proposals were submitted to the Governor that would fill the gap by providing savings and shrinking the size of state government. On Nov. 9, Gov. Paterson finally

Marcia Moxam Comrie, Contributing Editor Reporters: Sasha Austrie, Harley Benson, Lori Gross, Joseph Orovic, Kaitlyn Kilmetis, Domenick Rafter Editorial Intern: Christina Fong Photographers: Ira Cohen, Michael Fischthal, Lee Katzman Contributors: Tom Allon, Melissa Hom, Michael VonDerLieth, Barbara Arnstein Art Department: Tania Y. Betancourt, Sara Gold, Rhonda Leefoon, Candice Lolier, Barbara Townsend Webmaster: Shiek Mohamed Assistant to the Publisher: Ria MacPherson

called the Legislature into Extraordinary Session to address the budgetary shortfall. Because of political infighting among the Democrats, legislators languished in Albany for four weeks before passing a wholly inadequate stop gap measure in the wee hours of Dec. 2, while most New Yorkers slept. The bills that passed fell $500M short of closing the deficit, and allowed $391M of federal stimulus money for education to be spent now rather than in next year's budget. This plan simply didn't do nearly enough to rein in spending and Assembly Member Carrozza and her colleagues should not have voted for it. Responsible lawmakers on both sides of the aisle need to refocus and fight for state agency efficiencies, a roll back of unfunded mandates and relief for New York City. A state spending cap and Medicaid reform are long overdue. With a deficit of at least $7B looming, we must begin to address next year's deficit and certain fiscal crisis sooner, rather than later. Utimately, we need more responsible independent leadership in Albany - not absentee legislators who rubberstamp whatever the Albany bosses and special interests put in front of them. We need innovation and a commitment to making government work for the people - not politics as usual. Vince Tabone, Bayside

Good Will? Peace? To The Editor: Christmas is almost here and there is much for most of us to do, gifts to buy and to wrap, a few more cards to send out, even a few more decorations. It is also a time to reflect about the troubles in the world, like our nation at war and many loss of lives. We can't help but wonder about the message of this season which is," peace on earth and good will towards men." Yet where is it? It is times like these that I think a lot of us perhaps reflect on a gentler time in our past. I, for one, found myself thinking about a Christmas when I was young and America was not so troubled. It was 1957 we were in the Cold War atmosphere and I didn't much care nor understand such things for I was eight years old. I was living in a corner house in Queens Village, there with my mother and father and two blind borders my mother took care of. We didn't have much money but we always had a good Christmas,it was always full of love and sharing and plenty of music, for my mother loved music, and often said," music was tonic for the soul." We had our traditions like most families do, one of which was to go out Howard Swengler Vice President of Sales Shelly Cookson, Corporate & Legal Advertising Account Executives Helene Sperber Merlene Carnegie Earl Steinman Tom Eisenhauer Shari Strongin Donna Lawlor Tony Nicodemo

Maureen Coppola, Advertising Administrator Accounting: Leticia Chen, Phyllis Wilson

a few days before Christmas and buy that Christmas Tree. That night my father and I were going out to buy that tree when my father's car would not start. It was a crisp cold night and snow was on the ground and still falling. My father had an idea so my mother wouldn't be disappointed, we would take my sled to the place where they sold Christmas Trees, about a half a mile away on Jamaica Ave. and Francis Lewis Blvd.When we got there, my father picked out this beautiful six foot tree, he tied it on top of my sled and took it home as we sang Christmas carols all the way home. We got back to the house where my mother had a special place in front of the fireplace for our Christmas tree. Our job was done once it was placed on the stand and my mother would decorate the tree with love and devotion to every detail. It was a time when kindness and love seem to bounce from house to house and neighbors would greet each other with a Merry Christmas as carolers would sing from house to house. Churches would be beaming with worshipers. I remember singing in the choir at church, Christmas Eve and being in a Christmas Pageant and played a Shepherd the week before. I think Christmas meant a lot back than, I just can't help but wonder if that kind of Christmas will return again. The picture perfect Christmas maybe was laced with imperfections but I think it was a little better back than. I can't help but wonder if America could return to family values and live out the true meaning of Christmas which is," Peace on earth and good will toward men." Fred Bedell Jr., Glen Oaks

Tough Choice To The Editor: On a recent evening, while switching through the myriads of stations of nonsensical reality and game shows, I paused at one of the educational channels. It was showing some footage of Roosevelt Raceway on Long Island plus a segment on the Roosevelt Raceway Flea Market. I had spent many Sunday afternoons there with my wife buying discount clothing and some delicious cheesecakes years ago. I knew my wife would be interested in viewing some of her fond memories of shopping there so I told her to switch the station she was watching in another bedroom. Well, Ellen Degeneres was on, dancing around the stage and audience. Could my wife bear to stop viewing Ellen Degeneres for a few minutes to see footage of the Roosevelt Raceway Flea Market? Apparently not. After a few moments of indecision and panic I saw in her eyes, I said "What's it gonna be? Ellen or Roosevelt?" Mark Lane, Little Neck Mitch Kronenfeld: Classified Manager Elizabeth Mance: Administrative Assistant Classified Ad Representatives: Nadia Hack, Peggie Henderson, Fran Gordon, Marty Lieberman, Chris Preasha, Lorraine Shaw, Sheila Scholder

An Award Winning Newspaper

New York Press Association National Newspaper Association The Tribune is not responsible for typographical errors beyond the cost of the space occupied by the advertisement.

The Queens Tribune (USPS 964-480) is published weekly every Thursday for $12 per year by Tribco, LLC, 174-15 Horace Harding Expwy., Fresh Meadows, NY 11365. Periodical Postage Paid at Flushing, NY. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Queens Tribune, 174-15 Horace Harding Expwy., Fresh Meadows, NY 11365.


Former Tribbie Mancini Resigns As Newsday Editor By MICHAEL SCHENKLER

Follow me on Twitter @QueensTribune Newsday was once a giant in journalism.

Their franchise on Long Island rivaled any paper’s news monopoly on a major important geographic area. Their award-winning journalism was recognized and awarded by the profession and Newsday made those lists of top 10 papers in the nation. That was another era when newspapers were household words and bibles of information to middle class families. The cha ngi ng t ime s and morphing media industr y has resulted in both the creation of alternative news sources and an economic reality that arrived with new media that there is an ever-decreasing revenue stream to fund gathering and disseminating news. The increasing role of larger media conglomerates have further eroded the newsroom as many of us have known it. Our industry is changing, and although we’re not certain where it will wind up, some

of the changes are not good. Whenever the financial investment in a newsroom is cut, the quality of the news received is jeopardized. The newsroom in this countr y has tradit ional ly been funded by the print industry. And the true investigative stories and hard-hitting quality journalistic endeavors still exist in the traditional (print) newsroom. So each time a small paper, large, mega-conglomerate or family-owned cuts newsroom funding to meet the realities of the changing industry and worldwide recession, our access to news is threatened. This should be of concern to all the freedom-loving people of the world. The flow of reliable, qualit y independent news is essential to democracy. And friends, the best enter pr ise journalist ic effor ts haven’t existed on cable or broadcast media and we have little way to judge the reliability of what we get on the internet. That was a long way to explain why after five years at the helm of the news operation of the once mighty Newsday, editor-inchief John Mancini resigned last week. After 20 years at the paper, Mancini, who got his start in journalism at the Queens Tribune under legendary editor David Oats, bid a surprise teary-eyed goodbye to his staff. Since the acquisition of the troubled Newsday by Cablevision, which also owns Madison Square

Garden, the NY Knicks and Rangers, Mancini has clashed with the company’s owners over coverage of negative news about Knicks and over newsroom cuts. Almost a year ago, Mancini and other top editors walked out for a five day period. According to published reports, the 49-year-old newsroom vet saluted his staff for get ting through the rough times. “You’ve kept this place afloat and not only afloat but thriving . . .You do work that you have the right to be proud of everyday.” John Mancini, still a resident of Maspeth, is certain to reappear on the journalism scene, but his courageous leadership of the Newsday newsroom during the past five turbulent years was indeed work he has the right to be proud of everyday. John, stop by for a cup of coffee; we’d like some of our new reporters to meet one of the newsroom giants who learned journalism the right way. We salute you. Shortly after taking over at Newsday as editor and executive vice president Mancini contributed the following piece to our Special 35th Anniversary Edition of the Tribune reflecting on his experience in the Tribune newsroom. By JOHN MANCINI The early ‘80s in Queens. Call it the Era of Big Threats. A subway strike? Maybe.

Cable TV may be coming to your block. Don’t do the crime if you can’t do the time. Leave the Trib office to do a story? Only if I can borrow your jacket. Never before or since have I worked in place where so many of the people you wrote about actually showed up in the newsroom. The Gray Panthers? Fine, please have a seat, each of you. Please don’t step on the Cub Scout. Or that man with the giant squash. These were the people of the community. It was less fulfilling to meet, repeatedly, the local businessman who wasted time trying to impress a young reporter on his qualifications to be awarded part of that looming cable franchise. I say this because only later did we learn that a good number of the Queens Democrats who had cadged city jobs and spent their time trying to get the Trib to publicize their own supposed dogooder exploits were in fact crooks. It would be years before the Parking Violations Bureau scandal brought down the whole house, sending not only a few familiar DOT hacks to prison and the fallen Donald Manes to his grave. That local fellow who thought it would be worth his time for us to write him up in the Trib never had a chance. That’s what I know now. Still, right away back then, I did see a few valuable things quite

John Mancini started his career in journalism at the Queens Tribune in 1980. Since then he has held a number of positions at The New York Times, the New York Post, the Long Island Voice and most recently at Newsday, where he resigned last week as executive vice president and editorin-chief. clearly, such as how deeply David Oats believed in the value of the communit y press. And any fool knew instantly that the newsroom could never be big enough for both Abraham V. George and Joseph W. Queen. But it took a sustained period of observation to appreciate the journalistic stylings of one Bob Manas, scourge of Kissena Boulevard. In the end, what I recall most distinctly of that time in Queens is just how much I didn’t know. MSchenkler@QueensTribune.com

Page 8 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

They’re Not All Crooks, But They All Need Help the chances are that their By HENRY STERN strategy is correct: This, The sordid saga of too, shall pass. the squalid swamp — The Legislature is inthe state senate — recapable of reforming itself ceived considerable pubwithout external direction lic attention last week, because the current freestarting with former Mawheeling system is the jorit y Leader Joe way many of them make Bruno’s conviction Montheir living. Despite their day by an Albany jury. Henry Stern salaries, lulus, living allowThe very next day, Bruno received what may be a “get out of ances and expense accounts, their jail free” card as U.S. Supreme Court insatiable egos and their appetites justices disparaged the law under demand even more than they which he was convicted, alleging it receive. When the backbenchers see their leaders game the system, was too vague. Editorial writers from around they are further motivated to clamthe state have joined City dailies ber aboard t he grav y trai n. Of in expressing their disgust with the course, good behavior and subserethical standards of Albany. There vience to one’s seniors is the price is a widespread feeling that if other of a ticket. This does NOT apply to all elected officials were pursued with the diligence the US Attorney used legislators. There are the good to nail Bruno, more of the low- schnooks that live on their salahanging fruit could easily have been ries, or receive unearned income (dividends and interest). Many are brought to justice. Although many observers be- truly honest, but they are not usulieve that our dysfunctional legis- ally found in positions of power in lature has serious corruption issues, the legislature. Some have never had the powers that be (formerly known the opportunity to enrich themas the Three Men in a Room) are selves, political versions of the 40treating the problem with silence, year-old virgin depicted in popular hoping that it will blow over. Sadly, culture.

Others are money honest, but politically they are in the pockets of their contributors and their lobbyists. They are somewhat, but not substa nt ial ly, bet ter tha n thieves, because they too have sold their offices and abandoned the interests of their constituents for their own political advantage. Somet ime s, it’s not t hat simple. What if their constituents ARE the special interests? Public employees, retirees, employees of hospitals or other institutions receive support from the federal government, state or city. Farmers receive generous subsidies not to grow crops; why shouldn’t public employees receive the same benefits? It is relatively easy to express contempt for legislators. Most New Yorkers do not hold them in high regard, although they are usually satisfied with the individual who represents them. It is easy to exhor t elected officials to change their ways and to reprove them for not having done so. Unfortunately, great expectations run counter to: “The leopard cannot change its spots.” What can one do with an incumbent who is un-

able or unwilling to change? Either get a new leopard, available at the polls, who may have different spots, or better still, get a zebra, and see the spots replaced by stripes. Hopefully, the stripes will run in the right direction. Pre sident Obama said last

week in Oslo that some problems cannot be resolved without war. The ground wars are fought at the ballot box. The air strikes come from the Federal Department of Justice, because state law enforcement has proved inadequate. StarQuest@NYCivic.org

Not 4 Publication.com by Dom Nunziato


LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 11/25/09, bearing Index Number NC-001113-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) Immanuel (Middle) Partahi (Last) Sidabutar My present name is (First) Immanuel (Last) Partahi My present address i s 8 0 - 0 1 4 5 th A v e n u e , Elmhurst, NY 11373 My place of birth is Indonesia My date of birth is December 31, 1974; Assume the name of (First) Juliann (Last) Sidabutar My present name is (First) Juliann (Middle) Liberty (Last) Limbong My present address i s 8 0 - 0 1 4 5 th A v e n u e , Elmhurst, NY 11373 My place of birth is Brooklyn My date of birth is July 04, 1986 ________________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 11/25/09, bearing Index Number NC-001101-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) Gianluca (Middle) Stefano (Last) Dolce My present name is (First) Stefan (Middle) Phillip (Last) Bilanceri My present address is 146-35 20 th Rd, Whitestone, NY 11357 My place of birth is California My date of birth is June 05, 1978 ________________________________________________________________________ Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 08/13/2009, bearing Index Number NC-000717-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) Shane (Middle) Andrew (Last) Mc Farlane My present name is (First) Shane (Middle) Andrew (Last) McFarlane Fleary aka Shane Andrew Mc Farlane My present address is 227 Beach 98 St., Rockaway Park, NY 11694 My place of birth is Brooklyn My date of birth is April 09, 1990 ________________________________________________________________________ Main Northern Holding LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Sec of State of NY on 10/1/ 09. NY Office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 135-22 Northern Blvd., Flushing NY 11354. General Purposes. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of Goodhome LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on 8/13/ 2009. Office located in New York. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to THE LLC 2377 24TH

Street, Astoria, NY 11105. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of Tristan & Lucian Enterprise, LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/18/ 09. Office location: Queens. SSNY has been designated for service of process SSNY shall mail a copy of any process served against the LLC to c/o THE LLC, 154-02 33 rd Avenue, Flushing, NY 11354. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ IAS Part 4 For At an IAS Term Part 16 of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of Queens held at the Courthouse located at 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, New York on the 8th day of December, 2009. PRESENT: HON. MARGUERITE A. GRAYS for HON. PETER J. KELLY J.S.C. Index No. 32785/09 Date Filed: 12/8/ 09 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE In the Matter of the Application of ANTHONY GAROFANO, holder of onethird of all Outstanding shares of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD. For the judicial dissolution of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD., Petitioner, -against- FRANK M. CORDELLA and RONALD ANNUNZIATA, Respondents. Upon reading and filing the annexed petition of ANTHONY GAROFANO, the holder of no less than 33 1/3 percent of all outstanding voting shares of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD., a corporation incorporated and existing under the Business Corporation Law of the State of New York and having a principal office at 98-01 Liberty Avenue, Ozone Park, in the County of Queens, State of New York, duly verified by Petitioner on the 3 rd day of December, 2009, LET, the Respondents, FRANK M. CORDELLA and RONALD ANNUNZIATA show cause at an IAS Part 16 of this Court, 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York 11435 on January 19, 2010 at 9:30 o’clock in the forenoon or as soon thereafter as counsel may be heard why an order should not be entered granting Petitioner the following relief: (1) pursuant to Business Corporation Law §1104(a), an order and judgment dissolving FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD., on the ground that the directors are so divided respecting the management of the FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD.’s affairs that there is internal dissension and two or more factions of shareholders are so divided that dissolution would be beneficial to the shareholders; (2) pursuant to Business Corporation Law §1115, a preliminary injunction enjoining and restraining Respondents from expending any funds of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD., for the payment of their legal fees and expenses incurred in connection with this proceeding; (3) restraining the Respondents from transferring, pledging, assigning, encum-

bering or otherwise disposing of any of the assets of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD., except in the ordinary course of business; (4) restraining the Respondents from disbursing any and all proceeds derived from the operation of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD., other than in the ordinary course of business; (5) restraining the Respondents from taking any salaries or profits from the operation of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD.; (6) restraining the Respondents from discarding any and all books and records, including, but not limited to, all Shareholder’s Agreements, Franchise Agreements, accounts payable and accounts receivables in connection with the operation of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD.; (7) compelling the Respondents to account for all funds received and dispersed in connection with the operation of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD.; (8) appointing a receiver or liquidating trustee for the purpose of, inter alia, liquidating and distributing the assets of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD.; and (9) for such other and further relief as maybe just and proper. And sufficient cause appearing thereof, IT IS HEREBY: ORDERED PENDING THE HEARING ORDERED, that the Respondents are restrained from transferring, pledging, assigning, encumbering or otherwise disposing of any of the assets of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD., other than in the ordinary course of business; ORDERED, that the Respondents are restrained from disbursing any and all proceeds derived from the operation of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD., other than in the ordinary course of business; ORDERED, that the Respondents are restrained from taking any salaries or profits from the operation of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD.; ORDERED, that the Respondents are restrained from discarding any and all books and records, including but not limited to, all Shareholder’s Agreements, Franchise Agreements, accounts payable and accounts receivables in connection with the operation of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD.; ORDERED, that the Respondents are hereby directed to account for all funds received and dispersed since October 1, 2008 in connection with the operation of FOOD MARKETING CONCEPTS LTD. Within 21 days from the date hereof. ORDERED, that in compliance with the provisions of the Business Corporation Law §1106(e) the Petitioner shall cause to be published a copy of this order at least once in each week for the three weeks immediately proceeding the time fixed herein for the hearing in QUEENS TRIBUNE, a newspaper in general circulation in Queens County; ORDERED, that personal service of a copy of this

