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Educating Leaders for the st Century

THE FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE AT QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY

ANNUAL REPORT /

ANNUAL REPORT / I


CONTENTS

DEAN

1

MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN

2

ABOUT QUEEN’S ENGINEERING

Kimberly A. Woodhouse MANAGING EDITOR

Adam Walker WRITER

Nanci Corrigan

4

OUR PROGRAMS

Chemical Engineering, Engineering Chemistry

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Queen’s Marketing and Communications

Civil Engineering

CONTACT INFORMATION

Computer and Electrical Engineering

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Queen’s University Beamish-Munro Hall 45 Union Street Kingston, ON k7l 3n6 Tel 613.533.2055 Fax 613.533.6500 Email complete.engineer@queensu.ca

Mechanical and Materials Engineering Mining Engineering Engineering Physics Geological Engineering Mathematics and Engineering 7

RENOWNED SPIRIT, UNRIVALED EXCELLENCE: The Undergraduate Experience

COVER: Beamish-Munro Hall

10

THE FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING INNOVATION:

Research and Graduate Studies


ANNUAL REPORT:

Message from the Dean

W

elcome to our inaugural annual report. This has been a year of great opportunity and success for our Faculty, and it’s a pleasure to share our achievements with you. The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science has maintained a focus on evolving as our world changes around us. Our researchers are exploring new ways to respond to global problems while mentoring bright new minds. We continue to attract top-quality faculty and students who believe in our commitment to an unparalleled learning experience. In this report, you’ll read about some of the incredible research taking place within our labs – including new insights into solar technology, innovative nuclear storage design and novel methods for using stem cells for tissue regeneration. You’ll also learn about how we’re expanding our first-year project course to enhance learning and how new programing in areas such as biomedical engineering and applied sustainability are giving our students the skills they need to contribute to these growing fields of study and discovery. Our strategic and academic plans have been completed and provide the foundation for our way forward as we continue to promote leadership, enhance our distinctive learning experience and push the frontiers of engineering innovation. I hope that you will enjoy reading this report and welcome your comments. We’re proud of our Faculty – and we hope that you share in our pride and excitement as we continue to grow and thrive.

Kimberly A. Woodhouse, PhD, PEng, fcae, fbse Dean, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

ANNUAL REPORT / 


About Queen’s Engineering OUR VISION Educating leaders for the 21st century The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s builds on a tradition of spirit and loyalty to provide a distinctive learning experience at the frontiers of engineering innovation.

OUR MISSION We educate engineering students for leadership and citizenship in a global society through highquality, technically-rigorous engineering programs.

Queen’s Engineering and Applied Science is: • • •

demonstrating leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship within the curriculum enhancing a distinctive learning experience pushing the frontiers of engineering innovation The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts and Science, offers ten undergraduate engineering programs covering multiple disciplines found within the engineering profession:

• • • • • • • • • •

Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Mining Engineering Engineering Chemistry Engineering Physics Geological Engineering Mathematics and Engineering The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is organized along discipline lines, into five departments:

• • • • •

Chemical Engineering, Engineering Chemistry Civil Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering The Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining Engineering The Faculty offers a common first year with unconstrained discipline choice after first year – a feature unique to Queen’s that provides a strong foundation for our students, as well as the opportunity for students to explore their passion for engineering. Graduate study includes a number of MEng, MASc and PhD degrees within our programs. Graduate programs are designed to meet evolving needs for today’s engineer – for example, new programs include a Masters of Applied Sustainability and a Collaborative Masters in Biomedical Engineering.

 ANNUAL REPORT /


BY THE NUMBERS:

2010/11 OUR FACULTY Full-Time Faculty: 149.3 CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC Percentage of Female Faculty – 13%

OUR STUDENTS 2566 Full-Time Undergraduates CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 93 Part-Time Undergraduates CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 259 Full-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 26 Part-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 195 Full-Time PhD Candidates CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 12 Part-Time PhD Candidates CCCCCCCCCCCC

Origin

Gender 24.6% Female

Degrees Awarded 9.1% International

67 Masters 40 PhD

75.4% Male

90.9% Domestic

544 Undergraduate

ANNUAL REPORT / 


CIVIL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Kent Novakowski

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. James McLellan

Chemical Engineering – The Chemical Engineering program provides students with a versatile engineering experience based on fundamental chemical and biochemical engineering concepts, strengthening knowledge in chemistry and mathematics. In addition to the technical content of the program, students are introduced to business skills, engineering economics, communications, humanities and social sciences, and explore current issues, such as the impact of technology on society. Engineering Chemistry – More than a century old, this program is unique in Canada and offers a strong base in chemistry in combination with chemical, biochemical, environmental and/or materials engineering. Accredited by both the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board and the Canadian Society for Chemistry, the curriculum integrates a core of chemistry with a body of engineering to give students expertise in environmental improvement, in the design of processes and in the development of electronic and structural materials. 396 Full-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCC 16 Part-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 57 Full-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 2 Part-Time Masters Students CC 36 Full-Time PhD Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 2 Part-Time PhD Students CC 20.1 Faculty CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 133 Undergraduate Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 10 Master Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCC 12 PhD Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCC

B

 ANNUAL REPORT /

The Civil Engineering program provides students with a broad-spectrum education in structural design, geotechnical engineering, hydraulics, environmental engineering and water resources engineering. Research and learning focuses on the sustainability of both the natural and built environment, including advanced materials, infrastructure replacement, sustainable water supply and management, and environmental engineering in general. 377 Full-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 12 Part-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCC 39 Full-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 4 Part-Time Masters Students CCCC 45 Full-Time PhD Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCC 5 Part-Time PhD Students CCCCC 17 Faculty CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 101 Undergraduate Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 7 Master Degrees Awarded CCCCCCC 8 PhD Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCC


MECHANICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Michael Birk

Mechanical and materials engineering uses principles of engineering graphics, mathematics, materials, physics and economics to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, operate and maintain processes and devices. The program specializes in materials, biomechanical, aerospace, manufacturing, mechatronics, energy and fluid systems.

