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Educating Leaders for the 21st Century THE FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE AT QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/2012


CONTENTS 1  A MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN CONTENTS  Our programs continue to evolve to meet changing needs

DEAN Kimberly A. Woodhouse MANAGING EDITOR Adam Walker

2  ABOUT QUEEN’S ENGINEERING Our Faculty by the numbers

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Jason DEAN Whitehouse

1

Kimberly A. Woodhouse GRAPHIC DESIGN Walker Design & Communications MANAGING EDITOR

MESSAGE DEAN 4 FROM OURTHE PROGRAMS

2

ABOUT QUEEN’S Civil ENGINEERING Engineering

Adam Walker

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS WRITERCorrigan Nanci Nanci Corrigan Christine Ward

Chemical Engineering, Engineering Chemistry

4

GRAPHIC DESIGN CONTACT INFORMATION Queen’sof Marketing and Communications Faculty Engineering and Applied Science CONTACT INFORMATION Queen’s Faculty ofUniversity Engineering Beamish-Munro Hall and Applied Science 45 UnionUniversity Street Queen’s Kingston, ON Hall Beamish-Munro K7L 3N6 Street 45 Union Tel 613.533.2055 Kingston, ON Fax 613.533.6500 k7l 3n6 Tel complete.engineer@queensu.ca 613.533.2055 Email

Fax 613.533.6500 Email complete.engineer@queensu.ca

7

COVER: Beamish-Munro Hall

COVER Beamish-Munro Hall

10

Electrical and Computer Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering OUR PROGRAMS Mining Engineering Chemical Engineering, Engineering Chemistry Engineering Physics Civil Engineering Geological Engineering Computer and Electrical Engineering Mathematics and Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering 8 RENOWNED SPIRIT, UNRIVALED EXCELLENCE Mining  Engineering The undergraduate experience Engineering Physics 10 THE FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING INNOVATION Geological Engineering Research and graduate studies Mathematics and Engineering 12 INSPIRING GREATNESS: CAMPAIGN QUEEN’SThe ENGINEERING RENOWNED THE SPIRIT, UNRIVALEDFOR EXCELLENCE: Undergraduate Experience  We launch our most ambitious fundraising campaign ever THE FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING INNOVATION: 14  CAMPAIGN PRIORITIES

Programs Student Experiences Teaching and Research Spaces 18 Inspiring Alumni

Research and Graduate Studies

I

ANNUAL REPORT:

Message from the Dean It’s my pleasure to introduce our second annual report, which features just a few examples of our many achievements over the past twelve months. We’ve had another busy and successful year, and I’m proud to share some of our accomplishments with you. Our programs continue to evolve to meet the changing needs of industry and global discovery. Along with new undergraduate courses, such as the hands-on APSC 200, we’re offering new and socially relevant graduate certification programs that fully prepare our students to take on the challenges of a quickly changing world. Our faculty and researchers continue to blaze a path of discovery that places Queen’s at the leading edge of emerging technology—working deep within the earth, far into space and intricately at the nanoscale level to better understand how we translate knowledge into action. And our engagement with industry partners has resulted in exceptional learning opportunities while offering significant mutual benefits to all involved. We are also pleased to announce the launch of Inspiring Greatness: The Campaign for Queen’s Engineering. This $85 million fundraising initiative, the largest in our history, is vital to maintaining our place at the forefront of engineering educational excellence in Canada. I invite you to learn about our priorities and see how you can help. I truly hope that you enjoy reading about our successes, and that you share our pride in the growth that we’ve achieved. As always, I invite you to contact us to provide feedback or to learn more about our activities. Best wishes for a healthy and prosperous year!

Kimberly A. Woodhouse PhD, PEng, FCAE, FBSE Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 1


BY THE NUMBERS 2011/12

About Queen’s Engineering OUR VISION

Queen’s Engineering and Applied Science is:

E ducating leaders for the 21st century, the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s builds on a tradition of spirit and loyalty to provide a distinctive learning experience at the frontiers of engineering innovation.

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demonstrating leadership, innovation, and entrepreneurship within the curriculum enhancing a distinctive learning experience l pushing the frontiers of engineering innovation l

The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts and Science, offers ten undergraduate engineering programs covering multiple disciplines found within the engineering profession: Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering l Computer Engineering l Electrical Engineering l Mechanical Engineering l Mining Engineering l Engineering Chemistry l Engineering Physics l Geological Engineering l Mathematics and Engineering l

OUR MISSION  e educate engineering students W for leadership and citizenship in a global society through high-quality, technically-rigorous engineering programs.

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The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is organized along discipline lines, into five departments: Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering l Electrical and Computer Engineering l Mechanical and Materials Engineering l The Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining l l

The Faculty offers a common first year with unconstrained discipline choice after first year—a feature unique to Queen’s that provides a strong foundation for our students, as well as the opportunity for students to explore their passion for engineering. Graduate study includes a number of MEng, MASc and PhD degrees within our programs. Graduate programs are designed to meet evolving needs for today’s engineer—for example, programs such as a Master of Applied Sustainability and a Collaborative Master in Biomedical Engineering.

Our Students 2706

Full-time Undergraduates

70

Part-time Undergraduates

273

Full-time Master’s Students

36

Part-time Master’s Students

197

Full-time PhD Candidates

17

Part-time PhD Candidates 0

Degrees Awarded

500

92 Master’s

1000

Origin %

1500

International 9.1%

31 PhD

2000

2500

3000

Gender % Female 25.3%

Domestic 90.9% 507 Undergraduate

2 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

Male 74.7%

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 3


BY THE NUMBERS 2011/12 ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Chemical Engineering, Engineering Chemistry

DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Michael Greenspan

418

Full-time Undergraduate Students 13

Part-time Undergraduate Students

Our Electrical and Computer Engineering programs are based upon the fundamental physical principles that govern the flow of electricity, as well as the design methods that allow us to effectively harness those principles.

48

Full-time Master’s Students 1

Part-time Master’s Students

43

Full-time PhD Students 0

Part-time PhD Students

20.1

Faculty

114

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded

The department specializes in a number of areas relevant to evolving needs in society, including biomedical engineering, signal processing, communications systems and networks, computer hardware and systems, electronics and photonics, mechatronics, power electronics and systems, robotics and control, and software engineering.

20

Master Degrees Awarded 6

PhD Degrees Awarded

Electrical and Computer Engineering

0

100

200

300

400

500

215

Full-time Undergraduate Students 18

Part-time Undergraduate Students

63

Full-time Master’s Students

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY

2

Part-time Master’s Students

DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. James McLellan

55

Full-time PhD Students

Chemical Engineering—The Chemical Engineering program provides students with a versatile engineering experience based on fundamental chemical and biochemical engineering concepts, strengthening knowledge in chemistry and mathematics.

Engineering Chemistry—More than a century old, this program is unique in Canada and offers a strong base in chemistry in combination with chemical, biochemical, environmental, and/or materials engineering.

