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MON 16 APRIL 2018

Mediaportal Report

Resident airfare rort North West Star, Mount Isa QLD, General News, Sally Cripps

14 Apr 2018

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Audience 1,082 CIRCULATION

Regional tourism growth is not universal - The Good Oil by Rod Brown lgfocus.com.au

13 Apr 2018 8:18 AM

915 words • ASR N/A • Longreach Airport Online • ID: 939684535 Read on source site

Audience N/A UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, N/A UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

Sky high prices North West Star, Mount Isa QLD, General News, Derek Barry

14 Apr 2018

Page 1 • 756 words • ASR AUD 1,868 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 1,141.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • Mount Isa Airport Press • ID: 939796653 View original - Full text: 756 word(s), ~3 mins

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CLONCURRY HEARING North West Star, Mount Isa QLD, General News

14 Apr 2018

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Audience 1,082 CIRCULATION

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Report by Eric Barker, ABC Rural Reporter.... ABC Eyre Peninsula and West Coast, Port Lincoln, SA Country Hour, Deborah O'Callaghan

13 Apr 2018 12:26 PM

Duration: 5 mins 20 secs • ASR AUD 3,275 • SA • Australia • Mount Isa Airport Radio & TV • ID: X00074279966 Report by Eric Barker, ABC Rural Reporter. O'Callaghan asserts the tyranny of distance leads arguments when it comes to regional airfares. She mentions North Queensland residents made submissions to a Senate inquiry into regional airfares. Barker reports Danielle Doyle was on a 13-hour return road trip from her Northern Territory cattle station to speak at the Cloncurry hearing, intent on venting her frustration at the $2500 she pays for her son's commute to and from school. Barker shares Doyle lives on Mittiebah Station, which is a five-hour drive to Mount Isa, where her son Tom catches a plane to boarding school. Doyle says she feels sick of the financial hardships the high cost of airfares brings. Doyle reveals the sale is not available everytime her son needs to fly. Doyle says she does not know whether these are all worth it in the long run. Barker notes Doyle's submission to the hearing was at the centre of the discussions, with SA Senator Rex Patrick saying the situation is a complete anomaly. Patrick says he was moved by the interesting story of Doyle, which he mentions is not being assisted by the NT nor the Qld governments being on the border. He shares he will be following the matter up along with Senator O'Sullivan to make sure they can do something for her and others who share the same circumstances. He notes they can take this submission to Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack and Aviation Minister O'Sullivan. Meanwhile, Barker notes the cost element of flights has been a big part of the inquiry. Mckinlay Shire Councillor Neil Walker says issues with reliability also need to be addressed as the inconvenience of flight delays has heightened. He acknowledges an airline is a business but problem arises when airfares increase up to four times higher than that of other areas. Audience N/A All, N/A MALE 16+, N/A FEMALE 16+ Interviewees Danielle Doyle, Mittiebah Station resident|Eric Barker, ABC Rural Reporter|Neil Walker, Councillor, McKinlay Shire Council|Rex Patrick, SA Senator Also broadcast from the following 4 stations ABC Broken Hill (Broken Hill), ABC North and West SA (Port Pirie), ABC Riverland SA (Renmark), ABC South East SA (Mt Gambier)

About a hundred Mt Isa locals have attended public meeting last night to relay their ... ABC Western Queensland, Longreach, 07:30 News, Newsreader

13 Apr 2018 7:30 AM

Duration: 1 min 14 secs • ASR AUD 302 • QLD • Australia • Mount Isa Airport Radio & TV • ID: X00074274439 About a hundred Mt Isa locals have attended public meeting last night to relay their concerns to the senators conducting an inquiry into root service delivery in regional and remote communities. Mt Isa resident Steve Carlson says the high air fare cost in Mt Isa is affecting the town, unconvinced that the inquiry will bring forth change. Senator Barry O'Sullivan says the air fare pricing seems to be worse in Mt Isa than anywhere else, noting that they plan to meet with other communities, airlines and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority. Audience N/A All, N/A MALE 16+, N/A FEMALE 16+ Interviewees Barry O'Sullivan, Senator|Steve Carlson, Mt Isa resident Also broadcast from the following 1 station ABC North West Qld (Mt Isa)

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Report about the regional and remote airfares. ... ABC North West Qld, Mt Isa, Breakfast, Zara Margolis

13 Apr 2018 7:11 AM

Duration: 7 mins 46 secs • ASR AUD 953 • QLD • Australia • Mount Isa Airport Radio & TV • ID: X00074277649 Report about the regional and remote airfares. Margolis mentions there is a Senate inquiry into regional and remote airfares in the North West yesterday. She notes the Senate heard from Cloncurry Shire Council, MITEZ, Isolated Children's Parents' Association of Australia, Mt Isa City Council, McKinlay Shire Council and Cloncurry resident Hamish Griffin. She says people turn out to these meetings to voice their frustration about regional and remote airfares. Steve Carson(*), North West resident, says he went to the public meeting because he is tired of the price gouging. He thinks the Senate inquiry could do nothing but make recommendations to Qantas and Virgin. He thinks the Senate has ignored everyone else. Jeck Thompson(*), North West resident, notes Qantas offers a disgusting service. Danielle Slade(*), North West resident, thinks it is important for Mt Isa to have their say. She notes the airline charges have affected their lifestyle and cost of living. She states the airline prices affects 20,000 people in Mt Isa. Robert Cuttmore(*), North West resident, asks about the looming pilot shortage in the region. Craig Scriven(*), North West resident, says more of the complaints relate to the social issues the prices have caused. Audience N/A All, N/A MALE 16+, N/A FEMALE 16+ Interviewees Craig Scriven(*), North West resident|Danielle Slade(*), North West resident|David Fletcher(*), North West resident|Jeck Thompson(*), North West resident|Robert Cuttmore(*), North West resident|Steve Carson(*), North West resident

Interview with Cameron Hart, Events Management Queensland CEO. He says the key ... ABC Gold Coast, Gold Coast, Breakfast , Bern Young

13 Apr 2018 6:40 AM

Duration: 5 mins 32 secs • ASR AUD 1,588 • QLD • Australia • Gold Coast Marathon • ID: X00074272761 Interview with Cameron Hart, Events Management Queensland CEO. He says the key reasons they got to host the Games are the annual Gold Coast Marathon and the way they drew people in. He says it's one of the most interesting discussions around the Commonwealth Games and the legacy. He notes they're celebrating their 40th edition of the marathon and they've been demonstrating for a long time that the Gold Coast could deliver big sporting events and deliver them well. He says they're really proud they were able to play a role in winning the bid. He says at the post-Commonwealth Games, it will give them a legacy and focus on the Gold Coast marathon. He says the action starts and finishes at Southport, the Northern and Broadwater Parklands with men and women in wheelchair races to get away at 6:10 am. He says the full marathon for the women begins at 7:20 am and the men's at 8:15 am. He says they're going north first then south. He says the men will probably be at the Burleigh Hotel at 8:30-9:15 am. He notes it will be a slower marathon due to the hot weather. Compere mentions Kurt Fearnley's final game at the Commonwealth Games. She also mentions she spoke with Michael Shelley and he says he's super focused on running that he can't hear nor see the spectators cheers. He says the women's event will have one Kenyan lady but their top pick is Lisa(*) Whiteman(*). [cont.] Audience 8,000 All, 4,000 MALE 16+, 3,000 FEMALE 16+ Interviewees Cameron Hart, CEO, Events Management Queensland

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VISITORS TO CITY FIND BUMPS IN THE ROAD Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News, Peyton Hutchins

16 Apr 2018

Page 4 • 393 words • ASR AUD 5,600 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 878.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • Gold Coast Airport Press • ID: 940605717 View original - Full text: 393 word(s), ~1 min

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REMEMBER WHEN Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News

16 Apr 2018

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The Gold Coast could secure funding for major projects on the back of a successful Commonwealth Games Cairns Post by Denis Doherty

14 Apr 2018 11:00 PM

483 words • ASR AUD 3 • Gold Coast Airport Online • ID: 940320362 Read on source site

Audience 1,556 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, 10 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

Gold Coast Airport redevelopment reaches new milestone infrastructuremagazine.com.au by Elisa Iannunzio

13 Apr 2018 2:38 PM

273 words • ASR N/A • Gold Coast Airport Online • ID: 939789331 Read on source site

Audience N/A UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, N/A UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

Host with the most: Gold Coast to inspire Brisbane Olympic bid The Australian by Wayne Smith

15 Apr 2018 11:00 PM

1113 words • ASR AUD 4,960 • Gold Coast Industry News Online • ID: 940554793 Read on source site

Audience 33,387 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, 1,813 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

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Gold Coast event puts a shine on city coffers The Australian by Charlie Peel

15 Apr 2018 11:00 PM

549 words • ASR AUD 2,910 • Gold Coast Industry News Online • ID: 940557995 Read on source site

Audience 33,387 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, 1,813 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

ROAD RAGE AT THE POLITICS OF INFRASTRUCTURE Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast, General News, Paul Murray

14 Apr 2018

Page 80 • 500 words • ASR AUD 1,748 • Photo: No • Type: News Item • Size: 216.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • Gold Coast Industry News Press • ID: 939999590 View original - Full text: 500 word(s), ~2 mins

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Southeast Queensland could host the Olympic Games 'tomorrow', Peter Beattie says Brisbane Courier-Mail

13 Apr 2018 11:00 PM

1802 words • ASR AUD 242 • Gold Coast Industry News Online • ID: 939919640 Read on source site

Audience 20,312 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, 129 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

Looking past the Gold Coast the world sees today The Age by ANDREW LEACH

13 Apr 2018 9:42 AM

1241 words • ASR AUD 5,411 • Gold Coast Industry News Online • ID: 939711174 Read on source site

Audience 72,479 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS, 1,901 UNIQUE DAILY VISITORS

Inspire to explore the best region North West Star, Mount Isa QLD, General News, Melissa North

14 Apr 2018

Page 7 • 465 words • ASR AUD 724 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 442.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • Other Tourism Industry News Press • ID: 939793941 View original - Full text: 465 word(s), ~1 min

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Tourism and Events Queensland says operators need to develop outback holiday ... ABC Western Queensland, Longreach, 06:30 News, Newsreader

13 Apr 2018 6:31 AM

Duration: 0 min 39 secs • ASR AUD 160 • QLD • Australia • Other Tourism Industry News Radio & TV • ID: X00074275413 Tourism and Events Queensland says operators need to develop outback holiday packages to increase tourism long-term in the West. North West tourism operators and government representatives met in Mt Isa yesterday to share ideas about outback tourism. Matt Bron states cheaper air fares is only a short-term solution. Audience N/A All, N/A MALE 16+, N/A FEMALE 16+ Interviewees Matt Bron, Tourism and Events Queensland Also broadcast from the following 1 station ABC North West Qld (Mt Isa)

Fearnley flies green and gold flag to the end The Australian, Australia, General News, Wally Mason

16 Apr 2018

Page 1 • 856 words • ASR AUD 20,128 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 996.00 cm² • National • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940538199 View original - Full text: 856 word(s), ~3 mins

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It's totally gold, gold, gold for city coffers The Australian, Australia, General News, Charlie Peel

16 Apr 2018

Page 5 • 526 words • ASR AUD 5,194 • Photo: No • Type: News Item • Size: 257.00 cm² • National • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940538285 View original - Full text: 526 word(s), ~2 mins

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Fun and Games Courier Mail, Brisbane, General News, Greg Stolz

16 Apr 2018

Page 21 • 1037 words • ASR AUD 18,669 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 1,063.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940538711 View original - Full text: 1037 word(s), ~4 mins

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Queensland worthy of a podium spot for Olympics Courier Mail, Brisbane, General News, Greg Stolz

16 Apr 2018

Page 7 • 315 words • ASR AUD 2,389 • Photo: No • Type: News Item • Size: 136.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940538951 View original - Full text: 315 word(s), ~1 min

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SWIM GREAT TIPS DAWN OF A NEW TOURISM ERA Courier Mail, Brisbane, General News, Jonathon Moran

16 Apr 2018

Page 18 • 140 words • ASR AUD 8,518 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 485.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940542134 View original - Full text: 140 word(s), <1 min

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Host with the most: Gold Coast inspires Olympic push The Australian, Australia, Sport, Wayne Smith

16 Apr 2018

Page 32 • 1166 words • ASR AUD 16,854 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 834.00 cm² • National • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940543003 View original - Full text: 1166 word(s), ~4 mins

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Olympics too big for Gold Coast Australian Financial Review, Australia, General News, Laine Clark

16 Apr 2018

Page 3 • 405 words • ASR AUD 5,704 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 282.00 cm² • National • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940574937 View original - Full text: 405 word(s), ~1 min

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The Games celebration most of us didn't see The Australian, Australia, Edition Changes - All-round Metro, Wally Mason

16 Apr 2018

Page 1 • 863 words • ASR AUD 20,128 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 996.00 cm² • National • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940578546 View original - Full text: 863 word(s), ~3 mins

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REPORT CARD: HOW THE GAMES RATED Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News

16 Apr 2018

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'A TOUGH ACT TO FOLLOW' Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News, Jeremy Pierce

16 Apr 2018

Page 1 • 477 words • ASR AUD 3,712 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 582.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940605710 View original - Full text: 477 word(s), ~1 min

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BUILD IT AND THEY WILL COME Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News, Chris Mcmahon Page 4 • 907 words • ASR AUD 3,731 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 585.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940605711 View original - Full text: 907 word(s), ~3 mins