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Michael Greenspan

Our Electrical and Computer Engineering programs are based upon the fundamental physical principles that govern the flow of electricity, as well as the design methods that allow us to effectively harness those principles. The department specializes in a number of areas relevant to evolving needs in society, including biomedical engineering, signal processing, communications systems and networks, computer hardware and systems, electronics and photonics, mechatronics, power electronics and systems, robotics and control, and software engineering. 196 Full-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC C 22 Part-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 54 Full-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 3 Part-Time Masters Students CCC 57 Full-Time PhD Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 4 Part-Time PhD Students CCCC 25.2 Faculty CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 67 Undergraduate Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 18 Master Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 13 PhD Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCC

Many students choose not to specialize, but rather sample courses from a number of different fields to develop a wide breadth of knowledge. Hands-on design and teamwork are integral to the program, which includes opportunities to create anything from solar cells and robots to artificial joint prostheses. 505 Full-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 22 Part-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 67 Full-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 15 Part-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 41 Full-Time PhD Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CC 28.2 Faculty CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 128 Undergraduate Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCC 26 Master Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 6 PhD Degrees Awarded CCCCCC

B

B

ANNUAL REPORT / 


MINING ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Laeeque Daneshmend

From its inauguration in 1893, Mining Engineering at Queen’s

has held a significant position in the Canadian mineral

industry, and is currently the largest mining school in North

America and one of the largest in the world. Graduates are involved in all facets of the Canadian mineral industry and

can also be found in most major mining operations throughout the world. The Mining Department is also at the forefront in developing computer applications for engineering design and works in close contact with the mineral industry. The program consists of three major options: Mining, Mineral Processing and Mine Environment, and Mine-Mechanical. 115 Full-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 12 Part-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCC 24 Full-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 2 Part-Time Masters Students

CC 6 Full-Time PhD Students

CCCCCC 1 Part-Time PhD Student C 10.85 Faculty CCCCCCCCCCC 35 Undergraduate Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 6 Master Degrees Awarded CCCCCC 1 PhD Degree Awarded C

B

ENGINEERING PHYSICS DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. David Hanes

The Department of Physics offers excellent undergraduate programs in Physics and Engineering Physics, including the option to specialize in any of a number of areas, such as Astrophysics, Mathematical Physics, Chemical Physics, and Geological Science with Physics. The development of new devices and technologies often requires an understanding of the underlying physics at a

fundamental level. The Engineering Physics program provides students with this background through a challenging series of courses in modern physics and engineering. Students specialize in one of the following four options: Mechanical, Electrical, Materials or Computing. They receive the engineering training required to work in these fields and also the physics training required to prepare them for graduate work or work in a research laboratory. Approximately half of the graduates of the program pursue post-graduate degrees in Engineering or Physics. 158 Full-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CC 4 Part-Time Undergraduate Students CCCC 7 Full-Time Masters Students CCCCCCC 5 Full-Time PhD Students CCCCC 22 Faculty* CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 32 Undergraduate Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC  ANNUAL REPORT /

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Jean Hutchinson

Geological engineering is the practical application of principles, concepts and techniques of the geological sciences to provide sustainable solutions to human needs. Studies include resource exploitation and management; environmental and geotechnical design involving rock, soil and water interaction; groundwater protection and remediation; risk mitigation; and the non-destructive or geophysical investigation of the subsurface environment. Students are taught the skills required to meet the challenges of the future in mineral and energy exploration, geotechnical engineering, geo-environmental engineering and applied geophysics.

110 Full-Time Undergraduate Students

CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 2 Part-Time Undergraduate Students CC 10 Full-Time Masters Students CCCCCCCCCC 1 Full-Time PhD Student C 12.5 Faculty* CCCCCCCCCCCCC 26 Undergraduate Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

B

MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT HEAD Dr. Ram Murty

Modern communications, control, electrical, mechanical and mechatronic systems require sophisticated mathematical models and analysis. The Mathematics and Engineering program is developed for those who wish to understand the fundamentals that underpin so many of the models used in engineering.

This program specializes in systems and robotics, applied mechanics, and computing and communication, with graduates going on to work in a broad range of engineering careers. 65 Full-Time Undergraduate Students CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC 1 Part-Time Undergraduate Student C 1 Full-Time Masters Student C 4 Full-Time PhD Students CCCC 8 Faculty* CCCCCCCC 22 Undergraduate Degrees Awarded CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

* The faculty member head count represents the number of Professors who provide teaching instruction or research support to the engineering program, in addition to their duties for programs in the Faculty of Arts and Science.