25.2

Faculty

42

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded 22

Master Degrees Awarded 7

PhD Degrees Awarded

Accredited by both the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board and the Canadian Society for Chemistry, the curriculum integrates a core of chemistry with a body of engineering to give students expertise in environmental improvement, in the design of processes, and in the development of electronic and structural materials.

In addition to the technical content of the program, students are introduced to business skills, engineering economics, communications, humanities, and social sciences, and explore current issues, such as the impact of technology on society.

7

Part-time PhD Students

0

50

100

150

200

250

MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Michael Birk

CIVIL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Kent Novakowski

The Civil Engineering program provides students with a broad-spectrum education in structural design, geotechnical engineering, hydraulics, environmental engineering, and water resources engineering. Research and learning focuses on the sustainability of both the natural and built environment, including advanced materials, infrastructure replacement, sustainable water supply and management, and environmental engineering in general.

Mechanical and materials engineering uses principles of engineering graphics, mathematics, materials, physics, and economics to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, operate, and maintain processes and devices. The program specializes in materials, biomechanical, aerospace, manufacturing, mechatronics, energy, and fluid systems. Many students choose not to specialize, but rather sample courses from a number of different fields to develop a wide breadth of knowledge. Hands-on design and teamwork are integral to the program, which includes opportunities to create anything from solar cells and robots to artificial joint prostheses.

McLaughlin Hall

Ellis Hall

Civil Engineering

Mechancial and Materials Engineering 375

Full-time Undergraduate Students 8

Part-time Undergraduate Students

38

18

Faculty 115

4 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

128 28

Master Degrees Awarded

9

5

PhD Degrees Awarded

50

100

28.2

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded

10

0

0

Part-time PhD Students

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded PhD Degrees Awarded

45

Full-time PhD Students

9

Master Degrees Awarded

15

Part-time Master’s Students

Full-time PhD Students Faculty

59

Full-time Master’s Students

7

Part-time PhD Students

19

Part-time Undergraduate Students 59

Full-time Master’s Students Part-time Master’s Students

520

Full-time Undergraduate Students

150

200

250

300

350

400

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 5


BY THE NUMBERS 2011/12 MINING ENGINEERING Geological Engineering

DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Laeeque Daneshmend

From its inauguration in 1893, Mining Engineering at Queen’s has held a significant position in the Canadian mineral industry, and is currently the largest mining school in North America and one of the largest in the world. Graduates are involved in all facets of the Canadian mineral industry and can also be found in most major mining operations throughout the world.

The Mining Department is also at the forefront in developing computer applications for engineering design and works in close contact with the mineral industry. The program consists of three major options: Mining, Mineral Processing and Mine Environment, and Mine-Mechanical.

126

Full-time Undergraduate Students 3

Part-time Undergraduate Students

10

Full-time Master’s Students 1

Part-time Master’s Students

3

Full-time PhD Students 0

Part-time PhD Students

12.5

Faculty

22

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded 2

Master Degrees Awarded

Mining Engineering 138

Full-time Undergraduate Students 3

Part-time Undergraduate Students

0

24

Full-time Master’s Students 5

Full-time PhD Students

11.85

Faculty

44

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded 5

Master Degrees Awarded 2

PhD Degrees Awarded

60

90

120

150

DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Jean Hutchinson

1

Part-time PhD Students

30

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

10

Part-time Master’s Students

0

PhD Degrees Awarded

0

30

60

90

120

150

Geological engineering is the practical application of principles, concepts, and techniques of the geological sciences to provide sustainable solutions to human needs. Studies include resource exploitation and management; environmental and geotechnical design involving rock, soil, and water interaction; groundwater protection and remediation; risk mitigation; and the nondestructive or geophysical investigation of the subsurface environment. Students are taught the skills required to meet the challenges of the future in mineral and energy exploration, geotechnical engineering, geo-environmental engineering, and applied geophysics.

Engineering Physics 180

Full-time Undergraduate Students 3

Part-time Undergraduate Students

6

Full-time Master’s Students

Bruce Wing - Miller Hall

0

Part-time Master’s Students

MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING

4

Full-time PhD Students 0

Part-time PhD Students

22

Faculty

24

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded 5

Master Degrees Awarded

2

PhD Degrees Awarded 0

50

100

150

200

DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Ram Murty

that underpin so many of the models used in engineering.

Modern communications, control, electrical, mechanical, and mechatronic systems require sophisticated mathematical models and analysis. The Mathematics and Engineering program is developed for those who wish to understand the fundamentals

This program specializes in systems and robotics, applied mechanics, and computing and communication communications, with graduates going on to work in a broad range of engineering careers.

ENGINEERING PHYSICS

Mathematics and Engineering

DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. David Hanes

The Department of Physics offers excellent undergraduate programs in Physics and Engineering Physics, including the option to specialize in any of a number of areas, such as Astrophysics, Mathematical Physics, Chemical Physics, and Geological Science with Physics. The development of new devices and technologies often requires an understanding of the underlying physics at a fundamental level. The Engineering Physics program provides students with this background through a challenging series 6 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

92

Full-time Undergraduate Students

of courses in modern physics and engineering. Students specialize in one of the following four options: Mechanical, Electrical, Materials, or Computing. They receive the engineering training required to work in these fields and also the physics training required to prepare them for graduate work or work in a research laboratory. Approximately half of the graduates of the program pursue post-graduate degrees in Engineering or Physics.

2

Part-time Undergraduate Students

4

Full-time Master’s Students Part-time Master’s Students

0 4

Full-time PhD Students 0

Part-time PhD Students

6

Faculty

18

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded Master Degrees Awarded

0

PhD Degrees Awarded

0

0

20

40

60

80

100

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 7


RENOWNED SPIRIT, UNRIVALED EXCELLENCE: THE UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE APSC 200/293: Nurturing critical thinking The vast majority of Canadians enjoy all the amenities of a first-world lifestyle, but for many northern communities the comforts we take for granted, such as reliable electricity, comfortable homes, and indoor plumbing, simply don’t exist. A second-year course that features a project on designing solutions for northern Canada is giving students more than technical training—it’s challenging them to think creatively about these kinds of real-world issues and constraints, and to work collaboratively to solve them.

A student tests out a prototype for an APSC 200 design challenge

The Tea Room, located in Beamish-Munro Hall, is entirely student run, and thanks to an ambitious recycling and composting program, creates zero waste.

