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TUE 16 APRIL 2019

Mediaportal Report

PBCA: It’s high time we made some noise about the proposed new Sunshine Coast flight paths MySunshineCoast

16 Apr 2019 7:45 AM

405 words • ASR AUD 1,283 • Report Builder • ID: 1108782607 Read on source site

Audience N/A UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, N/A UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

City at risk without fix for rail line Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD, General News, Madura McCormack

16 Apr 2019

Page 6 • 561 words • ASR AUD 3,884 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 640.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • Report Builder • ID: 1108700073 View original - Full text: 561 word(s), ~2 mins

Audience 16,484 CIRCULATION

India high commissioner calls for Adani approval Australian Financial Review, Australia, General News, Mark Ludlow

16 Apr 2019

Page 10 • 522 words • ASR AUD 6,250 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 309.00 cm² • National • Australia • Report Builder • ID: 1108561789 View original - Full text: 522 word(s), ~2 mins

Audience 38,015 CIRCULATION

Pleasing patterns of Tweed New Zealand Herald, Auckland, Travel, Dionne Christian

16 Apr 2019

Page 16 • 851 words • ASR AUD 14,060 • Photo: Yes • Type: Travel Story • Size: 849.00 cm² • NZ • New Zealand • Report Builder • ID: 1108587608 View original - Full text: 851 word(s), ~3 mins

Audience 117,269 CIRCULATION

COPYRIGHT This report and its contents are for the internal research use of Mediaportal subscribers only and must not be provided to any third party by any means for any purpose without the express permission of Isentia and/or the relevant copyright owner. For more information contact copyright@isentia.com DISCLAIMER Isentia makes no representations and, to the extent permitted by law, excludes all warranties in relation to the information contained in the report and is not liable for any losses, costs or expenses, resulting from any use or misuse of the report.


Interview with Patricia O'Callahan, CEO, Townsville Enterprise. O'Callahan says the ... Triple J, Sydney, Hack, Tom Tilley

15 Apr 2019 5:42 PM

Duration: 3 mins 16 secs • ASR AUD 136,483 • National • Australia • Report Builder • ID: M00078547027 Interview with Patricia O'Callahan, CEO, Townsville Enterprise. O'Callahan says the Galilee Basin is an important economic opportunity for the region and they have been a proud mining and resources region. She says it is not the only pillar but it is significant in north Qld. O'Callahan says the Adani project has been assessed for almost 10 years now. She says there has been drought and hurt in the resources sector and the mine provides a pathway for apprenticeships and traineeships. O'Callahan says they are frustrated these decisions are taking as long as they have and these assessments are exceptionally important. O'Callahan says coal is an important part of our energy mix and we cannot say it is going away. She says it is about a transition and it is important to acknowledge this coal is being exported to places like India. Audience 134,000 All, 68,000 MALE 16+, 59,000 FEMALE 16+ Interviewees Patricia O'Callahan, CEO, Townsville Enterprise Also broadcast from the following 7 stations Triple J (Perth), Triple J (Melbourne), Triple J (Canberra), Triple J (Brisbane), Triple J (Adelaide), Triple J (Hobart), Triple J (Darwin)

Queensland Airports Limited, a great place to work miragenews.com

15 Apr 2019 1:43 PM

345 words • ASR AUD 1,024 • Report Builder • ID: 1108361340 Read on source site

Audience N/A UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, N/A UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

COPYRIGHT This report and its contents are for the internal research use of Mediaportal subscribers only and must not be provided to any third party by any means for any purpose without the express permission of Isentia and/or the relevant copyright owner. For more information contact copyright@isentia.com DISCLAIMER Isentia makes no representations and, to the extent permitted by law, excludes all warranties in relation to the information contained in the report and is not liable for any losses, costs or expenses, resulting from any use or misuse of the report.