RENOWNED SPIRIT, UNRIVALED EXCELLENCE:

The Undergraduate Experience

Learning in the real world Lectures and labs provide critical learning opportunities for future engineers, but there’s nothing like a real world experience to transform theory into action. The APSC 100 course, introduced in 1997 to develop students’ creativity and open-ended problem skills, provides that opportunity to every first-year student through a team design project. Now, an update to the course is providing valuable skills training for first year and beyond. Until 2010 the APSC 100 course, mandatory for all entering engineering students, consisted of two modules – one focusing on developing the ability to design an experiment and analyze uncertainties in measurement; the other a community service-based team design project designed to nurture creative problem solving. This past year, the course was re-designed to include a semester-long module on complex problem solving and modelling, with students exploring open-ended problems while learning the fundamentals of Matlab, a computer program that helps users perform complex numerical calculations and model design scenarios. Until now, Matlab has primarily been used by upper-year students.

Faculty members are now working on developing a sequence of engineering design and professional skill courses in all engineering programs. A new project-based faculty-wide course, APSC 200, ran for the first time in 2011/12, focusing on design methods and tools, project management, decision-making and creativity. The third year experience, scheduled to begin in 2012/2013, will focus on an open-ended design experience that allows students to use disciplinary design tools and knowledge developed in their second year. “The ability to solve a complex problem is the essence of engineering,” says Dr. Frank. “We believe that integrating skills learning with real-world experiences gives our students the strong foundation they need to become great problem solvers – and great engineers.”

Dr. Brian Frank, APSC 100’s course coordinator, says that the new module design provides the opportunity to expose students to a broader set of engineering tools and processes right from the very start of their education. “The goal is to teach students how to solve open-ended engineering problems using the same approaches and tools that professional engineers use,” he says. “The new module encourages students to apply creative, new approaches to problem solving, while teaching them how to use the tools they’ll need to augment those capabilities.”

ANNUAL REPORT / 


Brian Frank receives teaching award

Student team presents paper at CDIO Academy in Copenhagen Engineering students at Queen’s are used to venturing beyond the classroom walls to further their educational knowledge with experiences in the real-world. This past June, a group of second year students took a field trip beyond our country’s borders as well, travelling to the internationally acclaimed CDIO Academy in Copenhagen to present their idea for improving traffic congestion in large cities. The CDIO initiative (CDIO stands for Conceive – Design – Implement – Operate) is a global collaborative of engineering schools and funders who work together to improve engineering education with a context focused on engineering practice. Students use engineering fundamentals to develop real products and systems in their courses. This year, students had the opportunity to submit their ideas to the CDIO Academy, and the top 25 groups were invited to participate in a camp at the annual CDIO Conference. The successful Queen’s team, comprised of Charles Allan, Eric Deys, Nick Kozmin, Kevin MacDonald and Mitch Purcell, submitted an idea proposing a network of GPS devices that work in harmony to improve the flow of traffic in mega cities by combing 2-D and 3-D models of traffic to adjust lights. Along with meeting peers from around the world, the students had the opportunity to meet internationally renowned entrepreneurs, consultants and business managers who gave lectures and provided guidance for developing a business strategy to bring their idea to market.

Dr. Brian Frank, a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the DuPont Chair in Engineering Education Research and Development, was the 2011 winner of the Chancellor A. Charles Baillie Teaching Award. Established in 2003 through gifts from the Toronto Dominion Bank and Chancellor Baillie, the award recognizes undergraduate or graduate teaching that has had an outstanding influence on the quality of student learning at Queen’s University. It is bestowed annually for activities that lead to improved learning, including curriculum development, educational leadership, design and delivery of out-of-classroom educational experiences, or classroom teaching and supervision. Dr. Frank tries to provide a variety of experiences for students to develop, including in-class activities, team projects, and educational technology. He likes to begin his classes by sharing a concrete example, such as a current news item that relates to the day’s material, and posing a problem he can use as the context for developing new knowledge and skills in class. Dr. Frank received his BSc, MSc and PhD degrees in electrical engineering at Queen’s and worked as a consultant in both the private sector and at Royal Military College before joining Queen’s in 2002. As the DuPont Canada Chair in Engineering Education Research and Development, he has a mandate to teach and conduct research in order to facilitate a strategy of integrated learning across the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and to place Queen’s on the leading edge of engineering education.

After discussing their idea with peer groups, the Queen’s team decided to modify their idea into a system that uses a smartphone application to assist drivers in traffic by helping them adjust their driving habits based on traffic patterns and traffic lights along their route. The concept was greeted with great enthusiasm by camp participants and by sponsors, including IBM and Grundfos, an international manufacturing group with more than 80 companies in 55 countries. Team member Nick Kozmin says that while current patent holdings make the idea difficult to pursue at this time, he was thrilled to have the opportunity to work through the design process with guidance from global professionals. “This experience provided us with access to peers and business leaders who helped us further our design processes,” he says. “We hope it will also lead to employment and collaboration opportunities in the future.”