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16 Apr 2018


Golden opportunity to put on a great party squandered Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, General News, Jonathon Moran

16 Apr 2018

Page 6 • 509 words • ASR AUD 2,130 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 334.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940607712 View original - Full text: 509 word(s), ~2 mins

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THANK YOU AND GOODNIGHT Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD, Supplements, Greg Stolz

16 Apr 2018

Page 2 • 723 words • ASR AUD 8,024 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 1,258.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940616302 View original - Full text: 723 word(s), ~2 mins

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Southeast Olympic bid would need federal cash Sunday Mail Brisbane, Brisbane, General News, Greg Stolz

15 Apr 2018

Page 6 • 132 words • ASR AUD 3,054 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 94.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940293387 View original - Full text: 132 word(s), <1 min

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Borobi on track to be the glitter strip mascot Courier Mail, Brisbane, General News Page 11 • 153 words • ASR AUD 2,016 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 92.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 939919633 View original - Full text: 153 word(s), <1 min

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14 Apr 2018


Council report predicted trade downturn last year Courier Mail, Brisbane, General News

14 Apr 2018

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THEY KNEW Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast, General News, Kirstin Payne

14 Apr 2018

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GO LARGER Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast, Supplements, Paul Malone and Ryan Keen

14 Apr 2018

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BOROBI'S FIRE AND RICE Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast, General News, Andrew Potts Page 1 • 420 words • ASR AUD 5,875 • Photo: Yes • Type: News Item • Size: 726.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940065403 View original - Full text: 420 word(s), ~1 min

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14 Apr 2018


Banks 'did not tip in a cent towards Games' Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast, General News, Kathleen Skene

14 Apr 2018

Page 4 • 472 words • ASR AUD 1,505 • Photo: No • Type: News Item • Size: 186.00 cm² • QLD • Australia • 2018 Commonwealth Games Press • ID: 940065468 View original - Full text: 472 word(s), ~1 min

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Call for rethink on Virgin privatisation Australian Financial Review, Australia, Companies and Markets, Jenny Wiggins Page 15 • 521 words • ASR AUD 4,531 • Photo: No • Type: News Item • Size: 224.00 cm² • National • Australia • Airline/Aviation Industry News Press • ID: 940587305 View original - Full text: 521 word(s), ~2 mins

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16 Apr 2018


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Author: Sally Cripps • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 1,082 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 361.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 591 • Words: 382 • Item ID: 939793331

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Resident airfare rort

BY SALLY CRIPPS

A CONCERN that “resident fares” were being used by people other than genuine residents was one of the issues listed when Senator Barry O’Sullivan met with disgruntled air travellers in Blackall on Saturday. Much of the conversation with Mr O’Sullivan, the cochair of the Senate Standing Committee on Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport looking into the social and economic impacts of fare costs and service delivery for non-metropolitan communities, revolved around reducing the cost of air travel by making more cheaper resident fares available. It was initially suggested by Sonja Doyle, who said at least two discounted seats needed to be set aside on each of the daily services between Brisbane and the Blackall/Barcaldine/Longreach destination for compassionate travel. “Pricing can be a problem, particularly if you have to do it at short notice,” she said. The vexed question of Qantas’ refusal to disclose how many resident fares are offered, slammed by the Member for Gregory, Lachlan Millar, in March last year, was raised again at Blackall. Western Queenslanders had told Mr Millar they were very difficult to obtain but when asked how many were available at each price point, a Qantas spokeswoman said

they didn’t disclose that “simply for commercial reasons”. Mr O’Sullivan on Saturday vowed to get answers to information Qantas wasn’t prepared to disclose, through the inquiry process. More information would also be sought on the sugges-

tion that resident fares were being made available to people other than those whose usual place of residence was in eligible shires. “I interrogated Qantas in my office but I’m not satisfied,” Mr O’Sullivan said. “There seem to be some for contractors not living here, and that’s making less resident fares available. “I have clear evidence where this is being abused.” He had been told by Qantas that an address on a driver’s licence or a rates notice was proof of residency. The time set aside in Blackall on Saturday, as well as in Charleville and Barcaldine on Monday, were made possible by Mr O’Sullivan travelling to western Queensland before the Senate hearings in Longreach in Tuesday and Cloncurry on Thursday, to hear personally from affected people in other communities.


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Author: Sally Cripps • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 1,082 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 361.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 591 • Words: 382 • Item ID: 939793331

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Regional air services inquiry co-chair, Senator Barry O'Sullivan, flanked by BlackallTambo mayor Andrew Martin and Rockhampton regional councillor, Neil Fisher.

Query over Qantas.

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14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Author: Derek Barry • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 1,082 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 1141.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,868 • Words: 756 • Item ID: 939796653

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Sky high prices BY DEREK BARRY

THERE’S no real answers yet but North West Queensland had its day to ask questions and give its experiences to the airline inquiry in Cloncurry and Mount Isa on Thursday. With the high price of air fares a hot button issue across the region, the hearing into "The operation, regulation and funding of air route service delivery to rural, regional and remote communities" was eagerly anticipated. Cloncurry hosted a formal hearing in the morning with Cloncurry Shire Council, local resident Hamish Griffin, MITEZ, the Isolated Children's Parents Association and Mount Isa and McKinlay councils all giving evidence. Later it was Mount Isa's turn with almost 100 peo-

ple at the Good Shepherd Catholic College for an informal hearing. Four senators from the committee attended in Cloncurry: Rex Patrick (NXT) Barry O'Sullivan (LNP), Richard Colbeck (LNP) and Anthony Chisholm (ALP) and all bar Senator Colbeck went on to the Mount Isa forum cochaired by state member for Traeger Robbie Katter and Mayor Joyce McCulloch. Cloncurry Mayor Greg Campbell opened the Curry hearing saying the issue was one of “affordability on a day-to-day-basis”. The committee scrutinised Cloncurry Airport charges but Senator Barry O’Sullivan said their costs of $35 a head which includes security charges made it hard to justify the airlines’ case it was a significant addition to costs. Mr Griffin, a long-time

advocate of cheaper flights who has used social media to great effect, spoke next. Mr Griffin wanted to talk about the combined airline submission under the banner “A4ANZ” which he described as a “cartel”. However he was warned by Senator O’Sullivan that any testimony that was “adverse” to the airlines might have to be held in camera. Continued on page 4.

Hamish Griffin speaks.


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Author: Derek Barry • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 1,082 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 1141.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,868 • Words: 756 • Item ID: 939796653

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BIG COST: With their signs of their price of flights at Mount Isa are Sarrah Bowcock, Rachel Baker and Danielle Slade. Photos: Derek Barry

North West has its chance CONTINUED from page 1. Mr Griffin had better luck when speaking about airline “dynamic pricing” which is the practice of pricing items judged by the customer’s perceived ability to pay. He said when Cloncurry flooded and road closed prices went sky high. When his post to Virgin complaining about the practice went viral and people started checking prices online, the demand drove the price higher still. MITEZ CEO Glen Graham called for hardship payments to be made for people who have to attend h d funerals f l on short notice though Senator

O’Sullivan warned that system could be abused. “"We all know more aunties die on the last day of the test than any day,” he said. Mount Isa City Council spoke about the economic impacts and said the 2017 Triple J One Night Stand crowd was well done on expected numbers due to high airfare costs to get to Mount Isa from the coast. In the afternoon session at Mount Isa, speaker after speaker told about their experiences of dealing with the problem.

Katrina Gall’s story was heartbreaking as she and her husband were forced to moved away after spending $20,000 to visit her father. When he passed away and they moved back to Mount Isa, they faced the same problem when her husband’s parent also fell ill. “Everyone here in Mount Isa has family from away and there are times when you need to get away quickly in a tragedy," she said. Kim Coghlan also had similar sized bills supporting her children to play sport away from home and said they had the same dreams as kids on the coast. Commerce North West president Travis Crowther said governments needed to incentivise people to move to regional areas – a point Cloncurry Mayor Greg Campbell also raised saying tax breaks for regional areas


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Author: Derek Barry • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 1,082 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 1141.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,868 • Words: 756 • Item ID: 939796653

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were needed. Tony McGrady asked the committee what powers they had to enforce findings and wondered what would happen if airlines only “noted” the recommendations and did not act on them. Senator O’Sullivan said they could enforce actions through regulations and the airlines themselves would be appearing in front of the committee later in the year. Member for Traeger Robbie Katter said the committee should also look at the case for re-regulating the Mount Isa-Townsville route with a lot of evidence to suggest many currently travel to Townsville by car before getting cheaper fares to other destinations.

EXPENSIVE: Business owner Mary-Jane Caldwell speaks about the airline impact on the cost of flying in contractors during floods at the Mount Isa forum. Photo: Derek Barry


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Author: Derek Barry • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 1,082 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 1141.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,868 • Words: 756 • Item ID: 939796653

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TALKS: Some of the Cloncurry participants posed for a group photo at the end of the hearing at the Precinct. Photo: supplied

Page 4 of 4


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Section: General News • Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional Audience : 1,082 • Page: 29 • Printed Size: 386.00cm² • Market: QLD Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 632 • Words: 102 • Item ID: 939794254

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CLONCURRY HEARING Cloncurry hosted the official North West Queensland hearing into the high cost of air fares on Thursday. Photos: Derek Barry

Committee members Senators Rex Patrick and Barry O'Sullivan, secretary Tim Watling and Senators Richard Colbeck and Anthony Chisholm.

Kim Hughes, Wendy Hick and Danielle Doyle give evidence in Cloncurry for the ICPA.

Cloncurry Shire CEO Jo Morris and Mayor Greg Campbell give evidence.

Glen Graham, MITEZ CEO gives evidence.


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Section: General News • Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional Audience : 1,082 • Page: 29 • Printed Size: 386.00cm² • Market: QLD Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 632 • Words: 102 • Item ID: 939794254

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EVIDENCE: McKinlay deputy mayor Neil Walker and CEO Peter Fitchat speak for their shire at the Cloncurry hearing.

Mount Isa City Council deputy CEO Mark Coffey, CEO Sharon Ibardolaza, Mayor Joyce McCulloch and Deputy mayor Phil Barwick.

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16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Peyton Hutchins • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 4 • Printed Size: 878.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 5,600 • Words: 393 • Item ID: 940605717

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VISITORS TO CITY FIND BUMPS IN THE ROAD PEYTON HUTCHINS

peyton.hutchins@news.com.au

OVER the past 10 days, game-goers have been through some highs and lows when it comes to Gold Coast public transport. Sydneysider Dianne Isichei said that for a regional area, the Gold Coast public transport was very spread out. “I think the only downfall with public transport over the Games period was definitely the opening ceremony, they just didn’t realise how big it would’ve actually been,” Isichei said. “I do have to say though, the drivers and volunteers were absolutely gorgeous, so happy and welcoming. “The tramline was fantastic and shuttle buses came every 15 minutes which was brilliant – no delays whatsoever.” While some people may have had a great experience, others did not fare so well. Another Sydney resident, Lui Basile, said not everything was properly organised. “At the tram station there were so many people mashed in one area with absolutely no direction given to the gamegoers,” Basile said. Mr Basile said he left the closing ceremony extra early so he wouldn’t have to wait as long, but ended up not getting home until 1am. “Ridiculous – even having to walk to the buses was very inconvenient for elderly people,” Basile said. Mr Basile’s final verdict was that overall, public transport did its job. As for Mrs Isichei, she

CAR V PUBLIC TRANSPORT: WHICH WINS? believes the Gold Coast deserves a very big tick.

ASHMORE PLAZA TO HE DS JAMES ST BURLEIGH HEA PUBLIC TRANSPORT: 1 hour 13 minutes, costs $3.96 DRIVING: 22 — 35 minutes

FOXWELL RD COOMERA TO SOUTHPORT TRAM STATION PUBLIC TRANSPORT: catching a bus, a train and then a tram — 1 hour 1 minute, costs $3.96 DRIVING: 20 — 30 minutes

SWANTON DR, MUDGEERABA TO BROADBEACH PUBLIC TRANSPORT lk two buses, TRANSPORT: walk, walk — 1 hour 5 minutes, $3.25 DRIVING: 19 minutes

GOLD COAST HWY CURRUMBIN TO CAVILL AVE PU PUBLIC TRANSPORT TRANSPORT: BBus, walk, tram — 58 minutes, cost $3.96 DRIVING: 31 minutes

SOUTHPORT TRAM STATION TO GOLD COAST AIRPORT PUBLIC TRANSPORT: tram, walk, bus — 1 hour 3 minutes, cost $3.96 DRIVING: 30 — 55 minutes

SOUTHPORT TRAM STATION TO BRISBANE DOMESTIC AIRPORT PUBLIC TRANSPORT: tram, walk, train — 2 hours 5mins, cost $32.22 DRIVING: 55 minutes to 1 hour 10 minutes *Trips are based on leaving about 8.30am on a Saturday morning.