Order and Verified Petition with Index number and date of filing endorsed thereon, together with the papers upon which it is based, be served upon the Respondents, State Tax Commission, and Attorney General by service pursuant to BCL 1106(c) on or before December 28 th , 2009, be deemed good and sufficient service thereof. ENTER, s/HON. MARGUERITE A GRAYS J.S.C. ________________________________________________________________________

RICHARDS and DELROSE RICHARDS dated the 9th day of August, 2006, to secure the sum of $323,000.00, and recorded at Instrument No. 20060004971 92 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of QUEENS, on the 1st day of September, 2006; which mortgage was duly assigned by assignment dated the 19th day of August, 2008, and sent for recording in the Office of the Clerk of QUEENS County; The property in question is described as follows: 105-64 VAN WYCK EXPRESSWAY, RICHMOND HILL, NY 11419 SEE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION Block 9595 and Lot 29 ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York, bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the Westerly side of Van Wyck Blvd., distance 180.18 feet Northerly from the corner formed by the intersection of the Westerly side of Van Wyck Expressway with the Northerly side of 1 071h Avenue, formerly Roanoke Avenue and also formerly Metropolis Avenue; RUNNING THENCE Westerly parallel with 107th Avenue, 100.12 feet; THENCE Northerly parallel with Van Wyck Expressway, 20 feet; THENCE Easterly again parallel with 107th Avenue, 100.12 feet to the Westerly side of Van Wyck Expressway; THENCE Southerly along the Westerly side of Van Wyck Expressway, 20.00 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING. Premises known as 105-64 Van Wyck Expressway, Richmond Hill, New York HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE NEW YORK STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT WE SEND YOU THIS NOTICE ABOUT THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. IF YOU FAIL TO RESPOND TO THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT IN THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION, YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. PLEASE READ THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT CAREFULLY. YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CONTACT AN ATTORNEY OR YOUR LOCAL LEGAL AID OFFICE TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The state encourages you to become informed

about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877-BANK-NYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the department’s website at WWW.BANKING.STATE.NY.US. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. § 1303 NOTICE NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: December 9, 2009 Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 The law firm of Steven J. Baum, P.C. and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained by them will be used for that purpose.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF OBJECT OF ACTION STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF QUEENS ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE INDEX NO.: 21078/08 RESIDENTIAL FUNDING CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. WINSTON RICHARDS, DELROSE RICHARDS, Defendant(s). MORTGAGED PREMISES: 105-64 VAN WYCK EXPRESSWAY, RICHMOND HILL, NY 11419 SBL #: BLOCK: 9595 LOT: 29 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Queens. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. Dated this 9th day of December, 2009, Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 TO: WINSTON RICHARDS, Defendant(s) In this Action. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. MARGUERITE A. GRAYS of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 20 th day of November, 2009 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Queens County Clerk, in the City of Jamaica. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by WINSTON

Our Office Will Be Closed on Fridays, Dec. 25, 2009 & Jan. 1, 2010 DEADLINE FOR DEC. 31, 2009 PUBLICATION IS NOON 12/24/09 You Can E-Mail Your Legal Copy to legals@queenstribune.com To Place Your Legal Advertisement, Call the Tr ibune at (718) 357-7400 ext. 144

THE TRIBUNE STAFF WISHES A HAPPY HOLIDAY TO ALL!

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 9

LEGAL NOTICE


Queens This Week

Page 10 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

Norwood Rebuilds His Home And Ar t In early January, John Norwood sat in his car, gloomy and disoriented. His home, as well as a decade's-worth of his artwork, laid in cinders on 119th Street in Whitestone. "One three-hour fire and the whole world goes to hell. I'm feeling very black," he said. The once-white home is now an ashy grey and nearly rebuilt. Norwood has reached the middle point of recovery while reigniting his artistic urges. "It's damn nice," the laconic 72-year-old said, his North Carolina drawl noticeably more upbeat. After the fire wiped out 35 years of possessions and memories, Norwood spent the better part of eight months in the darkest of depressions. He spent the majority of his days sitting inside, watching talking heads on television while falling behind on his magazine subscriptions. The lone bright spot being the birth of his granddaughter, Ruby Jane. "We call her RJ, like an executive," he said, flashing a slight grin. Meanwhile, a hired architect struggled with restoring a building the City wanted razed. "Dealing with bureaucracies is enough to make you a goddamn Republican," the selfprofessed liberal Norwood said. His home is once again habitable - but not complete. Norwood has begun fervently filling empty spaces. While hustling from room to room, he pointed to a shelf he installed in the morning, an uncooperative shower rack, and tables resting on legs of his art. "He's just so happy doing all of this," his wife, Dr. Ruby Malva, said. "I think this is going to prolong both our lives." Much is left to be done. Several sections of the home are missing, costing him considerable square footage and an optimal view of the Manhattan skyline from his shore-line home. But rebuilding has become secondary to his art. After months of not touching his materials, Norwood has produced a bevy of intricate pieces. The self-professed "infernally abstract" artist habitually repurposes items normally destined for the trash, creating intricate sculptures morphed and warped to create a whole wildly different from its component parts. "I'm a Depression baby. We don't throw out anything," he said. His schedule now involves a 4 a.m. wake up then toiling throughout the day until about 8 p.m. He traverses the stairs between his work and living space at least 30

times a day. He recognizes the greatest irony of a fire that cost him everything remains its ability to provide him with an abundance of material to work with. His most recent sculptures are comprised of leftover Styrofoam packaging from various electronics and Ikea goods, as well as the charred remnants of his home. "It's amazing how much crap you accumulate over time," he said, pointing to charred boxes filled with plastic dinosaurs. He roamed about his work space, pointing out foam, booze bottles, boxes and a welding mask he plans to incorporate into his work. At the time of the fire, Norwood had been working on a cityscape. It had consumed several years of his life. Now, its charred remains are scattered around his studio. He plans to reuse it all. "Oh yeah, I'm trying to put it all back together," he said. Having his home back has given his artistic tendencies second wind. Standing on his terrace, puffing a Marlboro, Norwood faced the marina below and skyline in the distance. "I'm going to keep working on stuff 'til I drop," he said. "I've been very happy with what I've done over the last 50 years. It'll all probably end up in a Dumpster down there." Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127. —Joseph Orovic

Francis Lewis HS Gets Dept. Of Ed 'A' The largest secondary school in Queens, Francis Lewis High School, earned an "A" on this year's New York City Department of Education Report Cards. Francis Lewis is one of three Queens schools to receive and "A" and a "well developed" score on its annual Quality Review. "We say we are a victim of our own success," said Principal Musa Ali Shama, referring to the swell of the school population to 4,500 students - over twice what the school was built to accommodate. Shama has said the overflow is due to the school's fabulous reputation, and accessibility by way of several nearby bus lines. Special programs like the Jacob K. Javits Law Institute, offering law-related courses; a selective University Scholar Program giving students advanced courses in the humanities, and which requires participating students to learn two foreign languages; and the Math and Science Research Program, also contribute to the popularity of the school amongst ambitious kids.

John Norwood is rediscovering his muse after a fire destroyed his home.

Students deemed "at risk" are placed in the Return to Success program, to take double sessions of core subjects and travel from class to class as a group. The school also offers summer instruction for incoming ninth graders who are struggling. Letter grades given by the Dept. of Education to schools are based on student academic achievement, progress, student attendance and the result of the annual parent, teacher, and student surveys about school learning environments. Despite the swell in size, 95 percent of Francis Lewis teachers thought order and discipline are maintained at the Students enter Francis Lewis High School, an “A” school, up from 88 percent last school. year, and 73 percent since 2007. However the percent of parents satis- had a trade-in program for customers, allowfied with the education their children re- ing them to bring their old watches and buy ceived this year sunk to 89 percent, down a new one for a discount. three percent from 2008, but up from the 83 "We often use the old watches for parts so parent-education satisfaction rating of 2007. it makes sense for us," Michael said. The percent of students who feel safe in Should any "Santa Care" watches be left the hallways, bathrooms and lockers is 81 over, the store might expand the program for percent, hovering just above the Citywide Valentine's Day. average, and up from 77 percent last year. "We're starting an ongoing tradition with The percent of students who agreed or this," he said. "From now on, we're doing strongly agreed that the teachers inspire them this every year." to learn is 66 percent, below the Citywide Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at average. jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 357R e a c h R e p o r t e r L o r i G r o s s a t 7400, Ext. 127. lgross@queenstribune.com, or (718) 357—Joseph Orov ic 7400, Ext. 124. —Lori Gross

‘Santa Care’ Gives Watches To Seniors People's minds can become lofty and single-minded when their daily lives are surrounded by jewels and precious metals. But the NY Diamond Boutique on Austin Street has kept humility and giving at the forefront. The two-year-old establishment has joined forces with Sunnyside Community Services to create a unique gift-giving program for underprivileged seniors. "It really is born out of our general 'giving back to the community' philosophy," said Michael, the store's manager. He asked remain anonymous for security reasons. The boutique started accepting old broken watches from donors, with a program called "Santa Care." The broken watches are then repaired to a working, wearable state and polished condition. Then, SSC picks them up and distributes them to seniors in need. "They need to know the time to go to the doctor, take their medications, do what they need to do to function in the world," Michael said. On Tuesday, SCS stopped by to pick up 65 watches, their combined retail value about $11,000. Michael laughed when asked how long it takes to repair so many watches. "It takes several evenings of hard work," he said, a box of more old watches needing repair under his hand. "If we have more coming in during the Christmas season, we'll distribute those, too." The larger sense of giving by the boutique was apparent outside, in the form of a large Toy for Tots box outside the store. It had become overfilled with gifts once already, and had been emptied on Tuesday. The boutique also does another charitable program around Valentine's Day, with donations going towards breast cancer research. The origins of the watch-giving stem from a bit of pure capitalism. The store originally

First Edition Goes, More May Follow

Business at bars and eateries on Bell Boulevard is down 25 to 30 percent "across the board," according to a Bayside resident who claims to have insider information because of his position at a major insurance carrier. The information comes on the heels of the closing of First Edition bar and restaurant, near the steps to Bayside's LIRR train station. The source, who asked not to be identified, said he works specifically on retirement accounts, and that he works with four bars and restaurants just within three blocks of New Edition. Two of those establishments, he said, are now listed on the buyer's market anonymously in private business listings. He attributes the strip's financial woes to the inflated housing prices in Bayside, which doubled in a two-year span, and the home equity loans with which homeowners with deflated home values are now contending. For people cutting down on extraneous spending, a night out is usually the first thing on the chopping block. Places that draw a young crowd are doing better, by his observation. An employee at 7/ 11 on the corner of Bell Boulevard and 41st Avenue, who identified himself as Summer Song, said business has "slowed down somewhat," but did not seem too disheartened. Dozens of passersby streaming past New Edition were incredulous on spotting a sign which read: "After serving the Bayside community for the past 61 years, First Edition has been forced to close our doors due to declining business brought on by the economic conditions of the past year." "We thank all our loyal customers who have patronized us over the years and wish everyone a Healthy and Happy Holiday Season." Several people commented that First Edition was a Bayside "institution," and that it was a shame that the neighborhood could not sustain it. Reach Reporter Lori Gross at lgross@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 124. —Lori Gross


CEC Fights For School DOE Forgot By DOMENICK RAFTER PS/IS 87 in Middle Village was never meant to handle the number of students it has today. The century-old Middle Village School, located at 67-54 80th St., handled students from kindergarten through fifth grade until about eight years ago, when the Board of Education asked parents if they wanted to turn the school into a K-8 school, the first in District 24. Until its conversion to a K-8, the top two floors of the school were district offices and were not equipped to become part of a school. The school board opposed the expansion, but eventually they agreed and the school was expanded. Within a few years, as the first eighth grade class entered the school, parents began to realize the school was not equipped to handle them. On the first and second floors of the school, there are only one girls’ bathroom and one boys’ bathroom, and each bathroom only has one stall and one sink. These bathrooms are meant to accommodate approximately 125 students. In the basement, the cafeteria is severely overcrowded, and the gymnasium is in a room not originally intended to be a gym, and is riddled with exposed pipes and wires. The building also has limited handicapped access; the only handicapped accessible entrance is a ramp into the basement and the school has no elevators. This has become a larger issue recently as

the school has attracted a large percentage of special education students, who are hindered by the lack of handicapped facilities. The school’s auditorium is located on the third floor and is therefore not accessible to all students. The process of rectifying the problem has been long, arduous and very frustrating for students, parents, and policymakers in the community. Jeanne Forster, who has a daughter in fifth grade in PS 87, and who serves on Community Education Council 24, said students and parents love the school regardless. “It’s a great school, great building with great teachers,” Forster said. “It just needs the facilities to match” Her daughter began at PS/IS 87 in the fourth grade after attending a private school on Long Island. Forster said her daughter’s academic performance has improved drastically since she began attending PS/IS 87. The movement to update the school’s facilities began early in the decade. While he represented the area in the New York City Council, Thomas Ognibene allocated some money for updates to the school, including a new gym and an extension, but after mayoral control of schools began in 2002, the deal was eventually killed. “Promises went out the door” said CEC District 24 President Nick Comaianni. A few years later, Ognibene’s successor, Dennis Gallagher, was able to allocate money for new science labs, which were eventually constructed. The Community Education Council put the needed PS/IS 87 renova-

Wishing You and Yours A Blessed and Joyous Holiday Season and New Year! NYC Council Member, 24th Council District

James F. Gennaro 185-10 Union Turnpike Fresh Meadows, NY 11366 718.217.4969

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 11

PS/IS 87 front entrance is not handicapped accessible. The only handicapped accessible entrance is through the School’s basement.

tions and expansion on the top of its five-priority list in its five-year capital plan and submitted it to the Dept. of Education, but the DOE eliminated the school from the list. “Normally, we don’t have a problem getting our top five projects approved,” Comaianni said, “but [PS/IS] 87 was bypassed despite being in the top five.” Comaianni said the issue with the DOE came about because the DOE said a school needed to be overcrowded to warrant an expansion, and PS/IS 87 is not overcrowded. The proposed expansion will be construc ted behind the Comaianni said the current struc ture. CEC considered PS/IS 87 a special case and pleaded with the DOE to make an exception accessible. Finally, bathrooms would be constructed on the first and second floods with a for the school. Recently, the school expansion gained the minimum of six stalls in each bathroom. Comaianni said the CEC decided adding support of the area’s current representative on the New York City Council, Elizabeth more classroom space was the only way to get Crowley (D-Middle Village). Comaianni said the needed expansion to happen, but that it he will resubmit the school’s expansion in the “kills two birds with one stone.” It adds next five-year capital plan priority list, which much-needed seats that can be utilized to ease overcrowding in nearby district schools was approved by the CEC Tuesday night. The plans will include additional classroom and allows for the school to get the new space, with 612 more seats, a proper gymna- gymnasium, cafeteria and other renovations sium, and a cafeteria to accommodate a mini- that are needed. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at mum of 240 students with a properly serviceable kitchen. An elevator would be con- drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 357structed to make the school fully handicapped 7400, Ext. 125.


Page 12 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 â&#x20AC;˘ www.queenstribune.com

Tribune Professional Guide

To reserve your space call 357-7400


Queens CLOSEUP Cantor Performs Cantor Moti Fuchs will be leading a special Jewish meditation session celebrating Chanukah, the holiday of lights on Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at Hillcrest Jewish Center, 18302 Union Tpke. The performance is free. For more information, call (718) 380-4145.

Christmas Concer t Tired of the Christmas Rush? Join us for a Christmas Recharge Mosaic Concert by Immanuel Lutheran Church, Music, Food, Prayer, Fellowship and Fun for all ages on Dec. 20 6 p.m. at 12-10 150th St. The band “Leap of Faith” will play along with several mosaic groups. For more information, call (718) 767-5656 x 300.

Holiday Flea/Fair A giant Holiday Fair/Flea Market will be held Dec. 19, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Flushing House, 38-20 Bowne St. The Flea Market will be held in the Large Game Room on the ground floor of Flushing House. A huge variety of goods will be on sale, including jewelry, arts and crafts, collectibles, new and gently used clothing, white elephant items, etc. Admission is free. For vendor information, please call Joshua Lutz, activities leader, at (347) 532-3010.