 ANNUAL REPORT /

Dr. Brian Frank


High tech without high cost Virtual Desktop saves time, money and the environment Technology is a costly yet critical component of today’s educational experience – and as it becomes more integrated into the curriculum, so does the requirement to keep it maintained and updated to meet the evolving needs of faculty, students and staff. At the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, the IT team is working to stay one step ahead of these needs by introducing new technology designed to provide a faster and more reliable computing experience while saving the department time, money and energy. The Virtual Desktop operates using devices called ’thin clients’, hardware that facilitates the connection between a computer in a lab to the department’s servers. Each time users log into the system, they receive an individual desktop based on their login information. When they log out, that desktop disappears. The benefits of thin client computing are extensive, given the cost of computer technology and the near-constant need to update both hardware and software. With the Virtual Desktop concept, all software updates occur through the main server rather than at individual machines. Thin client devices also tend to last over twice as long as a desktop, saving on replacement costs. Air conditioning and power use is decreased as the new hardware devices don’t require the same amount of cooling, nor do they draw as much energy as a standard desktop system.

Students in the Undergraduate Computing Facility in Dupuis Hall

Thin client technology has been rolled out in Electrical and Computer Engineering’s Bain Lab and Chemical Engineering labs as a test, but IT Director Stephen Hunt hopes to roll it out throughout the Faculty and eventually as a mobile solution for students looking to access lab technology without having to line up at the lab. “A Virtual Desktop environment across the Faculty can dramatically reduce costs and improve operational efficiencies,” he says. “It provides the technical support the students and faculty need to optimize their learning experience.”

ANNUAL REPORT / 


THE FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING INNOVATION:

Research and Graduate Studies Queen’s is one of Canada’s leading research-intensive universities – a place many of Canada’s most outstanding researchers call home. The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science currently has more than 400 highly motivated graduate students of exceptional ability from around the world. We are proud to be home to these world leading researchers. The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s University contributes to the Canadian engineering and scientific expertise through its own basic and applied research, and through collaborative work with others. RESEARCH CENTRES

• Centre for Energy and Power

CANADA RESEARCH CHAIRS TIER I

Name Praveen Jain Timothy McKenna Ian Moore Brant Peppley Ugo Piomelli Kerry Rowe David Thomson

ENGINEERING RESEARCH FUNDING

By Category – 2010 (000’s) Total = $22,885

Field of Research

Electrical and Computer Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Chemical Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering Civil Engineering Mathematics and Engineering

Telecom Power Electronics Polymer Reaction Engineering Infrastructure Engineering Fuel Cells Computational Turbulence Civil and Geoenvironmental Engineering Statistics and Signal Processing

CANADA RESEARCH CHAIRS  TIER II

Name Mark Daymond Aristides Docoslis Amir Fam Kevin Robbie Stephen Waldman

Department

Field of Research

Mechanical and Materials Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Engineering Physics Chemical Engineering, Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Nuclear Materials and Mechanics of Materials Colloids and Nanoscale Engineering Innovative and Retrofitted Structures Nanostructured Materials Tissue Engineering of Human Joints

QUEEN’S RESEARCH CHAIRS

Name John Cartledge Andrew Daugulis Randy Ellis

Electronics Research

• Fuel Cell Research Centre • GeoEngineering Centre • Human Mobility Research Centre • Sustainable Bioeconomy Centre

Department

Andrew Pollard

Department

Field of Research

Electrical and Computer Engineering Chemical Engineering School of Computing, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Fibre-Optic Communications Biochemical and Cell Culture Engineering New Technologies for Computer-Assisted Surgery Computational Fluid Dynamics

Department

Field of Research

Mechanical and Materials Engineering Mechanical and Materials Engineering Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining Mechanical and Materials Engineering Engineering and Applied Science

Nuclear Materials (Associate Chairholder) Nuclear Materials Minerals and Metals Processing Engineering Design Engineering

NSERC CHAIRS

Name Mark Daymond Rick Holt John Peacey David Strong

Contracts 5,846

NAMED CHAIRS AND PROFESSORSHIPS

NSERC 6,703

Name Tim Bryant

Other 10,336

Department

Field of Research

Mechanical and Materials Engineering

Donald and Joan McGeachy Chair in Biomedical Engineering Ontario Research Chair in Green Chemistry and Engineering Noranda-Falconbridge Chair in Mine Mechanical Engineering DuPont Chair in Engineering Education Research and Development Helen and Arthur Stollery Professor in Mining Engineering and Geological Engineering Chair in Mine Design, Government of Ontario Kinross Professor of Mining and Sustainability

Michael Cunningham Chemical Engineering Laeeque Daneshmend Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining

By Source – 2010 (000’s) Total = $22,885 Federal-NSERC 6,703 Federal-CRC 1,600 Federal-CFI 3,348 Federal-Other 1,480 Other 1,055 Industry 2,169 Provincial-MRI 4,960 Provincial-Other 1,570 NSERC – 2010 (000’s)

Total = $6,703 Discovery 3,010 Equipment 268 Create 303 Other 516 Chair 518 Collaborative 610 Strategic 1,478

 ANNUAL REPORT /

Brian Frank Anthony Hodge Steve McKinnon Vic Pakalnis

Mechanical and Materials Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining Geological Engineering Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining Robert M. Buchan Department of Mining

Research Funding – Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 $0

$5,000,000

B NSERC BOther B Contracts

$10,000,000

$15,000,000

$20,000,000

$25,000,000


Collaborative Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering In 2009, nine students entered a unique Collaborative Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering (Masters and PhD) designed to combine expertise in chemical, electrical and mechanical engineering to meet the demand for new global health technologies. Now in its third year, the program has produced its first graduates, young professionals who represent the future in improving the quality of life for an aging population. The Collaborative Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering allows graduate students to access courses and supervisors in their respective departments, as well as courses in anatomy, cell biology and biochemistry, with the goal of generating innovative solutions and to nurture innovation in biomedical engineering discovery. Students work closely with university faculty, clinicians and industrial personnel. The research space includes laboratories within Queen’s University, Hotel Dieu Hospital and the Human Mobility Research Centre.