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Peyton Hutchins • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 4 • Printed Size: 878.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 5,600 • Words: 393 • Item ID: 940605717

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Picture: RICHARD GOSLING

Lynda Hoarau, Lui Basile and Dianne Isichei prepare to board a bus at Broadbeach. Picture: RICHARD GOSLING


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Section: General News • Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional Audience : 21,468 • Page: 23 • Printed Size: 139.00cm² • Market: QLD Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 887 • Words: 257 • Item ID: 940606174

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REMEMBER WHEN GOLD COAST BULLETIN Friday April 16, 2004 THE loss of Qantas’s iconic flying kangaroo from Gold Coast skies would backfire on the airline, a marketing expert said. Professor Bill Merrilees, head of marketing at Griffith University Gold Coast, said passengers snubbed by Qantas were likely to return the favour and fly Virgin instead. Prof Merrilees said it could lead to the loss of recognition of the Qantas brand or it being remembered for all the wrong reasons. “The consumer reaction is likely to be that this was a bit of an insult and I think a lot of customers will be left feeling out of joint,” said Prof Merrilees. “Qantas is saying ‘we don’t care about you and we’re not going to give you any choice, you can only fly discount’.” He said it was also a snub to the Gold Coast Airport. “It is saying: ‘You’ve now become a budget airport’,” said Prof Merrilees. “The airport may be able to fight back and reposition itself as offering convenience and value, but customers don’t like being dictated to and I think a lot of people could turn against what they see as Qantas’s ‘big brother’ monopoly. “I think people will blame Qantas and get upset. Transport, as we saw from the election, is a touchy issue. “I think there will be a negative reaction and it could be quite considerable.” Prof Merrilees said if Qantas had been trying to differentiate itself from the discount Jetstar brand ‘this was a very extreme way of going about it’.

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14 Apr 2018 Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast Author: Paul Murray • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 27,564 • Page: 80 • Printed Size: 216.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,748 • Words: 500 • Item ID: 939999590

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ROAD RAGE AT THE POLITICS OF INFRASTRUCTURE PAUL MURRAY Watch Paul Murray LIVE Sunday - Thursday at 9pm THIS week the Prime Minister made more than six billion dollars in promises to build things that may save his job at the next election. After suffering the humiliation of losing 30 Newspolls, he hit the road, dollars in hand. First stop was the Gold Coast where he promised a billon dollars for a much needed fix to the M1 motorway between the Coast and Brisbane. On Friday he was in Melbourne coming up with five billion dollars for a train between the airport and the city. Both are much needed serious projects, but despite all the hoopla and billions of dollars on the table, neither are going to happen. The problem with most significant projects these days is a Prime Minister needs the states to match him dollar for dollar, and the states need dollars from Canberra to make big things happen. But the strange thing about both announcements was the Prime Minister didn’t tell the Premiers he was stumping up the cash. You would think someone would have a meeting to see if everyone was on board before you invite cameras to see traffic jams you are promising to get rid of. The truth is, governments

have different priorities and think a billion may be better spent somewhere else. The problem is the somewhere else may not have the political pay off the government in Canberra wants. Hence projects like the M1 and the airport train are forever promised, but never delivered. Occasionally the planets align when governments are the same political party, but the moment that changes plans are abandoned. Take the example of the East West link in Melbourne, signed off by the state Liberals, then trashed by Labor’s Daniel Andrews. All power to Malcom Turnbull for throwing real money at the projects, but forgive locals for not cheering these latest announcements. We’ve seen this game many, many times before. ••••••••• DON’T be surprised if Agriculture Minister David Littleproud is a lot tougher on the live export industry than his predecessor Barnaby Joyce. Littleproud was clearly shocked by the same footage we all saw on TV last week, but he’s been shown even more graphic footage. This is not to say Joyce was

unmoved when activists sent him footage, but he was never going to repeat the mistakes of the past and shut this industry down overnight. While there is no indication this government will do anything as dumb as that, there is some serious pressure for change in Canberra. Senator Derryn Hinch has been fighting against the live export trade for decades and is becoming a regular make or break vote for the government to get anything done in the upper house. He wants a phase out over three years. For my part I don’t think we need to ban the entire industry, but we clearly need to invest in technologies that would let us see inside the ships at all times and if needed, change laws to make individuals more accountable for animal cruelty.


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Author: Melissa North • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 1,082 • Page: 7 • Printed Size: 442.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 724 • Words: 465 • Item ID: 939793941

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Inspire to explore the best region The secret to generating leading tourism BY MELISSA NORTH

ON THURSDAY April 12 the Mount Isa Tourism Association gathered for what was the culmination of a major strategic planning session held in 2017. MITA President Gary Murray said they wanted to establish a meeting with all the tourism businesses in North West Queensland to communicate their philosophy. “The power of suggestion means to talk about tourism in our region with confidence to tourists and service providers alike,” Mr Murray said. “To be able to do that means knowing what each tourism provider does, what their products are, what they offer and where they are situated. The power of suggestion can then generate more income into the region, create jobs and drive prosperity. All by simply showcasing what attractions we have available.” The meeting on Thursday afternoon highlighted the essence of what MITA were trying to achieve by dispelling old paradigms and providing information related to the sequence of events in generating outstanding tourism

within the region. “In the old days tourism within a region was very competitive but times have changed and now it’s all about collaboration and working together. “By informing tourists in our region and by suggesting other sights and attractions, it will create a snowball effect whereby more products are generated leading to more confidence in our marketing abilities,” he said. The sequence of events in generating outstanding tourism within the region began with a talk by Shelly Hawkins fromTrek West – Tailored Hiking Tours which is an innovative new business capitalising on the rugged and remote beauty of North West Queensland. “Starting up your own business can be daunting with legals, insurance, researching, marketing and networking but if you back yourself 100% you can only succeed,” Ms Hawkin’s said. Michelle Low Mow from Adels Grove spoke about how being involved in the tourism industry for over 17 years had helped her busi-

ness grow from little things into big things. “In the first year of business we had 4000 visitors, we saw the potential and growth of the region, and over the years we expanded in size and initiatives, last year we had over 40,000 visitors,” Ms Low Mow said. The final part of the transition was discussed by Natalie Flecker, General Manager of the Mount Isa Mines Rotary Rodeo, on how to become the best in your field. “It’s by taking ideas on board, listening and learning from the no’s to achieve the right mix of initiatives and ideas through networking among other things. In 2016 we claimed Major Event Status and since then have won a number of tourism awards,” Ms Flecker said.

‘‘

The power of suggestion could keep tourists in our locality much longer. Gary Murray


14 Apr 2018 North West Star, Mount Isa QLD Author: Melissa North • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 1,082 • Page: 7 • Printed Size: 442.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 724 • Words: 465 • Item ID: 939793941

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TOURISM: Growing your tourism business was presented by Mount Isa Tourism Association. Photo: Melissa North

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16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wally Mason • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 996.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 20,128 • Words: 856 Item ID: 940538199 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Fearnley flies green and gold flag to the end WALLY MASON SPORTS EDITOR

Kurt Fearnley always wanted to go out like his uncle, rugby league hardman Royce Simmons, who ended his career with two tries for Penrith in his team’s winning 1991 grand final and never played again. Yesterday, he did just that. After winning a gold medal in his last ever wheelchair marathon for Australia at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games yesterday morning, Fearnley carried the flag at the head of the Australian team in last night’s closing ceremony. A winner to the end. “I want to run to the finish like he did. Go out on a high. Go out with a celebration that you’ll never forget,” Fearnley said. The Australian team celebrated hard at last night’s all-singing, all-dancing ceremony, after streeting the field in the medal tally and recording its best result since the Melbourne Commonwealth Games in 2006, when the halo effect from the Sydney Olympics still lingered.

Australia finished these Games with 80 gold medals, 59 silver and 59 bronze for a total of 198 medals, well ahead of second-placed England on 45 gold, 45 silver and 46 bronze. In Melbourne, Australia topped the tally with 84 gold, 69 silver and 69 bronze. This time around, Australia was so dominant we even won more gold than the combined British teams — England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland won 65 gold medals between them. GOLDOC chairman Peter Beattie described the Games as “bloody fantastic”. A host of Australian musical superstars brought the curtain down on the Games last night — along with an element of the indigenous flavour that sparked criticism of the opening ceremony. Indigenous band Yothu Yindi and the Treaty Project were Continued on Page 5 MORE REPORTS P5 SPORT P30-32

FINAL TALLY Gold

Silver Bronze TOTAL

AUSTRALIA 80

59

59

198

46

136

20

66

27

82

ENGLAND 45

45

INDIA 26

20

CANADA 15

40

NEW ZEALAND 15

16

15

46


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wally Mason • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 996.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 20,128 • Words: 856 Item ID: 940538199 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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GETTY IMAGES

Wheelchair marathon champion Kurt Fearnley leads the Australian team at last night’s closing ceremony


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wally Mason • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 996.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 20,128 • Words: 856 Item ID: 940538199 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Fearnley rolls into sporting history, flying flag to the end Continued from Page 1

among the featured performers. And the first artist on stage was indigenous singer-songwriter Archie Roach, who performed Let Love Rule with Gold Coast indypop star Amy Shark. They were joined by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander choir Yugambeh Youth Choir. “Pretty much everything you need to know about the show is those first five minutes,” said ceremonies director David Zolkwer. The strong indigenous component of the Games opening ceremony sparked criticism from some quarters, with One Nation leader Pauline Hanson labelling it “over the top”. Mr Beattie said there had been no suggestion of making changes to last night’s schedule in response to criticism of the opening ceremony. “We’ve never asked for any changes of any kind,” he said. “We were very happy with the opening ceremony.” Guy Sebastian and Anthony Callea performed solos last night and the show climaxed with a special concert of Australian female artists including The Veronicas, Samantha Jade, Kate Ceberano, Deborah Conway, Emma Donovan, Dami Im, Thandi Phoenix and Kira Puru. The musical director of the opening and closing ceremonies, Katie Noonan, again included herself in the show last night. She had been criticised for her downbeat performance at the opening ceremony. Prince Edward delivered the official welcome last night and dignitaries in the stands included Malcolm Turnbull and retired sprint king Usain Bolt, who has been haunting glitter-strip nightclubs for the past few evenings. The ceremony also featured

the handover of the Games flag from the Gold Coast to the city of Birmingham, which will host the 2022 Games, in a segment involving the Queensland Ballet and the Queensland Youth Ballet. The culture and street life of the gritty Midlands city was celebrated, with Birmingham’s MC Lady Sanity performing her hit Go The Distance. And no tribute to Birmingham street culture would be complete without a grungy spoken-word poet — step up Amerah Saleh with her work Tourist in My City. On a balmy Gold Coast evening, Birmingham Lord Mayor Anne Underwood promised sporting competition to match the Gold Coast Games, even if the weather would not be as good. “Whilst we can’t promise the sun, sand and sea of these Gold Coast Commonwealth Games, we can promise youth, energy, creativity and a love of sport,” she said. The ceremony came at the end of a day of drama for Australian athletes that began with Fearnley’s heroics and Michael Shelley winning the marathon after Scottish runner Callum Hawkins collapsed 2km from home while in the gold medal position. After that, Australian athletes experienced mixed fortunes. Two gold medals we had banked on from the start went begging when the Diamonds went down to England by a point in the netball final and the women’s sevens team lost to New Zealand in extra time. The Boomers waltzed to victory in the men’s basketball final over Canada by 87-47, and our men’s squash doubles pairing of Zac Alexander and David Palmer, who came out of retirement as a 41-year-old, collected gold.

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16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wally Mason • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 996.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 20,128 • Words: 856 Item ID: 940538199 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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GETTY IMAGES

Guy Sebastian performs during the closing ceremony and, below, Australian athletes enter the stadium

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16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Charlie Peel • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 5 • Printed Size: 257.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 5,194 • Words: 526 Item ID: 940538285 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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It’s totally gold, gold, gold for city coffers $870 million economic injection from visitors in the lead-up to and during the Commonwealth Games Queensland will also benefit from a further $488m in direct foreign investment, on top of “billions” of dollars in private-sector infrastructure investment, the state government said yesterday. The Games may not have

Coast has risen to 81 per cent — up 10 per cent on the Games’ first week and above last year’s average of 71 per cent. About 95 per cent of Games tickets were sold, taking the total number to 1.16 million — on par with the Glasgow Games in 2014. Commonwealth Games Federation chief executive David Grevemberg said the competition was set up “by design” to stimulate sustainable development for host

“before, during and after the Games … but the real benefit for the Gold Coast and for Queensland comes from the great exposure we’ve received over the last two weeks,” she said. “Business confidence is strong and, thanks to the Games, we expect to generate an extra $488m in foreign direct investment and exports in Queensland. “On top of that, Griffith University modelling shows we can

delivered the immediate boost some Gold Coast businesses anticipated but tourism bosses believe they will position the city for its next growth period. Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate described it as a “boom for your buck” for taxpayers and ratepayers who spent $2 billion on the Games. Gold Coast Tourism chief Mark Winter said the real economic benefits for the city would be realised in the future on the back of

cities. He hailed the Gold Coast’s light-rail network, which had been fast-tracked in anticipation of the Games as an example of how the event could leave a positive legacy for residents. Mr Tate pointed to new residential development data by Ray White Surfers Paradise that said the Games would deliver about $30bn in property investment over the next decade. “(Ratepayers and taxpayers) get more than bang for

expect billions of dollars in private-sector investment in infrastructure as a result of the Games.” Ms Jones’s office said the state had provided $1.5bn towards the Games, with the federal government and Gold Coast City Council contributing the rest of the $2bn in public investment. Brisbane Airport also had a boost after 80 per cent of almost 14,000 athletes, families, officials, press and sponsors at the Games used the airport.

massive global exposure generated by the Games. “We believe this is a springboard to another incredible growth phase for the Gold Coast,” he said. According to data provided by Tourism Events Queensland, social-media exposure and web searches have risen more than four times their usual amount while visitor information centre bookings are up 60 per cent. Hotel occupancy on the Gold

their buck, I think they got boom.” Mr Tate said the athletes village, which is to become a “health and knowledge precinct”, would generate $6bn in investment. “That economy alone, when you add education and medical together, has outstripped our tourism industry,” he said. Commonwealth Games Minister Kate Jones said projections showed the city was on track to receive $870m in visitor expenditure

CHARLIE PEEL Th ld C The G Gold Coastt iis on track for an


16 Apr 2018 Courier Mail, Brisbane Author: Greg Stolz • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Capital City Daily • Audience : 135,007 • Page: 21 Printed Size: 1063.00cm² • Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 18,669 Words: 1037 • Item ID: 940538711 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Fun and Games Years of meticulous planning paid rich dividends for the organisers as the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast proved be a fantastic event for all concerned, writes Greg Stolz

B

EFORE the golden moments of the past two weeks, 10 years of meticulous planning went into the preparing for the 2018 Commonwealth Games. So how did we perform away from the sporting arena?