The APSC 200/293 course is a natural extension of APSC 100, introduced in 1997 as a mandatory course to help students develop creative and openended problem-solving skills through a team design project. Created as part of the Faculty initiative to implement a fouryear Engineering Design & Professional Practice component in all programs, the APSC curriculum aims to provide students with the professional skills they need to succeed after graduation. “Technical skills are critical, but they are only a part of what makes an engineer,” says Professor David Strong, the NSERC Chair in Design Engineering and one of the creators of the APSC program. “If we want our engineers to thrive, we need to build on those skills with creative, critical thinking, using problems and

environments that exist in the real world.” Twice-weekly lectures provide “just in time” information for interactive workshops that are directly related to team projects. Throughout the process, students learn and begin to apply various approaches to their project using creative thinking, design engineering, and shared expertise. They report on their progress on a regular basis and receive feedback on both technical and communication elements, allowing them to build vital communications and professional skills. This year’s project involves defining and providing engineering solutions for a northern community, such as energy generation, storage, modular home development or heating, plumbing, and ventilation. Teams were instructed to choose a community without year-round roads and with a significantly harsh climate. These constraints bring added—and very real—complexities to design. “It’s that much harder to design products or systems when you are working in bitter cold that can embrittle materials and stiffen lubricants,” says Strong. “And a lack of sunlight, which is a reality of life in the north, impacts opportunities such as photovoltaic energy generation and solar heating, just as a lack of year-round roads constrains shipments of supplies. We want students to think beyond the high-tech solution, to really focus on the process of problem identification and to generate ideas that are best suited to the needs and capabilities of the community.” Throughout the course, students gain experience working in both a multidisciplinary and discipline-specific environment. “The individuals within the teams need to learn how to work together for mutual benefit,” Strong says. “Engineering design is increasingly an integrated field, with systems that require expertise in many disciplines.” Strong notes that the course also fulfills many of the learning outcomes required by new Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) requirements. “This professional spine is now seen as a core competency for engineers who need to be able to adapt to rapidly changing environments. The APSC curriculum gives our students the critical skills they need to succeed in the global workforce.”

8 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

Nicol Hall turns one hundred Completed in 1912, Nicol Hall houses various Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science departments. It is named after William Nicol, Queen’s first professor of Metallurgy and Mining, and also the person who donated the funds for the building’s construction. Originally a student at Queen’s, William Nicol returned to Queen’s in 1896 as a Professor of Mineralogy. He was known as a strict disciplinarian in the classroom but was also known to provide financial support to students in need. Nicol was a great collector of mineral samples and donated them to Queen’s, where they are still displayed today as part of the Miller Museum of Geology. His generous donation of $40,000 to the University resulted in the building of Nicol Hall. He is considered one of the founders of Queen’s Engineering.

Just the facts  William Nicol was inspired

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to study at Queen’s at a lecture given by Nathan Dupuis—although he claimed that it was not so much the words that Dupuis spoke but rather his curiosity about the oxyhydrogen flame in a lantern in the room that was used to project pictures.

 The cost to build Nicol Hall

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was $70,000—the difference was covered mostly by alumni.

 During the First World War, the

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attic of Nicol Hall was used as an army barracks.

William Nicol

If you ever see a good specimen in a private collection, try to get the

owner to present it to the university. If he won’t do this, try to buy it. If he won’t sell it, steal it.

— William Nicol, to his class.

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 9


THE FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING INNOVATION: RESEARCH AND GRADUATE STUDIES Rob Knobel

Queen’s is one of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities—a place many of Canada’s most outstanding researchers call home. The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science currently has more than 400 highly motivated graduate students of exceptional ability from around the world. We are proud to be home to these world leading researchers. The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s University contributes to the Canadian engineering and scientific expertise through its own basic and applied research, and through collaborative work with others. RESEARCH CENTRES

A dog’s nose is an amazing thing. With the ability to smell chemicals in parts per billion concentration, dogs are often recruited to sniff out potential airport threats, drugs, earthquake victims, and even bedbugs. But they are also easily distracted and can’t always withstand harsh environments—which means, in an increasingly sophisticated world of terrorism and drug smuggling, that we can’t always rely on man’s best friend.

CANADA RESEARCH CHAIRS  TIER I

C  entre for Energy and Power Electronics Research l  Fuel Cell Research Centre l  GeoEngineering Centre l  Human Mobility Research Centre l  Water Research Centre l

NAME

DEPARTMENT

FIELD OF WORK

Praveen Jain Ian Moore Brant Peppley Ugo Piomelli Kerry Rowe David Thomson

Electrical and Computer Engineering Civil Engineering Chemical Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering Civil Engineering Mathematics and Engineering

Telecom Power Electronics Infrastructure Engineering Fuel Cells Computational Turbulence Civil and Geoenvironmental Engineering Statistics and Signal Processing

What if we could design tools that could mimic and, in fact, exceed these skills? Dr. Rob Knobel, an Associate Professor and the Chair of Undergraduate Studies in Engineering Physics, is conducting research at the nanoscale to better define and understand the ultimate limits of sensors, with the goal of translating this knowledge into tools that could be used for a range of situations in the macro world.

CANADA RESEARCH CHAIRS  TIER II ENGINEERING RESEARCH FUNDING By Category - 2011 Total = $26,420 Amts (000's)

NAME

DEPARTMENT

FIELD OF WORK

Pascale Champagne Mark Daymond Aristides Docoslis Amir Fam

Civil Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Chemical Engineering, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering

Bioresources Engineering Nuclear Materials and Mechanics of Materials Colloids and Nanoscale Engineering Innovative and Retrofitted Structures

Stephen Waldman

Other $312

Ying Zou

Provincial $5,706 Government Partnerships $7,307 Industry $2,901 Federal $10,194

Federal $435 Federal Partnerships $1,182 Provincial Partnerships $2,219 Provincial-MRI $5,121 Federal-CFI $4,634 Federal-CRC $1,600 Federal-NSERC $3,525 Provincial $585 Other $312 Industry $2,901 NSERC Partnerships $3.906

Engineering NSERC Grants - 2011 Total = $7,431 Amts (000's) Other $709 Discovery $3,063 Strategic $1,553 Create $680 Chairs $462 CRD $602 Equipment $362

Software Evolution

QUEEN’S RESEARCH CHAIRS NAME

DEPARTMENT

FIELD OF WORK

John Cartledge Andrew Daugulis

Electrical and Computer Engineering Chemical Engineering School of Computing, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Fibre-Optic Communications Biochemical and Cell Culture Engineering

NAME

DEPARTMENT

FIELD OF WORK

Mark Daymond David Strong

Mechanical and Materials Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Nuclear Materials Design Engineering

Randy Ellis

By Source - 2011 Total = $26,420 Amts (000's)

Tissue Engineering of Human Joints

Andrew Pollard

New Technologies and Computer Assisted Surgery Computational Fluid Dynamics

NSERC CHAIRS

DEPARTMENT

Tim Bryant

Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Michael Cunningham

Chemical Engineering

Laeeque Daneshmend

Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining

Brian Frank Anthony Hodge Steve McKinnon

Electrical and Computer Engineering Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining

Scott Parent

Chemical Engineering

Dr. Scott Yam began his career as a software designer at a time when the Internet was still in its infancy—and over the years, has been involved in various projects to advance different components of wired and wireless technology to meet consumer demand. Now, as Associate