Poetry Reading There will be a gathering of stimulating people in a Salon-like atmosphere will take place on Dec. 20 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Lewis H. Latimer House Museum home of the African-American Scientist, Inventor, and Renaissance man. The Poetry Salon Series, produced by award winning literary artist, Juanita Torrence-Thompson, Editorin-Chief/Publisher of Mobius: The Poetry Magazine, will offer readings by Ms. Torrence-Thompson and other outstanding poets, Alison Roh Park, George H. Northrup, and Christopher Stackhouse. The admission fee is $10 for adults, and $7 for seniors, students, and children 12 and over. Due to limited seating, RSVP is suggested. For information, call the Lewis H. Latimer House Museum at (718) 961-8585.

Actor Wanted

The Long Fall The Queensboro Hill Library hosts a book club on Fridays at 2 p.m. On Dec. 18, it will discuss The Long Fall at 60-05 Main St. For more information, call (718) 359-8332.

Willow Lake Tour The Flushing Meadows Corona Park Conservancy and the NYC Parks Department’s Urban Rangers are sponsoring the final 2009 tour of the Willow Lake natural area on Dec. 20. Participants will meet at the Al Mauro Playground, 73 Terrace and Park Drive East (between Jewel Avenue and Union Turnpike) at 10 a.m. for the one hour free tour. The Rangers will discuss the ecology of the area and point out the birds and geese that winter over at Willow. The Willow Lake natural area is an 80-acre marsh and includes Willow Lake, one of the City’s two largest fresh water lakes. The natural area is closed

Entitlement Counseling The Howard Beach Senior Center, located at 156-45 84th St. in Howard Beach is offering entitlement counseling for seniors living in Community Board 9 and 10. This counseling is for seniors over the age of 60 living in Community Board 9 and 10, who need assistance in Medicare, Medicaid, SSI, SNAP (formerly food stamps), housing, etc. If interested, call Elaine at (718) 738-8100 for further information.

Computer Classes The Howard Beach Senior Center, located at 156-45 84th St. in Howard Beach is conducting computer classes for beginners, intermediate and more advanced seniors. The classes will be held for six weeks at once a week. Anyone who is interested, please call Rosalie at (718) 738-8100.

Scarf Collection The Howard Beach Senior Center is collecting knitted or crocheted scarves for our troops overseas. We will be doing this yearround. The color of the scarves should be camouflage, black or dark green and 38-40 inches long and 7 ½ wide. Please bring your finished product to the Howard Beach Senior Center. For more information, please call Rosalie at (718) 738-8100.

Oratorio Holiday Concert Is there a better place to celebrate the holidays in style? Come hear the Oratorio Society of Queens as it presents its Annual Holiday Concert featuring excerpts from Handel’s “Messiah.” Sing along with Christmas Carols and Chanukah favorites performed by the chorus, soloists and The Orchestral Arts Ensemble of Queens under the direction of Maestro David Close. The concert will be held at the Queensborough Performing Arts Center at Queensborough Community College, 22205 56th Ave., Bayside, at 4 p.m. Tickets are $25 general; $20 seniors (62+) and students with ID; children, 12 and under, accompanied by an adult, free. To order tickets, call (718) 279-3006 or go to queensoratorio.org.

Winter Concer t At QC The Queens College Choral Society and the college’s Department of Drama, Theater and Dance will present Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana at the society’s 69th annual winter concert on Dec.19, at 8 p.m. in Colden Auditorium. The work will be presented in its chamber version for two pianos and percussion, featuring percussionists from Queens College’s Aaron Copland School of Music and pianists Max Midroit and Cathy Callis, both members of the college’s adjunct faculty. Tickets are $20 and $18, and are available through the Kupferberg Center Box office at (718) 793-8080 or online at www.kupferbergcenter.org/qcchoral.htm. Group discounts for high school students and teachers are also available.

Bakithi Kumalo Celebrate the rhythms and melodies of South Africa and Kwanzaa with this Grammy Award-winning bassist, composer and vocalist who has collaborated with Paul Simon, Laurie Anderson, Cyndi Lauper, Herbie Hancock, Chaka Khan and others. Thought of by many as the most talented living bassist, Kumalo possesses a unique musical style reflecting influences from around the world including South African traditional folk, con-

temporary jazz, and salsa. The event will be held Dec. 20 at Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Blvd., Dec. 20, 2 p.m. Tickets: $15/$12 Members; $12 Children; $10 Member Children. For information, visit flushingtownhall.org, or call (718) 463-7700. Ext. 222.

A Christmas Carol The LI Spotlight Players will perform “A Christmas Carol” on Dec. 18 at 8 p.m., Dec. 19 at 3:30 and 8 p.m., and Dec. 20 at 2:30 p.m. at Christ Lutheran Church (Parish Center) located at 85-15 101st Ave., Ozone Park. All tickets are $10. For tickets or info, call (631) 225-9102 or (516) 749-1744 or email SptltPlyrs@aol.com.

Recycle Electronics Sen. Joe Addabbo Jr. (D-Howard Beach) is sponsoring a free, post-holiday recycling event at his district office, at 159-53 102nd St. in Howard Beach on Saturday, Jan. 9, 2010 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., in collaboration with representatives from e-Green Management, LLC. Recycle your unwanted electronic equipment: laptops, cell phones, PDAs, cameras, televisions, etc. Two trucks will be available to collect your old, outdated items to make room for new equipment. For more information, call Sen. Addabbo’s district office at (718) 738-1111

WRBA Meeting The Woodhaven Residents’ Block Association will be holding town hall meetings on Saturday, Jan 9, 2010, and Saturday Feb 13, 2010 from 1-3 p.m. at the Woodhaven-Richmond Hill Volunteer Ambulance Corps, 7815 Jamaica Ave, Woodhaven, as part of their mission to keep residents informed and have them participate in the civil process. Bring a friend or neighbor, all are welcome.

Events At The Community House The Queens Community House Kew Gardens, 80-02 Kew Gardens Road, Suite 202, has many events in the coming weeks. It invites everyone to a special Poets & Writers Reading on Dec. 17 at 1 p.m. Every Thursday at 10 a.m. Ronnie is there to improve your health with meditation. Joyce Berger will review the movie that is now playing in Kew Gardens Cinemas on Dec. 18 at 1 p.m. The Community house also has classes for beginners in the French language. It takes place every Thursday at 12 Noon. For further information call (718) 268-5960.

Concer t & Dance The Morris Schaefer Branch of the Workmen’s Circle invites you to our super spectacular End of the Year Concert and Dance Program on Dec. 20 at 1:30 p.m. in the Crystal Ballroom of the Rego Park Jewish Center, 97-30 Queens Blvd.

Santa Breakfast The Forest Hills Chamber of Commerce’s members are welcome to bring friends and family to Uno Chicago Grill for a Breakfast Buffet with Santa on Dec. 19 from 8 to 11 a.m. There will be assorted foods, a picture with Santa and a complimentary goodie bag. Adults pay $13.99 and children are admitted for $6.99.

Sustainability With world leaders converging on Copenhagen in order to negotiate an urgent response to the climate crisis, many are questioning how our society got to this juncture. Do we need to go beyond new policies and new technologies, to a redefine our basic values and our ethics? Author Jeremy Benstein will discuss, “Sustainability: Redefining Our Ethics” on Dec. 22 at 1:30 p.m. at the Central Queens YM & YWHA. Associate Director of the Heschel Center in Tel Aviv and author of The Way into Judaism and the Environment, Jeremy Benstein is one of the leaders of a new Jewish environmental movement. Benstein’s talk is one in a series of events sponsored by the Hevesi Library of the Central Queens YM & YWHA, at 67-09 108th St. All events are open to the general public, with a $5 donation suggested. For more information, call (718) 268-5011, ext. 151, or email pkurtz@cqyjcc.org.

Meet The Wizard Queens Theatre in the Park (QTP) presents Santa Meets The Wicked Wizard on Dec. 26 at 11a.m. and 1 p.m. in the Claire Shulman Playhouse Main Stage Theatre at Queens Theatre in the Park, Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Tickets are $12 and are available at queenstheatre.org or by phone at (718) 760-0064.

Spousal Loss Support An 8-week bereavement support group will begin Dec. 23, in Kew Gardens Hills. If you have lost a spouse from 3 months to 1 year ago, and are age 60 or over, please consider joining this free group. To register or for more information, contact Carmiya Weinraub, MSW at (718) 896-9090, Ext. 243. This group is presented by F·E·G·S’s Partners in Caring, funded by a grant from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, Inc., with support from the UJA-Federation of New York.

Menorah Lighting Chabad of Rego Park will sponsor a Grand Menorah Lighting at Queens Boulevard and 67th Road at 3 p.m. Dec. 18, 5:30 p.m. For more information, call (718) 897-6578 or (718) 393-3085, or go to chabadrego.org.

New Year’s Eve Gala The Bellerose Jewish Center, 254-04 Union Tpke. in Floral Park will be celebrating its Annual New Year’s Eve Gala with music, dining and dancing. The $65 per person celebration includes hot d’oeuvres and dinner, champagne and desserts, dancing to DJ, party favors, and is BYOB. Reserve your tables early. The festivities start at 8:30 p.m. Please RSVP by Dec. 21. Advance payment is required. Contact the Bellerose JC Office at (718) 343-9001.

Precious On Dec. 18 at 1 p.m., Joyce Berger will moderate the movie “Precious,” which can be seen at the Kew Gardens Cinemas. The discussion will take place at the Queens Community House Kew Gardens. Everyone is welcome.

Send Queens Closeup News and Photos to: QueensTribune, 174-15 Horace Harding Expwy. Fresh Meadows, NY 11365

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 13

Theatre Time Productions is auditioning for the role of Danny in “Laura” by Vera Caspary and George Sklar. They’re seeking a male between ages 17 and 19. If interested, please contact the director Tom Williams at (516) 459-5585 to schedule an audition and any further information. The show will be performed April 16-18 and 23-25 at 15-43 149th St.

to the public except for guided tours led by the Urban Park Rangers.


Queens Focus PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . . PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE ...PEOPLE . .PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE.. PEOPLE. . .PEOPLE . . .PEOPLE... Army Pfc. Angel T. Mincer has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches, and field training exercises. She is the daughter of Billie Mincer of Leawood Court, Hephzibah, Ga., and niece of Carol Dismond of Flushing. Mincer graduated in 1998 from Glenn Hills High School, Augusta, Ga., and received an associate degree in 2003 from Georgia Military College, Martinez, Ga.

Page 14 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

The following area residents are among the approximately 3,600 new students who have enrolled at Syracuse University for the 2009-10 academic year. Syracuse’s new students are studying from among the more than 200 majors offered at the institution: Andrew Johnson of College Point, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Michael Lee of College Point, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Hyon Young

Choi of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Michelle Chun of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s School of Education; Kevon Davis of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Janet Huang of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Faizan Imam of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Young Kim of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Esther Lee of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s College of Human Ecology; Yunha Lim of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management; Dan Liu of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management; Paul No of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Winnie Pun of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management; Gino Rosignano of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s School of Education; Kenny Shin of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s The College of Arts and Sciences; Yatong Wang of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s College of Visual and Performing Arts; Qichang Weng of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Justine Yi of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s School of Education; Jae Hyun Yoo of Flushing, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Xue Rui Zhang of Flushing, enrolled in

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS INDEX NO.: 6250/2009 DATE FILED: 3-13-09 SUMMONS NYCTL 2008-A TRUST AND THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS COLLATERAL AGENT AND CUSTODIAN FOR NYCTL 2008-A TRUST, Plaintiffs, against- HELEN BOLDEN; JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, SUCCESSOR TO IRVING TRUST COMPANY; HERITAGE CREDIT CORPORATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; CITY OF NEW YORK ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD; “JOHN DOE # 1” through “JOHN DOE # 100”, the last 100 names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiffs. The persons or parties intended being the owners, tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, and if any of the aforesaid individual captioned defendants, if any, be dead, their respective heirs-at-law, next of kin, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors, and successors in interest, and generally all persons having or claiming under, by, or through any of the aforesaid individual captioned defendants, if any, if they be dead, whether by purchase, inheritance, lien

or otherwise, including any right, title or interest in and to the real property described in the complaint herein, all of who and whose names and places of residence are unknown to the plaintiffs. Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action, to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with the summons, to serve notice of appearance, on the plaintiffs’ attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the date of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York), and in case of failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Plaintiffs designate Queens County as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject property. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS; The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Bernice D. Siegal, a Justice of the Supreme Court, Queens County, dated Nov. 20, 2009 and filed with the complaint and other papers in the Queens County Clerk’s Office, Jamaica, NY. The object of the action is to foreclose a

Tax Lien along with interest, surcharges, penalties, additions, expenses, attorney’s fees, and the costs and disbursements of this action on prem. k/a Block 1732, Lot 41. Dated: Dec. 11, 2009, LEVY & LEVY, Attys. For Pltf. #76833 NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the tax lien holder who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the tax lien holder will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (TAX LIEN HOLDER) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: March 11, 2009 LEVY & LEVY Attorneys for Plaintiff 12 Tulip Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 487-6655 BY: JOSHUA LEVY, ESQ. File No.: 859328

You Can Now E-Mail Your Legal Copy to legals@queenstribune.com

SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management; Brennan Hughes of Whitestone, enrolled in SU’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science; Matthew Lum of Whitestone, enrolled in SU’s School o f E d u c a t i o n ; a n d S a n d r a Y a n g of Whitestone, enrolled in SU’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management. Air Force Airman Keith A. Garner graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, TX. The airman completed an intensive, eightweek program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. He is the son of Patricia Arthur-Garner of New York City, and Keith Garner Sr. of Queens. Garner is a 2002 graduate of Benjamin N. Cardozo High School. Robert T. Qi graduated from the Army ROTC (Reserve Officer Training Corps) Leader Development and Assessment Course, also known as “Operation Warrior Forge,” at Fort Lewis, Tacoma, Wash. The 32 days of training provide the best possible professional training and evaluation for all cadets in the aspects of military life, administration and logistical support. Although continued military training and leadership development is included in the curriculum, the primary focus of the course is to develop and evaluate each cadet’s officer potential as a leader by exercising the cadet’s intelligence, common sense, ingenuity and physical stamina. The cadet command assesses each cadet’s performance and progress in officer traits, qualities and professionalism while attending the course. Cadets in their junior and senior year of college must complete the leadership development course. Upon successful completion of the course, the ROTC program, and graduation from college, cadets are commissioned as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army, National Guard, or Reserve. The cadet is a student at St. Johns University. He is the son of Aili Yu of Flushing. Qi is a 2004 graduate of John Bowne High School. The following students from our area were admitted as first-year students at Pace University this fall: Andy Jang, from Oakland Gardens; Sharon Kim , from Bayside; Lauren Mckechnie, from Bayside; Peter Vasilakos, from Bayside; Danny Velasquez, from Bayside; Linda Yi, from Oakland Gardens; and Greta Rojas, from Bayside. Pace University is recognized for its programs such as business, law, art, science, computer information technology, education, and nursing with a core curriculum based in the liberal arts. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Abdul R. Shabazz, son of Lynette Abbott of Plainfield, N. J. and Blair King of Queens, along with sailors and Marines from the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group (BATARG), Norfolk, Va., and 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), Camp Lejeune, N. C., recently departed the 5th Fleet and entered 6th Fleet’s area of operations after traveling through the Suez Canal and entering the Mediterranean Sea. The BATARG is preparing to return to the U.S. as it nears the end of a six-month deployment. The BATARG has been conducting maritime security operations while the 22nd MEU participated in several theater security cooperation engagements and exercises in 5th

Fleet’s area of operation. The 5th Fleet area of operations encompasses 2. 5 million square miles of water and includes the Persian Gulf, the Arabian Sea, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Oman and parts of the Indian Ocean. While deployed, Bataan launched 10 MV22B Ospreys from the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit in three waves, completing the 510 nautical-mile flight to Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, in just over two hours. The aircraft were part of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 263 (Reinforced) and were attached to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 261 to serve as part of 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade’s aviation combat element. The 22nd MEU was the first Marine Expeditionary Unit to conduct a ship-based deployment with the tiltrotor aircraft. VMM263 (Rein) attached to the MEU in September 2008 and was the first squadron to deploy with the aircraft to Iraq in 2007. The Osprey was also used to conduct multiple medical evacuations from ship to shore during the deployment and was employed to conduct logistics flights to Rota, Spain; Sigonella, Italy; Djibouti, Africa; and Bahrain. For more than a month, the squadron supported desert training while the MEU trained ashore in Camp Buehring, Kuwait. During the bi-annual exercise Bright Star 2009, U.S. forces teamed with coalition forces including the Egyptian army and navy, Pakistani marines, and Kuwaiti marines to storm Egyptian beaches near Alexandria simulating an amphibious assault in October. Twelve aircraft from the MEU, five landing craft from the Bataan ARG, two Egyptian landing craft utilities, six amphibious assault vehicles, five Egyptian amphibious tracked vehicles and a host of forces from other partner nations also participated in the biannual event.Bright Star, the longest running exercise in the U.S. Central Command’s area of operations, was established in 1981 as a result of the Camp David Peace Accords. The CENTCOM and Egyptian co-sponsored exercise is designed to strengthen militaryto-military relationships and improve readiness and interoperability between U.S., Egyptian, and coalition forces. ARGs usually include an amphibious squadron (PHIBRON), an amphibious assault ship (LHA/D), amphibious transport dock (LPD), dock landing ship (LSD), embarked Naval support elements and an embarked MEU. The Bataan ARG is composed of the multipurpose amphibious assault ship USS Bataan (LHD 5), the amphibious transport dock USS Ponce (LPD 15), the amphibious dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43), Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22, Fleet Surgical Team (FST) 6, Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 2, ACU 4 and Beachmaster Unit (BMU) 2. The BATARG and 22nd MEU provide the combatant commander a versatile sea-based force that can be tailored to a variety of missions, including quick reaction crisis response options in maritime, as well as littoral and inland environments in support of the Navy’s Maritime Strategy. The 22nd MEU is composed of Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment; Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 263 (Reinforced); Combat Logistics Battalion 22 and its command element. The unit is serving as the theater reserve force for U.S. Central Command.