Collaborative Masters Program in Applied Sustainability The Collaborative Masters Program in Applied Sustainability accepted its first seven students in 2010. Building on our applied sustainability theme, the objective of the program is to expose students to the implementation of sustainable engineering solutions within the context of broader sustainability theory. To do this properly, engineering students must advance their technical education while gaining insights into how public policy affects the success of engineering solutions to multidisciplinary sustainability problems. This collaborative program features faculty members from Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Mechanical and Materials Engineering, and Mining Engineering. The School of Policy Studies is also contributing courses and faculty members to co-supervise students.

Along with educating students for careers in biomedical research and academia, the program offers valuable training for roles in the biomedical technology industry, particularly within research and development. Specialties within the program mirror that of current biomedical research at Queen’s, including controlled drug delivery systems, orthopedics, biomaterials and prosthetic development, as well as biosignal processing. The work is particularly important given that seniors, who often suffer from illnesses such as vascular disease, myocardial and peripheral ischemia, macular edema, glaucoma, osteoporosis, hip injuries and arthritis, currently make up the fastest-growing age group in Canada. Dr. Steve Waldman, an Associate Professor with the Mechanical and Materials and Chemical Engineering departments and the Canada Research Chair in Tissue Engineering of Synovial Joints, says that the value of the program stems from this integrated, hands-on approach to learning. “Our students are involved from bench to bedside,” he says. “This program puts them at the forefront of discovery for biomedical tools and devices that will improve the quality of life for Canadians at every stage in life.”

Dr. Steve Waldman

ANNUAL REPORT / 


Dr. Tim Bryant named the inaugural Donald and Joan McGeachy Chair in Biomedical Engineering The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science is proud to announce that Dr. Timothy Bryant, a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, has been awarded the Donald and Joan McGeachy Chair in Biomedical Engineering. The Chair was established in honour of alumnus Donald McGeachy, Sc’40, and his wife Joan, long-time supporters of Queen’s. It is designed to enhance the biomedical discipline within the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science and to contribute to the national and international growth of research at the frontiers of biomedical engineering. Dr. Bryant has spent his entire academic career at Queen’s – from undergraduate student to faculty member. For the past 12 years, he has been active in a broad range of projects in biomechanical design at the Human Mobility Research Centre, including work with a global research team that has been developing a prosthetic foot now being tested in many areas around the world. The new device costs a fraction of its conventional counterparts, which is good news for hundreds of thousands of people who have lost limbs to land mines in war-torn countries like El Salvador.

Michael Cunningham

awarded $1.25 M Chair in Green Chemistry and Engineering Dr. Michael Cunningham, a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, has been awarded one of two new Ontario Research Chairs in Green Chemistry and Engineering, receiving $1.25 million over 5 years. The award provides a valuable opportunity to nurture the next generation of scientists and engineers and to re-imagine manufacturing solutions for a cleaner, greener planet. Green chemistry and engineering focuses on the conservation of resources and the use of renewable and non-toxic materials in product development and manufacturing processes. Cunningham’s research within the field is both highly collaborative and diverse, with projects that include both the minimization of solvents and chemicals in production and their complete elimination through alternative processes. Much in the way that doctors pledge to ’do no harm’, Cunningham and his colleagues are working to prevent harm by changing the way polymeric materials are manufactured – compounds that are used to create everything from televisions to tires. “Researchers in green chemistry and engineering are guided by the 12 principles developed by John C. Warner, considered one of the founders of this field,” says Cunningham. “He believes that it is better to prevent waste than to treat it or clean it up after it is formed. Much of my work involves finding ways to do this.” The award provides Cunningham with the opportunity to collaborate extensively – and to include both undergraduate and graduate students in his work. His research has also attracted international attention, boosting Canada’s reputation as a leader in manufacturing new materials with intellectual capital. “Green chemistry is a young field, and there’s still so much to discover,” Cunningham says. “Each day brings new ideas that need to be propelled from speculation to potential discovery. At Queen’s, we’re working together to make that happen.”

Dr. Tim Bryant

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Kerry Rowe – Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering Dr. Kerry Rowe was one of eleven Queen’s researchers to receive Canada Research Chairs funding in 2010. As a Tier 1 Chair in Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering,

the funding allows Dr. Rowe to continue his important work developing improved methods for protecting groundwater and surface water from contamination and reducing the environmental impact of construction, especially near environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands. Educated at the University of Sydney, Australia, Dr. Rowe is an award-winning and internationally-recognized scholar in geotechnical engineering, with research and consulting expertise in geotechnical, geosynthetic, hydrogeologic, landfill and geoenvironmental engineering. His research covers a wide range of topics including developing improved methods of protecting groundwater and surface water from contamination due to landfills, mineral processing in the field, and mine wastes. Another aspect of his work examines improving methods for building embankments on soft soils found in many parts of Canada. He also specializes in examining and extending the lives of different engineered liner systems.