SECURITY GAMES officials had admitted that security and transport were the two big worries that kept them awake in the lead-up to the event. Peter Beattie, the Games chairman, told The Courier-Mail last year that the Gold Coast was a bigger terrorist target than Rio during the 2016 Olympics. But the massive security net thrown around the Gold Coast Games ensured they were incidentfree. Organisers would no doubt be relieved that the biggest security story of the Games was the 400 guards who downed tools and left because they weren’t happy with their accommodation or conditions. A security force of 3700 police, 4300 security guards and almost 2000 troops took to the streets of the Glitter Strip in a high-visibility operation to keep the crowds safe. Police were everywhere, providing a real sense of comfort for the masses. Some officers donned Borobi ears to engage with the punters. Police, under the command of Deputy Commissioner Steve Gollschewski, also deserve praise for their diplomacy during indigenous protests. Airport-style scanning at Games venues was largely quick and efficient. In keeping with the “Friendly Games’’, even the anti-terror bollards

were welcoming. The Gold Coast City Council shrouded bollards in high-profile areas like Broadbeach with colourful covers depicting beach and rainforest scenes.

TRANSPORT ORGANISERS were left red-faced on the first day of the Games when thousands of spectators trying to get to the opening ceremony were left stranded at Broadbeach and Nerang with no buses to get to Carrara Stadium. Transport Minister Mark Bailey was forced to publicly apologise and vowed to fix the debacle, which some insiders blamed on a controversial decision to award the Games transport contract to a country bus line from Victoria rather than proven Gold Coast operator Surfside. There was more transport embarrassment when an out-of-town bus driver took the Grenada women’s beach volleyball team to Chandler instead of Coolangatta after punching the wrong co-ordinates into his GPS. There were also 90-minute waits for spectators getting out of Carrara Stadium on the first day of the athletics.

But what looked like it could be a rickety Games transport plan soon stabilised and began to run much more smoothly. While the M1 was largely deserted, trains, trams and buses were packed as people embraced public transport to get to and from venues. Mr Bailey said more than 5.4 million public transport trips were made during the Games, with the Coast’s light-rail system carrying four times as many passengers as its daily average.

THE CROWDS WHEN it came to the crowds, the Games started with a whimper rather than a bang. Glitter Strip streets and even the M1 were eerily deserted in the lead-up to, and first few days, of the Games. Angry traders called it a “ghost town’’ and the worst Easter school holidays in years, with some threatening a class action against Games organisers. Beattie admitted the scare campaign urging people to stay off the roads had backfired. He urged locals who had left town, amid fears of chaos, to return and support the Games, while Brisbane residents were encouraged to get on the M1 down to the Coast. The crowds finally started to pick up on the first weekend of the Games and built steadily throughout the second week.


16 Apr 2018 Courier Mail, Brisbane Author: Greg Stolz • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Capital City Daily • Audience : 135,007 • Page: 21 Printed Size: 1063.00cm² • Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 18,669 Words: 1037 • Item ID: 940538711 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Sin City last Thursday. Then there were the 13 African athletes and officials, including eight Cameroonians, who disappeared during the Games – some without even competing. The opening ceremony was also not without controversy, with leading promoter Michael Michael Chugg slamming it as a “f.....g disgrace’’ and Sydney Olympics “ringmaster’’ comparing it to a school musical. Musical director Katie Noonan was accused of hogging the spotlight and there was also criticism of the heavy indigenous content. With 6600 athletes and officials and 1.2 million spectators on the Coast for the Games, some scandal was inevitable. But it failed to overshadow what was largely, as Beattie described it, a “bloody fantastic’’ Games.

Crowds at the sports, especially the swimming and athletics, were huge. Organisers said they were delighted with the more than 1.2 million tickets sold, about 80,000 snapped up since the opening ceremony.

THE SCANDALS FROM British boxers punching on in notorious nightclub Sin City to African athletes going MIA, a senior Mauritian official charged with sexual assault and syringe discoveries in the Indian team rooms, the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games delivered its share of scandals. India was plunged into controversy before the Games even began when cleaners found a bottle of syringes in the boxing team’s room in the athletes village. Indian officials were strongly reprimanded but that didn’t stop the team again falling foul of the village’s strict “no needles’’ policy. The Commonwealth Games Federation Court had to convene an emergency session last Thursday after more needles were found in an Indian team room. Triple jumper Rakesh Babu and race walker Irfan Thodi were kicked out of the Games and sent home on the first plane after the latest needle discovery. There was more drama in the Games village when a Mauritian delegate was charged with sexually assaulting a young female athlete during a photo shoot. He was given a notice to appear in Southport Magistrates Court tomorrow, but left the country hours after being charged and is not expected to return. Northern Ireland boxer Sean McComb was hit with a $756 fine for public nuisance and banned from the party precincts of Surfers Paradise and Broadbeach after allegedly throwing a haymaker at Sin City bouncers last week. Former Scottish Commonwealth Games boxing bronze medallist Stephen Lavelle was charged with two counts of assault after allegedly punching a woman and hurling a glass at a man on the dance floor of

M

m

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16 Apr 2018 Courier Mail, Brisbane Author: Greg Stolz • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Capital City Daily • Audience : 135,007 • Page: 21 Printed Size: 1063.00cm² • Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 18,669 Words: 1037 • Item ID: 940538711 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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GOOD DAY: Huge crowds (top) turned up to watch swimmers like Ariarne Titmus (right); a strong security presence had protests under control (above); and the Games chairman Peter Beattie (below).

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16 Apr 2018 Courier Mail, Brisbane Author: Greg Stolz • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Capital City Daily • Audience : 135,007 • Page: 7 Printed Size: 136.00cm² • Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 2,389 Words: 315 • Item ID: 940538951 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Queensland worthy of a podium spot for Olympics GREG STOLZ THE curtain has come down on “the best Commonwealth Games ever”, with global Games supremo Louise Martin declaring Queensland had proven it could now shoot for the Olympics. A dazzling closing ceremony starred the likes of Guy Sebastian, Dami Im, The Veronicas, Amy Shark and Yothu Yindi as the 12-day Gold Coast Commonwealth Games reached the finish line, a decade since they were first envisioned. A rampaging Australian team reclaimed its position at the top of the medal tally from England, collecting 80 gold – our equal fourth greatest haul. “It has exceeded my expectations,” Aussie chef de mission Steve Moneghetti said. Youth performers fittingly took centre stage in the closing spectacular as the Coast and Queensland looked to a bold new future in the wake of the state’s biggest-ever event. Queensland will use the Games as a springboard to lure even bigger and better events including the 2025 world athletic championships and possibly 2032 Olympics. After his emotional retirement from international competition, a proud Kurt Fearnley had the honour of leading the Aussie team into the stadium for the closing ceremony. Female performers had the longest time in the spotlight at last night’s ceremony in a nod to the focus on equality at the Gold Coast Games – the first to feature equal numbers of medals for women and men. As well as Shark’s solo, pop veterans Kate Ceberano and Deborah Conway joined The Veronicas, Dami Im, Samantha Jade, Thandi Phoenix, Kira Puru and Emma Donovan in a 45-minute segment dubbed ‘Sisters’.

Ceremonies musical director Katie Noonan, accused by critics of injecting herself on centre stage in the opening ceremony, had an encore performance in the celebration of female Aussie music icons from Olivia Newton-John to the The Divinyls’ Chrissie Amphlett. Ms Martin, the Commonwealth Games Federation president, said the stunning success of the Coast Games showed an Olympics was “definitely doable” for Queensland.

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16 Apr 2018 Courier Mail, Brisbane Author: Jonathon Moran • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Capital City Daily • Audience : 135,007 • Page: 18 Printed Size: 485.00cm² • Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,518 Words: 140 • Item ID: 940542134 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Glamour and

SWIM GREAT TIPS DAWN OF A NEW TOURISM ERA OLYMPIC great Dawn Fraser has tipped a boom in international tourism off the back of the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast. “I think in the next two years we will have so many visitors from overseas because the camera-work that has been going on has been absolutely fantastic,” Fraser said at The Star Celebration Lawn. “We’ve had very good weather. We’ve had a few rainy days but the weather here on the Gold Coast has been absolutely fantastic. And

CONFIDENTIAL 19

the organisation, the volunteers, everything has gone down very smoothly.” Fraser, 80, has been a regular in the stands throughout the Games. As well as the swimming she also attended the Rugby Sevens, basketball, beach volleyball (pictured watching with Natalie Cook) and badminton. Earlier in the Games she attended a women in sport luncheon at the Longines Records Club.


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wayne Smith • Section: Sport • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 32 • Printed Size: 834.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 16,854 • Words: 1166 Item ID: 940543003 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Host with the most: Gold Coast inspires Olympic push WAYNE SMITH

COMMONWEALTH GAMES

There have been 28 Olympic Games held throughout history, 21 Commonwealth Games, and human nature being what it is there has been much progress made down the decades in the way they are staged but, alas, also many mistakes repeated. Certainly the Gold Coast has hosted a truly memorable Commonwealth Games, among the greatest ever staged — impressively well-supported, a spectacular showcase for the city and, best of all, aglow with smiles. The befuddled, win-at-all-costs mindset that somehow gripped Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft while on a cricket tour in South Africa last month was nowhere to be seen during these Games. It did not detract from Australia’s extraordinary success — there was, it must be said, almost an orgy of green-and-gold triumphs — but in so many cases both winners and losers carried themselves with commendable grace and that self-deprecatory wit for which Australians were once renowned. And what a positive contribution to that atmosphere was made by the paraathletes. They enriched the experience for so many people, on so many levels. Inevitably, too, the success of the Gold Coast Games has breathed renewed vigour into the bid by Brisbane and its surround-

ing councils to stage the 2032 Olympic Games. This had its genesis in these very pages of The Australian, which, in February 2015 first prompted Brisbane Lord Mayor Graham Quirk to put the idea of an Olympic bid onto the next agenda of the regional Council of Mayors meeting. With all the added infrastructure the Gold Coast can bring to that bid — not to mention the massive accommodation base — there is absolutely no reason why that regional approach should not sing to the International Olympic Committee. But first, those lessons. Most important, stop with the horror stories. Instead of terrifying the locals with stories of massive crowds and transportation chaos — which inevitably cause many to pack up and leave for the duration of the Games — why not encourage them instead to embrace the internationalisation of their city and the new infrastructure and extra facilities that flow from it. Barcelona threw itself into the Olympics and was all abuzz during the Games of 1992. A decade later, it was still feeling the Olympic afterglow with a 100 per cent increase in hotel accommodation. At the other end of the scale, Atlanta, which never wanted the Olympics and accordingly did the worst job of any modern-day host city, became almost a ghost town during the Games of 1996. Work with the people, don’t scare them and certainly don’t bully them. Threatening to tow those cars that hadn’t been moved from park-and-ride hubs within an hour of events ending was madness. Worse than madness because it scared them away from the very venues to which they were supposed to be bringing life. It’s generally accepted that the Continued on Page 31


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wayne Smith • Section: Sport • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 32 • Printed Size: 834.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 16,854 • Words: 1166 Item ID: 940543003 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Gold Coast proves host with the most Continued from Page 32

Games of 1982 were the making of Brisbane. In conjunction with Expo ’88, they transformed it from an overgrown country town into one of Australia’s great cities. The Gold Coast is at a different stage in its development, but there still will be a dramatic sense of “we showed ’em what we could do”. One of Australia’s great selling points to the IOC is its reputation of delivering magnificent, safe Games. The Sydney Games were rated “the greatest Olympics” by Juan Antonio Samaranch, for good reason, and that same knowhow and can-do flowed into the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games. And now the Gold Coast Games has enhanced and enriched that reputation. Let’s not gloss over that important element — safety. Games can rise or fall as much on what didn’t happen as much as what did and what didn’t happen on the Gold Coast was a terrorist attack. There was no electronic chatter before the Games, nothing to indicate an attack was being planned, but that never precludes an act of one-off violence. And even if the odds of an attack were remote, somewhere in the vicinity of purple pelicans being sighted over the Spit, there is still cause to be grateful whenever purple pelicans do keep their distance. As for the people who put the purple pelican repellents in place, they too deserve our thanks. Nor was there a drug bust — not yet, at least. Watch will need to be maintained for a few days yet as the time-lag in drug testing runs its course but, aside from the needles found in the Indian camp — which, let’s be charitable, may well

have been used for legitimate purposes — there was no evidence of any widescale attempt by athletes to cheat their fellow competitors. Nor was there a large-scale effort to breach Australia’s borders. Yes, 13 athletes, all from African nations, did go missing from the village though, as yet, they have not overstayed their visas. But let’s not forget, at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics at the height of the Cold War, 45 Hungarians took advantage to defect to the West just days after Soviet tanks had rumbled into Budapest. They were welcomed here and in America and treated as heroes. There’s a chance others too are fleeing oppression. As for the athletic success or failure of the Games, what more needs to be said than “We beat the Poms”. That might sound totally puerile but, hey, it is how the Australian mind works. When Britain hooked its Games funding to a lottery, it seemed like all their Christmases had come at once. Money was no object. All things were possible. Sadly, as Eddie Jones and the England rugby side discovered during the recent Six Nations, that doesn’t always correlate to success. England have dropped the ball and there was no better illustration of that than when English cyclist Melissa Lowther was not permitted to ride in the women’s time trial because her country had failed to enter her. As these Games were drawing to a close, it was time for reflection and evaluation. The swim team were responsible for more than a third of Australia’s total medals and golds, yet how had they performed according to

their own parameters? There were 45 individual personal best swims in individual events, which frankly is surprising, but perhaps the more important stat is the 65 per cent improvement from trials through to Commonwealth Games, the highest improvement on record. It’s an important stat because Australia switched from having trials a full training cycle out from the target meet to the US system of doing it just five weeks in advance. In that, as in so many recent and dramatic improvements in Australian sports, it has the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games to thank.