Send your people news to: Queens Focus, Queens Tribune 174-15 Horace Harding Expy. Fresh Meadows, NY 11365


Cold Weather Tips: Save Energy. Save Money. Stay Warm. Conservation is a smart energy strategy year round. Frigid weather brings its own challenges for New Yorkers, and these cold weather tips offer ways to help you keep warm, save energy and get help with energy bills.

CONSERVE • Seal leaks around windows and doors with caulk or weather stripping. • Keep drapes or furniture away from heat sources so heat can flow freely. • Open curtains and let the sun warm rooms; close them at night to keep heat in. • Close doors and warm-air vents in unused rooms. • Get financial incentives for upgrades to homes and businesses that will help you save energy and money. Learn more at www.conEd.com/energyefficiency or call 1-877-870-6118. • Find more energy tips at www.conEd.com and www.getenergysmart.org, the web site of NYSERDA – New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

GET HELP • Call 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633) if you’re having trouble paying your energy bill. • Ask about our Level Payment Plan, which spreads payments evenly over the year so colder months are less of a burden. • If you’re income-eligible, you can get help from the Con Edison-sponsored EnergyShare fund at 1-877-480-SHARE, or the Federal Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) at 1-800-692-0557 in NYC or 1-914-995-5619 in Westchester County. • If you receive a HEAP grant for another utility or an oil company and pay Con Edison bills, you may be eligible for our low-income rate. To qualify, fax a copy of your award letter to 1-212-844-0110.

STAY SAFE • Never use your kitchen gas range or oven to heat your home. It can cause a fire or create lethal carbon monoxide gas. • Never extinguish a pilot light. It could lead to a dangerous gas leak.

• Report electric service problems at 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633) or online at www.conEd.com.

©2009 Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Ad: Arnell

• If you see steam on Manhattan streets, call us immediately at 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633) so we can check it out. Steam is caused by water falling on a steam pipe or manhole cover, or it is caused by a leak.

Visit conEd.com for 100+ tips to go green and save green. Find us at facebook.com/powerofgreen.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 15

• If you smell gas, leave the area at once and call 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633). A gas leak has the smell of rotten eggs. Don’t light matches or use any electrical device.


Trib Plays Role In Local Horror Flick

Tribune Photo by Ira Cohen

By DOMENICK RAFTER Film director/producer and Glendale native Thomas Churchill brought his latest production, a horror flick titled “Emerging Past,” as close to home as possible – right onto the streets of his old neighborhood and the hallways of the Queens Tribune office. The film, which Churchill describes as “in the tradition of ‘The Exorcist’ and ‘The Omen,’” stars Krista Grotte, who plays Pam, a photographer working for the Tribune who is assigned by her boss, Cameron, played by Stephen Geoffreys, to cover an election. In the process, she stumbles across a frightening hidden world where she witnesses human sacrifices. She then becomes a target of the cult she exposes. Churchill said the film has a surprise twist ending that people won’t see coming. Churchill filmed the bulk of the movie on site around his native parts of Queens, including Glendale, Ridgewood and Middle Village. One scene was shot at St. Matthias Parish in Ridgewood, where Churchill went to school as a child. Filming also took place in early and mid-November in the Queens Tribune office

The crew of “Emerging Past” sets up a scene in the office of Tribune Publisher Michael Schenkler.

and included a cameo appearance by Queens Tribune Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Michael Schenkler. Churchill said the Queens Tribune is “a major part of the film.” “Emerging Past,” which Churchill says is meant to “scare the hell out of you,” also stars Brooke McCarter, who had a role in the 1987 film “The Lost Boys,” Steve Dash, and Edward X. Young. Churchill worked with producers Paul and Lori Weinroth, as well as his

childhood friend David Lee Madison, who is a Middle Village native and a close friend of Churchill’s since junior high school. Churchill was raised in the Queens neighborhoods of Glendale and Ridgewood, and graduated from Franklin K. Lane High School in Cypress Hills, Brooklyn. He now divides his time between Los Angeles and New York. Churchill will head back to California to

Low-Income = Free Cell Phones By DOMENICK RAFTER Virgin Mobile launched a new cell phone service last week aimed at bringing no-cost cellular service to more than a million lowincome New Yorkers . Partnering w ith HeartShare Human Service s, a New York-based non-profit organization, Virgin Mobile launched Assurance Wirele ss in New York State Dec 9. The new service provides customers with a free cell phone, 200 free minutes per month, free voicemail and free 911 access. For an extra charge, customers can add on more minutes, international calling, text messaging, and 411 service. “Most of us take cell phone service for granted,” said Dan Schulman, president of Sprint’s prepaid group, which includes Virgin Mobile USA. “The government estimates that more than one million households in New York State are eligible for income-based assistance programs. We are proud to offer this valuable service, part icularly in these tough time s, which dispropor tionately affect lower income customers” To qualify for the free service, applicants

must be participating in one or more of seven government assistance programs: Medicaid, Food Stamps/SNAP, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporar y Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Federal Public Housing Assistance or Section 8, Low Income Home Energy Assistance (LIHEAP), or the National School Lunch Program’s Free Lunch Program. Applicants may also qualify if their household income is at or below 133 percent of the federal povert y level. Assurance Wirele ss is being suppor ted financially by the Lifeline Assistance program, par t of the Low Income Program of the federal Universal Services Fund. It is administered by the Universal Service Administrative Company, and designed to ensure that qualit y and necessar y telecommunications services, like phone and internet service, are available to low-income customers at affordable rates. The launch kicked off with a training session held in the office of Assemblyman Peter Rivera (D-Bronx). Ne w York State is t he f o u r t h s t a t e w he re Vi r gi n M o b i l e launched this service, following North Caro-

Tribune Professional Guide

CORNS CALLOUSES ULCERS DIABETIC FOOT CARE FUNGAL NAILS INGROWN TOE NAILS

House Calls Podiatrists

DR. DOV RUBENSTEIN

DABPOPPM*

*Diplomate American Board of Podiatric Orthopedics and Primary Podriatic Med.

Medicare Participant

DR ELIZABETH RUBENSTEIN

CALL (718) 961-5320

lina, Tenne ssee and Virginia. “Individuals given the oppor tunit y to have wireless connections at no cost, offered accessibility and convenience; I applaud Virgin Mobile and Hear tShare for their commitment to improve local communities,” said Rivera. For t heir part, HeartShare Human Services is helping spread word of the new service to those who may be eligible, but not have heard about the launch. “This is a special situation in which the public and private sectors are working together to meet the needs of the community,” said HeartShare Human Services President and CEO William R. Guarinello. “We are excited to work with Virgin Mobile and local organizations to provide these muchneeded cell phones to lower-income individuals who may use the phone to obtain employment, schedule medical appointments, or be in contact with their children’s schools.” Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125.

To reserve your space call 357-7400

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 17

Gentle Foot Care In Your Home! · · · · · ·

cut the movie, which he expects to be ready for release sometime mid-winter. He is currently in discussions with a few studios about a theatrical release, which he hopes will happen in the spring or summer of 2010. In the meantime, Churchill will be back in New York in February to film his next project. Reach Reporter Domenick Rafter at drafter@queenstribune.com or (718) 3577400, Ext. 125.


Tribune Professional Guide To reserve your space call 357-7400 – MASSAGE ENVY –

Gift Cards

YOUR SHORTCUT TO A HAPPY HOLIDAY

Gift Cards

Gift Packages

Gift Memberships

Starting at $49

Starting at $69

Starting at $177

Perfectly HEALTHY. Perfectly CONVENIENT. Perfectly PRICED.

49

$

*

Introductory 1-hour Massage Session

Instant Gratification

When the holiday stress becomes too much, find relief in a soothing one-hour massage session at Massage Envy.

Massage Envy - Port Washington Located at 47 Main Street Across the street from the Port Washington LIRR train station Call 516-767-6368

Professional | Affordable Open 7 days: M-F 9am-9pm, Sat 9am-8pm, Sun 10am-6pm

Page 18 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

*Valid for first one hour session which consists of a 50-minute massage and time for consultation and dressing.

Compiled by DOMENICK RAFTER

101st Precinct DOUBLE SHOOTING: On Saturday, Dec. 6, at 10:47 p.m., police responded to 29-32 Beach Channel Dr. in Bayswater to a call of a man who had been shot. Upon arrival, police discovered two men, a black man who had been shot in the head and chest, and an 18-year-old Hispanic man who had been shot in the chest and neck. Both victims were taken to Jamaica Hospital where the black male was pronounced dead on arrival.

at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crimestoppers website at nypdcrimestoppers.com or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then entering TIP577.All calls are strictly confidential.

From the DA VEHICULAR ASSAULT CONVICTION: An Ozone Park man was convicted of firstdegree reckless endangerment, second-degree vehicular assault, two counts of driving while intoxicated, speeding, leaving the scene of an 106th Precinct DRIVER KILLED: On Sunday, Dec. 13, at accident, driving without insurance and driv5:40 a.m., police responded to a vehicle accident ing without a license after a drunk driving on the southbound service road of the Van Wyck accident that left six women injured. According to the trial testimony, 35 yearExpressway at 111th Avenue in South Richmond Hill. Upon arriving, police determined old Anthony Rampino of 103-17 90th St. in that the unidentified male driver was driving Ozone Park was driving a 2002 Chrysler southbound on the service road when he lost convertible, with his roof down, at a high rate control of the auto and struck a tree. The driver of speed – sometimes as fast as 100 mph – down the Long Island Expressway near Flushwas pronounced dead on the scene. ing Meadows Corona Park, while intoxicated, on July 25, 2006. In addition to 107th Precinct MAN KILLED BY TRAIN: On Thurs- Rampino, there was a male passenger in the day, Dec. 10, at approximately 5:05 p.m., front passenger seat and six women in the police responded to the 179th Street subway back seat, three on the seats and three on the station at 179th Street and Hillside Ave in other women’s laps. Rampino ignored the Jamaica, after receiving a 911 call of a male women’s pleas to slow down and stop swervstruck by a train. Upon arrival, responding ing in and out of lanes, instead raising the car officers found an unidentified black man, radio volume louder to drown out the probetween 40 and 50 years old, who was un- tests. He eventually crashed into two medians and fled the scene of the accident by foot. conscious and unresponsive. The District Attorney’s office said one Additionally, it was determined that a northbound F train struck the victim. EMS responded female passenger was ejected from the veand pronounced the victim DOA on the scene. hicle and thrown across three lanes of traffic. No criminality is suspected. The Medical Exam- she suffered severe abrasions on her arms, iner will investigate to determine the cause of shoulders and face and required reconstructive surgery on her knees. Another woman death. suffered a broken pelvis. The other four women passengers were all treated 110th Precinct at local hospitals for various back SUBWAY FLASHER: T h e injuries and lacerations. An off-duty NYPD is asking for the public’s police officer saw the defendant assistance in identifying an indileave the scene of the accident and vidual wanted in connection with chased him, eventually locating the an act of public lewdness on the defendant walking in Flushing subway. Meadows Park. He was arrested On Saturday, Dec. 7, at approximately 3 a.m., the subject sat across This man ex- and taken to the 112th precinct from a 18-year-old black woman on posed himself where an intoxilyzer exam was administered and indicated his blood a Queens-bound G train and rubbed on the train. alcohol level to be .10, which is his crotch area. The subject exposed his erect penis while looking at the victim and above the legal limit. The defendant, who faces up to seven began to masturbate. The subject then exited the train at Woodhaven Blvd and boarded the years in prison, has been remanded without next Brooklyn bound train out of the station. bail pending his sentencing on Dec. 23. The suspect is described as an black man, FUGITIVE FELON CAPTURED: A 5-foot-11, between 30 and 40 years old and was wearing a white jacket, colorful shirt, dark former Brooklyn elementary school principants and a blue winter hat with white trim. pal, sentenced in absentia to 20 years in prison in 2004 for molesting a young relative has been extradited to Queens from Con112th Precinct ABDUCTION ATTEMPT: The NYPD is necticut, arraigned on bail jumping and will seeking the public’s assistance in identifying soon begin his 20-year prison sentence. Forty-six year-old Leroy Johnson, formerly and apprehending an individual wanted in of 159-16 Meyer Ave. in Jamaica, skipped out connection with an attempted abduction. on $100,000 bail after pleading guilty On Tuesday, Dec. 8, at approxito engaging in sexual conduct with an mately 8:20 a.m., a man approached underage girl in his residence bea 14-year-old Asian girl from behind tween September 1998 and July 1, and grabbed her near the intersec2003, during which time the victim tion of 67th Avenue and Yellowstone was between nine and 14 years of age. Boulevard. The suspect then pushed He was apprehended in New the victim into the back seat of a dark Haven, CT in April 2009 by federal colored car. The victim was able to authorities when he fraudulently get free and run away to a school attempted to obtain a Social Secuwere she reported the incident. rity card using an alias. On June 8, The suspect is described as a Hispanic man in this 30s, 5-foot-10, This suspec t at- 2009, Johnson appeared in U.S. approximately 150 lbs. wearing a tempted to ab- District Court in Bridgeport, CT brown Gucci baseball hat, dark jacket duc t a 14-year- to plead guilty to making false statements to the Social Security Adwith gray hooded sweatshirt and old. ministration. Johnson was the prinblue jeans. Anyone with information in regards to cipal of P.S. 25 in Brooklyn from 2000 until this incident is asked to call Crime stoppers his arrest on July 2, 2003.


Start Managing Your Health! It's Time to Partner With a Team of Dedicated Primary Care Physicians Who Care About You!

Barra, Rawlings and Coman Medical Group

Peace in the World Good Health Care To All

Our doctors are Board Certified in the most advanced procedures and techniques in the fields of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics and are available in a multi-specialty setting. The practice focuses on the prevention, diagnosis, management and treatment of adult illnesses and diseases.

Take the first step to better health – call us! Call BRC Internal Medicine of Bayside at 718-631-0500 for an appointment BRC Internal Medicine – An affiliate of Lenox Hill Hospital’s Bayside Primary & Specialist Health Care Center. www.lenoxhillhospital.org

Peter Barra, M.D. John Rawlings, M.D. John Coman, M.D. Internal Medicine – Primary Care Physicians Serving the Queens Community for over 30 years 44-02 Francis Lewis Blvd, Bayside • 718-631-0500 The practice accepts most insurance plans.

Ion Oltean, M.D. Svetlana Fuzaylova, M.D. Sherban Pavlovici, M.D. Grigoriy Shatenfeld, M.D. Calina Pavlovici, M.D.

Congressman

GARY L. ACKERMAN Paid For And Authorized by Ackerman For Congress

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 19


Campaign Mystery:

Peralta Defends Office Space Donation, Fingers Point From Monserrate’s Office By KAITLYN KILMETIS A swarm of unanswered questions loom around allegations surrounding a New York Daily News article about Assemblyman Jose Peralta (D-Corona) and the Corona-Elmhurst Center for Economic Development. On Dec. 9, columnist Juan Gonzalez wrote that Peralta requested more than $500,000 in taxpayer funds for a nonprofit organization that is inactive and has been for defunct for at least the past two years. Peralta, who aided in developing the Corona-Elmhurst Center for Economic Development early in his Assembly tenure, vehemently disputes the article’s claims and attempted to set the record straight.

Page 20 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

The Group In Question Per alta said in 2003 he was approached by Fernando Fernandez – who had a background in nonprofit organizations with an emphasis on development groups – about his plans for a development center for the area. Peralta said he was attracted to the nonprofit, the Corona-Elmhurst Center for Economic Development, because bringing a voice to the small business community was a platform issue throughout his campaign. In 2003 Peralta earmarked $125,000 for the organization to begin after being presented a comprehensive business plan by Fernandez, who was named Executive Director, according to the Assemblyman. Then, for the next three years, from 2004 through 2006, Peralta secured increments of $125,000 each year for the center, totaling another $375,000. Peralta said the first $250,000 was dispersed successfully by the organization through computer classes, business seminars and a variety of community services. As the organization flourished, Peralta said Fernandez fell ill and required a kidney transplant. In 2006, he approached Peralta and said due to his deteriorating health, he was not sure how effectively he could continue to run the organization. Immediately after, Peralta said he approached the Assembly’s Ways and Means Committee in order to put a freeze on the $250,000 earmarked in 2005 and 2006. Also, in 2005 U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer secured $250,000 in federal funds for the center’s development. This week, the Senator’s spokesman Josh Vlasto said, “The federal money was never drawn down and, as the grant has since expired, we have asked the SBA to redirect the funds.” In terms of state funding, Peralta maintains that the first $250,000 the state supplied was dispersed and the other $250,000 remains untouched to this day. He added that as an assemblyman his job description includes earmarking the funds, but each assembly project is administered by a state agency. In this case, that agency was the State Dept. of Economic Development. Although an Assembly spokesperson could not locate the Center’s files in time for print, the Empire State Development Corp. released a statement asserting their oversight of the Assembly-sponsored projects.