FIELD OF WORK

Donald and Joan McGeachy Chair in Biomedical Engineering Ontario Research Chair in Green Chemistry Noranda-Falconbridge Chair in Mine-Mechanical Engineering DuPont Chair in Engineering Education Helen and Arthur Stollery Professor in Mining Chair in Mine Design, Government of Ontario Hazell Research Professor in Chemical Design and Innovation

A fusion splicer which is used to connect two pieces of bare fibre together

Research Funding – Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 $0

$7,500,000 Government Partnerships

Industry

10 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

$15,000,000 Federal

Provincial

Other

$22,500,000

Some of his work involves chemical sensing with graphene, a form of carbon a single atom thick with amazing strength and excellent electrical properties, making it ideal for next generation sensors. A drumhead made with graphene will vibrate like a macroscopic drum, but it is so light that even a single molecule absorbed on its surface will change that vibration. Graphene is also quite easy to produce for research, and through Knobel’s research, may allow for exceptionally accurate measurements of chemicals, a feat that, in the case of chemical sensing—or in airport security—can be critical to national security. Knobel was awarded funding for his work from The Way Memorial Trust, established through a bequest to Queen’s to support research in both the Faculty of

Dr. Rob Knobel

Engineering and Applied Science and the Faculty of Health Sciences. Recipients are faculty members chosen based on their record of accomplishment, integrity, and strong sense of dedication to their work. Knobel says that while nanoscale research and quantum mechanics may seem far removed from applied technologies, it is this work that allows us to develop the tools required in many fields, including security, sensing devices, and transistor technology. “My interest is in developing a new understanding of the transition from the classical to the quantum environment, but for a broader purpose,” he says. “By understanding the limits due to quantum mechanics, and being able to measure phenomena that exist at these limits, we can build tools that are more accurate and better able to respond to real-world problems.”

Scott Yam

NAMED CHAIRS AND PROFESSORSHIPS NAME

Knobel, a Queen’s graduate who has studied high temperature superconductors and magnetic semiconductors, researches nano mechanics and electronics, using temperatures close to absolute zero to better understand their behavior and push their limits in a pure environment. He refers to his work as being within the “delicate boundary between pure discovery and applied science.”

“When you make a vibrating membrane, like a drum, smaller and colder, eventually you reach the point where it won’t vibrate like a bigger drum—the vibrations become quantized like the energy levels of an atom,” he says. “Quantum mechanics ultimately limits both how much the drum moves and how precisely we can measure it. At colder temperatures we are probing these limits to better understand how we can improve sensors in real-world situations.”

$30,000,000

Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Yam continues to contribute to this critical tool as well as many other discoveries through research in optical networks and by mentoring graduate students in the constantly changing world of communications. Yam’s research focuses on three major areas: signal processing for long distance communications, high speed data transmissions in local area networks, and optical sensors. Much of his work revolves around making systems more robust and efficient so that they can continue to meet and exceed the demands of an informationhungry world. At the same time, he is investigating how the same technology can be applied to environmental and infrastructure monitoring. As data continues to be shared over higher and higher speeds, the quality of the transmission becomes a challenge.

Yam and his colleagues are exploring new ways to use optical technology to provide quality and ultra-fast transmissions in a cost-effective way, both for short and long distances. Other work involves sensitizing fibre-based sensors that can pick up contaminants on the order of parts per million—important for containment detection in hazardous environments. Yam also heads up the Next Generation Optical Networks training program, which focuses on developing both technical and professional skills in graduate students. He says that it is this type of work that makes his career so rewarding. “I work with leading researchers, and have incredible opportunities to work with industry and to develop national and international collaborations,” he says. “Best of all, I get to see my own graduate trainees develop as engineers, scientists, and balanced individuals who challenge me to push the envelope and boundaries every day.”

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 11


CAMPAIGN CABINET

Launched!

Name & Degree

Discipline

Year

Business Title

Mike Norris (Chair)

Civil Engineering

Sc’75

Former Deputy Chairman, RBC Capital Markets

Tom Kennedy (Vice Chair)

Mining

Sc’73

Managing Director, Kensington Capital Partners

Evan Hazell (Co Vice Chair - Western Region)

Chemical Engineering

Sc’81

Jeff van Steenbergen (Co Vice Chair - Western Region)

Civil Engineering

Sc’77

Co-Founder & Co-Managing Partner, Kern Partners Ltd.

Read Gomm (Vice Chair - UK)

Mechanical Engineering

Sc’83

Senior Managing Director, Evercore Partners International, LLP

Greg Bavington

Mechanical Engineering

Sc’85

Former President, CEO of KN Rubber LLC

Gordon Bell

Mining

Sc’80

Managing Director, Head Mining & Metals RBC Capital Markets

These are exactly the kind of leaders Canada needs and Queen’s Engineering is poised to deliver.

Bob Buchan

Mining Engineering

MSc’72

Chairman, Allied Nevada Gold Corporation

Inspiring Greatness: The Campaign for Queen’s Engineering is about enabling more of the inspiring experiences for which we are already known. It’s about inspiring great new ways of thinking, teaching, and researching. It’s about inspiring you to action.

Martha van Berkel

Mathematics and Engineering Sc’00

Senior Manager, Cisco

I invite you to invest now in The Campaign for Queen’s Engineering.

Greg Heath

Geological Engineering

Sc’96

Director, Global Investment Banking RBC Capital Markets

Mike Norris, Civil Engineering ’75 Chair

Tim Kitchen

Chemical Engineering

Sc’86

Managing Director and Head of Investment Banking, Barclay’s Capital

Michelle Lalonde

Civil Engineering

Sc’95

Global Knowledge Manager for the CEO & Board Practice, Russell Reynolds Associates

Julie Lassonde

Civil Engineering

Sc’96

Executive Chairman, Director, Shear Minerals Ltd.

Sue Riddell Rose

Geological Engineering

Sc’86

CEO, Perpetual Energy

Mike Serbinis

Engineering Physics

Sc’96

Chief Executive Officer, Kobo Inc.

We start with exceptional raw material—top-performing high school graduates who are already leaders in their own right. We then set out to realize that promise. From Canada’s only first-year design course and a one-of-a-kind industry project that brings together students in business, arts and science, law, and engineering, to internships, exchanges, design teams, clubs, and outreach programs, Queen’s students have the capacity to develop wide-ranging skills, tackle new opportunities and experiences, and become well-rounded leaders long before they even graduate.

Andrew Shaughnessy

Chemical Engineering

Sc’87

Partner, Torys LLP

Barry Stewart

Engineering Physics

Sc’64

Retired Executive / Board Director

Kim Sturgess

Engineering Physics

Sc’77

CEO, Alberta WaterSMART

With your support through Inspiring Greatness: The Campaign for Queen’s Engineering, we will raise the bar on engineering leadership in Canada. Working together, there are no limits to what... or who we might inspire.