16 Apr 2019 Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD Author: Madura McCormack • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 16,484 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 640.00cm² Region: QLD • Market: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,884 • Words: 561 • Item ID: 1108700073

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City at risk without fix for rail line

MADURA MCCORMACK

THE future of Townsville’s economy is at “significant risk” if action isn’t taken to fix the complex operating and ageing infrastructure issues of the rail line that connects Mt Isa to Townsville. Nearly 1000km long, the Mt Isa to Townsville rail line transports millions of tonnes of freight to and from the Townsville Port. Civic leaders, including Richmond Mayor John Wharton and Traeger MP Robbie Katter, have repeatedly criticised the complex pricing nature of the rail line, operated by Queensland Rail, as an impediment to industry with companies forced to truck ore to the port. The Mount Isa to Townsville “supply chain” is a focus of Townsville Enterprise’s lobbying efforts during the Federal Election campaign. The peak economic body is calling on the next federal government to bring their state counterparts and businesses to the table to figure out how to “sustainably” operate, fund and invest in the Mt Isa to Townsville Rail line.

Townsville Enterprise chief executive Patricia O’Callaghan said the two issues, access and upgrades, needed to be addressed in parallel.

“There is a significant risk to the Queensland economy, in particular the ongoing contribution made by the North and northwest, through prolonged disruption to the existing supply chain,” she said. “However, it’s important to remember that this is a Queensland governmentowned asset and one that they must take the lead on.” Mr Katter said it was undeniable there were “threats looming” from the proposed Mt Isa to Tennant Creek rail link. Expected to cost between $2 billion and $3 billion, the project would expand the rail line from Mt Isa to Tennant Creek, joining it to an existing rail line headed to the Darwin Port. Its viability is being investigated by the Northern Territory and Queensland state governments and the Federal Government. Mr Katter said the solution lay with the State Govern-

ment, but called on federal candidates in Herbert to bang the drum and get the issue noticed. “Townsville is going to lose out more than us; Mount Isa won’t stop mining, we’ll just send it to Darwin,” he said. A study done on behalf of Townsville Enterprise in 2017 found more than 900 North

Queensland jobs could be lost if the proposed Darwin rail link superseded an upgrade of the Mount Isa to Townsville line due to the loss of economic activity from the North West Minerals Province. Herbert MP Cathy O’Toole said the recent February flood catastrophe, which wiped out a third of the line at an estimated cost of tens of millions to mining companies, meant a conversation needed to be had now more than ever. “It is something that I think the Federal Government does have a role to play in … the trickle-down effect (on communities) is quite significant,” she said. “We cannot afford to lose one more job from this city.” Mr Katter said it would be


16 Apr 2019 Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD Author: Madura McCormack • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 16,484 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 640.00cm² Region: QLD • Market: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,884 • Words: 561 • Item ID: 1108700073

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foolish to build the Townsville Eastern Access Rail Corridor before the operation and pricing structure of the Mt Isa to Townsville rail line was overhauled. A Building Queensland business case found the costs of building the 8km line extension would “significantly outweigh” the marginal increase in rail efficiency. “I’ve had people in industry tell me (TEARC) would be the world’s most expensive bicycle track if they built it now,” Mr Katter said.

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16 Apr 2019 Townsville Bulletin, Townsville QLD Author: Madura McCormack • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 16,484 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 640.00cm² Region: QLD • Market: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,884 • Words: 561 • Item ID: 1108700073

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”BANG THE DRUM”: MP Robbie Katter backs rail action.

Picture: SCOTT RADFORD-CHISHOLM


16 Apr 2019 Australian Financial Review, Australia Author: Mark Ludlow • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 38,015 • Page: 10 • Printed Size: 309.00cm² Region: National • Market: Australia • ASR: AUD 6,250 • Words: 522 Item ID: 1108561789 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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India high commissioner calls for Adani approval Exclusive Mark Ludlow Th Indian I di hi h commissioner i i The high to A Australia Ajay Gondane said Adani’s controversial $2 billion Carmichael mine should be approved as soon as possible, to ensure the crucial trade relationship continues between Australia and India. While some Indian Australians have been increasingly uneasy about what they consider to be xenophobic comments about the Indian energy company’s plans in Australia, Dr Gondane said the Carmichael mine should be treated like any other new mine. ‘‘It is surprising to me that one particular mine is up in the media or public discourse because mines are being developed all over,’’ he said in an interview with The Australian Financial Review. ‘‘They should also be treating it like any other mine and it would be much better.’’ Dr Gondane would not comment on the claims of xenophobia, but said he wanted to see bipartisan support for the coal and rail project in central Queensland, which has become a key issue ahead of next month’s federal election. He said it should be approved as soon as possible provided it meets strict environmental requirements. ‘‘I’m very optimistic this will come to fruition soon because it has taken some time. They [Adani management] are doing their utmost to meet all conditions from government,’’ he said. ‘‘We would prefer that this particular project is offered bipartisan support because our relationship with the Australian government is bipartisan. Labor and the LNP support India and Australia engagement and both want it to be going to a higher level.’’ Trade between Australia and India accounts for about $29 billion a year, which is expected to increase to up to $100 billion by 2035. Australian India Business Council chairman Jim Varghese in March warned the vilification of Adani’s coal mine could cause significant damage to bilateral trade if it was blocked, saying the company should receive a ‘‘fair go’’.