Site In Question Another topic raised by Gonzalez was the location of the CoronaElmhurst Center – 104-01 Roosevelt Ave. When active, the center was housed in a twostory commercial building that at times was also home to Peralta’s 500-sq. ft. campaign Assemblyman Jose Peralta (2nd from r.) is joined by Asoffice. Peralta said semblyman Jeffrion Aubry (r.) and members of the CoFernandez found rona-Elmhurst Center for Economic Development at a the space on his breakfast meeting at Rancho Jubilee Restaurant in East own and he had no Elmhurst shortly after the group’s founding. part in determining the space, he chose to make payments the location of the Center. because the election was more relaxed The space is owned by a corporation than his 2006 run against Carmen headed by a dentist named Mercedes Enriquez. He said the fact he began Mota-Martinez, a woman in a business paying rent had nothing to do with the relationship with Peralta’s mother, Rosa fact the Corona-Elmhurst Center had Hernandez, who serves as the shut down. company’s office manager. At one point, Peralta, Hernandez and Behind The Scenes Mota-Martinez all lived in the same multiPeralta, who is staging a Senate race dwelling home in Corona – Hernandez and Peralta in one apartment and Mota- against Sen. Hiram Monserrate (D-CoMartinez in another. Although the Daily rona), said he believes the entire Daily News article states the two both currently News story is a hit piece staged by the live together, Peralta said his mother has Senator to distract from the pertinent issince moved to a home in East Elmhurst sues. “This is a classic smear campaign – a dwelling which is co-owned by MotaMartinez. He said Mota-Martinez still tactic that needs to end,” Peralta said. “This is one of the reasons why I am lives in the Corona building. The Daily News article also mentions running.” He continued that the piece’s rea number of in-kind donations from porter seems to habitually Peralta’s mother, reported sing Monserrate’s praises. on the Assemblyman’s “The facts speak for them2005 and 2006 campaign selves,” Peralta said. “Every finance records. At the time time there was a positive arwhen Gonzalez’ article was ticle about Hiram Monserrate published, there were 23 in the Daily News it was Juan monthly $1,300 donations Gonzalez that wrote it. Let the from Hernandez to account readers make the judgment.” for the market value of the Gonzalez declined to redonated office space. spond to Peralta’s claim. The Board of Elections When Monserrate’s office confirmed that on Dec. 14, was contacted for comment, Peralta filed a number of amendments to the campaign Fernando Fernandez, one of the Senator’s staffers finance records to switch the who was the CEO of the answered the phone and said donor from his mother to the Corona-Elmhurst Cen- he had already been made 104-01 Roosevelt Realty ter for Economic De- aware, via Juan Gonzalez, that the Tribune was investiCorporation. As of publica- velopment. gating the story. tion, there are now only eight Gonzalez would not substantiate that donations for a total of $12,000. Peralta said his mother was originally assertion. The employee then introduced the listed as the donor because she is the office’s manager. The error was an “hon- Tribune to the source that had given inest make in terms of who [the donation] formation to the Daily News – an Elmhurst author, who asked to remain was attributed to,” Peralta said. He also added in the future he will unnamed. He said he has been gatherhave an election lawyer review all the ing information about the Peralta situation for the past seven years. documents his campaign files. He said as an investigative journalJohn Conklin, a spokesman for the Board of Elections, said filing adjustments ist he researches the campaigns and years after a campaign is neither typical actions of many Queens officials as a nor atypical. He said making alterations service to his community. The author asto the records is encouraged because the sured he had no link to Monserrate and investigates all borough politicians. ultimate goal is accurate filing. Upon further research, it was ascerIn his campaign records from his 2008 election, rather than receive the rent as tained that through personal contribua donation, Peralta began making cash tions and donations from businesses payments for $1,300. He said although the author operates, the unnamed the 104-01 corporation offered to donate source contributed large amounts to the

campaign of Peralta’s 2006 opponent Carmen Enriquez. Campaign finance records also list the source and Enriquez as having the same address, including apartment number. Enriquez’ campaign spending reports state that the unnamed source and the businesses he owns received a total of $600, in consulting, printing and office space fees, from the 2006 campaign.

Future Consideration According to Peralta, since Fernandez’ illness and subsequent resignation, operations at the Corona-Elmhurst Center for Economic Development have come to a halt. Currently, a Manhattan-based development organization, Audubon Partnership for Economic Development, LDC, is in the process of taking measures to reopen the agency. After repeated attempts, Fernandez could not be reached for comment. Peralta said he believes he has withdrawn from the community due to his health problems. Although his page on a social networking site states he is employed by Audubon, Audubon representatives said he hasn’t worked at the company for a year or two. Peralta said he reached out to the Audubon Partnership because he felt personally invested in the Center and believes its restoration will serve the community immeasurably, especially in difficult economic times. He said Audubon is in the process of restructuring the organization and finding a new executive director. Although Monserrate refused to speak to Peralta’s accusations against him, he was willing to discuss the $47,500 he earmarked for Audubon, which he later decided to withdraw from the appropriation in June this year. He said Peralta asked him for support for the agency, and initially agreed but eventually changed his mind after conducting his own internal investigation. “I did further review, myself and my office, and we found one that they had not filed any of their 990’s [the forms nonprofit organizations must file with the IRS],” he said. “Upon further review, we learned later in my office that the organization was not running and wasn’t providing services.” Through a popular non-profit public record clearinghouse, guidestar.org, Corona-Elmhurst Center for Economic Development did not have any tax filings on record. A press conference has been scheduled for noon Thursday, Dec. 17, outside the defunct group’s headquarters at 104th Street and Roosevelt Avenue to address the accusations against Peralta. City of New York Neighborhood Advisory Board Member Humberto Suarez Mota and Queens County civic and community group leaders will gather to investigate “possible fraud and illegal activities by the State official.” The release asserts that other violations by Peralta will be revealed at the news conference. The organizers did not respond to requests for comment. Reach Reporter Kaitlyn Kilmetis at kkilmetis@queenstribune.com or (718) 357-7400, Ext. 128.


Page 24 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

LEGAL NOTICE PROBATE CITATION File No. 2009-3608 SURROGATE’S COURT – QUEENS COUNTY CITATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: Hilda Robinson, John Henry Robinson and Vernon Staunton if living and if dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin and distributees whose names and places of residence are unknown and if they died subsequent to the decedent herein, to their executors, administrators, legatees, devisees, assignees and successors in interest whose name and places of residence are unknown and to all other heirs at law; next of kin and distributees of Etta Hebbons, the decedent herein, whose names and places of residence are unknown and cannot after diligent inquiry be ascertained. ATTORNEY GENERAL N.Y. STATE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR QUEENS COUNTY A petition having been duly filed by Ruth Dumas who is domiciled at 172-05 108th Avenue, Jamaica, N.Y. 11433. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York, on 22nd day of October, 2009 at 9:30 .M. of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Etta. M. Hebbons, a/k/a Etta Hebbons lately domiciled at 172-05 108th Avenue, Jamaica, N.Y. 11433 admitting to probate a Will dated December 6, 2000 a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Etta M. Hebbons deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that [x] Letters Testamentary issue to: Etta M Hebbons (State any further relief requested) HON. ROBERT L. NAHMAN Surrogate Alicermarie E. Rice Chief Clerk SEP 09 2009 (Seal) Thomas J. Adams, Esq. Attorney for Petitioner 718847-4572 Telephone Number 114-06 Jamaica Avenue, Richmond Hill, N.Y. 11418 Address of Attorney [Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you.] ________________________________________________________________________ Name: WEISMAN ENTERPRISES LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. Of State of NY 09/17/ 09. Off. Loc.:Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to THE LLC, 218-01 Merrick Blvd., Springfield Gardens, NY 11413. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. _______________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of COASTAL LIGHT LLC, a domestic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/11/ 2009. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 29 Beach 220th

LEGAL NOTICE Street, Breezy Point, NY 11697. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ 20-34 119TH STREET LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/1/2009. Office in Queens Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 20-48 119th St., College Point, N.Y. 11356. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. _______________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of DOCTOR ON THE GO, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/27/ 09. Office location: Queens County. Princ. office of PLLC: 92-04 Springfield Blvd., Queens Village, NY 11428. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Practice of medicine. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of QUEENS ASC PARTNERS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/09. Office location: Queens County. Princ. office of LLC: 192-13 Union Tnpk., Fresh Meadows, NY 11366. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Purpose: Any lawful activity. _______________________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: GIASU LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/02/09. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2060. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Alexandros Giannakis, 35-55 29th Street, Apartment 6G, Long Island City, New York 11106. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. _______________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of MCGUINNESS MANAGEMENT TEAM LLC, a domestic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/02/2009. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Stephen McGuinness , 9109 96 St., Woodhaven, NY 11421. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. _______________________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: COMPREHENSIVE HEALTH CONSULTANTS, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/03/09. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Koenig & Samberg, 300 Old Country Road,

LEGAL NOTICE Mineola, New York 11501. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of Velvetchrome Assets Review LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/09. Office location: Queens Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents Inc., 875 Avenue of the Americas, Ste. 501, NY, NY 10001, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of 188 GREEN ST., LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/02/09. Office location: Queens County. Princ. Office of LLC: 80-55 255 th St., Floral Park, NY 11004. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. Of its princ. Office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation InterActive Publications, LLC Filed with the Sec of State NY (SSNY) on 09/03/2009. Principal office location: Queens County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom processes against the LLC may be served. SSNY Shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him/her to: 14945 258 th Street, Rosedale, NY 11422. Purpose: Any lawful activity. _______________________________________________________________________ NOTICE OF FORMATION of: 48-20 48 th STREET LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/28/09. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is James Montgomery, Esq., 267 Fifth Avenue, Suite 810, New York, New York 10016. Purpose of LLC: to engage in any lawful activity. Street address of Principal Business location i s : 4 8 - 2 0 4 8 th S t r e e t , Woodside, New York 11377 ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of GLOBAL TALK NETWORKS LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on 09/21/2007. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to THE LLC: 32-41 Steinway Street 2nd Fl, Astoria, NY 11103-4075. Purpose: Any lawful activity. ________________________________________________________________________ SUPREME COURT – QUEENS COUNTY In the Matter of the Application of Benny F. Terrusa, as Guardian of the Person and Property of JORGE REGUEIRO, an incapacitated person to sell certain real property pursuant to an order of this court dated October 16, 2009, by Hon. Charles J. Thomas, a

LEGAL NOTICE Justice of this Court, an application to sell premises 14944 118 th Street South Ozone Park, N.Y. 11420 Block 11818 Lot 61 being a plot 30 feet by 100 feet will be made on the 22nd day of December 2009 at 11:00 A.M. at I.A. Part 20 of the Supreme Court at 8811 Sutphin Boulevard Jamaica, N.Y. 11435. Said property is presently under contract, subject to the approval of the court, for the price of $250,000.00. Contact PETER M. WOLF, ESQ. of Kew Gardens, N.Y. Attorney for the Guardian 125-10 Queens Boulevard Kew Gardens, N.Y. 11415 (718) 261-7580 ________________________________________________________________________ SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF OBJECT OF ACTION STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT: COUNTY OF QUEENS ACTION TO FORECLOSE A MORTGAGE INDEX NO.: 5741/09 PRIVATE CAPITAL GROUP, LLC Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL CURRAN, DEIRDRE CURRAN, Defendant(s). MORTGAGED PREMISES: 217-19 BEACH 116TH STREET, FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11694 SBL #: BLOCK 16212 LOT 28 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby summoned to answer the Complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff(s) attorney(s) within twenty days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Attorney for Plaintiff has an office for business in the County of Erie. Trial to be held in the County of Queens. The basis of the venue designated above is the location of the Mortgaged Premises. Dated this 12th day of November, 2009, Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 TO: DANIEL CURRAN, Defendant(s) In this Action. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an order of HON. JOSEPH G. GOLIA of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 28th day of October, 2009 and filed with the Complaint in the Office of the Queens County Clerk, in the City of Jamaica. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by DANIEL CURRAN and DEIRDRE CURRAN dated the 9th day of August, 2005, to secure the sum of $250,000.00, and recorded at Instrument No. 2005000533004 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of QUEENS, on the 22nd day of September, 2005; which mortgage was duly assigned by assignment dated the 21st

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

day of December, 2006, and recorded on the 14th day of February, 2008, in the Office of the Clerk of QUEENS County at Instrument No. 2008000063083; The property in question is described as follows: 217-19 BEACH 116TH STREET, FAR ROCKAWAY, NY 11694 SEE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION Block 16212 and Lot 28 ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York, known and designated on a certain map entitled, “Map of Rockaway Park (No. 3) 5 Ward, Borough of Queens, City of New York, belonging to the Rockaway Park Improvement Company Limited, surveyed by E. W. & F. W, Conklin, C.S.” filed in the Office of the Clerk of Queens County on August 13,1903, as and byLotsNos.634 and 635 In Book No.11 on said map. Said parcels taken together are bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the Westerly side of Beach 116th Street (formerly Fifth Avenue) distant 140 feet Northerly from the corner formed by the Intersection of the Northerly side of Rockaway Beach Boulevard (formerly Washington Avenue) with the Westerly side of Beach 116th Street; RUNNING THENCE Northerly along the Westerly side of Beach 116th Street, 40 feet; THENCE Westerly at right angles to Beach 116th Street, 100 feet; THENCE Southerly parallel with Beach 116th Street, 40 feet; THENCE Easterly again at right angles to Beach 116th Street, 100 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE NEW YORK STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT WE SEND YOU THIS NOTICE ABOUT THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. PLEASE READ IT CAREFULLY. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. IF YOU FAIL TO RESPOND TO THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT IN THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION, YOU MAY LOSE YOUR HOME. PLEASE READ THE SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT CAREFULLY. YOU SHOULD IMMEDIATELY CONTACT AN ATTORNEY OR YOUR LOCAL LEGAL AID OFFICE TO OBTAIN ADVICE ON HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The state encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877-

BANK-NYS (1-877-226-5697) or visit the department’s website at WWW.BANKING.STATE.NY.US. FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. § 1303 NOTICE NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: November 12, 2009 Steven J. Baum, P.C., Attorney(s) For Plaintiff(s), 220 Northpointe Parkway, Suite G, Amherst, NY 14228 The law firm of Steven J. Baum, P.C. and the attorneys whom it employs are debt collectors who are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained by them will be used for that purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of LE CHAVEZ LLC, a limited liability company. Articles of Organization filed with the Secy. Of State of the State of NY (SSNY) on 10/02/2009. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to the LLC 150-13 Hillside Ave., Jamaica, NY 11432. Purpose: any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of formation of Knights Design & Construction LLC, a limited liability company (LLC). Arts. of Org. filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 9/4/ 2009. Office located in Queens County. SSNY designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to THE LLC 129-27 135TH PLACE SOUTH OZONE PARK, NY 11420 Purpose: Any lawful purpose.


Leisure

Author Channels Boro For Inspiration more short s based on those characters,” By JOSEPH OROV IC Queens has been stage to many a weird Hughes said. “I was impressed with the reoccurrence. The boulevard bearing its name sults and decided to publish the collection.” Despite the stories being able to stand has itself been topic to much fodder. But never has it seen two ghosts haunt its stretch. alone, most center around Harold Schreiber, a housing contractor and Teacher, former jourvigilante. The character nalist and now author star ted as a fictionalizaMichael Gold created that tion of Gold’s father. vision in his shor t stor y “I wanted to write a collection “Horror House stor y about my father as Detective.” a detective. He was very The Kew Gardens nainto justice. He was in tive star ted the collection the business world, but with “On the Road Rage,” he was always hone st.” a shor t stor y t hat apGold said. peared on publisher The initial stories S i l ve r t h o u g h t P r e s s ’s about his father Web site. The story folmorphed over two years lows two apparitions stalkinto a fictionalization of ing the boulevard, caushis entire family, with ing accidents. four unruly kids causing “T here were cer tain family strife. things in Queens,” Gold Writing the book itsaid. “Queens Boulevard self presented a problem. was one of the first things Already a second grade that drove me nuts.” teacher with a 3-year-old Five of the collection’s daughter, Gold got up at six stories are staged in Queens, ranging from the “ H o r r o r H o u s e D e t e c t i ve ” i s 4 a.m. to write ever y morning. Forest Hills Gardens to Michael Gold’s first book. “I would pick up my lit tle daughter the now-closed Woodhaven Lanes. “A lot of it was my experience here,” Miriam at day care, bring her home in her Gold said. “And ye s, there was no que s- stroller, feed her dinner, set her up with a tion there was cer tain things about Queens Dora or Sesame Street DVD, then promptly that real ly bugged me. It’s ver y much not fall asleep on the couch in the living room,” Manhat tan. There are a lot of tough people he said. His daughter, in a fit of angst, would here. T hat was a big par t of where t he wake up her father only to have him pass book came from.” After submitting “On the Road Rage” to out again. The scene became routine durSilvert hought, Gold posted two more sto- ing the book’s writing. For the fledgling but long-time aspiring rie s, and caught t he at tent ion of writer, h is work of pulp fict ion has been reSilvert hought’s exec Paul Hughes. “Based on the strength of those three ceived with mixed reviews by his family. Dad short stories, I asked Michael if he’d be in- liked it. Mom didn’t. His wife? “She read two stories and said, ‘Michael, I terested in filling in the gaps, writing some

This Is Not A Meat

REVIEW

It’s based, of course, in Queens. Reach Reporter Joseph Orovic at jorovic@queenstribune.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 127.