Mary Ann Turcke

Civil Engineering

Sc’88

EVP Field Operations, Bell Canada

Queen’s Engineering has launched the largest fundraising effort in its history. Inspiring Greatness: The Campaign for Queen’s Engineering is about enabling more of the inspiring experiences for which the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is known. Join the many alumni, corporations, foundations, and friends who have already committed to our $85 million goal.

CHAIR’S MESSAGE

For more information, visit www.inspiring.engineering.queensu.ca

We can’t be great on our own. Twenty years ago if you had asked someone about the role of an engineer, they might have told you that engineers build bridges. In the last decade, the world realized new possibilities. As natural problem-solvers, engineers are also great CEOs and policymakers, entrepreneurs, and researchers. And now the paradigm is shifting again. In today’s complex world, there are no longer engineering leaders or business leaders or communication leaders. There are only change-leaders, and changeleaders don’t just start companies—they transform them in ways never before imagined.

DEAN’S MESSAGE

What better foundation for greatness? Every engineering school in North America has a vision of leadership. But our pathway to the finish line, and the kind of leaders we ultimately deliver, are uniquely Queen’s.

Kimberly A. Woodhouse Dean 12 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 13


I N S P I R I N G G R E AT N E S S C A M PA I G N P R I O R I T I E S Inspiring Programs: $12 million

15 years ago Queen’s Engineering launched an Integrated Learning model that has stood the test of time, remaining one of the most innovative approaches to engineering education in the world. Building on this model, we’re now developing a professional slate of courses integrating design, professional expectations, innovation, communication, and industry internships across every program and year of study. As part of this strategy to innovate, problem-solve, and work in teams across disciplines and cultures, we’re planning two new programs, both of which require private support.

Inspiring Student Experiences: $10 million

INNOVATION PROGRAM Today’s engineers are working in the realm of business, economics, and policy. And today’s business grads are increasingly looking to technological innovation as a launch pad for the knowledge economy’s growth. Queen’s Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and the School of Business are collaborating to create the Innovation Initiative to develop the innovators who will fuel the success of technology-driven companies, provide direct solutions for corporate challenges, and deliver incubation for start-ups.

Queen’s Engineering is known for helping students grow as leaders within the community beyond the classroom. Competitive design teams, outreach programs, conferences, clubs, and student-led campus businesses all bring distinction to the university and provide invaluable teamwork, leadership, project planning, design, marketing, and communication skills. Your investment will support Queen’s competitive design teams, like the Baja SAE Team and the Formula SAE Team. We will invest in student outreach efforts, including Science Quest summer camp, FIRST Robotics, and Queen’s Engineers Without Borders. Campaign gifts will also help establish the Queen’s Engineering Exchange and Internship Fund to provide Queen’s engineers with the financial support they need to study and learn abroad.

The Shell Experiential Learning Fund

ABORIGINAL ACCESS TO ENGINEERING PROGRAM Canada’s Aboriginal communities are increasingly involved in the management and stewardship of natural resources sectors, including mining, forestry, oil and gas, and water. Yet Aboriginal engineers account for fewer than 1% of the country’s practicing professional engineers. Queen’s Engineering is launching the Aboriginal Access to Engineering Program to inspire young Aboriginal men and women to develop an interest in math and science, promote engineering as a post-secondary field of study, and help Aboriginal students succeed in undergraduate engineering programs at Queen’s.

diverse skill sets by investing $220,000 in the Inspiring Greatness campaign. The Shell Experiential Learning Fund (SELF) was created to help support student projects related to the oil and gas industry. Students eligible to apply must be enrolled in engineering, geological sciences, and business. SELF supports initiatives such as student clubs, projects, field trips, and attendance at industryspecific conferences and workshops.

Bob Burnside: A lifetime of giving Bob Burnside was mulling over a list of Queen’s donation opportunities when his wife, Doris, hit the nail on the head. “She said, ‘Bob, how could you give to anything other than engineering?’” laughs the 1956 Chemical Engineering grad and retired Vice President of Imperial Oil.

SELF builds on the Queen’s Technology Engineering and Management (TEAM) fund, another program sponsored by Shell. TEAM pairs fourth-year arts, science, engineering, law, and business students to solve real-world industry challenges by working on projects for industrial clients.

In the nearly 60 years since graduating, Burnside has remained a committed Queen’s engineer, organizing class reunions, chairing the Engineering Advisory Council, and serving as President of the Alumni Association in 1986-87. It almost went without saying that his leadership gift would benefit Queen’s Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science.

Bob Burnside, Sc’56, and his late wife Doris

Bob and Doris Burnside donated $1 million to help launch the Innovation Program, an important collaboration between Queen’s Engineering and Queen’s School of Business. Focused on teaching students the leadership and teamwork skills to bring innovative ideas, inventions, and products to market, the program will be taught by Faculty leaders working together with some of the world’s best innovators, policymakers, and legal and business strategists. “It’s a worthy concept,” says Burnside. “The world’s problems don’t come the way universities are typically organized. Students better learn how to work together. Leadership is important.” During 32 years with Imperial Oil, working on such major projects as building a world class chemical company called Esso Chemical Canada, Burnside saw clearly how a blend of engineering and business could yield “fantastic results.” In fact, he used some of those results, in the form of Imperial Oil shares, to provide the capital for his campaign donation. His gift of shares has other benefits, too; donations of publicly-listed stocks and securities are not subject to capital gains tax. “I had a successful career and it all started as a Queen’s engineering graduate. This is my way to pay back.”

David Schneuker, 4th Year Mechanical Engineering student, with Michele Harradence, Sc’91, in Beamish-Munro Hall

There’s a myth at Queen’s Engineering that Michele Harradence, Sc’91, is determined to bust. “Half of the grads Shell hires are mechanical engineers, but students repeatedly tell us that Shell Canada only hires chemical and geological engineers,” says Harradence, newly appointed as General Manager of Shell’s Sarnia manufacturing centre, a long time leader in Shell’s Campus Ambassador Team for Queen’s, and a 1991 Queen’s Mechanical Engineering grad. In fact, she says, there are “a multitude of opportunities in the energy business.” In 2012, Shell took a bold step towards promoting the value of students with

14 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

“Queen’s grads are already strong teamplayers. We wanted to take advantage of that,” explains John Courtright, Law’76, Artsci’77, Shell’s Associate General Counsel and Campus Ambassador to Queen’s. “We want to give students an opportunity to learn in a way that’s closer to real life, to have that in-themoment experience of working with others from a diversity of backgrounds.” SELF has already attracted strong student interest. The first grants will be awarded this winter, with four additional granting cycles occurring over the next three years. The simple reality, says Harradence, “is you can’t get through the engineering program without learning how to work collaboratively with others. It was the real differentiator for me as a Queen’s grad.” ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 15


I N S P I R I N G G R E AT N E S S C A M PA I G N P R I O R I T I E S Inspiring Teaching and Research: $18 million

Exceptional learning experiences demand exceptional professors—teachers and researchers who can apply their expertise in fields like energy, health, mineral resources, and the environment to ignite the imagination and inspire students to achieve greatness. With your support, we will launch three new centres of research excellence in areas of existing strength and promise: the Centre for Mineral Resources; the Centre for Water, Environment and Health; and the Queen’s Energy Institute. Within each centre, your investment will help attract a high-profile scholar and endow a research and innovation fund to jumpstart new research, support publications and participation in conferences, and provide critical funding for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.

