Issuu on Google+


Words from the EIC

s

At the AMS Fall Referendum, the QCP got 45% of the students vote ‘Yes’ for the magazine, short of 5% to receive funding from the University. This news came to me as a disappointment at first; the result did not reflect all the effort we had exerted. However, we need to go beyond disappointment. What we gained through the process of going to the referendum is greater than what we could have ever imagined: dedication from the QCP team, encouragement from Queen’s alumni, and help from fellow students. Thanks for all your support. The QCP will move on; see you at the next referendum. Yue Editorial Room

DEC 2010

Executive Director James C. Co-Editor-in-Chief Helen Z./Yue M. Chinese Editor Rachel Z./Jenny C./Suzanne L. English Editor Diana M./Dingchao Z./Hennie W. Translator Jessica C./Nash Z./Nelson Y. Staff Writer Jenn D./Shiny X./Amber G. Rachael Y./Yuchen W./Tiffany Y. Production Director Ying Z.

P4 2010 Fall News Flash Author: Jenny Chen

Editorials/Opinions

P6 Racism in Canada

P8 Face It

Author: Michael Zhang

Campus News

P9 Campus News

Author: Diana Ma

Arts & Entertainment

P10 The Getaway: Luxembourg

Author: Tracy Zhang

Graphics & Layout Designer Alice Z./Peter Z./Yan Z./Yuki W./Yang W./Yang Z. Amber G.

Culture

Communications & Sponsorship Coordinator Sarah Y./Rachel W./Jia W. Catrina Z

P14 Unveiling the Meanings Behind Chinese Characters

Webmaster Oscar C./Jing G.

Copyright & Disclaimer The Queen’s Chinese Press, formerly The Empress, founded in 1994, is published under the Alma Mater Society of Queen’s University Incorporated, Kingston. Editorial opinions expressed in the Queen’s Chinese Press are the sole responsibility of the QCP’s editorial board, and are not necessarily those of the University, the AMS or their officers. Contents ©2010 by the Queen’s Chinese Press. All rights are reserved. No part of this publication and the website may be duplicated without the permission of the QCP. Contributions from all are welcome. The QCP reserves the right to edit all submissions.

World Events

Website www.queenschinesepress.com E-mail qcp.eic@gmail.com

P12 Learning Chinese, filling the gap?

Author: Grégoire Legault

Author: Helen Zhang

Life

P16 Looking Back

P17 The Age of Machine

Author: Wendy A. Reid Author: Annabelle Wu


World Events

World Events

November 2, 2010. Millions of Americans casted ballots in the United States Midterm Election which is expected to shake the political landscape in Washington, D.C., and across the US. Voters decided on all 435 seats in the House of Representatives, 37 of the 100 Senate seats, and governors of 37 states. Although President Obama and his Democratic Party gained power on promises of hope and change, many Americans are discouraged by high unemployment rate and the struggling economy. As expected, Republicans received an uptick in seats, gaining six additional Senate seats and 60 House seats. Republicans were able to retake control of House of Representatives after two years of controlling neither the chamber nor White House. November 4, 2010. A young Asian man successfully boarded a plane wearing the disguise and presenting a U.S. passport of a Caucasian man born in 1955. The Hong Kong authorities over the weekend identified the man as coming from mainland China. Although his disguise managed to pass the inspection, his “young hands” brought attention to Air Canada security personnel. The traveler has requested asylum, and an immigration hearing is expected this week in Canada for his appeal, possibly as early as Monday. This case has the governments in Hong Kong and in Canada scrambling to review their security procedures at airports and places airlines under scrutiny for their passenger screening procedures. November 5, 2010. According to “Open Doors,” the Institute of International Education’s annual report, the number of Chinese students studying in the United States surged 30 percent in the 2009-10 academic year, which makes China the top country of origin for international students for the first time. It is said that a record high of 690,923 international students came to the United States last year; nearly 128,000 of them, or more than 18 percent, from China. This figure surpassed India’s, which in recent years had been in the top spot.