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wayne Smith • Section: Sport • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 32 • Printed Size: 834.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 16,854 • Words: 1166 Item ID: 940543003 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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GETTY IMAGES, AA AAP AP

New Zealand’s sevens players celebrate the gold-medal winning try scored in extra time against Australia on the final day off the h Commonwealth C l h Games G yesterday. Insets from top: Kurt Fearnley with his family, Michael Shelley wins the marathon; heartbreak for Australia’s netball team after losing to England


16 Apr 2018 Australian Financial Review, Australia Author: Laine Clark • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 44,635 • Page: 3 • Printed Size: 282.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 5,704 • Words: 405 Item ID: 940574937 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Olympics too big for Gold Coast Laine Clark

Hosting the world athletics titles may be next on the Gold Coast's to-do list after the Commonwealth Games success. But the Olympics? Well, that may be a bit of a stretch, according to the Commonwealth Games Federation boss. As the Games finished on Sunday with Australia winning 80 gold medals, Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation chairman Peter Beatn'e urged the tourist strip to use the Games as a springboard to launching a bid to host the world athletics titles. Momentum is already building with IAAF president Sebastian Coe speaking with Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk last week over the possibility of hosting it in 2025. "It's really important now that these Games have been a success that we continue the ... opportunities for the Gold Coast and Queensland and that will require a long-term strategy," Mr Beattie said. "I would personally like to see the world athletics titles in Queensland.

work with us to see how they can host a Games in future. "We are looking 2026,2030 and even 2034. That is what we are trying to do [organise] in the next two years." AAP

We had Lord Coe here the other day. We have to find a way to continue this and that is a significant way to do it" While CGF president Louise Martin believed an Olympic bid was still too big an ask for the Gold Coast, she warmed to the idea of Queensland hosting the Games. "I would say it is a viable proposition for Queensland," she said. "With the [small] size of the Gold Coast and the number of athletes in the Olympics, you would need to work within the whole of Queensland area to do that It is definitely doable. What has been shown here, it has proved that nothing is impossible." Ms Martin said smaller Commonwealth nations were also daring to dream big. She said countries had made inquiries to become the first nation outside Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the UK to host the Commonwealth Games as soon as 2026. "Costs [to host Games] will come down. We are determined to make sure it happens," she said. "There are a number of smaller countries who have actually asked to

Scots marathon runner Callum Hawkins was leading before he collapsed. Australian Michael "Turtle" Shelley (approaching) won the gold. Right: Kurt Fearnley and wife Sheridan and children Harry and baby Emilia after his gold medal win. PHOTOS: AAP


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wally Mason • Section: Edition Changes - All-round Metro Article type : News Item • Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 1 Printed Size: 996.00cm² • Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 20,128 Words: 863 • Item ID: 940578546 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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The Games celebration most of us didn’t see WALLY MASON SPORTS EDITOR

It was the big moment Kurt Fearnley and hundreds of Commonwealth Games athletes had waited for: their crowning glory at last night’s closing ceremony on the Gold Coast. However, except for a few thousand spectators inside Carrara Stadium, Fearnley was not shown leading the team into the arena because the host broadcaster decided it would not be shown. The athletes were already in the stadium when Channel Seven began televising and instead of footage celebrating the athletes, host broadcaster NEP treated television viewers to long speeches described by some as “selfindulgent”. The lack of focus on the athletes cast a pall over the ceremony and many athletes left before the performance was over. Channel Seven commentators Basil Zempalist and Johanna Griggs lashed out at the decision.

“People are thinking that Channel Seven has chosen not to show pictures of athletes or not to show the flag-bearer Kurt Fearnley or other flag bearers,” said Griggs, a former Australian swimmer. “We can only show the pictures that are provided by the actual host broadcasters. They made decisions not to have athletes enter the stadium. They made the decision not to show the flag-bearers. “I’m furious. Actually, wrecking a tradition that is so important. “You want to see the athletes come in. You want to see them jumping in front of camera. You want to see them celebrating 11 days of great sport. “We missed out on all of that. There’s no athletes in here. I’ve never seen the stadium so empty halfway through a ceremony.” At the end of the broadcast, Continued on Page 5 MORE REPORTS P5 SPORT P30-32

FINAL TALLY Gold

Silver Bronze TOTAL

AUSTRALIA 80

59

59

198

46

136

20

66

27

82

ENGLAND 45

45

INDIA 26

20

CANADA 15

40

NEW ZEALAND 15

16

15

46


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wally Mason • Section: Edition Changes - All-round Metro Article type : News Item • Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 1 Printed Size: 996.00cm² • Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 20,128 Words: 863 • Item ID: 940578546 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Wheelchair marathon champion Kurt Fearnley leads the Australian team at last night’s closing ceremony


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wally Mason • Section: Edition Changes - All-round Metro Article type : News Item • Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 1 Printed Size: 996.00cm² • Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 20,128 Words: 863 • Item ID: 940578546 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Fearnley’s Games celebration that most of us didn’t get to see Continued from Page 1

Seven showed some footage of Fearnley shot earlier in the day. “A little consolation for you ... we had vision that we took of Kurt ... we weren’t allowed to put it in the ceremony, we were restricted by it,’’ Griggs said. “Kurt did get to have his moment with his teammates, which is really important. But I just wish we could have had that moment, I wish we could have seen him as part of the program.” Fearnley had always wanted to go out like his uncle, rugby league hardman Royce Simmons, who ended his career with two tries for Penrith in his team’s winning 1991 grand final and never played again. After winning a gold medal in his last wheelchair marathon for Australia at the Games yesterday morning, Fearnley carried the flag at the head of the Australian team. “I want to run to the finish like he did. Go out on a high. Go out with a celebration that you’ll never forget,” Fearnley said. The Australian team streeted the field in the medal tally and recorded its best result since the Melbourne Commonwealth Games in 2006, when the halo effect from the Sydney Olympics still lingered. Australia finished these Games with 80 gold medals, 59 silver and 59 bronze for a total of 198 medals, well ahead of second-placed England on 45 gold, 45 silver and 46 bronze. In Melbourne, Australia topped the tally with 84 gold, 69 silver and 69 bronze. This time around, Australia was so dominant we won more gold than the combined British teams — England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland won 65 gold medals between them. GOLDOC chairman Peter

Beattie described the Games as “bloody fantastic”. A host of Australian musical superstars brought the curtain down on the Games last night — along with an element of the indigenous flavour that sparked criticism of the opening ceremony. Indigenous band Yothu Yindi and the Treaty Project were among the featured performers. And the first artist on stage was indigenous singer-songwriter Archie Roach, who performed Let Love Rule with Gold Coast indypop star Amy Shark. They were joined by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander choir Yugambeh Youth Choir. “Pretty much everything you need to know about the show is those first five minutes,” said ceremonies director David Zolkwer. Youth was a strong theme of the ceremony, with 12-year-old Max Deffenti of North Burleigh acting as MC and teenage slam poet Solli Raphael setting the Games to verse. Guy Sebastian and Anthony Callea performed solos and the show climaxed with a concert of Australian female artists including The Veronicas, Samantha Jade, Kate Ceberano, Deborah Conway, Emma Donovan, Dami Im, Thandi Phoenix and Kira Puru. The musical director of the opening and closing ceremonies, Katie Noonan, included herself in the show last night after being criticised for her downbeat performance at the opening ceremony. Prince Edward delivered the official welcome last night and dignitaries in the stands included Malcolm Turnbull and retired sprint king Usain Bolt, who has been haunting glitter-strip nightclubs for the past few evenings. The ceremony also featured the handover of the Games flag to

the city of Birmingham.


16 Apr 2018 The Australian, Australia Author: Wally Mason • Section: Edition Changes - All-round Metro Article type : News Item • Classification : National • Audience : 94,448 • Page: 1 Printed Size: 996.00cm² • Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 20,128 Words: 863 • Item ID: 940578546 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Athletes inside a partial empty stadium last night above; and an angry Johanna Griggs and Basil Zempalist, below

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16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Section: General News • Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional Audience : 21,468 • Page: 8 • Printed Size: 2067.00cm² • Market: QLD Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 13,184 • Words: 1934 • Item ID: 940605301

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REPORT CARD: HOW

THE GAMES RATED SECURITY KATHLEEN SKENE GAMES organisers long acknowledged security as a key challenge, but they were adamant their multi-tiered approach struck the right balance between safety and obtrusiveness. Their efforts appear to have been ultimately successful – there were no significant incidents, and the vast, active presence of police, defence force personnel and private security officers likely deterred troublemakers large and small from targeting the Games. On the negative side, the exodus of private security officers over working conditions, along with revelations guards did not

SPORTSMANSHIP EMMA GREENWOOD THE Commonwealth Games lived up to their reputation as the “Friendly Games”, with acts of sportsmanship and friendship as common as winning medals. The tone was set in the opening days at the pool, with para athletes often helping each other out of the water. Whether it was Ellie Cole holding the crutches of rival Alice Tai as the Englishwoman who had just beaten her to gold exited the pool, or Mack Horton and Jack McLoughlin waiting to congratulate Cypr-

THE AUSSIES

receive suitable training, eroded some confidence in the security preparations as a whole and there were also some inconsistencies in physical security measures. For example, while rubbish bins at light rail stops were covered for security reasons, and clear bags were used for rubbish at the entrance to Carrara Stadium, dozens of council wheelie bins were used at the crowded entrances to the Optus Aquatic Centre and Coomera Sports Centre. An unattended bag in the midst of queuing people would be a full-scale incident, but a device in a wheelie bin would almost certainly do the job it was put there for. Generally though, the city felt safe and the Games were secure.

iot Constantinos Hadjittooulis after he was lapped in the 1500m, winning medals was not the only criteria. Aussies Elouise Wellings, Celia Sullohern and Madeline Hills stayed at the finish line of their 10,000m race long after they were done to clap home Lesotho’s Lineo Chaka. When England’s Katie Stainton was left writhing on the track after hitting a hurdle, her rivals gathered around to console her. And disqualified 20km race walker Claire Tallent congratulating teammate Jemima Montag, the event winner, was gold in the eyes of many.

EMMA GREENWOOD SHOCK losses in the netball, women’s sevens and women’s hockey prevent Australia from getting an A+ here, despite romping home in the race for Games supremacy. The Aussies finished with 198 medals overall, including 80 gold, a tally only beaten in Manchester in 2002 (82), Melbourne in 2006 (84) and Vic-

NIGHTLIFE FINGERS crossed there are no final dramas on the Glitter Strip because this was written prior to midnight and what was being anticipated as a huge party night after the closing ceremony. The State Government came to the party in the leadup and freely extended licensing by an hour for all venues across Surfers Paradise and Broadbeach during the Games. For the dire first week, it seemed it might have been for nothing. But once week two kicked in when athletes started going out and Usain Bolt ignit-

B K T pl f

toria, Canada in 1994 (87). While several old faithfuls saluted – including Mitch Larkin who recovered from what he termed an “embarrassing” world championships last year with five gold medals – it was the performance of generation next that was most exciting for a team building towards Tokyo in 2020 as plenty of fresh faces emerged in both able bodied and para sport competition.

ed the Glitter Strip with a cameo DJ set at hotspot Sin City, trade soared. Saturday night was spectacular, with venues on famed party strip Orchid Ave hitting capacity at times. Many had staffed up and put on extra security from day one so it was good to see them finally rewarded. Similarly, Games partner The Star deserves a big pat on the back for ensuring swanky rooftop bar and restaurant Nineteen opened weeks prior to the Games. The Star’s new Sports Bar plus Garden Bar and “Celebration Lawn” were also popular social hubs oozing buzz and a sense of never knowing who you might run into.


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Section: General News • Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional Audience : 21,468 • Page: 8 • Printed Size: 2067.00cm² • Market: QLD Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 13,184 • Words: 1934 • Item ID: 940605301

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BUSINESS KATHLEEN SKENE THERE were two games at play when it came to the benefits of the Gold Coast Games to local business – the short game and the long game. Businesses outside the key Games precinct of Broadbeach have proven the losers in the short-term, despite politicians describing a Games-time downturn of 40 per cent or more as a media beat-up. The city’s biggest business group issued an SOS midway through the Games, saying their members were desperate for customers, and Games organisers themselves admitted

LEGACY PAUL WESTON THE Gold Coast got more than $500 million worth of new sporting facilities. Assets like the Coomera Indoor Sports Centre in the city’s fast-growing north will be fantastic venues for our youth. The entire Carrara Sports and Leisure Centre precinct can host major world sporting events in the future. Clubs and schools will use the first-class hockey fields at Labrador. The city showed it could host 6500 athletes and officials, and attract 15,000 volunteers. The Coast can put on a major world class show.

their ‘Get Set for the Games’ campaign had gone too far and scared people away. Moreover, more than 90 per cent of the value of Games contracts – as opposed to the number of contracts as spruiked by organisers – went to companies centrally based outside the Gold Coast. As for the long game, the Gold Coast stands to gain priceless marketing collateral in the form of brilliant images beamed across the world. More than 1500 delegates attended Trade 2018, in tandem with the Games, which Minister Kate Jones said represented billions of dollars of potential investment.