Inspiring Spaces: $45 million

Did you know that many companies, large and small, will partially or fully match your gift to the Faculty of Engineering? To find out if your employer has a matching gift program, simply check with your human resources department or visit www.matchinggift.com/canada/queens. For further information, please contact Donna Dwyre at 1-800-267-7837 or donna.dwyre@queensu.ca

16 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

But even the most innovative experiences pale when they are spread across aging buildings designed for far fewer students and built at a time when many of today’s fields of study didn’t even exist. Your investment will help build the Centre for Innovation in Global Engineering, a 70,000 square-foot research and teaching space immediately adjacent to Beamish-Munro Hall. Featuring interdisciplinary research space and flexible laboratories and design studios, the centre will accelerate innovative programming and research across the disciplines; attract the best students and faculty; and deliver cutting-edge experiences to meet the changing role of engineers tomorrow.

The RBC Queen’s University Water Initiative

The Centre for Innovation in Global Engineering

Inspiring greatness is something Gordon Nixon knows plenty about as a Queen’s grad and the President and CEO of one of Canada’s largest banks. It’s also his goal for RBC’s $2 million donation to create the RBC Queen’s University Water Initiative.

Convergence. That in a nutshell is how award-winning architect Jack Diamond describes the new Queen’s Centre for Innovation in Global Engineering. “Queen’s Engineering is a series of buildings built independently and without coordination,” says the principal at Canada’s Diamond Schmitt Architects and the visionary behind Queen’s School of Business Goodes Hall expansion and Queen’s Medical School Building. “The challenge we set ourselves was how to connect all those pieces and create a coherent, integrated space.”

Aimed at raising awareness and inspiring solutions to the impact of industrial development and agriculture on watershed health and water supplies, the Water Initiative is a cornerstone of the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science plans to launch new centres of excellence and attract thought leaders in areas of existing strength and promise.

Principal Woolf at the RBC Queen’s University Water Initiative launch

Queen’s Engineering has a vision to provide a distinctive learning experience at the frontiers of engineering innovation.

“We’re proud to support this new initiative that will bring together the brightest minds to tackle some of the most serious water issues facing our country,” says Nixon. “Our $2 million grant is one of the largest commitments we have made under the RBC Blue Water Project and is a testament to our confidence in Queen’s University.” RBC’s campaign donation will help develop a groundwater field school at Queen’s 135-acre Kennedy Field Station, part of the Salmon River Watershed. A new watershed assessment course for students in programs from Engineering and Environmental Studies, to Geography and Policy Studies will include hands-on examinations of watershed quality and flow, its impact on local communities, and the regulations that govern it. The fund will also support a watershed speakers series; the E-Water Project to collect real-time data from the Salmon River Watershed; and a Student-Industry Partnership Program that brings together engineering, business, science, and law students as watershed consultants to industry clients. “We’ve been talking about this kind of multidisciplinary training and research for years,” says Civil Engineering Professor and initiative lead Dr. Kent Novakowski. “We’re fostering a culture of water stewardship that will impact our communities and our planet for generations to come.”

Artist’s rendering of the Centre for Innovation in Global Engineering as seen from Union Street

Diamond has done just that with his bold plans for the four-storey, 70,000 square-foot research and teaching building to be built immediately adjacent to Beamish-Munro Hall. The Centre for Innovation in Global Engineering will feature new laboratories and design studios for teaching at the undergraduate level and interdisciplinary research space where researchers and graduate students can come together to support initiatives in engineering design and innovation in bioengineering. The building’s showpiece will be a two-storey glass entranceway projecting over Union Street that welcomes students and visitors. “It’s an engineering feat, and our literal and virtual front door,” explains Brian Surgenor, Associate Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science (Research, Graduate Studies, External Affairs). Informal gathering spaces throughout the centre will give further character to the space that Diamond hopes will inspire students to stay long after classes have ended. “A chance encounter over coffee, natural light, and comfortable chairs where you can curl up and read—these informal contacts are as important as formal teaching sessions,” he says. Diamond calls the building “an agent of change”—a catalyst for more effective connections between students, faculty, and even alumni. Says Surgenor: “It’s Queen’s take on what you need to innovate in the global community.” U.S.-based alumni interested in making a gift to the Faculty of Engineering should contact Director of Development Jane McMillan at 1-800-267-7837 or jane.mcmillan@queensu.ca

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 17


I N S P I R I N G G R E AT N E S S I N S P I R I N G A L U M N I Inspiring young alumni

Calling all young alumni Martha van Berkel (Garriock), Sc’00, has this challenge for other young Queen’s engineering alumni: “Prove that you believe in your school.” van Berkel did just that this year with a leadership gift to the Innovation Program, a priority of the Campaign for Queen’s Engineering. The Senior Manager at Cisco made the donation to help ensure Queen’s curricula remains reflective of today’s business needs and focused on developing innovative leaders. She is also the founding Chair for Queen’s Young Engineering Alumni (QYea!), established in 2011 to help new grads engage in professional development and networking opportunities, reconnect with old classmates, and reignite their passion for Queen’s.

An inspiring class challenge!

Five years after graduating, the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Class of ’82 had raised $7,000 for their alma mater. Twenty-five years after that, their two class funds topped $300,000—among the largest cumulative class gifts ever made to Queen’s Engineering. “The Science ’82 Fund began with the goal of making a class gift to Queen’s at our fifth reunion in 1987,” explains Class President Don MacDiarmid. “The idea then as now is to aggregate gifts from many Science ’82 graduates into a more meaningful class donation and to nurture a continuing Science ’82 legacy.” The Science ’82 Fund, now reconstituted as an endowment, provides annual income to enrich the quality of undergraduate engineering education at Queen’s through the purchase of lab equipment and the support of initiatives like Queen’s solar car, Science Quest, and student conference travel. In 2007, Science ‘82 launched a second endowment for student awards.

She hopes her gifts of time and money inspire other young alumni to play a role in the future of Queen’s Engineering. “You’ll receive back way more than you give,” she says. “My contributions are me saying, ‘I believe in this school, and I’m willing to put my foot forward to help keep Queen’s among the best engineering schools in Canada, somewhere I’m proud to have a degree from.’”