Dr. Rowe is the lead author of the book Barrier Systems for Waste Disposal Facilities, editor of the Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering Handbook for Kluwer Academic Publishers, and has more than 400 publications in refereed journals, conferences and books. His research and teaching has been recognized by a number of awards, including, most recently, the Killam Prize and Legget Medal. Dr. Rowe has been elected a fellow of The Royal Society of Canada, The Canadian Academy of Engineering, Engineering Institute of Canada, Australian Institution of Engineers, Canadian Society for Civil Engineering and the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Turning a foe into a friend – Dr. Lauren Flynn’s amazing work with stem cells Most of us consider fat cells to be public enemy number

one – they’re easy to gain, hard to lose and the cause of

much angst during bikini season. But Dr. Lauren Flynn, a

professor and researcher with the Department of Chemical

Engineering, has managed to redeem this most reviled part

of our bodies. She’s developed novel methods for using stem cells from fat tissue and made significant medical strides in regenerating tissue and repairing damage from burns, injuries – and even heart attacks. Flynn, who has been with Queen’s since 2007, focuses her talents in the areas of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and adipose-derived stem cell research. Crossappointed to the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, she is investigating innovative methods for developing a deeper understanding of how cells respond, with a goal to use this knowledge to regenerate tissue for those with

injuries, disease or degenerating bones.

Her work with adipose-derived stem cells – a population of cells found in fat – involves stimulating them to transform into more useful cells, such as muscle, bone and even cartilage. They can then be used to re-grow skin tissue for burn victims, help repair aging hips, or even repair the effects of a major heart attack. One area of particular interest to Flynn is the application of stem cells for reconstruction following breast cancer. The advantages of using adipose-derived stem cells are many. “These cells have an immuno-privileged status that facilitates their use between donors,” says Flynn. “As well, most patients are willing and able to donate samples using minimally invasive techniques.” Flynn is now trying to understand the difference in the stem cells from different parts of the body. These cells can also be used to repair the heart. “We’ve learned that stem cells mobilize when there’s an injury to the body,” says Flynn, “and they play an important role in supporting blood vessel re-formation. We can use that mobilization to direct implanted stem cells to repair damage after a heart attack – it’s like using a smart drug, only we’re using the body’s own natural resources instead.”

Dr. Lauren Flynn

For an aging population, Flynn’s research is both timely and significant. By storing fat cells for treatment – material that is currently considered to be ’medical waste’ – scientists can potentially develop a stem cell bank to treat the many issues associated with aging, including hip replacements, mobility issues and overall quality of life. For Flynn, this is an important component of her discovery. “Research should drive innovation,” she says. “It’s my hope – and goal – that this work will provide the knowledge we need to provide the quality of life that all of us – no matter what age – deserve to have.”

ANNUAL REPORT / 


Dr. Leon Boegman – Making waves The Great Lakes contain 20 percent of the world’s fresh surface water, and yet they are under constant threat from pollution, excessive nutrient loads, invasive species, declining levels and climate change. Queen’s researcher Dr. Leon Boegman is working to better manage these threats and protect the Lakes’ valuable resources by studying how currents and waves can impact their health and well-being. Dr. Boegman, who was recently awarded an Early Researcher Award from the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation for his work, focuses on hydrodynamic processes in lakes – currents, waves and turbulent mixing of the water and their effect on lake health. Lab experiments are conducted in small tanks and flumes, but field data (such as temperatures, oxygen, algae, currents and sediment concentration) are also collected for use in virtual lake models that use computers to solve mathematical equations that govern fluid flow. “The Great Lakes provide drinking water for 20 million people, allow for recreation and shipping, and support an $8 billion annual fishing industry,” says Dr. Boegman. “They are a critical resource.” Dr. Boegman’s simulations include work in a number of important areas. An experiment examining the flow of wastewater and industrial effluents in Lake Ontario relative to the location of drinking water intakes reveals potential safety issues for communities. Other simulations will help scientists better understand why a 10,000 square kilometre oxygendepleted ’dead zone’ forms in Lake Erie every year and why the fish stocks in the Great Lakes vary throughout the year. Much of Dr. Boegman’s work also involves developing the tools necessary to perform these experiments. This includes instrument development, data processing innovation, computer model development and fundamental research on describing fluid flow, tools that could be used around the world to assess and better understand lake health. The overall objective is to collaborate with biologists and chemists to better manage lake resources for the benefit of all. “Our Great Lakes are more than a source of drinking water,” he says. “They support economies, facilitate travel and are home to many valuable species. It’s vital that we understand how to manage them – today and for the future.”