November 12, 2010. NASA has announced that astronomers at Harvard University discovered a black hole born  thirty years ago through X-ray   “Chandra” telescope. Observations from Chandra and other X-ray telescopes have established the existence of a powerful source of X-ray remained stable from 1995 to 2007, suggesting it to be a black hole powered by supernova remnant or from another nearby star; it would be the closest singularity ever detected to date. November 15, 2010. S high-rise apartment building undergoing construction in Shanghai was set on fire. According to Xinhua News, until the morning of the 16th, the incident has caused the death of 53 people and injured at least 90 other. This is one of the deadliest fires in Shanghai. The Chinese authorities detained four suspects after determining that unlicensed welders may have been responsible for the fire.

The Nobel Prize presentation in Oslo next month will most likely be postponed because China is not allowing the dissident Liu Xiaobo or his family to attend. The Chinese government has come up with a less magnanimous approach to the Norwegian Nobel Committee’s decision to give the peace prize to Mr. Liu, 54, who is serving an 11-year sentence for subversion. Mr. Liu’s wife, Liu Xia, has been held incommunicado since news of the award broke last month, and the government has been waging an offensive to rebrand the prize as a Western ploy to undermine the Chinese Communist Party’s hold on power.

November 11-12, 2010. Group of 20 Summit was held during November 11th – 12th in Seoul, South Korea. After weeks of bickering about economic policies, the Group was able to reach consensus on commitments and frameworks, upon which more discussion will be held early next year. The Group reached agreements on topics including global financial imbalances, exchange rates, financial market regulation, and International Monetary Fund (IMF) reforms. Washington has been unsuccessful in pursuing numeral targets for trade account surpluses and deficiencies; this topic will be discussed further in consult of IMF in first half of next year. The Group further agreed to move towards market-determined exchange rate and discourage competitive devaluation. The Toronto stock market closed sharply lower immediately following the close of the Summit, down 185.5 points, on worries that the Chinese government may have to tighten credit to tame inflation. Wall Street recorded a similar reaction. 4

Editor/Jenny Chen Graphics and Layout/Ying Zhou

5


Editorial/Opinions

6

Editor/Dingchao Zhang

Graphics and Layout/Alice ZhangYuki Wu

Editorial/Opinions

Editor/Diana Ma

Graphics and Layout/Ying Zhou

7


Editorial/Opinions

Campus News

Author: Diana Ma

8

Editor/Dingchao Zhang

Graphics and Layout/Alice ZhangYu

Editor/Diana Ma

Graphics and Layout/Yan Zhao

9


Arts & Entertainment

Arts & Entertainment

As much as I love the early morning journey to the beautiful Nice and the overnight train to the historical Berlin, the constant travelling really takes a toll on the body and mind after a while. Since I came to France a little over a month ago, I’ve taken jetting off on 4-day trips every 3 days. My friend categorizes my travelling lifestyle as “tourism on steroids”. Ok, point taken. To take a rest and focus more attention on work, I decided to forego a 4-day trip to the UK for a full weekend in Paris and a day trip to Luxembourg. With nothing more than train tickets, cash, and a book, I set off for Luxembourg alone on a cool Monday morning. The compact city centre made for a perfect day to people-watch, take a long lunch, and read along the water. Sitting at a cute coffee shop at town square with my coffee and pocket novel, I felt a little European. Tracy is currently on exchange in Europe. Find more @ http://www.tracyzhangphoto.wordpress.com

10

Editor/Diana Ma

Graphics and Layout/Ying Zhou

9 11


Culture

Culture

, 12

Editor/Hennie Wei Graphics and Layout/Yuki WuYuki Wu

13


Culture

14 Editor/Hennie Wei Graphics and Layout/Yuki WuYuki Wu

Culture

Editor/Diana Ma

Graphics and Layout/Ying Zhou

15


Life These days, it’s hard to walk outside and not see a cellphone, Blackberry, iPhone, iTouch, or a combination of the above. As someone who can’t go through a day without spending at least an hour on her laptop, I enjoy the fruits of technology as much as the next person, but I sometimes wonder if there’s such a thing as “going too far.” Have you ever walked into a restaurant and seen at least one Blackberry and/or a Nintendo DS at every table? It’s one of those gradual things you never really notice unless you actually look for it. I was shocked when I first realized this, and from then on, no matter where I went, I never failed to see the same. Quite frankly, it’s a little disconcerting. I’ll admit that I’m guilty of this practice myself. There have been times when, while eating out with friends or with my family, I feel my cellphone vibrate in my side pocket, and without even thinking about it, my fingers automatically begin to reach for it like a missile. Anxiety rushes over me, eager to see if it’s a new text message or a tweet from a friend. But let’s be honest, is it really that important to check your phone at that very moment? After all, your time with friends and family members is precious. It’s not going to last forever. An e-mail, on