Queens And Russia Blend Into New Music By SASHA AUSTRIE Looking for a new musical experience this holiday season? Well, do we have a tip for you. Drozdy, a critically acclaimed phenomena, is pushing aside the Iron Curtain and dredging up images of a Cold War past. Drozdy, comprised of seven members, classifies its music as syncretic existential rock. “We take music forms, literar y forms, ar t forms…and combine them in our music,” said Vadim Moldovan, the group’s lyricist. Drozdy will rock out to at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 18 at the Symphony Space/ Leonard Nimoy Thalia, located at 250 W. 95th St. in Manhattan. Ticket s are $20 on the day of the event, $15 for members and $12 for students and seniors. Though Drozdy’s latest single, “Night Train” is brooding and bleak, t here is a smear of sunny yellow, upbeat sound in “Nav y Blue Bra.” To listen to Drozdy’s tunes, visit w w w.drozdy.com According to Moldovan, the group started when a colleague and the group’s composer heard his poetry and wrote music to flow alongside his words. Though the group largely performs in Russian, only three

of Drozdy’s members hail from Russia. The others are from far away as Cameroon and another from right here in New York. In the two and a half years since they came in on the scene, Moldovan said the group has released two albums and is working on releasing its third by May. Though the group is diverse, there is a common thread that binds them. Moldovan said that the group is inundated with professors. He himself is a professor of social science s at York College. Joining their ranks is Mart in “Mart ino” Atangana, a history professor at York and a renowned afro-jazz guitarist, who will add depth to the already eclectic sound. He said that out of their first performance at the Bower y Poetr y Club t he y’ve had amassed quite a following. Moldovan said the band’s following is a blend of American college students fascinated with Russian culture and the other is people who remember the Soviet Union. “It is a joy for us and I hope it is interesting for others,” Moldovan said. Reach Reporter Sasha Austrie at saustrie@queenspress.com, or (718) 3577400, Ext. 123.

Dean Project Focuses On Visual Perception “Parallel States” a group exhibition featuring the work of Palma Blank-Rosenblum, Sangbin IM and Kris Tamburello, will open this weekend at the Dean Project. The works in this exhibition explore concepts of structure and visual perception, which includes image construction, deconstruction, transformation and the perspectivedimension of space. The art ists in this exhibition have approached these concepts by creating paintings Sangbin IM’s Myungdong 2009 is part of the or photography based on abstract exhibit. geometric compositions or from photo- bling his own photography and paintings. graphs of city and landscapes. Acting as a curator, he selects a group of Through the chosen building process and images from a pool of his photographs of medium by each of the artists, the viewer is specific places or subjects. He then orgapresented with a group of works that dis- nizes imaginary environments of both unfaplay elemental and conceptual ideas of im- miliar images of landscape or compositions age perception. based on real life elements. In the process of layering transparent Palma Blank-Rosenblum is based in New colors with simple geometric structures, York and received her MFA from Yale UniPalma Blank-Rosenblum’s acrylic paint ings versity in 2006. Sangbin IM is based in New create both multiple spaces, directions ex- York having received his MFA from Yale isting in a state of flux, multidimensional University in 2005 and is presently completevolution and an amplifier of color and light. ing his PHD at Columbia University. Kris Kris Tamburel lo’s work originates from Tamburello is based in New York where he the use of his architectural photography from has been working in photography for 15 in which he chooses details of light and re- years. flections. He then transforms the photo by The Dean project is located at 45-43 21st way of a digital process of stretching and St., Long Island City. The opening receppulling the image in order to uncover the tion with artists will take place Saturday Dec. layers of the inner structure of the image. 19, from 6-9 p.m. For additional informaSangbin IM’s photographs are the me- tion contact t he galler y at (718) 706-1462 ticulous result of transforming and assem- or info@deanproject.com.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 25

from sugar packets to menus. And the menu is an interesting one – guru quotes aside. The Magic Mushroom salad is a wonder ful mixture of Por tobello and white cap mushrooms sautéed to perfection, doused in a light ginger sauce and served over a luscious bed of spinach. In fact, all of the vegetable dishes I had, including a heart y barley soup, were both I’m not a vegetarian. I probably never tasty and satisfying. Fountain Heart’s fruit smoothies were will be. And The Oneness-Fountain Hear t also notable. Vitamin Blast, a puree mixdidn’t convert me. But the Flushing restaurant specializ- ture of fruits and natural sweets like baing in vegetarian meat substitutes did of- nana, orange, honey and bee pollen, was smooth, sweet and satisfying. fer plenty of compelling meat-like The vegetarian meats though, dishes for herbivores who may RESTAURANT which dominate much of the miss the tastes and textures of our menu, were harder to judge. The furr y and feathered friends. veggie-buffalo wings are stringyNow that that’s out of the soy-based pieces of veggieway – the Fountai n Hear t is chicken wrapped around a more tha n just a n eater y. T he wooden stick and covered in a restaurant was inspired by the Cajun barbeque sauce. While teachings of Queens guru and they’re well prepared and taste world peace activist Shri good, they simply lose too much Chinmoy. Fountain Hear t offers of the simple, messy and greasy its patrons both healthy meals and serene set t ings. Baby-blue wal ls a nd pleasure of the original. The same applies ceilings are covered in ink drawings, for the Thai veggie-chicken and veggiepaint ings and other original ar t by the meatloaf. It’s just hard to justify picking late guru. Music performed and composed the meat-alternatives when the real stuff is by Chinmoy is played throughout the res- a viable option. All said – if meat isn’t a viable option – taurant while quotes from his teachings and poetr y are stamped on e ver y th ing you’ll probably love it. The Oneness-Fountain-Hear t 157-19 72nd Avenue, Flushing CUISINE: Vegetarian HOURS: Lunch from 11:30 to 4 p.m. and diner from 4 p.m. to 9p.m. Sunday brunch from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Closed Wednesday. PARKING: Street side

love you. But I can’t get through this,’” he said. Gold has already finished his second work, a novel based on rival religions going through violent extremes against each other.


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today SECTION EDITOR: REGINA VOGEL

Send typed announcements for your club or organization’s events at least TWO weeks in advance to “Queens Today” Editor, Queens Tribune, 174-15 Horace Harding Expressway, Fresh Meadows, NY 11365. Send faxes to 357-9417, c/o Regina. IF YOUR ORGANIZATION MEETS ON A REGULAR BASIS, SEND ALL DATES FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR.

ALUMNI CARDOZO 70-74 School reunion being planned. 347-414-4775.

DANCE ST. NICHOLAS DAY Sunday, December 20 at St. Josaphat’s RC Church in Bayside. $30. 224-3052. COUNTRY WESTERN Saturday, January 9 San Antones performs. $12. The NY Metropolitan Country Music Association. $12. Glendale Memorial Building, 72-02 Myrtle Avenue at 7:30. 763-4328.

Page 26 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

RELIGION REGO PARK JC Saturday, December 19 Parashat and Hafarat Club t 1:30. Sunday, December 20 “Expression in the Arts” Chanukah Brunch at 11:30. 7. Saturday Shabbat Services at 9. Wednesdays 12:30-2:30 Yiddish Vinkel. Rego Park Jewish Center, 97-30 Queens Blvd. 4591000. EMANUEL UNITED Christmas Eve at 8 and Sunday, December 27 at 10:45. Emanuel United Church of Christ, Woodhaven Blvd. and 91 st Avenue, invite all to special candlelight and worship services.

MISCELLANEOUS ADOPTION 10+ Sunday, December 20 free classes on adopting an older child. 4 at Little Flower, 891 2 1 6 2 nd S t r e e t , J a m a i c a . 372-3003. PATHWAYS TO US Mondays, December 21, 28, January 4, 11 sessions on basic civics education at 5:30 at the Woodside library. SEPARATION/DIV. Starting Tuesday, December 29 a separation/divorce support group meets for 10 sessions at the Samuel Field Y. 22-6750, ext. 243. AUXILIARY OFF. The 105 th Precinct Community Council invites all interested in becoming an Auxiliary Police Officer to contact 776-9268.

ENTERTAINMENT NEW YEARS EVE Bellerose Jewish Center in Floral Park with music, dining and dancing. $65 per person. 343-9001 by December 21. GUIDED TOUR Saturdays and Wednesdays guided tour of the landmark Poppenhusen Institute. 3580067 reservations. NUTCRACKER Saturday, December 19 The Nutcracker will be perfo r m e d a t F l u s h i n g Tow n Hall. 463-7700, ext. 222. FROM THE SCRIPT Saturday, December 19 adults read original scripts and participate in acting scenes at the Forest Hills library at 1. KWANZA A Saturday December 19 with the Ebony Hillbillies at 2 at the Flushing library. RUSSIAN AVANT-GARDE Saturday, December 19 at the Forest Hills library at 2. CHRISTMAS & CHANUKAH Saturday, December 19 at 2 North Forest Park library. HOLIDAY CONCERT Saturday, December 19 with Linda Ipanema at 2:30 at the Fresh Meadows library. HOLIDAY MUSIC Saturday, December 19 at the Maspeth library with Teresa Mazzilli at 2. JINGLE BELL SWING Saturday, December 19 ma:at the Bayside library at 3. A CHRISTMAS CAROL Saturday, December 19 at the Sunnyside library at 3. PAUL TAYLOR DANCE Saturday and Sunday, December 19, 20 at Queens Theatre in the Park. 7600064. CARMINA BURANA Saturday, December 19 Queens College Choral Society at 8. $20. 793-8080. ASTRONOMY Saturday, December 19 from 7-9 An Evening With the Stars at Alley Pond Environmental Center. $12 nonadult member, $7 children 7-12. Register. 229-4000. KWANZAA CELEBRATION Sunday, December 20 at Flushing Town Hall. $15. 4637700, ext. 222. MESSIAH Sunday, December 20 the Oratorio Societ y of Queens performs portions of Messiah at Queensborough C o m m u n i t y C o l l e ge . $ 2 5 . 279-3006. FAVORITE MELODIES Monday, December 21 Favorite Melodies featuring Russian soprano Anya Yelizarova at 6 at the Forest Hills library. JINGLE BELL SWING Monday, December 21 at the South Jamaica library at 6:30. BINGO Tuesdays at 7:15 at American Martyrs Church, church basement, 216-01 Union Tu r n p i k e , B a ys i d e . 4 6 4 4 5 8 2 . Tu e s d a y s a t 7 : 1 5 (doors open 6) at the Rego Park Jewish Center, 97-30 Queens Blvd. 459-1000.$3 admission includes 12 games.

POETS Saturday, December 26 the Fresh Meadow Poets meet to discuss and critique their poems at 10 at the Forest Hills library. SANTA & THE WIZARD Saturday, December 26 Santa Meets the Wicked Wizard at Queens Theatre in the Park. 760-0064.

DINNER LIVING THE DREAM Saturday, Januar y 16 TriBoro Intergenerational Services, Inc. of Jamaica presents the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Songs, dance, speakers and luncheon in St. Albans. $40. 481-7927.

HEALTH ADULT ALZHEIMER The Adult Day program is available weekdays 10-4 in Flushing. Contact 358-3541. HATHA YOGA Saturday, December 19 at the Queensboro Hill library at 10:15. BLOOD DRIVE Sunday, December 20 from 9 : 3 0 - 3 a t Te m p l e T i k va h , 3315 Hillside Avenue, New Hyde Park. 516-746-1120. HEART SUPPORT Monday, December 21 Womenheart meets at the Cardiac Health Center of NY Hospital in Fresh Meadows from 6:30-8:00. 526-0790. TAI CHI Mondays and Thursdays at 11 at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1695. $5 a class. AUTISM Monday, December 21 at the Broadway library at 6. YOGA DANCE Tuesdays 4:30-5:30 at the Cardiac Health Center in Fresh Meadows. 670-1948. $10 class. MS SELF HELP Tuesday, December 22 at the Howard Beach library from 1-2:30. CAREGIVER SUPPORT Tu e s d a y, D e c e m b e r 2 2 Western Queens Caregiver Network at Sunnyside Communit y Services. 392-6945. BRAIN INJURY Wednesday, December 23 Traumatic Brain Injury Support Group at Peninsula Hospital. 734-2432. ALZHEIMERS Thursday, December 24 Caregiver Support Group at the Forest Hills Communit y House. 592-5757, ext. 237. OA Thursday, December 24 at the Howard Beach library at 10:30. OA Fridays 6:30-8:30 at Unit y Center of Flushing, 42-11 155th Street. Beginners meeting except the last Friday of each month, which is a writing meeting. CO-DEPENDENTS ANON. Fridays 10-11:45 at Resurrection Ascension Pastoral C e n t e r , 8 5 - 1 8 6 1 st R o a d , Rego Park. Women only.


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today EDUCATION/GAMES/CRAFTS rary, all levels. 969-1128. PUBLIC SPEAKING Wednesday, December 23 learn how to communicate effectively with the Red Storm Toastmasters at t he Ramada Plaza in East Elmhurst. 424-9754. CHESS CLUB Thursdays at 5:30 at the East Flushing library, 196-36 Northern Blvd. SCRABBLE/CHESS Thursdays at 4 at the Windsor Park library, 79-50 Bell Blvd., Bayside. CHESS CLUB Every Thursday at 6 at the Queens Village library. QUILTING CLASSES

Thursdays 10-2 at the Maria Rose Doll Museum in St. Albans. 917-817-8653 to register. KNIT/CROCHET Thursdays at 6 and Fridays at 10:30 at the Fresh Meadows library. CHESS CLUB Fridays at 3:30 at the Auburndale library, 25-55 Francis Lewis Blvd., Flushing. CHESS & CHECKERS Fridays at 4 at the Lefrak Cit y library. GAME DAY Fridays at the Bay Terrace library, 18-36 Bell Blvd. for all ages from 2:30-4:30.

EXHIBIT QUEENS HISTORICAL Tu e s d ay s , S a t u r d ay s a n d Sundays 2:30-4:30 “Unraveling History: Using Textiles to Date the Past,” “Kingsland: From Homestead to House Museum,” “Persistence: A Celebration of Landmarks in Queens – Past, Present, Future,” and “ T h e C i v i l Wa r ’ s L a s t i n g Memory.” Queens Historical Societ y at Kingsland Homestead, 144-35 37 th avenue, Flushing. 939-0647, ext. 17. $2 seniors and students, $3 adults. DOLL MUSEUM Wednesday through Saturdays tours at the Maria Rose Doll Museum in St. Albans. 523-5138. AFRICAN ART “Dynast y and Divinit y: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria” and “Perspectives: Women, Art and Islam” at the Museum for African Art, 36-01 43 rd Avenue, LIC. POPPENHUSEN Wednesdays and Saturdays guided tour through the historic Poppenhusen Institute in College Point from 11-3. 358-0067. FITZ MAURICE Through December 19 “Fitz Maurice: Common Ground” a t t h e G o d w i n - Te r n b a c h Museum at Queens College. 997-4747 for schedule. WRITING THE BODY Through December 23 “Writing the Body: New Work by Naomi Grossman” at Queens College Art Center.997-3770. HOLIDAY ART Through January 2 National Art League members’ exhibit art suitable for holiday giving at the league, 44-21 Douglaston Parkway. Monday through Thursday and Saturday 1:30-4:00. NAL STUDENT EXHIBIT January 4 through January 30 National Art League Student Exhibit at the league, 44-21 Douglaston Parkway. Monday through Thursday and Saturday 1:30-4:00. Free. 428-1859. TALISMANS Through Januar y 31 “Talismans of Protection from Choson Korea: Antique Locks, Latches and Key Charms” Thursdays through Sundays 12-5 at Flushing Town Hall. 463-7700, ext.

222. EMERGING ARTISTS Through March 7 2009 Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition at the Socrates S c u l p t u r e Pa r k . Ve r n o n Blvd. at Broadway, LIC. www.socratessculpturepark.org. NOGUCHI REINSTALLED Through October 24, 2010 the Noguchi Museum has completed a major renovation project. Wednesdays through Fridays 10-5, weekends 11-6. $10, students and seniors $5. 32-37 Ve r n o n B l vd . , LIC www.noguchi.org.