To achieve this the government accelerated spending on the $420 million light rail stage two, the $163 million Coomera to Helensvale rail duplication and $160 million on major roads. Other legacies will take time to unfold, like the impact of pictures broadcast across the world of the beaches during the race walk at Currumbin and the marathon from Runaway Bay to Burleigh Heads. Talk to visitors and the majority want to stay longer, return and encourage their friends to stay here. While the focus for previously was on Surfers Paradise, many have fallin in live with the southern Gold Coast.

TRANSPORT PAUL WESTON ROAD transport was predicted to increase by 22 per cent during the Games. In April 2017, Commonwealth Games Minister Kate Jones released a plan to cut 50,000 cars with drivers urged to avoid the Pacific Motorway. The council, together with Games organisers GOLDOC, worked on a Travel Demand Management Plan. The challenge was to reduce 30 per cent of background traffic from Coast roads. Businesses cut back on deliveries. Employees worked from home. The plan worked a treat.

CEREMONIES RYAN KEEN GOLD Coast Inc. had its collective heart in its mouth in the lead-up to the opening ceremony. The Games showpiece upon which so much international opinion is made about the host city would be a major litmus for the event and the Gold Coast. When it poured – briefly – just minutes to kick-off, Gold Coast Tourism chairman Paul Donovan probably summed it up best when he said he was a jumble of “expectation, excitement, pride, nerves and emotions”. The rain stopped on cue

Usual bottlenecks like Reedy Creek and Coomera on the M1 had fastflowing traffic. The downside from the scare campaign was residents refused to travel to Broadbeach and Surfers Paradise for festival events. Road closures for free public events like the Race Walk and road cycling at Currumbin were far too early and killed off business during Easter. About 180,000 passengers were being moved daily from Beenleigh to Varsity on heavy rail. On light rail, the trams were packed with 100,000 passengers each day. The city for the first time embraced public transport.

and what unfolded was a Gold Coast-style showcase of all that is fun and fabulous about the city, with impressive special effects, a rollicking good Australian soundtrack and top speeches. It must be said Games organising committee chairman Peter Beattie (controversially getting the nod to speak by the Commonwealth Games Federation ahead of Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk) delivered brilliantly, opening with a hearty “G’day” to the Commonwealth and over a billion viewers. Unfortunately, the closing ceremony fell flat, with athletes leaving early and plenty of empty seats on show.


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Section: General News • Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional Audience : 21,468 • Page: 8 • Printed Size: 2067.00cm² • Market: QLD Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 13,184 • Words: 1934 • Item ID: 940605301

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THE SPORT

VENUES KATHLEEN SKENE

IT’S not an Olympics or world championships but the Commonwealth Games is far from a Mickey Mouse competition. World records in the pool and at the velodrome show the competition in certain events was on par with anything in the world. Fields were littered with Olympic and world champions in several sports and while there were big names missing, those who made the trip to the Gold Coast shone. Sure, there are some exceptions. Australia led the basketball field by a mile in a sport that has made its only two Games appearances ... both on home soil. And being able to win a medal in a sport like boxing when you lose your only bout is hardly a shining example of a deep and competitive field. But there can be few complaints overall. The Games also provide a valuable stepping stone for athletes looking to step up to Olympic competition in two years’ time and the Gold Coast is likely to be seen as an important plank in any Tokyo success.

WITH a delivery of ponchos and smile from the weather gods, debate over the roofless aquatic centre faded into distant memory once the athletes walked on to the pooldeck and the crowd began to roar. Patchy rain caused slight annoyance on one night of the swimming, while a session of diving copped more wind than was ideal – but fears of a repeat of the 2014 Pan Pacifics ‘weathergeddon’ did not eventuate. Most of the 12 Gold Coast venues proved their mettle well before the opening cer-

VOLUNTEERS BRITT RAMSEY HAVE you heard anything negative about our 2018 Games volunteers? Because I certainly haven’t. And you know what, I’m glad. Shade has been thrown at athletes for their questionable or poor behaviour, or level of sportsmanship; at GOLDOC and the organising committee for comments made or logistical errors ... but the volunteers, I cannot fault them.

emony, with all but the athletes village completed, as promised, at least 12 months ago. Carrara Stadium sang as the athletics headquarters, the Coomera Indoor Sports Centre was perfect for gymnastics, while the athletes village has been roundly praised by athletes and officials. As far as white elephants go there are no standouts – although it would have been good to see the athletics warmup track left in place instead of being ripped up and returned to grass. The Coolangatta beach volleyball stadium was so popular people don’t want them to take it down. Well played. Every last one I met, had a unique story to tell, and were more than willing to strike up a conversation. Every single one I spoke to or even just walked past, engaged with me in some way – by simply smiling, hi-fiving or wishing me well on my next journey. They truly went above and beyond to make the Games experience memorable. I think I speak for everyone when I say the volunteers were one of the best parts of our Games.


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Section: General News • Article type : News Item • Classification : Regional Audience : 21,468 • Page: 8 • Printed Size: 2067.00cm² • Market: QLD Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 13,184 • Words: 1934 • Item ID: 940605301

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The ‘House Full’ sign went up for almost every session at Carrara Stadium as the athletes played their part in the Gold Coast’s ‘Friendly Games’. Picture: GETTY IMAGES

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16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Jeremy Pierce • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 582.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,712 • Words: 477 • Item ID: 940605710

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Commonwealth Games ‘relaunched’ by Gold Coast success

‘A TOU UGH ACT TO FO OLLOW’

Federation President Louise Martin says the Gold Coast will be ”a tough act to follow” following a successful 10 days that have been credited with breathing new life into the event. REPORT P3

‘A tough act to follow’ for Birmingham JEREMY PIERCE THE Gold Coast’s Commonwealth Games have brought new life to the event as the city basks in the afterglow of its greatest sporting spectacle. Commonwealth Games Federation President Louise

Martin admitted the Gold Coast would be “a tough act to follow” as the curtain last night came down on a spectacular 12 days and nights for the Glitter Strip. After the dubious Delhi

Games in 2010, the collapse of Durban’s bid for the 2022 event and with the Gold Coast facing competition for 2018 only from a small town in Sri Lanka, there were fears for the future, but Gold Coast Com-

monwealth Games Corporation chairman Peter Beattie said it now had a new lease of life. “We think we have relaunched the Commonwealth Games,” he said.


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Jeremy Pierce • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 582.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,712 • Words: 477 • Item ID: 940605710

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“The Games were in good shape after Glasgow, don’t get me wrong, but we have given the Commonwealth Games back to Louise in very good order. “The Para sports program has been incredibly popular, that doesn’t happen at the Olympics and we did it. “There were the same number of medal events for women as men for the first time ever, so it’s incredibly distinctive what we’ve done.” Ms Martin said the Games were on the rise. The next instalment is in Birmingham, England, in 2022. “The Commonwealth Games are more relevant than they have ever been before,” she said. “We started in Glasgow and it was just the first steps on the ladder. “Gold Coast has certainly shown the way we want to go. “It’s a hard act to follow.” The sporting side of the Games has been hailed as a runaway success, though elements of the business community were left waiting for a financial windfall that never came. Mr Beattie said the blame for that did not rest with GOLDOC. “There was feast and famine, but our job was to deliver a world-class sporting event and we did that,” he said. “We did everything we could, but we can’t force people to go in to a particular restaurant.” He had little sympathy for hotels and resorts which jacked up rates to exorbitant prices only to be left with empty rooms. “Some of the businesses early who tried to gouge people, in the end karma came back at them,” the former Queensland premier said. “Those who charged a reasonable prices did well, those who tried to gouge

didn’t. “At the end of the day that was karma in action.”

Spectators from across the globe trekked to the Gold Coast to prove the Commonwealth Games movement is alive and well.

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16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Chris Mcmahon • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 4 • Printed Size: 585.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,731 • Words: 907 • Item ID: 940605711

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BUILD IT AND THEY WILL COME Experts say Games prove locals will embrace public transport if it’s good enough CHRIS MCMAHON

chris.mcmahon@news.com.au

PUBLIC transport has been a revelation at the Commonwealth Games, with more than two million trips taken on buses and rail during the two-week event. Many are calling the light rail system the most significant legacy to be left after the Games, but will Gold Coasters continue to buy into public transport when the dust settles and the athletes go home? The expert consensus is that, yes, the community will get on board public transport, although there is a caveat: it needs to be quick, reliable and meet the needs of our commuters. Figures show the stark increase in usage throughout the Games with 100,000 trips made by light rail every day. Prior to the Games, there was a measly 27,500 trips a day. There has also been about 200,000 passenger trips per day on local bus services. RACQ spokesman Paul Turner said there appeared to

be a cultural shift taking place. “The light rail has been an unqualified success and really now what we’re talking about is how quickly can we roll it out for the rest of the Gold Coast,” Mr Turner said. “The Gold Coast has the capability over the next few years to exponentially provide a public transport system.” He said for residents to buy into public transport, they need to have a reliable and constant service. s “Often people are blamed for f not using public transport, but b we find people will use public l transport if it meets their needs, and unfortunately over the decades we’ve provided public transport that suits the needs of the authority … not necessarily the commuter,” he said. “A lot of conversations around public transport these days is about what we call ‘the last mile’ … people won’t catch the train or the bus if they face a kilometre and a half walk to get

from the bus or train stop to their home, it’s the reason a lot of people drive. “Whenever we do research into why people drive, congestion and public transport, it really comes back to convenience … if you get the convenience factor right and meet the needs of the commuter, the whole city will turn to public transport.” Associate Professor of Urban Planning at Bond University Daniel O’Hare said the public transport uptake during the Games caused significant easing of traffic congestion, but said people won’t use it if it does not work for them. “We’ve seen what happens when more people use public transport, there is a whole lot less traffic congestion on our roads,” he said. “Anywhere where people have to change modes (of public transport) you lose people, because it is not as clear to them where they are meant to go and they know they lose


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Chris Mcmahon • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 4 • Printed Size: 585.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,731 • Words: 907 • Item ID: 940605711

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time when they get off one and have to wait for another. “As long as that’s the case you’re not going to be competitive, you’ve got to make it work well.” He said major destinations need to be linked and the tram system extended inland in the next five years. “I’m a big advocate for getting the loop going sooner rather than later, I tend to call it the ‘knowledge loop’ … I really think it is a priority to loop back inland, south of Broadbeach, via Bond and back to Robina,” he said. “You’d then have two of the three universities on that link, as well as the two biggest hospitals … you would have an enormous concentration of people who work or go to university off that line, as well as the major centres of the city. “I am aware that this isn’t the next stage, but I do think it needs to be moved up in priority. “I would expect some time in the next six to 12 months an announcement made on the next stage, which is likely to continue down the Coast to Burleigh, but then the next stage should be east to west … that should be getting underway within five years.” Minister for Transport and Main Roads Mark Bailey said he expects the community will continue to use public transport after the Games. “One of the greatest legacies of the Games for the Gold Coast will be the light rail stage 2 from Helensvale to the Gold Coast University Hospital seamlessly connecting light rail and heavy rail for the first time,” Mr Bailey said. “Throughout the Games people have embraced public transport in huge numbers as their preferred way to get around the Gold Coast. There is no doubt that this popularity will equate to greater confi-

dence and an increase in public transport usage into the future.” GOLDOC Chairman Peter Beattie said he believed the public transport system established for the Games would be its biggest legacy. “I think one of the big transformative things out of this Games is people using light rail and using public transport,” Mr Beattie said. “It’s a mentality, I think the culture will change, if you said to me, what’s the biggest legacy out of the Games, I think the biggest legacy is the improved public transport system. “I think people who have used it will use it again.” TOMORROW: WHAT THE GAMES HAS ACHIEVED FOR TOURISM

PEOPLE WON’T CATCH THE TRAIN OR THE BUS IF THEY FACE A KILOMETRE AND A HALF WALK TO GET FROM THE BUS OR TRAIN STOP TO THEIR HOME PAUL TURNER

Keeping the

WINNING FEELING

It was a great Games – but it doesn’t end here. In the first of a five-part series, the Bulletin examines its legacy. TODAY: PUBLIC TRANSPORT

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16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Jonathon Moran • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 334.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 2,130 • Words: 509 • Item ID: 940607712

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ALL THAT GLITTERS AT THE GAMES

There’s plenty of Comm Games action outside the sporting arenas, keep up to date with the parties, events, celebs and goss with All That Glitters

Golden opportunity to put on a great party squandered

JONATHON MORAN WHAT a wasted opportunity. How did Gold Coast Commonwealth Games organisers get it so wrong? Hosting the Games in the entertainment mecca with its beaches, top restaurants and bars and amazing attractions, the issue was not a lack of things to do but that people weren’t told what was happening and organisers told locals to stay away. As an interstate visitor, who was looking forward to lapping it all up with great expectations, I’m leaving supremely disappointed. Where was the vibe? Hometown girl and one of the top female artists in the country at the moment, Amy Shark, performed on the free live stage at Broadbeach before the Opening Ceremony was played on the big screen. It should have been a packed crowd and one of the highlights of the Games calendar. Instead, punters only found out she was performing when they strolled by. This was a theme goes for the awesome free Sparkle in the Sand concert with a sensational line-up that included Marcia Hines, Luke Antony, Alfie Arcurie, Kitty Glitter and Courtney Act.

thousands enjoying the night, just a few hundred revellers enjoyed the show that would have cost organisers a fortune. Regurgitator performed on the stage at Broadbeach on Friday night. Who knew? Not many people it seemed. During the day, and many nights, contemporary dancers did their thing. They were great but it was the wrong style of creative artistry. The only people watching were the customers sipping a brew at Starbucks 50m away. The staging alone would have cost upwards of $100,000. Why didn’t organisers set up a rotating roster of local artists to perform each hour, celebrating local talent, with a headliner each night? Why didn’t organisers market this fabulous party avenue? Restaurants, too, were pretty much empty the whole way through the Games. Bars were too, with locals saying the weekend trade was It should have been heaving. I feel for the local businesses, who should have had a boon during the Games. Retailers too suffered. Department store Myer had

hours to 9pm on Friday night but closed three hours early. “It has been a fizzer,” a sales assistant told this scribe. Woolworths in Broadbeach was supposed to open round the clock but wound back the clock to normal hours. Festival 2018 venue NightQuarter, perfectly positioned at the heavy meets light rail transit Helensvale nights last week despite its promise to open every night. Locals rallied towards the end of the Games after GOLDOC boss Peter Beattie’s embarrassing admission his team got it wrong by telling them to stay away but it was too late. What did work was The Star’s Celebration Lawn, which provided the sort of fun party vibe I expected across the city. And what about the other local attractions? The Gold Coast’s famous theme parks barely registered a blip. What a wasted opportunity. What a shame.