‘‘No company in Australia’s history has suffered such an unrelenting campaign to undermine and discredit is as Adani has,’’ Mr Varghese told the AFR at the time. ‘‘The Adani coal project is a bellwether project for more investment from India. If it does not go ahead because of political considerations, there will be very likely be implications for trade between the two nations.’’ The Labor Party has gone cold on the Adani project in recent years as it moves to shore up Green preferences in inner-city seats to defeat the Coalition, mirroring the strategy employed by Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk at the 2017 Queensland election. The Adani mine has become a lightning rod for environmental activists in recent years, with protests in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne, even though the mine is in the frontier Galilee Basin in Central Queensland. The Morrison government gave their final approval for the Carmichael mine just days before the election was called. The project plans to export between 10 million and 15 million tonnes of thermal coal a year, well down on its original proposal to export 60 million tonnes a year. Adani Australia is waiting for approvals from the Queensland government on its environmental management plans for groundwater and the black-throated finch.

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16 Apr 2019 Australian Financial Review, Australia Author: Mark Ludlow • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 38,015 • Page: 10 • Printed Size: 309.00cm² Region: National • Market: Australia • ASR: AUD 6,250 • Words: 522 Item ID: 1108561789 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Indian high commissioner Ajay Gondane wants approval fast-tracked.

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16 Apr 2019 New Zealand Herald, Auckland Author: Dionne Christian • Section: Travel • Article type : Travel Story Classification : Metro • Audience : 117,269 • Page: 16 • Printed Size: 849.00cm² Region: NZ • Market: New Zealand • ASR: AUD 14,060 • Words: 851 Item ID: 1108587608 PMCA licensed copy. You may not further copy, reproduce, record, retransmit, sell, publish, distribute, share or store this information without the prior written consent of the Print Media Copyright Agency. Phone +64-4-4984487 or email info@pmca.co.nz for further information.

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Pleasing patterns of Tweed The drive to Murwillumbah is almost as great as its gallery, writes Dionne Christian

I

t’s fair to say that Gerard Krefft’s time as curator of the Australian Museum did not end well. After an illustrious career largely spent exploring and bringing to world attention the natural wonders of Australia, Krefft “fell out” with the museum’s trustees and was dismissed. (I’m unsure whether one of the reasons was the activity he organised for a royal tour — staging a fight between a snake and a mongoose in the museum’s basement for the Duke of Edinburgh; thank heavens they now limit novel activities for royal tours to gumboot throwing.) In any event, Krefft refused to leave the museum, barricaded himself inside and was forcibly carried out, seated in his chair, by two prize-fighting boxers. He died, destitute and in ill health, seven years later in 1881. I know this story because I saw it in a linocut print, Krefft’s Chair, by artist Rew Hanks, one of numerous artworks displayed in the 30th anniversary exhibition at the Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre. I’m not sure how knowing about Krefft — and seeing, in striking black and white, his chair with a mongoose and a snake at its foot – impacts on me. I just understand that I like knowing it and it makes, for me, the world a slightly richer place. I’d only vaguely heard of the Tweed Regional Gallery up until a month ago when I got the opportunity to visit. It’s an excellent regional gallery, with seven exhibition spaces and a