Life the other hand, will still be there when you get back home. So, unless it’s actually a heavily coded message that contains the entire database of the government’s most vital secrets (cookies for those who get the reference!), there’s really no reason you can’t wait another hour to check it. You’re probably thinking, “Oh, I’ve heard this song and dance before. Blah blah blah, technology is evil so we should stop being so consumed by the virtual world and start living in the real world, blah blah blah…” but I think it’s something people need to hear again. Years ago, if I tried to sneak a book at the dinner table, I’d promptly be forced to relinquish it to my mother and won’t be able to see it again until the next day. My ten-year-old self thought that was extremely unfair, but looking back, it wasn’t as bad as I thought. Redwall would still be waiting for me, but an actual, meaningful conversation with my family wouldn’t be. Now, though, kids’ ignoring their parents at the dinner table is a frighteningly common occurrence. I’m not saying we should give up on technology entirely—because let’s face it, we probably won’t last a day—but I don’t think it’s too unreasonable to give up a little of our time to actually get to know someone in real life instead of through Facebook.

I opted for the ultimate package in the firstyear-making-sure-OSAP-owns-your-soul catalogue. I went abroad, specifically to Queen’s lovely Herstmonceux Castle in the south of England. Similar to the south of France, just with more sheep and less Riviera. The experience for the sake of education was well worth it. As an English Literature Major, any opportunity to visit Shakespeare’s grave or Oxford or the British Library is a treat and a half. The locals look at you funny when you squeal excitedly over, knowing your dorm is only a few miles away from the residence of Virginia Wolf, but overall, it’s well worth it. Outside of the educational side of my adventure, like my fellow students, I had a few cultural hurdles to get over. Simple, everyday things like, “You can buy vodka at the grocery store?!” or that they call Cinnamon Toast Crunch “Curiously Cinnamon,” which raises more philosophical questions than anyone ever needs about their breakfast cereal. Another benefit of studying in England was the ease of travel. Flights within Europe are ridiculously cheap as long as you don’t have many hold ups about checked luggage, free soda, safe landings, or leg room. I do recommend hostels too, despite what any horror films may have told you in the past. The language barrier is rarely as bad as one would think, though learning useful new words is always fun. (Sklep is Polish for “Store,” I think.)

16

Edito/Annabelle Wu

Graphics and Layout/Amber Gao

Another benefit to hostels aside from cheap rooms is a strange sense of community your average Best Western simply cannot provide. Maybe it’s sharing bunk beds with complete strangers (not the same bunk, but you get the idea; you never know what that guy below you is doing under the sheets), or the fun common rooms, or even the shared bathrooms. Even if it’s just one weekend, there’s much to be learned from your fellow travellers. While away, I got the chance to travel to Portugal. I’d never really had a desire to go before, but the flights were cheap and I just needed a weekend to myself. My fellow students looked at me as if I were mad as I recounted the adventures of a lone female in the wilds of Porto, Portugal. You know, since travelling alone is generally considered the appropriate beginning to any “Taken”-style horror flick. But since I made it back to write this article, it’s safe to say I never became a victim of the humantrafficking industry. I recommend the city of Porto if you ever get the chance. It’s quiet, oozes with character, and the people of the town welcome you with open, touristsare-still-okay-with-us arms. I got directions from burly men smoking cigarettes in alleyways, walked through gardens with peacocks, and ate the local specialty, a sandwich called a Francesinha (stuffed with three kinds of meat and covered in cheese and gravy, delicious!).

And yes, I drank the local beer.

Editor/Annabelle Wu

Graphics and Layout/Amber Gao 1 7



Queen's Chinese Press Issue 3 (English)