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Greg Stolz • Section: Supplements • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 2 • Printed Size: 1258.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,024 • Words: 723 • Item ID: 940616302

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THANK YOU AND GOODNIGHT Controversial ceremony ends Games GREG STOLZ THE stars of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games – the athletes – were glaringly absent in a bittersweet end to Queensland’s biggest-ever event last night. What had been hailed as the “best Commonwealth Games ever” ended on a sour note after athletes including Australia’s flag-bearer, inspirational para-sports legend Kurt Fearnley, barely got a look-in. Thousands of spectators left Carrara Stadium early and a “furious” Channel 7 host, former Games athlete Johanna Griggs, apologised. “I’m sorry, you’re being way too polite. People thinking Channel 7 have chosen not to show pictures of athletes or show the flag-bearer Kurt Fearnley and other flag-bearers from nations,” she said. “We are the Australian rights holder so we can only show the pictures that are provided by the actual host broadcaster. They made the decision not to have the athletes enter the stadium, they made the decision not to show the flagbearers and I am furious. “We are wrecking a tradition that is so important and part of the Commonwealth Games. You want to see the

athletes coming in and jumping at the camera. You want to see them celebrating 11 days of great sport. We missed out on all of that. “There’s no athletes in here. I’ve never seen a stadium so empty halfway through a ceremony.” The controversy was an unfortunate end to a dramatic and emotional last day of competition in which retiring Fearnley won his last wheelchair marathon, Gold Coast runner Michael Shelley won the men’s marathon and England sensationally pipped Australia for netball gold. Australia easily topped the medal tally, bagging 198 medals (including 80 golds). After a sell-out opening ceremony, thousands of empty seats were adisappointing sight at last night’s closing ceremony which saw cameo appearances by a dancing retired track superstar Usain Bolt and Games cult figure Borobi. Volunteers were even on standby to help fill empty seats at Carrara Stadium and Aussie athletes left the ceremony early and hit the bar. Youth performers fittingly took centre stage as the Coast and Queensland looked to a bold new future in the wake of the state’sbiggest-ever event. They included 12-year-old Gold Coast schoolboy Max Deffenti who opened the show,

teenage slam poet Solli Raphael and young dancers the BratPack Tappers. ARIA-award winning homegrown Gold Coast star Amy Shark teamed up with indigenous music great Archie Roach for the ceremony’s musical opener, Let Love Rule, backed by the two youth choirs and disabled performers from the Restless Dance Theatre. The Coast’s “everyday heroes”, from lifeguards to firefighters, were honoured on stage in a musical tribute performed by Ricki-Lee Coulter, who also starred in the opening ceremony, and Anthony Callea along with the Brat Pack. Barber shop singers The Blenders along with Yothu Yindi, who performedtheir biggest hit Treaty, also sang the praises of the “everyday heroes” who helped make the Games a success. The 15,500 Games volunteers, dubbed “Games Shapers” were also honoured, bathing in the well-deserved spotlight as Guy Sebastian performed. “A beautiful bunch of people have put their hearts and souls into making these Games


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Greg Stolz • Section: Supplements • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 2 • Printed Size: 1258.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,024 • Words: 723 • Item ID: 940616302

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amazing,” Sebastian said. Bolt, who partied all week at notorious Surfers Paradise club Sin City, danced in front of a DJ deck. Borobi, a glaring omission from the opening ceremony, bopped on stage beside Bolt. Games chairman Peter Beattie told the crowd the Games had made “beautiful history” as the first to have equal medals for men and women, an inclusive parasports program and an indigenous Reconciliation Action Plan. Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, who was snubbed for a speaking role at the opening ceremony, said the Games may be ending “but what we haveseen is the beginning of Queensland’s golden age”. “What can we say, except how good was that?” she said. “Nothing can stop us now.” Ms Martin, the Commonwealth Games Federation president, had earlier said the stunning success of the Coast Games showed an Olympics was “definitely doable” for Queensland.

Usain Bolt performs on stage with the Games mascot Borobi, and Picture: AAP IMAGE Anthony Callea

Ricki-Lee Coulter performs on stage during last night’s closing ceremony at Carrara Stadium. Picture: AAP IMAGE

Yothu Yindi and The Treaty Project perform.

Picture: GETTY IMAGES


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Greg Stolz • Section: Supplements • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 2 • Printed Size: 1258.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,024 • Words: 723 • Item ID: 940616302

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Australian athletes enjoy the atmosphere during last night’s closing ceremony at Carrara.

Picture: GETTY IMAGES


16 Apr 2018 Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast QLD Author: Greg Stolz • Section: Supplements • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 21,468 • Page: 2 • Printed Size: 1258.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 8,024 • Words: 723 • Item ID: 940616302

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Fireworks erupt at Carrara Staium as the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games closing ceremony concludes.

Picture: GETTY IMAGES


15 Apr 2018 Sunday Mail Brisbane, Brisbane Author: Greg Stolz • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Capital City Daily • Audience : 289,888 • Page: 6 • Printed Size: 94.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 3,054 • Words: 132 • Item ID: 940293387

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Southeast Olympic bid would need federal cash GREG STOLZ SENIOR Gold Coast-based Turnbull Government Minister Steve Ciobo says he “likes the idea” of a southeast Queensland bid for the Olympics. Mr Ciobo (right) weighed in yesterday after State Commonwealth Games Minister Kate Jones and Games chairman Peter Beattie said a pitch for the 2032 Olympic Games would only be possible with federal backing. A potential SEQ Olympic bid has been

strengthened by the successful running of the Coast Commonwealth Games. Ms Jones said “knockers” who believed the Coast could not uccessfully host he Commonwealth Games had been proven wrong and the outheast was being talked about as a potenial Olympics enue. But with the 2020 Tokyo Olympic tipped to cost at least $15.4 billion, she said any SEQ bid for the global sporting spectacular would need federal funding.

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Borobi on track to be the glitter strip mascot COMMONWEALTH Games mascot Borobi is to stick around on the Gold Coast, for a new life as the city’s mascot. Branding experts say his new role as the city’s most famous marsupial could help attract extra millions into the region’s economy, in the short term, and could also prove to be a long-term figure of endearment. After the Games, the 10 Borobi statues that have lined the walk along the Gold Coast beachfront will be given to V2 BCME01Z01MA

event sponsors and partners, such as the Gold Coast City Council, TAFE, The Star casino and Griffith University, and spread out along he Coast in prominent locaions. GOLDOC chairman Peter Beattie said the tatues, which have proven to be popular for selfies, will be preserved n perpetuity as a tribute to the Games. Mayor Tom Tate said a prime spot in the coast’s Cultural Precinct at Bundall would be one of Borobi’s new homes.

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WS

trade downturn last year GOLD Coast City Council had been warned a year ago of a downturn in trade during the Commonwealth Games. A Griffith University Business School report, released in July, highlighted a risk the “mega-event” would “fail to generate additional employment or income benefits” and deter locals, which could see a 40 per cent drop in demand. Angry businesses that paid for extra staff and stock have already threatened a class action to recoup the costs. The council said it knew of the report, but refused to say how it was used in planning or communications. Gold Coast Central Cham-

ber of Commerce president Martin Hall said he was not informed about the report. “It is hard, we were told to get behind the advice we were given at the time,” he said. “There was no secret about what they told us about preparedness, to arrange earlier deliveries and get ready for a large amount of people.” Destination Gold Coast executive director Dean Gould said the organisation was aware of the report. “Information from that report, and several other sources, was included in industry briefings to the tourism sector in 2017 and 2018,” he said. KIRSTIN PAYNE

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14 Apr 2018 Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast Author: Kirstin Payne • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 27,564 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 1270.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 10,277 • Words: 1033 Item ID: 940065372 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Exclusive: Planners told risk of Games trading slump last July

THEYCouncil KNEW THE Gold Coast City Council was told last July that traders would face a tough time during the Commonwealth Games, but key business leaders say they were never told. A Griffith University Business School report, launched publicly in July 2017, warned non-tourism businesses to brace for a 40 per cent slump during the Games. An overwhelming number of traders have reported dismal Easter and Games takings. “It is hard, we were told to get behind the advice we were given at the time,” said Gold Coast Central Chamber of Commerce president Martin Hall, who first read the report yesterday. “There was no secret about what they told us about preparedness, to arrange earlier deliveries and get ready for a large amount of people.” Council yesterday admitted it was aware of the report, but declined to answer questions on how the study was used in Games planning or communications with businesses. Instead, it directed the Bulletin back to Griffith University. KIRSTIN PAYNE REPORTS P4-5

warned of trade slump

KIRSTIN PAYNE

kirstin.payne@news.com.au

GOLD Coast City Council was warned a year ago of a downturn in trade during the Commonwealth Games, as part of a detailed report into the impacts and opportunities of the event. The Griffith University Business School report, released publicly in July 2017, highlighted a risk the “mega-event” would “fail to generate additional employment or income benefits” in the short to medium term, and deter locals, which would have “a deleterious impact on local spending in the Gold Coast region”.

The Gold Coast Business and the Commonwealth Games: Impact, Legacy and Opportunity report also estimated nontourism businesses could expect a decrease in demand by up to 40 per cent. While Get Set for the Games representatives and city councillors were present at the launch and a subsequent panel discussion of the report, businesses say they were not informed of the findings and instead encouraged to expect large crowds. Angry businesses that paid for extra staff and stock have already threatened a class ac-


14 Apr 2018 Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast Author: Kirstin Payne • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 27,564 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 1270.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 10,277 • Words: 1033 Item ID: 940065372 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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y tion to recoup the costs. The council has confirmed it was aware of the report, but declined to answer Bulletin questions on how the revealing study was used in Games planning or communications with businesses. Get Set for the Games is a council-run agency. Instead, the City of Gold Coast directed the Bulletin back to Griffith University. “In the lead up to GC2018, businesses were encouraged not only to plan ahead and think about how they will operate during the Games, but also how they might take best advantage of the opportunity,” a council spokesman said. Cr Gary Baildon, who attended the event, directed the Bulletin back to the university. “I only attended the launch and have had no involvement since,” Cr Baildon said. Dr Joan Carlini, co-author of the report commissioned by the Friends of the Griffith Business School, said the report was shared with businesses and stakeholders to ensure potential impacts and opportunities were known. “In the context of some of the Games messaging to businesses, I don’t know if the (report) learnings got carried across,” Dr Carlini said. “There was not very much information on how business

will be affected by the Commonwealth Games at the time, so we had a look at other major events to make a comparison in the context of the Gold Coast while speaking with experts in the area,” Dr Carlini said. “Long-term we found Games investments benefit cities’ futures, but business in past Games is not always going to be what people expect it was going to be in the immediate term.” Her co-author, Professor Andrew O’Neil, said the pattern was a little more telling in Australia. “Australians seem to be particularly optimistic around sporting events.” Gold Coast Central Chamber of Commerce president Martin Hall said he was not informed about the report, nor the findings by council. “Get Set for the Games should have embraced more of these findings,” Mr Hall said. After reading the report for the first time yesterday, Mr Hall said the writing was clearly on the wall for small to medium size businesses. “It is hard, we were told to get behind the advice we were given at the time,” he said. “There was no secret about what they told us about preparedness, to arrange earlier deliveries and get ready for a large amount of people.”

Destination Gold Coast spokesman Dean Gould said the organisation was aware of the report. Forecasts and opportunities “were shared regularly with members in the months leading up to the Games”. “Information from that report, and several other sources, was included in industry briefings to the tourism sector in 2017 and 2018,” he said. The Business School report did however predict opportunities from the Games, stating “tangible economic benefits tend to be realised over the longer term”.