“We had a really fantastic time when we were at Queen’s,” says Class Reunion Co-ordinator Catherine Ella, Sc’82. “We want to ensure other students benefit from the same excellence and traditions.” Sue Lounsbury, Sc’82, and a member of Queen’s University Council, hopes the Class of ’82 will be a role model for future Queen’s Engineering classes. “This is about getting more people to give, not getting the same people to give more.” Sc’82 standing proud!

Ways to give

Martha van Berkel (Garriock), Sc’00

ONLINE

Giving back year after year Eleven years, a cross-country move, and careers as both an engineer and investment advisor have only strengthened Jeff Mackie’s appreciation for his Queen’s education. “The fundamentals—how to think, question, and learn—stick with you no matter what you do in life,” says the 2001 Applied Science grad and Associate Portfolio Manager at Macquarie Private Wealth in Calgary. “I value my Queen’s education above most everything else.” Every year since 2002, Mackie has shown his gratitude with a gift to the Faculty’s Dean’s Excellence Fund. “The education I received wasn’t free. It’s my responsibility to give back.” Like many alumni donors, his gifts started small and increased as his career advanced and financial security grew. Over 10 years, Mackie’s total contributions have topped $25,000. “As Queen’s grads, we share a common bond. I’d like to see more alumni join with me in giving back to Queen’s.”

Use the GIVE NOW button at inspiring. engineering.queensu.ca/Giving/Ways-toGive.html to make a secure online donation. We are pleased to accept one-time campaign gifts and pledges by credit card, direct withdrawal, and payroll deduction (Queen’s employees only).

BY PHONE Call 613-533-6000 x75248 or toll free at 1-800-267-7837 x75248 to make a credit card donation by telephone.

BY MAIL Cheques made payable to Queen’s University – Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science can be sent to:

18 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

MATCHING GIFTS FROM YOUR EMPLOYER

pleased to speak to you and your financial planner about your gift plans.

Double your dollars! Many companies have a program that will partially or fully match your gift to Queen’s Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. To find out if your employer has a matching gift program, please contact your human resources department or visit matchinggifts.com/ canada/queens.

GIFTS OF SECURITIES There are considerable tax advantages to making a gift of appreciated securities (stocks and bonds). You and your broker can electronically transfer these types of gifts into the Queen’s account. Please contact us for details at inspiring@engineering. queensu.ca

Linda Pearson Director of Development, Gift Planning linda.pearson@queensu.ca Extension 77196

INTERNATIONAL GIVING U.S.-based alumni and their relatives can donate directly to Queen’s University and receive an income tax receipt. U.K.-based alumni can support Queen’s Engineering through the Charities Aid Foundation U.K. at cafonline.org. For further details on international giving, please contact us or consult your financial planner.

Inspiring Greatness Campaign Queen’s Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Beamish-Munro Hall Queen’s University Kingston, ON K7L 3N6

IN PERSON Jeff Mackie, Sc’01

To discuss corporate giving opportunities, please contact Donna Dwyre at 1-800-267-7837 or donna.dwyre@queensu.ca

Please present your gift to the Inspiring Greatness campaign office on Queen’s campus in Beamish-Munro Hall, Room 200.

GIFT PLANNING Planning for a gift through your will, a gift of life insurance policy, or a charitable gift annuity are thoughtful ways to support Queen’s Engineering and leave a legacy, while maximizing tax and other benefits. We would be

Gifts by Source (2011-2012) Queen's Alumni (non Engineering): 11% Corporations & Foundations: 5% Engineering & Applied Science Alumni: 66%

Friends 18%

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 19


I N S P I R I N G G R E AT N E S S C A M PA I G N S U P P O R T E R S

R E CO G N I Z I N G A N N UA L G I V I N G

The following list recognizes generous supporters who have given $25,000 or more, cumulatively, to Inspiring Greatness: The Campaign for Queen’s Engineering May 1, 2006 to April 30, 2012.

The following list recognizes donors whose contribution to Queen’s Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science totalled more than $2,500 and was made during the fiscal year May 1, 2011 to April 30, 2012.

$10,000,000+

$2,000,000+

Robert Buchan, MSc’72

Robert Burnside, Sc’56 & Doris Burnside Evan Hazell, Sc’81 Estate of Catherine Hewitson Kinross Gold Corporation Estate of Donald McGeachy, Sc’40 Michael Norris, Sc’75 RBC Foundation Jeff van Steenbergen, Sc’77 & Kim van Steenbergen, BNSc ‘78 Estate of David Vice, Sc’55, DSc’93

Russell Kenney, Sc’41, DSc’93 & Marjorie Kennedy, BA’39 David Pakrul, Sc’69 Shell Canada Limited Bert Wasmund, Sc’61, MSc’63

Gordon Bell, Sc’80 Michael Chernoff, Sc’59 Norman Loveland, Sc’65 & Gay Loveland

$1,000,000 - $4,999,999

$500,000 - $999,999

$250,000 - $499,999

$100,000 - $249,999

Michael Birch, Sc’74 J Armand Bombardier Foundation Richard Dobson, Sc’68 & Leigh Dobson Estate of Jean M Garrow Golder Associates Ltd. Laurence Hall, Sc’58 Hatch Ltd. Greg Heath, Sc’96 & Lori Heath, BA’96 David E Jackson, Sc’55 & Elinor Jackson Tim Kitchen, Sc’86 & Alana Kitchen, Sc’86 Marvin Kriluck, Sc’59 Marguerite McCaffrey Michael J O’Connor, Sc’68, PhD’76 Estate of Robert Papoe, BCom’78 Estate of James H Rattray, BA’10 Estate of Phyllis J Smart Estate of Iva Speers, BA’76 Andrew Spriet, Sc’57 & Helen Spriet Estate of Evelyn Warren The Women’s Association of the Mining Industry of Canada Anonymous Anonymous Anonymous

For more information on how to make a major donation, including one of life insurance or a transfer of stocks, please contact Director of Development Jane McMillan at 1-800-267-7837 or jane.mcmillan@queensu.ca

20 ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12

$50,000 - $99,999 Thomas Bain, Sc’65 Barrick Gold Corporation Bell Canada H G Bertram Foundation Robert Chad, Sc’82 & Laura Chad ConeTec Investigations Ltd. Estate of William A Davis, Sc’62 Ivana Farrar Eugene Gierczak, Sc’74 Hewlett-Packard (Canada) Ltd. ITLMA Foundation Colin Jardine, Sc’56 Peter Kenny, Sc’55 The Kenny Family Foundation Macquarie Private Wealth Inc. Murray Matangi Kenneth McKibbin, Sc’38 David Parkes, Sc’68 Robert Peterson, Sc’59, MSc’61 & Yvonne Peterson Estate of Robert Pound Estate of Lillian Preston Bryan Rapson, Sc’47, MSc’49 Estate of Albert Ruddell, Sc’52 Andrew Shaughnessy, Sc’87, LLB’91 Kim Sturgess, Sc’77 Tenaris Global Services (Canada) Inc. Anonymous Anonymous