varied programme of activities and shows, inland in a New South Wales border region normally associated with beaches. Being smack on the border with Queensland means you can change time zones simply by crossing the street in some places, because NSW observes daylight savings while Queensland does not. You need to watch that if you’re flying in or out of the Gold Coast airport which serves the rapidly growing area. When it comes to holidays, especially in Australia, there’s a temptation to stick to the wellknown tourist hotspots — the cities and its famous beaches. But this gallery proves there is much more to the “lucky country” than sun, sand and surf – although, it’s not too far away from some spectacular beaches. We left the stunning Santai Resort, at Casuarina Beach, half an hour before heading west toward South Murwillumbah, one of the numerous small towns in the Tweed Heads Region, and home to the gallery. The Tweed River Valley makes me think of music, but nothing that we might think of as quintessentially Australian — like Icehouse’s Great Southern Land or Midnight Oil’s Beds Are Burning. Songs like that speak of a vast, russet-red land where women glow and men plunder. This is a verdant valley of fields and farmland, looking west toward Wollumbin National Park and Mt Warning. Here cows graze and grass grows. If anything, the music is Edvard Grieg’s bucolic Morning.


16 Apr 2019 New Zealand Herald, Auckland Author: Dionne Christian • Section: Travel • Article type : Travel Story Classification : Metro • Audience : 117,269 • Page: 16 • Printed Size: 849.00cm² Region: NZ • Market: New Zealand • ASR: AUD 14,060 • Words: 851 Item ID: 1108587608 PMCA licensed copy. You may not further copy, reproduce, record, retransmit, sell, publish, distribute, share or store this information without the prior written consent of the Print Media Copyright Agency. Phone +64-4-4984487 or email info@pmca.co.nz for further information.

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Then again, that’s not right because the vegetation which lines Tweed Valley Way is decidedly tropical — banana palms, sugar cane and bamboo — and the river, lazy today, looks like it could turn into a torrent in a heartbeat. Or a thunder clap. Maybe it’s more Robbie Robertson’s Somewhere Down the Crazy River. The gallery sits on a slight hill and is large, modern and should look out of place in this almost English landscape; instead, it looks as if it’s proudly surveying the landscape. That’s what gallery visitors can do from the decks and viewing windows along the length of the building, making the most of the panoramic views of Tweed River, Mts Nullum, Wollumbin and Warning, the Border Ranges, fields and farmland. The gallery moved to this site in 2004 but it’s been a feature of Tweed Heads’ cultural landscape since 1988. In 2004, fundraising plus a generous donation of land meant it could move out of a historic homestead into a purposebuilt contemporary facility. Two years later, Stage II saw more space added to show off its collection of Australian artworks then, in 2011, the great Australian painter Margaret Olley, originally from Tweed, passed away. A $1 million bequest meant the building of the Margaret Olley Art Centre with more exhibition space, storage and multimedia areas, not to mention the recreation of her home studio. It offers one of the most vivid, immersive insights into how an artist lived and worked; you could spend an age peering into the windows seeing what inspired Olley and thanking your lucky stars you weren’t the cleaner who cared for it — in these rooms alone there’s some 10,000 objects!

QLD

Australia

Brisbane

Tweed

NSW Sydney Canberra Victoria

Tasman Sea

Checklist TWEED GETTING THERE Qantas flies from Auckland to Gold Coast, via Sydney, with return airfares starting from $785. qantas.com DETAILS For more information on the gallery, go to artgallery. tweed.nsw.gov.au

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16 Apr 2019 New Zealand Herald, Auckland Author: Dionne Christian • Section: Travel • Article type : Travel Story Classification : Metro • Audience : 117,269 • Page: 16 • Printed Size: 849.00cm² Region: NZ • Market: New Zealand • ASR: AUD 14,060 • Words: 851 Item ID: 1108587608 PMCA licensed copy. You may not further copy, reproduce, record, retransmit, sell, publish, distribute, share or store this information without the prior written consent of the Print Media Copyright Agency. Phone +64-4-4984487 or email info@pmca.co.nz for further information.

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The many objects in the Margaret Olley Art Centre; Rew Hanks’ Krefft’s Chair; the viewing windows at Tweed Regional Gallery make the most of panoramic views. Photos / Supplied

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