FLEA MARKETS HOLIDAY SALE Sunday, December 20 from 10-1 at Annunciation Ukrainian Catholic Church, 171-21 Underhill Avenue, Fresh Meadows. THRIFT SHOPS Saturdays and Sundays 10-4 at St. Fidelis Mother & Child Residence, 124-15 1 4 th A v e n u e , C o l l e g e Point. 353-4749. Saturdays 11-4 at Bargain Boutique Thrift Shop, Baptist Church, 93-23 217 th Street, Queens Village. 527-2132. Mondays 10-3 at the Free Synagogue of Flushing, 4160 Kissena Blvd. Mondays and Wednesdays 9:301:30 at Temple Sholom of Floral Park, 263 rd Street and Union Turnpike. Tuesdays and Wednesdays 2-5 at Church-in-the-Gardens, 50 Ascan Avenue, Forest Hills. 268-6704. First and third Wednesday (September through June) 10:30-2:30 at Grace Episcopal Church, 14 th Avenue and Clintonv i l l e S t r e e t , W h i t e s t o n e. Wednesdays Hillcrest Senior Center 11:30-2:00 at 168-01 Hillside Avenue. Wednesdays at Grace Church, 151-17 14 th Road, Whitestone. Thursdays from 10-1 at All Saints’ Church, Bayside. 2295631. Fridays through June 11-3 at the Maspeth United Methodist Church, 66-35 58 th Avenue. JUDAICA SHOPS Daily Forest Hills Jewish Center. 263-7000. Sundays 9-11:30 Bay Terrace Jewish Center. 428-6363.

Happy Holidays

little cakes a cupcake shoppe Now Accepting Holiday Orders for Convenient Pick-Up Open Christmas Eve 10am-4pm Vanilla Chocolate Devil’s Food Angel Food Lemon Poppy Red Velvet Coffee Cake Rainbow Cookie The Bedrock Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Strawberry Shortcake Try our seasonal flavors Gingerbread, Snowball, Peppermint Hot Chocolate, Eggnog Latte 14-33 150th Street, Whitestone • 718-746-1020 www .littlecak esshoppe.com www.littlecak .littlecakesshoppe.com Shoppe hours Wed-Fri 12-6, Sat-Sun 10-4

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 27

BUDGET GIFTS Saturday, December 19 holiday gifts on a budget at 2 at the Whitestone library. CAREER POTENTIAL Saturday, December 19 Career Exploration Inventory at the Central library at 3. PUBLIC SPEAKING Saturday, December 19 learn how to communicate effectively at Elmhurst Hospital. 457-8390. KNIT AND CROCHET Saturdays at the Seaside library at 2:30. PET OWNERS Sundays (not on holidays) from 1-4 free workshops on pet behavior at Crocheron Park in Bayside (weather permitting). 454-5800. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at 4 at the Douglaston/Little Neck library, 249-01 Northern Blvd. INSTRUCTION & DANCE Mondays and Fridays 7:158:00 dance lessons, dance from 8-11. Italian Charities of America, 83-20 Queens Blvd., Elmhurst. $10. ADULT CHESS Every Monday at 6 at the Queens Village library, 9411 217 th Street. ONE-ON-ONE COMPUTER Mondays at the Arverne library at 6. BALLROOM DANCING Monday, December 21 at the Forest Hills library at 6:30. WRITE PROSE Monday, December 21 at the Seaside library a 5:30. INTRO E-MAIL Monday, December 21 at the Fresh Meadows library. Register. COMPUTER CLASS Monday, December 21 at the Lefferts library at 10:30 and at the Cambria Heights library. Register. DRAWING CLASS Tuesdays at 1. All medias, all levels. 969-1128. INTERMED. COMPUTER Tuesday, December 22 at the Forest Hills library at 10:30. EMAIL Tuesday, December 22 at the Queens Village library. Register,. ADULT SCRABLE Tuesday, December 22 at the Fresh Meadows library at 1. SCRABBLE CLUB Tuesday, December 22 at the East Flushing library at 3:30. COMPUTER CLASS Tuesday, December 22 at the Sunnyside library. Register. BEGIN COMPUTERS Tuesday, December 22 at the Queensboro Hill library. Register. LEARN TO DRAW Tuesday, December 22 at the Hillcrest library. Register. GET YOUR YARNS OUT! Tuesdays after evening Minyan at 8, knitters, crocheters, needlepointers, and others meet at the Forest Hills Jewish Center. 263-7000, ext. 200. WATERCOLOR CL ASS Wednesdays at 9:30 at NAL. Traditional and contempo-


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT Page 28 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

Queens Today YOUTH

MEETINGS POMONOK FRIENDS Saturday, December 19 at the Pomonok library at 10:30. BELLA ITALIA MIA Saturday, December 19 Dominick Sabatino on “The Italia American Dramatic and Operatic Connection” 125:30. $5 members, 7 others. Christ the King HS, 6802Metropolitan Avenue, Middle Village in the CNL Paolucci International Conference Center. 426-120. QUEENS GREENS Sunday, December 20 West Queens Greens meet in Sunnyside. 728-1092. PFLAG Sunday, December 20 PFLAG, a support group for parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays, meet in Forest Hills. 271-6663. 2pm. SONS OF ITALY Monday, December 21 Marcus Aurelius Lodge, Order Sons of Italy in America, m e e t s a t H o l y Tr i n i t y Church’s rectory/school basement in Whitestone at 7:30. 347-204-8006. COUNCIL 27 Monday, December 21 open calendar meeting at PS215, 129-1 150 th Avenue, South Ozone Park at 7:30. LOST MIRACLES Monday, December 21 St. Adalbert’s bereavement support group, for the loss of a newborn or miscarriage, meets in Elmhurst. 429-2005. NYC CORRECTION Monday, December 21 NYC Correction Retirees Benevolent Association meets at the American Legion Hall in Forest Hills. 263-6334. FRESH MEADOW CAMERA Tuesdays the Fresh Meadows Camera Club meets. 917-612-3463. ADVANCED WRITERS Tuesdays at 6:30 at the Terrace Diner at Bay Terrace Shopping Center and also t h e l a s t Tu e s d a y o f t h e month n the Communit y Room in Panera Bread at Bay Terrace Shopping. NEGRO WOMEN Tuesday, December 22 the National Council of Negro Women, Inc. meet at Roy W i l k i n s P a r k , 1 1 9 th a n d Merrick Blvd., St. Albans at 7:30. TALK OF THE TOWN Tu e s d a y, D e c e m b e r 2 2 Toastmasters Club meets at the Robert R. Johnson Family Life Center in St. Albans. 527-5889. SOUTHEAST CAMERA Tu e s d a y, D e c e m b e r 2 2 Southeast Queens Camera Club meets at Roy Wilkins Park Family Center in Jamaica. 516-328-3776. FH VAC Wednesday, December 23 the Fore st Hills Volunteer Ambulance Corp meets. 793-2055. CIVIL AIR PATROL Fridays 6-10 at Vaughn College of Aeronautics, 86-01 23 rd Avenue, East Elmhurst. Academy WOMAN’S GROUP Fridays the Woman’s Group of Jamaica Estates meets at

noon. Call 461-3193 for information. POETS Saturday, December 26 the Fresh Meadow Poets meet to discuss and critique their poems at 10 at the Forest Hills library. WOMEN WRITERS Saturday, December 26 Women Writers Forum at Women’s Studio Center, Inc. in LIC. 3615649. JEWISH VETS Sunday, December 27 Jewi s h Wa r Ve t e r a n s o f t h e USA meet at the Garden Jewish Center. 463-4742.

SINGLES SINGLES 45+ Wednesdays, December 23, 30, January 6 the Singles Center of the Samuel Field Y in Flushing holds a Wednesday Night Rap. 7:30, $7. 225-6750, ext. 243.

TALKS BOOK TALK Saturday, December 19 “The Art of Racing in the Rain” will be discussed at 10 at the Maspeth library BOOK CLUB Saturday, December 19 books by Omar Tyree will be discussed at 2 at the South Ozone Park library. CONVERSATIONS Tuesday, December 22 Jeremy Benstein – Sustain-abilit y: Redefining Our Ethics at 1:30. Conversations with Outstanding Authors and Filmmakers at the Central Queens YM-YWHA.2685011, ext. 151 for reservations and information. $5 non member donation.

THEATER MANA MHTEPA MAMA Through December 20 the Greek Cultural Center presents “Mana Mhtepa Mama” (“Mommy Mother Mom”) at the Center in Astoria. $20. 726-7329. SWEET KARMA Through December 20 at Queens Theatre in the Park. 760-0064. A Cambodian doctor is gunned down outside his LA apartment. AUDITION Saturday, January 9 from 1-4 the Outrageous Fortune Company is casting “Spalding Gray: Stories Left to Tell” at 42-24 Douglaston Parkway. 428-2500, ext. 20. Roles: 5 actors, male and female of various ages, ethnicities, must be good storytellers. AUDITION January 19, 20 at 7:30 The Andrean Players will hold auditions for “Cinderella.” 19-30 plus other roles and stage crew, construction, costumes, etc. St. Andrew Avellino, Northern Blvd. bet w e e n 1 5 7 th a n d 1 5 8 th Street, Flushing. 460-3072

QUEENS LIBRARIES Many branches of the Queensborough Library offer toddler and pre-school programs. Contact your local branch for dates. FAMILY STORY TME Saturday, December 19 at the Flushing library at 11. SCRAPBOOKING Saturday, December 19 at the Ozone Park library. Register. S TORY T I M E Saturday, December 19 at the Court Square library at 2. BOY SCOUTS Saturdays 1-3 at St. Paul’s Church. 271-4309. TEEN TUTORING Saturday, December 19 at the Bayside library at 10. MATH HELP Saturday, December 19 at 10 at the Flushing library. SCIENCE LAB Saturday, December 19 at noon at the Central library. CHESS CLUB Saturday, December 19 at the Douglaston/Little Neck library at 12:30. CHESS CLUB Saturdays, December 19, 26 at the Flushing library at 2. HOMEWORK HELP Monday, December 21 at the LIC library at 2:30 and at the Hollis library at 3. CRAFT KIDS Monday, December 21 at the Flushing library at 3. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS Monday, December 21 at the Baisley Park library Register. PLAY-DOH PARTY Monday, December 21 at the Fresh Meadows library at 3. EARTH ACTION/GREEN Monday, December 21 at the Broadway library. Register. LITTLE TOT TIME Monday, December 21 at the Hillcrest library at 4. SCAVENGER HUNT Monday, December 21 at the Seaside library at 4. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at the Douglaston/ Little Neck library at 4. S TORY TIMES Tuesdays at 10:30 and Thursdays at 7 weekly story times at 7 at Barnes & Noble, 1766 0 Un i o n Tu r n p i ke , Fre s h Meadows. HOMEWORK HELP Tuesday, December 22 at the LIC library at 2:30 and the Hollis library at 3. TEEN TUTORING Tuesday, December 22 at the Bayside library at 3:30 S TORY T I M E Tuesday, December 22 at the Lefferts library at 3:30. STORY & CRAFT Tuesday, December 22 at the Central library at 4. HOLIDAY CRAFT Wednesday, December 23 at the South Hollis library at 3:30. CHESS Wednesday, December 23 at the Queen Village library at 3:30. ART WORKSHOPS Saturdays Women’s Studio Center in LIC holds Children’s Art Workshops. 361-5649.


Diner & Restaurant

Happy Holidays

From Our Winning Staff

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Georgia

Dinner Includes Choice of Appetizer or Cup of Soup or Juice, Celery and Olives, House Salad with Choice of Dressing, Entrée, Vegetable, Potato, Challah Bread & Rolls, Any Pastry and Beverage, Dried Fruit and Nuts

Beer

Wines by the Glass

Budweiser .......................... Heineken ............................ Amstel ................................ Corona ...............................

5.00 Classic Red ......................... 4.75 5.00 Classic White ...................... 4.75 5.00 Blush ................................. 4.75 5.00

Appetizers Extra on Dinner

Extra on Dinner

Jumbo Shrimp Cocktail ....... 9.95 Chicken Fingers ................. Filet of Marinated Herring .. 6.50 Mozzarella Sticks ............... Baked Stuffed Clams ........... 6.95 Buffalo Wings ..................... Potato Skins (6 Pieces) ......

5.95 5.95 5.95 5.95

STUFFED GRAPE LEAVES with Rice • FRUIT SALAD Cocktail Supreme Assorted JUICES• HALF GRAPEFRUIT Maraschino Homemade CHOPPED CHICKEN LIVER PATÉ’

Soups CREAM of TURKEY — MANHATTAN CLAM CHOWDER CHICKEN CONSOMME with Rice, Noodles or Matzoh Balls

Entrees

VEGETABLES: Green Beans Almondine • Sweet Peas • Glazed Baby Belgian Carrots • Broccoli Spears • Creamed Spinach • Corn on the Cob • Mashed Turnips POTATOES: Baked • Fresh Garlic Mashed • French Fries • Candied Yams

Children’s Menu ROAST TURKEY with Apple Raisin Dressing ................................ ROAST LEG of LAMB with Mint Jelly ........................................... CHEESE RAVIOLI topped with Mozzarella .................................... CHICKEN PARMIGIANA with Spaghetti ........................................

15.95 15.95 15.95 15.95

Beverages

Desserts

SODA, JUICE, COFFEE OR TEA

APPLE PIE, CHEESE CAKE, ASSORTED DANISH, CHOCOLATE LAYER CAKE OR ANY OTHER PASTRY

Make Reservations for Private Parties for The Holidays!

Georgia Diner 85-55 Queens Boulevard, Elmhurst 718-651-9000

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 29

ROAST MARYLAND TURKEY with Apple Raisin Dressing ............... 24.95 VIRGINIA HAM STEAK Served with Wild Berry Ragu ..................... 23.95 ROAST LEG of LAMB with Mint Jelly ........................................... 25.95 ROAST PRIME RIB of BEEF Au Jus ............................................ 27.95 CHICKEN PARMIGIANA with Spaghetti ....................................... 22.95 ROAST CHICKEN with Apple Raisin Dressing ............................... 22.95 BROILED VEAL CHOP .............................................................. 31.95 BROILED HEAVY NY CUT SIRLOIN with Mushroom Caps .............. 32.95 BROILED FILET MIGNON with Mushroom Caps ........................... 33.95 BROILED FILET of SOLE ALMONDINE Topped with Roasted Almonds ... 29.95 BROILED STUFFED FILET of SOLE with Crabmeat Stuffing .......... 32.95 BROILED SEAFOOD COMBINATION: Shrimps, Scallops, Filet of Sole, Halibut and Baked Clams ........................................................... 34.95 BROILED LOBSTER TAILS with Drawn Butter ............................. 45.95 BEEF & REEF: FILET MIGNON & TENDER ROCK LOBSTER Served with salad, potato and veg ................................................................. 46.95


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

Queens Today TEENS KWANZA A Saturday, December 19 celebrate Kwanzaa at 2 with the Ebony Hillbillies at the Flushing library. SCRAPBOOKING Saturday, December 19 at the Ozone Park library. Register. TEEN TUTORING Saturday, December 19 at the Bayside library at 10. A CHRISTMAS CAROL Saturday, December 19 one act presentation at 3 at the Sunnyside librar y. CHESS Saturday, December 19 at the Douglaston/Little Neck library at 12:30. CHESS Saturdays, December 19, 26 at 2 at the Flushing library. TEEN ADVISORY BOARD Monday, December 21 at the Central library a 4. CROCHET KNIT Monday, December 21 at the St. Albans library at 4. BOOK CLIQUE

Monday, December 21 at the Queens Village library a 4:30. KNIT & CROCHET Mondays at the Douglaston/ Little Neck library at 4. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS Monday, December 21 at the Baisley Park library. Register. TEEN GAMING Tuesday, December 22 at the Fresh Meadows library at 3. WII PARTY Tuesday, December 22 at the Auburndale library at 3:30. TEEN TUTORING Tuesday, December 22 a t the Bayside library at 3:30. TEEN TIME Tuesday, December 22 at the Peninsula library at 4. TEEN GAMING Wednesday, December 23 at the Fresh Meadows library at 3.

CONTINUOUS MEETINGS

Page 30 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

SENIORS COMPUTER CLASSES The Selfhelp Benjamin Rosenthal Senior Center in Flushing offers a series of senior computer classes. 445-3864. AARP WORKSEARCH Looking for a job and over 50? Call the Selfhelp Benjamin Rosenthal Senior Center in Flushing. 8865777. SENIOR LUNCH Saturday, December 19 at noon at Church of the Resurrection in Kew Gardens. 847-2649 reservations. GAME DAY Monday, December 21 at the Queens Village library at 1. CLEARVIEW Monday, December 21 PS 193 Chorus entertains 1011. Tuesday, December 22 holiday part y 12-3. Reservations required. Thursday, December 24 “Introduction to Food Stamps” talk at 10:15. Selfhelp Clearview Senior Center, 208-11 26th Avenue, Bayside. 224-7888 to register. AARP DRIVING Tuesday, December 22 at the Forest Hills library. Register. SUN-Q Tu e s d a y , D e c e m b e r 2 2 SUN-Q (Senior Umbrella Network of Queens) meets. 516-56-2700. STARS Wednesday, December 23 at 10:30 at the Hollis library. Senior Theatre Acting Repertory is rehearsing for their next season. TAKING RISKS Thursday, December 24 “Taking Risks Over 50” at t h e Sa m u e l F i e l d Y. 2 2 5 6750, ext. 236. CHRISTMAS DINNER Friday, December 25 Southwest Queens Senior Services is hosting dinner at St. Mary Gate of Heaven Church basement from 102. 847-9200 information and to volunteer.