14 Apr 2018 Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast Author: Kirstin Payne • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 27,564 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 1270.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 10,277 • Words: 1033 Item ID: 940065372 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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WHAT THE GRIFFITH REPORT WARNED BENEFITS NEFITS  Legacy for increased tourism demand and supply.  Upskilling and civic pride.  Lever for future events and sports industry.  Improved image and employer brand.  Accelerated infrastructure.  Higher real estate prices. SHORT-TERM IMPACTS  Change in traditional tourist ‘type’ in the short term  Locals “switching off” and temporarily departing the

Gold Coast  Business disruption, including non-tourism traders

recording possible 40 per cent slump  Limited Commonwealth appeal.  Spread geographical distribution of benefits.

LESSONS FROM PAST SPORTING EVENTS GLASGOW 2014 Cost analysis suggested that the 425 million pounds could generate similar economic benefits. However, outside spending would not create legacy benefits. SYDNEY 2000 Before KPMG predicted the event would add $7.3 billion to economy. After Monash University found the event had a net consumption loss of $2.1 billion. Sydney anticipated 132,000 foreign visitors per night, only 97,000 realised. BARCELONA 1992 Ten years after hosting the Games there was a 100 per cent increase in hotel capacity and overnight stays. GOLD COAST 2018 Expected to create 30,000 jobs and inject $2 billion into Queensland economy. Source: Gold Coast Business and the Commonwealth Games: Impact, Legacy and opportunityCommissioned by the Friends of the Griffith Business School Authors Dr Joan Carlini and Professor Andrew O’Neil

Businesses who reported dismal takings during Easter and the Commonwealth Games say they could have prepared better if told of the projected slump.


14 Apr 2018 Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast Author: Paul Malone and Ryan Keen • Section: Supplements • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 27,564 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 500.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 4,046 • Words: 669 • Item ID: 940057005

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Tourism boss says GC triumph must pave way for 2032 Olympics bid

AUSTRALIA’S top tourism boss says a Gold Coast-anchored bid for the 2032 Olympics is the “next logical step” after hosting the Commonwealth Games. Tourism Australia managing director John O’Sullivan said: “Australia already has a great reputation of being able to host, stage and manage major events

The Bulletin can reveal informal meetings have been held on the Gold Coast to discuss an Olympics bid alongside Brisbane, as momentum builds towards a tilt to bring the world’s greatest sporting showpiece to the state’s south east. PAUL MALONE AND RYAN KEEN REPORT P6

Gold Coast — this might be a bit presumptuous — is going to be no different. For me it is the next logical step.”

dream real for Coast

PAUL MALONE AND RYAN KEEN AUSTRALIA’S

top tourism


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boss says a Gold Coast-anchored southeast Queensland bid for the 2032 Olympics is the “next logical step” after hosting the Commonwealth Games. Tourism Australia managing director John O’Sullivan’s backing for the idea is shared by Gold Coast Tourism CEO Martin Winter, with momentum building due to visiting International Olympic Committee officials impressed by the Gold Coast Games. The Bulletin can reveal informal meetings have been held on the Gold Coast during the Commonwealth Games to discuss an Olympics bid. GOLDOC chairman Peter Beattie said visiting IOC officials witnessed the “success” of the Commonwealth Games first-hand, but warned a bipartisan federal agreement to underwrite the event must be secured if the bid was to fly. The cost of the bid would be at least the $US12 billion Tokyo 2020 Olympics organisers now say it will cost to host their Games. Mr Winter said of a regional bid to host the 2032 Olympics: “Why not think big, why not dream big? “By 2032 the southeast corner of Queensland will be bigger than Sydney, bigger than Melbourne and potentially an important world-leading destination. I have no doubt we’ll put on the best Commonwealth Games ever and the next logical step is the Olympics. “With the growth we are seeing in Brisbane and the development, linked with the world-beat lifestyle of the Gold Coast, it’s a no-brainer.” Mr O’Sullivan added: “I think an Olympic bid for Queensland would be a great thing. “Obviously I’m not the person who funds it so it is easy for me to say. But having grown up in Brisbane and seen what a (1982) Commonwealth Games

and also (1988) World Expo did for that city it is kind of the next step. “Australia already has a great reputation of being able to host, stage and manage major events internationally and I’m sure the Gold Coast – this might be a bit presumptuous – is going to be no different. For me it is the next logical step.” When asked about the idea of hosting an Olympics, both Commonwealth Games Minister Kate Jones and Gold Coastbased Federal Tourism Minister Steve Ciobo said they wanted to see the city get through the Commonwealth Games before commenting. Mr Beattie said: “I know the IOC has an interest in the Commonwealth Games and has an interest in southeast Queensland considering a bid for the Olympics. “They will have seen our capacity to run a Games in the southeast corner. There’s a recognition globally that we really do these events well. “The two weaknesses (in an SEQ bid) are that you need a big stadium and the $12 billion (US dollars) – other than that we could do it tomorrow.” A feasibility study commissioned by the SEQ Council of Mayors is to be delivered in mid-year and help the mayors decide later this year whether to make a bid to the IOC. The Australian Olympic Committee, which must submit any Australian bid, urged southeast Queensland to bid for the Olympics last year when AOC president John Coates made championing a bid part of his reelection platform.

I HAVE NO DOUBT WE’LL PUT ON THE BEST COMMONWEALTH GAMES EVER AND THE NEXT LOGICAL STEP IS THE

OLYMPICS MARTIN WINTER


14 Apr 2018 Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast Author: Andrew Potts • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 27,564 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 726.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 5,875 • Words: 420 • Item ID: 940065403

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REAL ESTATE MAGAZINE LUXURY

Glitz and m ur glamo

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has all the Sorrento property extravagant hallmarks of an Gold Coast mansion

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BOROBI’S FIRE AND RICE COMMONWEALTH Games mascot Borobi has proven a boon for the city, generating millions of dollars in merchandise sales and branding. He has been seen all around the world alongside former Olympic heroes such as Stephanie Rice (above) and Usain Bolt and, unlike other Games emblems who died days after their closing ceremony, he is here to stay. STORY P2

Borobi’s fun and Games to carry on ANDREW POTTS andrew.potts@news.com.au

BELOVED Commonwealth Games mascot Borobi will be sticking around on the Gold Coast for a long life as the city’s own mascot That’s good news because branding experts say his new role as the city’s most famous marsupial could help bring further

millions into the city’s economy in the short term and the mascot could prove to be a long-term figure of endearment associated with the Coast. Following the Games’ conclusion the 10 Borobi statues that have lined the walk along the Gold Coast beachfront will be

given to the event’s sponsors and partners, including the Gold Coast City Council, TAFE, The Star and Griffith University, and spread out across the Coast in strategic locations. GOLDOC chairman Peter Beattie said the statues, which have proven to be popular for


14 Apr 2018 Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast Author: Andrew Potts • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 27,564 • Page: 1 • Printed Size: 726.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 5,875 • Words: 420 • Item ID: 940065403

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selfies, will be preserved in perpetuity as a tribute to the Games. Mayor Tom Tate said a prime position in the Gold Coast Cultural Precinct at Bundall would be one of Borobi’s future homes. “Throughout these Games, I have not met a single person who has objected to Borobi as an emblem of our success and that includes many of the protesters, so I am absolutely determined to see the legacy of Borobi live on,” he said. “To many, Borobi is a permanent reminder of our Games so I will ensure the statues that line his walking trail remain, including re-positioning the largest one so it is prominently placed at our new Home Of The Arts.”

Borobi has proven to have a stronger appeal than previous Australian mascots, including 2000 Sydney Olympics figures Olly, Syd and Millie, which faded from memory at the conclusion of the Games. Associate Professor Stephen Holden, a Bond University brand expert, said Borobi had shown a strong connection to the public. “How big he will be after the Games is a mystery but continuing with Borobi is a really smart idea from a marketing point of view because when you have a good thing, you stick with it,” he said.

Commonwealth Games mascot Borobi entertains a crowd by lifting weights at the Carrara Sports and Leisure Centre.

Picture: AAP


14 Apr 2018 Weekend Gold Coast Bulletin, Gold Coast Author: Kathleen Skene • Section: General News • Article type : News Item Classification : Regional • Audience : 27,564 • Page: 4 • Printed Size: 186.00cm² Market: QLD • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 1,505 • Words: 472 • Item ID: 940065468

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Banks ‘did not tip in a cent towards Games’ KATHLEEN SKENE BUSINESS EDITOR

CORPORATE sponsorships were worth $91 million to the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games — $6 million more than they hoped for, $20 million more than was raised in Glasgow, and $4.1 million less than was raised in Melbourne. Chairman Peter Beattie yesterday revealed the event had attracted 68 sponsors, and lambasted Australia’s banks for “not contributing a cent”. National Australia Bank and Visa jointly tipped in $20 million to the Melbourne Games in 2006, but Mr Beattie was unable to convince any of the big four to come on board the Games train for 2018. “We did not get one cent from one Australian bank, not one cent, which I have to say is a matter of extraordinary irksomeness to me,” he told a major trade conference at Broadbeach. “What we did, because this was the first one of these events that had ever been held in a regional city, was go to Sydney and Melbourne and Brisbane and market to the big players. “Our target was $85 million, we actually raised $91 million — we’ve actually exceeded our partnership in the corporate sector.”

GC2018’s partners included The Star, Tafe, Optus, Griffith University, Atos, Woolworths and Longines. Speaking to global delegates at the Trade 2018 Major Event at Broadbeach yesterday, Mr Beattie declared the Games a success, saying the benefits to the city and state’s reputation, and the enhanced skills of those involved, would prove a lasting legacy. “We’ve now got a critical mass of people and a reputation that says we can put on good events,” he said. “That’s a useful marketing tool because that means that all the people who have done security here, transport, tick-

ets, commercial sponsorship, they’ve got something marketable that we can sell around the world. “There’s a lot more major events in the world than there’s ever been — suddenly there’s a lot more events around the world where the skills we’ve developed for this event are useful and marketable and are part of an economic recovery.” Mr Beattie said work to duplicate heavy rail, extend light rail and fix bottlenecks on local roads would be key legacies of the Games, along with a shift in the behaviour of locals towards public transport.

p p “The psychology of the

city’s changed — the trams are packed,” he said. “You’re changing the mentality of a city. “Putting on an event on the Gold Coast is a nightmare. It’s a narrow strip of land with water in the middle of it. If you want to take something and say `here’s a challenge’, well that’s a challenge.” The former Queensland premier said a less-publicised challenge of the process was working with various levels of government and other authorities, which he said “didn’t always love each other”. “At the end of that, you grow together and you can market together,” he said.


16 Apr 2018 Australian Financial Review, Australia Author: Jenny Wiggins • Section: Companies and Markets • Article type : News Item Classification : National • Audience : 44,635 • Page: 15 • Printed Size: 224.00cm² Market: National • Country: Australia • ASR: AUD 4,531 • Words: 521 Item ID: 940587305 Licensed by Copyright Agency. You may only copy or communicate this work with a licence.

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Call for rethink on Virgin privatisation Jenny Wiggins Virgin Australia's board has not been transparent about how it came to a decision to reject privatisation and should re-examine a delisting because the airline's stock price is undervalued, Wilson Asset Management founder Geoff Wilson says. "I believe the company should be privatised," Mr Wilson told The Australian Financial Review. "I call on the board to be more transparent and to seriously look at privatisation again." Virgin Australia's board told investors in late February that it had decided not to privatise the company after talks with its biggest shareholders, which include Etihad Airways and China's HNA Aviation Group. The board instead offered some 21,000 investors stuck with "unmarketable" share parcels worth less than $500 a buyback plan so they could get rid of their holdings at 30<t per share. Virgin's shares closed at 21.5<t: on Friday. The buyback, which will cost an estimated $5 million, is expected to reduce the airline's 38,000 shareholders to 17,000. Virgin will announce how many shareholders participated in the plan on Monday. But Mr Wilson, who owns about 12 million Virgin shares, says the buyback will not solve the problem of the company's relatively small free float,

which is running at about 8.5 per cent of its total market value, and lack of support from institutional investors and brokers. He says bigger minority shareholders, like Wilson Asset Management, should also have the opportunity to sell their stock at a premium to the current share price. "From an investment perspective, I don't think the share price will ever fully reflect the true [value] of the company." He also wants Virgin's board, which is chaired by Elizabeth Bryan, to "clearly articulate" why it decided against privatisation, and to disclose which shareholders opposed privatisation. "I'm not sure which case the independent directors have pushed." Virgin's other top shareholders are the Nanshan Group, Singapore Airlines and the Virgin Group. Although Ms Bryan told Virgin's annual general meeting in early November that it was the board's responsibility to ensure it represented "the interests of the minority shareholders," the board had not asked smaller shareholders for their opinions, Mr Wilson said. "The board hasn't approached us to ask our view if it should be privatised or not," he said. "If privatisation was at a fair price, we would expect to participate and sell our shares." Mr Wilson said he had been "incred-

ibly impressed" with Virgin's performance and believed the company's stock price was cheap. "It's where Qantas was three to four years ago in terms of its cost-out program." Qantas' share price has risen from just over $1 in late 2013 to close at $5.95 on Friday. Mr Wilson chose Virgin as his stock pick at the Sohn Hearts and Minds investment conference in Sydney in mid-November, leading to a temporary spike in Virgin's share price and a price query from the ASX. Virgin reported a 142.3 per cent jump in interim underlying profit to $102.5 million in February, its best firsthalf profit in 10 years.

Wllson Asset Management founder Geoff Wilson says stock price is undervalued. Virgin board did not ask smaller shareholders their opinions, Mr Wilson said.

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