$25,000 - $49,999

Estate of Gordon Asselstine, Sc’48 John Billingsley, Sc’48, MSc’52 Bruce Chernoff, Sc’87 Robert Cole, Sc’46 Leonard Cunningham, Sc’43 Stephen Dryden, Sc’79 & Patricia Dryden Gerald Dyer, Sc’52, DSc’94 Estate of Frederick Dyke, Sc’41 Gunnar Eggertson, Sc’87 & Catherine Eggertson, Sc’87 James Eickmeier, Sc’59 Estate of Lorne Elder, Sc’42 John Evert Kevin Hall, Sc’79, MSc’81 Estate of John Johnston, Sc’41 Robert King, Sc’70, MSc’75 & Patricia King, BA’72 Carol F Lee John Lill, Sc’73 Monica Mainland, Sc’96 & Todd Fisher Manford Mallory, Sc’73, MBA’75 Bruce H Mitchell, Sc’68 Estate of Donald Munro, Sc’52 Carolyn Murray, Sc’76 & Gregory Murray, BCom’78 Nautilus Minerals Inc. James Nenniger, Sc’79, LLB’82 & Kimberly Nenniger, BCom’82 David Nicholson, Sc’62 Ontario Professional Engineers Anthony Petrina, Sc’59 & Gloria Petrina Gregory Piasetzki, LLB’80 Robert Quartermain, MSc’81 John Singlehurst, Sc’62 WB Family Foundation David Whiting, Sc’65 & Donna Whiting, BA’65 Anonymous

RBC Foundation

$500,000 - $1,000,000

Kinross Gold Corporation Shell Canada Limited

$100,000 - $250,000

Andrew Spriet, Sc’57 & Helen Spriet

$50,000 - $100,000

Estate of Lillian Preston Golder Associates Ltd. Kim Sturgess, Sc’77

$10,000 - $25,000 David E Jackson, Sc’55 & Elinor Jackson

Estate of James H Rattray, BA’10 Estate of Donald McGeachy, Sc’40 Bryan Rapson, Sc’47, MSc’49 Sheryl Pichler Peter Kenny, Sc’55 Robert Chad, Sc’82 & Laurel Chad Eugene Gierczak, Sc’74 H G Bertram Foundation Dr Murray Matangi & Robyn Matangi Bruce H Mitchell, Sc’68 Musk Foundation David Nicholson, Sc’62 James Noble, Sc’85 Dr Michael J O’Connor, Sc’68, PhD’76 Robert Peterson, Sc’59, MSc’61 & Yvonne Peterson Suncor Energy Inc. The Kenny Family Foundation Total E&P Canada Ltd. Martha van Berkel, Sc’00 Glenn Wilson, Sc’88 & Michele Wilson Anonymous

$5,000 - 9,999

Ontario Professional Engineers EnCana Corporation Read Gomm, Sc’83 Gerald Dyer, Sc’52, DSc’94 Professor William George Colborne, Sc’48, MSc’51 Class of AppSci 2011 Robert Crawford, Sc’70 Michael Purcell, Sc’75 & Catherine Purcell, BScH’78, BEd’85, Med’98 Karen Risto, Sc’97 & Jonathan Risto, BSc’98 Dr Bert Wasmund, Sc’61, MSc’63 Richard Wyman, Sc’78 Neal Pirie, Sc’84 Michael Birch, Sc’74 Thomas Bain, Sc’65 Allan Brayley, Sc’80 Donald Burns, Sc’53 Cameco Corporation John Evert Alevia Healey Dr John Higginson, Sc’62, MSc’64 Honda Canada Inc.

Imperial Oil Foundation ITLMA Foundation Carol F Lee Ronald D Lee Nancy Lever, Sc’78 Bruce Lounsbury, BSc’80 & Susan Lounsbury, Sc’82 Monica Mainland, Sc’96 & Todd Fisher Manford Mallory, Sc’73, MBA’75 Shelagh McAree, BCom’84 Karl Meade, Sc’85 & Celia Meade, BSc’86 Robert Pow, Sc’59 Provident Energy Trust Kathleen Reece, Sc’82 John Singlehurst, Sc’62 James Stirling, Sc’48, BEd’83 Anonymous Anonymous Anonymous

$2500 - $4999 Lloyd Secord, Sc’45 Andrew Hill, Sc’91 Colin Jardine, Sc’55 Douglas Sanderson, Sc’58 Shirley Abramsky Lindamayer Holdings Ltd. Donald MacDiarmid, Sc’82 Dr Howard Slack, Sc’47 Halsall Associates Ltd. Dr Thomas Fahidy, Sc’59, MSc’61 & Sharee Fahidy Dr Malcolm Wright, Sc’57, MSc’59 David Bellamy, Sc’79 C N Lund, Sc’47, MSc’49 & Jean Lund, BA’51 John Malysh, Sc’54 The Colleen A Griffin Charitable Foundation Inc. Dow Chemical Foundation Jeffrey Mackie, Sc’01 & Vanessa Mackie, BA’01 Major-General Alan Pickering, Sc’54 & Margaret Pickering, BA’51 Dr William Bawden, Sc’70 Haydn Matthews, Sc’70 & Ann Matthews, BA’70 Ernst & Young LLP Hatch Ltd. Richard Hinterhoeller, Sc’78 & Josephine Marks, BSc’78 Ingenium Group Inc. James Jarrell, Sc’82 Matrix Solutions Inc. Real Time Tools Inc. Tenaris Global Services (Canada) Inc. Donald Vanstone, Sc’51 Richard Ward, Sc’83 & Susan Ward, BA’83 Anonymous Anonymous Anonymous

Every effort has been made to ensure that this is a complete and accurate list. If there are errors and omissions, we apologize and ask that you contact the Advancement office to make any necessary corrections.

ANNUAL REPORT 2011/12 21


INSPIRING GREATNESS CAMPAIGN

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE

Beamish-Munro Hall, Queen’s Universtiy, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6

inspiring.engineering.queensu.ca

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Development Team Jane McMillan Director of Development jane.mcmillan@queensu.ca Extension 32160

Pat Smith Senior Development Officer pat.smith@queensu.ca Extension 79513

Heather McMartin Senior Development Officer heather.mcmartin@queensu.ca Direct Line 416-525-3923

Maura Doyle Development Coordinator maura.doyle@queensu.ca Extension 79533

Michelle Miatello Associate Director of Development michelle.miatello@queensu.ca Extension 75804

Donna Dwyre Senior Development Officer donna.dwyre@queensu.ca Extension 78212

Beth Wylie Development Officer beth.wylie@queensu.ca Extension 74594

Joanne Grills, Faculty Advancement Coordinator joanne.grills@queensu.ca Extension 75248

Contact us at 613.533.6000 or 1.800.267.7837

FEAS Annual Report 2011/2012  

The 2011/2012 Annual Report the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

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