GAME DAY Wednesday, December 23 at the St. Albans library at 3. CHESS Wednesday, December 23 at 3:30 at the Queens Village library. GAME DAY Wednesday, December 23 at the Howard Beach library at 4. WII Wednesday, December 23 at the Ridgewood library at 4. B’NAI B’RITH YOUTH Thursdays for high school s t u d e n t s a t Te m p l e B e t h S h o l o m , 1 7 2 nd S t r e e t a n d Northern Blvd., Flushing at 7:30. CHESS CLUB Fridays at 3:30 at the Auburndale library. BOY SCOUTS Fridays troop meets at Saint Barnabas. 843-7028.

DEBTORS ANON. Saturdays at 11:30 and Mondays at 7:30 Debtors Anonymous meets at Our Lady of Mercy, school auditorium in Forest Hills. 212969-8111. CIVIL AIR PATROL Saturdays Art & Business High School Cadet Squadron at 8 a.m. at the school, 10525 Horace Harding Expressway, Corona. ssgdmp@yahoo.com CIVIL AIR PATROL Mondays Falcon Senior Squadron at 7 at JFK Airport, Federal Express, Building 260, Jamaica. Falcon Senior Squadron. 781-2359. FM CAMERA Tuesdays at 7:45 the Fresh Meadows Camera Club meets. 917-363-6720. QUEENS PRIDE Wednesdays Spanish and English Club (conversational level). Thursdays Movie Night. Fridays Café Social. Saturday Art Club. Queens Pride House. 429-5309 information. BARBERSHOP Wednesdays a t 8 t h e J a maica Chapter of the Societ y for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America meets in Mahoney Hall in Flushing. 468-8416 or 381-8689. CIVIL AIR PATROL Thursdays at 3 at August Martin HS, 156-10 Baisley Blvd., Jamaica. August Martin Cadet Squadron. 5256925 or 835-6862. GOLD COAST ROTARY Fridays the Gold Coast Rotary Club meets from 8-9 am at the Nor th Shore Towers Restaurant, 272-48 Grand Central Parkway. 516-4663636. CODA F r i d a y s 1 0 -1 1 : 3 0 . COD A Women’s Group 12 step meeting for healthy relationships. Newcomers welcome. Resurrection Ascension Past o r a l C e n t e r , 8 5 - 1 8 6 1 st Road, off Woodhaven. Enter Freely Hall on Dry Harbor

Road. CLUTTERERS ANON. Fridays A Cluttered home makes a cluttered life. Learn how to gain control of your life by eliminating your clutter. 7:30-9:00 at Pastoral Care Center, Resurrection Ascension Church, 85-18 61 st Road, Rego Park. 712-7656. QUEENS PRIDE Call for meeting information for Queens Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride C o m m u n i t y C e n t e r. G AY 2300.

CONTINUOUS SENIORS CARING CALLS Caring Calls is a communit y supportive care program designed to provide services by seniors for seniors. 3472244. CUNNINGHAM PARK Monday-Friday 9:30-4:30 sit, relax or socialize at the Cunningham Park Field House, 196-10 Union Turnpike. 740-1999. GENTLE YOGA Mondays Gentle Yoga for Seniors at Fort Totten. 3521548. MEN 80+ Mondays men over 80 are invited for a “For Men Only” discussion group from 2-3 at t h e S a m u e l F i e l d Y. 2 2 5 6750, ext. 250. DUPLICATE BRIDGE Mondays 12-4 $9. Lunch, lesson and congenial play. Partners arranged. Pride of Judea Communit y Services, 243-02 Northern Blvd., Douglaston. 423-6200. BRIDGE Wednesdays bridge at the Re fo r m Te m p l e o f F o r e st Hills, 71-11 112 th Street from 11-3. $10. 261-2900. YOGA CLASS Wednesdays at 10 $1. Ridgewood Older Adult Center, 59-14 70 th Avenue, Ridgewood. 467-2000.


DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

La Tavernetta

www.queenstribune.com â&#x20AC;˘ Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 31


Queens guy Ray Romano’s new show “Men of a Certain Age” debuted with 5.4 million viewers on Dec. 7, making it cable’s most-watched series launch of 2009 among adults 25-54. So far the show, centered on the lives of three middle-aged men, is a hit across the borough and also the nation. We look forward to seeing if the Forest Hills native Ray Romano is back and Queens College attendee’s newest venture can rival the success of “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Romano’s Emmy-winning semi-autobiographical sitcom that aired from 1996 to 2005. Ray might have a tough time recreating timeless characters like his overbearing mother Marie or his monotone brother Robert, but his hometown borough wishes him the best of luck.

The Right Key Alicia Keys is hot. Not in that way, well okay, yes in that way. We mean she is a hot commodity in the music industry. The Queens beauty is getting accolades from award shows to other artists. An up and coming Artist, Drake, said his collaboration with Keys on her song “Unthinkable(I’m Ready)” was “one of the best Queens girl Alicia Keys moments of my career.” Adding to making Drake’s day, Keys also rocked the house with her performance at the American Music Awards. If you missed it you can get a personal one and playback of her performance when you buy her new album which hit the stores this week.

Rising Star A Queens boy is moving through the ranks of network television quicker that you can say Governor Andrew Cuomo. Chris Cuomo, son of former Gov. Mario Cuomo and brother of Attorney General Andrew Cuomo, came out of almost thin air and replaced Charlie Gibson on ABC’s Good Morning America. In three years he has been elevated to co-host the network’s prime time news magazine proQueens native Chris Cuomo gram, 20/20. We don’t like to speculate, but is this a push by the network to maybe gain exclusive access to another Gov. Cuomo? We could be wrong because Andrew has yet to say that he wants the governorship, but hey, you never know.

Math proves that crime does not pay. When Jack Rhodes beat and robbed three women, one of whom was 101 years old, he thought he would get away because the victims, with a combined age of 238, might not be able to give 5-O the 411 on their 47year-old assailant. But he was wrong, someone dropped the dime on him and he was arrested before he could 86 with the goods he stole – a total of $75 bucks. And so, in sentencing, the judge tacked on a year for every dollar taken, making Rhodes able to get out of jail at the young age of 119 – half the combined age of his victims.

Christina Jallim Richmond Hill Age: 17 Height: 5’ 4" Weight: 100 lbs Stats: 36-24-33

She’s Outta Here

Boo Radley Lives Don’t lose your ball in Harry Luft’s yard. The Ozone Park resident has turned his home into an impenetrable fortress, reports the New York Post. After being burglarized three times in the past two decades, Harry Luft, 86, has installed roll-down gates, four security cameras, window bars, four front door locks, barbed wire, and hinted that he’s got some guns hidden away other than in his shirt sleeves. He said he’s spent over $10,000 on cameras and security apparatus.

Bowled Over

photo: Scouting New York

Page 42 Tribune Dec. 17-23, 2009 • www.queenstribune.com

By The Numbers

This gal may only be 17, but she knows where she’s headed in life. Christina Jallim is a senior at Jamaica High School, and is ready to finish up so she can start classes next fall at Stony Brook, studying administrative nursing. “My mom is a nurse, so I’ve always been interested,” she said. As a young girl, Christina did some modeling, including a commercial for an item called Spelling Bee, which she remembers airing on MTV. Recently, she decided to get back into the game, and is participating in a local beauty pageant, where she is confident that “I’m going to do fine.” As many high school girls do, Christina enjoys spending her time hanging out with friends, talking and texting on her phone and goofing around on the computer – but she also loves to cook, and enjoys a good game of pool every now and again, especially at one particular site near Jamaica Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard. And when she gets settled after college, do you think Christina will stick around Queens? “Absolutely not,” she said, explaining that she’d love to move to Canada just for a change of scenery. In the meantime, she’s hoping to kick-start her modeling career and get some side work in front of the camera. “I’m just trying to pursue my dream,” she said.

Models Of Queens

Ray’s Return

When the new owners of an old Ridgewood building started cleaning out the basement, they didn’t expect to find a bowling alley waiting for them. The two-lane manual alley is in fairly good condition given its age. The owners believe while the upper floors served as a garment factory during prohibition, the basement served as a speakeasy. The lanes themselves have minimal damage, with only a handful of boards missing. They have two shallow gutters and one lane’s padded backstop looks like it can still handle a ball or two. The owners have invited film crews to use the alley in a movie. QConf is personally hoping for a prohibition prequel to “The Big Lebowski.”

We can’t blame Luft for trying to keep safe and protect what’s his, but we gotta wonder how his neighbors seem to manage without building their own Atticas. (r.):Robert Duval as the reclusive Boo radley in "To Kill a Mockingbird"

Confidentially, New York . . .


LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPREME COURT – QUEENS COUNTY In the Matter of the Application of PETER M. WOLF, as Guardian of the Person and Property of MAHLIA ROBINSON, a/k/a MAHALIA ROBINSON, an incapacitated person to sell certain real property pursuant to an order of this court dated November 23, 2009, by Hon. Charles J. Thomas, a Justice of this Court, an application to sell premises 1332 0 1 1 1 th A v e n u e S o u t h Ozone Park, N.Y. 11420 Block 11637 Lot 10 being a plot 30 feet by 100 feet will be made on the 6 th day of January 2010, at 11:00 A.M. at I.A. Part 20 of the Supreme Court at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard Jamaica, N.Y. 11435. Said property is presently under contract, subject to the approval of the court, for the price of $320,000.00. Contact PETER M. WOLF, ESQ. of Kew Gardens, N.Y. Attorney for the Guardian 125-10 Queens Boulevard Kew Gardens, N.Y. 11415 (718) 2617580 ________________________________________________________________________ CITATION File No. 2008-82 SURROGATE’S COURT, Queens COUNTY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: The heirs at law, next of kin, and distributees of VIVIAN GIRARDIN a/k/a VIVIAN V. GIRARDIN a/k/a VIVIAN ADELAINE GIRARDIN, deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence. Public Administrator of Queens County Attorney General of New York A petition having been duly filed by Albert E. Girardin who is/ are domiciled at 69-51 Alderton Street, Rego Park, New York 11374 YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, New York, on January 14, 2010, at 09:30 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Vivian Girardin, a/k/a Vivian V. Girardin a/k/a Vivian Adelaine Girardin lately domiciled at 69-51 Alderton Street, Rego Park, New York 11374, United States admitting to probate a Will dated February 11, 2006 (and Codicil(s), if any, dated ), a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Vivian Girardin deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that: x Letters Testamentary issue to Albert E. Girardin x Letters of Trusteeship issue to Esperanza Girardin f/b/o Victoria Girardin Esperenza Girardin f/b/o Jacqueline Girardin Dated, Attested and Sealed, NOV 18 2009 HON. Robert L. Nahman Surrogate ALICEMARIE E. RICE Chief Clerk Christine R. Shiebler, Esq. Print Name of Attorney (631) 543-7667 Telephone Sarisohn Law Partners, LLP

Firm 350 Veterans Memorial Hwy., Commack, New York 11725 NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you. ________________________________________________________________________

mons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN U. CRAIGWELL, UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF STANLEY CRAIGWELL, The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of the Honorable Duane A. Hart, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, QUEENS County, dated the 10th day of November, 2009, and filed with the complaint and other papers in the office of the Clerk of the County of QUEENS, New York. This action is for final judgment of foreclosure and sale of the premises known as and by 90-11 175th Street, Jamaica, New York, New York, described in the Schedule A which is annexed hereto as Exhibit “A”. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: New Rochelle, New York Signed Pursuant to 22 NYCRR §130-1.1-a LISA L. WALLACE, Esq. McCabe, Weisberg & Conway Attorneys for Plaintiff 145 Huguenot Street, Suite 310 New Rochelle, New York 10801 Tel. 914.636.8900 ________________________________________________________________________

Liberty Avenue, Richmond Hill, New York 11419. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS INDEX# 13275/09 FILED: 11/ 18/2009 SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE Plaintiff designates Queens County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the County in which the mortgage premises is situated. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff against NYOKA ROBINSON, IF LIVING, AND IF HE/SHE BE DEAD, HIS/ HER RESPECTIVE HEIRS-ATLAW, NEXT-OF-KIN, DISTRIBUTEES, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, TRUSTEES, DEVISEES, LEGATEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, AND SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND GENERALLY ALL PERSONS HAVING OR CLAIMING UNDER, BY OR THROUGH SAID DEFENDANT WHO MAY BE DECEASED, BY PURCHASE, INHERITANCE, LIEN OR OTHERWISE, ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE VERIFIED COMPLAINT HEREIN, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE AND INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE-UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Defendant(s). TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to serve upon plaintiff’s attorneys an answer to the Complaint in this action within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within (30) days after service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT: THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage, recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Queens on August 30, 2007 under CRFN: 2007000449133 covering premises known as 193 Beach 26th Street, Far Rockaway, NY 11691. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. To the above named defendants: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of the Hon. Timothy J. Flaherty, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated 10/ 23/2009 and filed along with the supporting papers in the Queens County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a mortgage. ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel

of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York. BLOCK 15818 LOT 138 said premises known as 193 Beach 26th Street, Far Rockaway, NY 11691. YOU ARE HEREBY PUT ON NOTICE THAT WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. THE UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF THE DEBT YOU OWE THE PLAINTIFF/CREDITOR, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., IS $553,493.28 AS OF JANUARY 1, 2009, WHICH DOES NOT INCLUDE INTEREST, LATE CHARGES, ATTORNEYS FEES, ESCROW ADVANCES, ETC. UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION THEREOF, WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER YOUR RECEIPT HEREOF THAT THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION THEREOF, IS DISPUTED, THE DEBTOR JUDGMENT AGAINST YOU AND A COPY OF SUCH VERIFICATION OR JUDGMENT WILL BE MAILED TO YOU BY THE HEREIN DEBT COLLECTOR. IF APPLICABLE, UPON YOUR WRITTEN REQUEST, WITHIN SAID THIRTY (30) DAY PERIOD. THE HEREIN DEBT COLLECTOR WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR. IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED A DISCHARGE FROM THE UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT, YOU ARE NOT PERSONALLY LIABLE FOR THE UNDERLYING INDEBTEDNESS OWED TO PLAINTIFF/CREDITOR AND THIS NOTICE/DISCLOSURE IS FOR COMPLIANCE AND INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. HELP FOR HOMEOWNERS IN FORECLOSURE New York State Law requires that we send you this notice about the foreclosure process. Please read it carefully. SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT You are in danger of losing your home. If you fail to respond to the summons and complaint in this foreclosure action, you may lose your home. Please read the summons and complaint carefully. You should immediately contact an attorney or your local legal aid office to obtain advice on how to protect yourself. SOURCES OF INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE The State encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. In addition to seeking assistance from an attorney or legal aid office, there are government agencies, and non-profit organizations that you may contact for information about possible options, including trying to work with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877Bank-NYS or visit the Department’s website at

www.banking.state.ny.us FORECLOSURE RESCUE SCAMS Be careful of people who approach you with offers to “save” your home. There are individuals who watch for notices of foreclosure actions in order to unfairly profit from a homeowner’s distress. You should be extremely careful about any such promises and any suggestions that you pay them a fee or sign over your deed. State law requires anyone offering such services for profit to enter into a contract which fully describes the services they will perform and fees they will charge, and which prohibits them from taking any money from you until they have completed all such promised services. Section 1303 NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Stiene & Associates, P.C., Attorneys for the Plaintiff 187 East Main Street, Huntington, NY 11743 (631) 935-1616 Our File#: 200900573 ________________________________________________________________________

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: CRITERION PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/26/09. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Criterion Group, LLC, 35-11 36 th Street, 3 rd Floor, Long Island City, New York 11106. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. ________________________________________________________________________ SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS BENEFICIAL HOMEOWNER SERVICE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, -Against- UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN U. CRAIGWELL, if they be living and if they be dead, the respective heirsat-law, next-of-kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors and successors in interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said defendants who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or inheritance, any right, title or interest in or to the real property described in the complaint, UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF STANLEY CRAIGWELL, if they be living and if they be dead, the respective heirsat-law, next-of-kin, distributees, executors, administrators, trustees, devisees, legatees, assignees, lienors, creditors and successors in interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said defendants who may be deceased, by purchase, inheritance, lien or inheritance, any right, title or interest in or to the real property described in the complaint, BENEFICIAL HOMEOWNER SERVICE CORPORATION, LICIA RAMOS, HECTOR RAMOS, LESLIE SADLER, MARVIN SADLER, JAMES MILES, BLAIR CRAIGWELL, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN CRAIGWELL, DIANA CRAIGWELL, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF LILLIAN CRAIGWELL, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, Defendants. Index No.: 13115-08 Date Filed: SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this sum-

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 128-02 HOLDING, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/20/04. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2103. Office location: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 128-02

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on 11/24/09, bearing Index Number NC-001089-09/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, NY 11435, grants me (us) the right to: Assume the name of (First) Christine (Middle) Ninal (Last) Antaran My present name is (First) Christine (Middle) Fernandez (Last) Antaran aka Christine Fernandez Ninal aka Christine Ninal Antaran My present address is 142-42 Booth Memorial Avenue, 3 rd Floor, Flushing, NY 11355 My place of birth is Aklan, Phillipines My date of birth is December 16, 1984 ________________________________________________________________________ Notice of Formation of JELB GRAND CONCOURSE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/ 24/09. Office location: Queens County. Princ. Office of LLC: 42-09 235 th St., Douglaston, NY 11363. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. Of its princ. Office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

www.queenstribune.com • Dec. 17-23, 2009 Tribune Page 43

LEGAL NOTICE



Queens Tribune