Queen’s researchers on the Great Lakes

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Mark Diederichs – Digging deep for nuclear solutions The use of nuclear energy products continues to generate controversy for nations around the world because of the dangers associated with its use and because of concerns over its disposal. At Queen’s, professor Dr. Mark Diederichs and his team are working with international colleagues to address these issues by using geological research and expertise to design underground storage facilities that provide the long-term stability required to manage this valuable yet potentially hazardous material. Dr. Diederichs, a professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering and most recently the winner of the Queen’s Chancellor’s Award, is involved in a number of research projects, including deep and shallow tunnelling in hard and soft rock, ground hazards for railways, underground excavation and support design, mine geo-risk, and rockmass characterization for engineering analysis. Currently, his expertise is focused on the challenge of underground nuclear waste storage. The construction of safe nuclear waste storage facilities requires a great deal of planning and knowledge of rock behavior. “There is little doubt that the requirements placed on the design of a geological repository for nuclear waste far exceed the traditional design expectations for underground civil or mining projects,” says Dr. Diederichs. “We will need to be able to store some waste for millions of years – that requires significant study and analysis.” Many countries are currently at the research or predevelopment stages for underground waste management, with Sweden the closest to actually placing spent fuel underground for permanent storage. In Canada, Dr. Diederichs is working with the national Nuclear Waste Management Organization on planned construction of an intermediate level facility near Kincardine – one that could handle items such as tools or machines but not high-level waste such as spent fuel. Dr. Diederichs notes that it’s vital for designers to be able to effectively predict and monitor the excavation damage zone around the storage facility to ensure rock stability over the longer term. “The long-term safety of such a facility, in part, relies on a complete understanding of the extent and impact of excavation induced damage within the host rock around both the main repository excavations and any access or service shafts,” he says. “That requires the application of geological principles integrated with advanced rock mechanics and state-of-the-art fracture and simulation tools.” The Queen’s research team also includes PhD and MSc students who are working with the University of Alberta to define, simulate and improve impact assessment of the damage zone around excavations, including shafts and caverns for nuclear waste storage. The group receives research funding from NSERC as well as from the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO). Together, these groups and organizations are building a strong knowledge base and engineering capabilities to help us optimize our safe use of this energy source – both for today and for the future.


New gait lab aims to keep people moving

Dr. Il-Yong Kim Designing a better world You may not see any connection between knee joints and cars, but Dr. Il-Yong Kim, a Materials and Mechanical Engineering faculty member finds a very common thread through the lens of computational modelling and design optimization - tools that can address global issues ranging from human health to automotive design. Dr. Kim, who has been with Queen’s since 2004, is using theoretical and computational modelling to develop virtual designs for both the biomedical and automotive industries, with the goal of finding effective and less expensive designs for artificial joints and emission-free cars. He recently earned an Early Researcher Award from the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation to allow him to further pursue his work in these two emerging fields. “As a researcher, I am interested in using computational modelling and optimization theories to solve real-world problems,” he says. “Biomedical mechanics and automotive design are two areas that can really benefit from these methods.” The design process is typically long and expensive, and prototypes can take a long time to develop and require significant investment. Computational modelling and optimization allows researchers to both develop and test virtual designs quickly and inexpensively, allowing for a shorter design cycle that may integrate components from many designs to create an optimal solution that’s cost effective, well-designed and faster to market. Dr. Kim’s work focuses on using computer modelling to optimize designs for zero emission automobiles, as well as the design of artificial joints. He notes that both fields can benefit from modelling tools. “We need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and we need to address the needs of an aging population,” he says. “Computational modelling and optimization can help us do this.”

One out of every three Canadians will be significantly affected by musculoskeletal disease during his or her lifetime. Today, an estimated 20,000 Canadians are waiting for knee or hip replacement surgery, and many others are living without the option of surgery. A new gait lab, part of the Human Mobility Research Centre, will help researchers change those statistics by better understanding, diagnosing and treating musculoskeletal disorders and keep Canadians moving and active at every stage of life. Located in Hotel Dieu Hospital, the Human Motion Performance Laboratory offers significant research opportunities for the Human Mobility Research Centre, a multidisciplinary group of clinician-scientists, basic scientists and engineers interested in the mechanisms of musculoskeletal diseases and disorders. The 3,000 square foot lab features leading edge technology, including floor sensors to measure joint load and a motion capture system that allows researchers to review and analyze motions. A video fluoroscopy unit – a type of high speed x-ray – provides accurate joint motion data to allow for a full analysis of a condition. “This is truly a world-class facility,” says Dr. Kevin Deluzio, the lab’s principal investigator and an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. “It’s also a valuable hub for integrated knowledge translation in medicine, engineering, health sciences and information technology.” This multidisciplinary approach allows researchers to collaborate more effectively – both across the university and around the world. The lab will not act as a clinic, however researchers will recruit study participants from the specialized orthopedics clinics located nearby in the hospital. In return, the research will help to improve patient care through the development of new and improved treatments. Dr. Deluzio notes that the need for this type of facility has never been greater. “We have an aging population with a growing need for orthopedic care,” he says. “It’s critical that we learn more about how to treat conditions such as osteoporosis, arthritis and knee and hip injuries to keep Canadians healthy and active as they age.”

His enthusiasm and knowledge has had an impact on his students as well. Recently, two of his graduate students won first prize at a national automotive conference, the AUTO21 Annual Meeting, for their work in improving the design of batteries for electric and hybrid cars. “Computational modelling can make a real difference in developing effective, efficient and safe solutions to address so many of our world’s needs,” says Dr. Kim. “These tools will position us as leaders in innovative design and global development.”

Dr. Il-Yong Kim

ANNUAL REPORT / 


A bright SPARQ in the future of solar energy A breakthrough solar photovoltaic technology developed at Queen’s University is providing invaluable opportunities for students to gain first-hand experience participating in the evolution of a start-up company – one that is poised to have a major impact on the future of solar energy technology. SPARQ Systems Inc. was developed through research

conducted at the university’s Centre for Energy and Power Electronics Research (ePOWER) and is the brainchild of Dr. Praveen Jain, Canada Research Chair in Power Electronics at Queen’s, and Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The company’s technology, a compact solar microinverter, enables more reliable, efficient power generation from solar PV systems.

Graduate student Jon Mash says that being a member of the SPARQ team has been an unforgettable experience. “Being part of the process of preparing the microinverter for launch, and helping to market it at Intersolar, showed me just how complex, unpredictable and competitive the commercialization process can be,” the Master’s candidate in Electrical Engineering says. “It was thrilling and extremely rewarding to see firsthand all the pieces of this process come together.” In addition to the approximately 20 graduate students who have helped to advance the SPARQ product to market, the company also had three undergraduates working throughout the summer on a range of projects. Ryan Poling worked alongside senior engineers to build and test prototypes, run simulations and help develop smartphone applications for the inverter. “At SPARQ, I experienced first­ hand how inventions and ideas become products,” he says. “I also learned about the many details involved in operating and managing a start-up company. It was great to work in a team environment with such talented co-workers.”

Microinverters are the heart of solar installations, converting direct current, harvested by the panel, into alternating current compatible with the electric utility grid. The product’s design eliminates unreliable components, such as electrolytic capacitors, which increases the lifespan of the microinverters threefold, giving homeowners at least 25 years of worry-free performance. The microinverter also produces more alternating current (AC) power from PV panels for longer periods under lower light and partial shading conditions, making them especially well-suited for urban installations. The technology was publicly launched in San Francisco at Intersolar, North America’s largest solar conference and trade show, and the company has now partnered with SanminaSCI of San Jose, CA, a leading manufacturer of electronic and mechanical products, to produce microinverters and communications hubs for the global consumer market. “For students – both at the graduate and undergraduate levels – SPARQ offers an unrivaled opportunity to witness research in action”, says Dr. Jain. “They are able to develop broader industry-relevant training than is often the case in academic research.”

Dr. Jain working with his graduate students

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Fuel Cell Research Centre – Powering up for a more sustainable future New project offers opportunities to develop new energy systems A new project designed to manage the variability of solar and wind power generation will help Canadians use this source of energy more effectively and offer new opportunities for technology development in this emerging field. The Energy Storage and Recovery Ontario (ESARO) project aims to create opportunities for Ontario to manufacture energy systems that complement renewable energy and to position the centre as a leader in the commercialization of these systems. The Queen’s-RMC Fuel Cell Research Centre (FCRC), Canada’s leading university-based research and development organization, is working in partnership with industry to advance the knowledge base for addressing the key technology challenges to the commercialization of fuel cell applications. The centre’s objective is to improve performance, reliability and durability while reducing the cost of fuel cell components and systems through innovations in materials, design and manufacturing processes. More than 40 researchers are affiliated with the centre, which has over 8,000 square feet of laboratory space.

The ESARO project, which is funded by the Ontario Research Fund – Research Excellence program, will develop technologies to help address the variability of solar and wind power generation to improve or complement these sources of energy. Researchers from Queen’s, Royal Military College (RMC), the University of Waterloo and the University of Western Ontario are participating in the project. Dr. Brant Peppley, the Canada Research Chair in Fuel Cells and a Professor in the Departments of Chemical and Mechanical Engineering, is the team leader, and he says that the project provides a valuable opportunity for the centre to position itself as a leader in new energy technologies. “Our project will allow society to use renewable energy more effectively and will create an opportunity for Ontario to manufacture energy systems that complement renewable energy,” he says. “These energy systems could then be exported to many countries in the world, increasing the global use of intermittent wind and solar energy.”

Dr. Peppley at the FCRC

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The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen’s University www.engineering.queensu.ca DEAN: Kimberly A. Woodhouse, B.Eng. (McGill), Ph.D. (McMaster), P.Eng.,

FCAE, FBSE, Professor of Chemical Engineering ASSOCIATE DEAN (ACADEMIC): Lynann Clapham, B.Met. (Wollongong), Ph.D. (Queen’s), P.Eng., Professor of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy ASSOCIATE DEAN (RESEARCH, GRADUATE STUDIES & EXTERNAL AFFAIRS):

Brian Surgenor, B.Sc. (Queen’s), M.Eng. (McMaster), Ph.D. (Queen’s), P.Eng., Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering THE FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE DEVELOPMENT TEAM

Contact us at 613.533.6000 or 1.800.267.7837 Jane McMillan, Director of Development jane.mcmillan@queensu.ca Extension 32160 Donna Dwyre, Sr. Development Officer donna.dwyre@queensu.ca Extension 78212 Pat Smith, Sr. Development Officer pat.smith@queensu.ca Extension 79531 Beth Wylie, Development Officer beth.wylie@queensu.ca Extension 74594

Joanne Grills, Faculty Advancement Coordinator grillsj@queensu.ca Extension 75248 Linda Pearson, Director of Development, Gift Planning linda.pearson@queensu.ca Extension 77196

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11-0296 Queen’s Marketing and Communications

Penny Bagnell, Development Coordinator penny.bagnell@queensu.ca Extension 79533

FEAS Annual Report 2010/2011  

The 2010/2011 Annual Report for the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

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