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Queen Mary, University of London Canada

www.qmul.ac.uk


Contents

Why choose Queen Mary, University of London

04

• Academic reputation • Graduate employment Entry requirements Popular Undergraduate Courses Popular Postgraduate Courses Law School

Fees and Scholarship Living expenses

06 07 08 09

28 29

• Part-time work Living at Queen Mary

30

• Location Accommodation Student Union, Sports and Societies

• English language requirements • English language support at Queen Mary

London

Professional Law Admission and Accreditation in Canada

12

Welfare, Support and Health Care

Undergraduate Courses popular with Canadian students

14

Professional Medical Admission and Accreditation in Canada

20

Canadian students at Queen Mary

32 33 34 35 35

• Student Profiles • Careers for international students Arrival and Welcome Programme

37

• Term dates Postgraduate Courses popular with Canadian students

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38

How to Apply • Finding out more and getting help

Research areas of interest to Canadian students

26

The information given in this brochure is correct at the time of going to press. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any statement in it and accepts no responsibility for the consequences of any such changes.

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Why choose Queen Mary, University of London?

Queen Mary is one of the largest colleges of the internationally recognised University of London. We offer first class teaching, research and resources in one of the world’s most dynamic cities. Queen Mary was founded in 1887 as the People's Palace and was admitted to the University of London in 1915. We currently have over 15,000 students, 20 per cent of whom are from overseas. This makes for a truly cosmopolitan environment that is welcoming to students from all over the world. Queen Mary's 2,800 staff deliver world class degree programmes and research across a wide range of subjects in Humanities, Social Sciences and Laws, in Medicine and Dentistry and in Science and Engineering.

Academic reputation As a member of the 1994 Group of researchfocused universities, we have made a strategic commitment to the highest quality of research, but also to the best possible educational, cultural and social experience for our students. Indeed, we believe that a vibrant research environment means that our students have access to the world's leading experts in their chosen subjects. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2008) we were ranked 13th in the UK by the Times Higher for the quality of our research. The Guardian placed Queen Mary even higher, 11th in the UK. Queen Mary also excelled in several subject groups, ranked in the top five for many, including:

• Drama, dance and performing arts (ranked 1st for Drama) • Dentistry (ranked 2nd) • English Language and Literature (ranked 2nd) • Epidemiology and public health (ranked 3rd) • Pre-clinical and human biological sciences (ranked 4th) • Health Services Research (ranked 4th) • Cancer studies (ranked 5th) Queen Mary was also ranked in the highest quartile for: • Law • Iberian Languages • History • Computer Science • Economics and Econometrics • Other hospital-based clinical subjects

• Linguistics (ranked 1st) • Geography (ranked 1st equal with Bristol, Cambridge, Durham and Oxford)

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Substantial achievements in a number of other extremely competitive subjects, including Russian, French, Materials,

Politics, Pure Maths and Electronic Engineering were also recorded. Business and Management, a new department not entered at all in the 2001 RAE, equalled the Cass Business School at City University in the Times Higher RAE ranking, coming within the top half of business schools in the UK. Queen Mary is also ranked in the top 200 universities in the world (THES World University Rankings 2008). The work of our academics regularly features in the news – both in the UK and internationally – www.qmul.ac.uk/news/

Graduate employment Degrees are awarded by the University of London and Queen Mary, and wherever you work in the world, you can be assured that employers will recognise its quality. The College has one of the UK’s best records for student employability and graduate starting salaries. (The Guardian). The College Careers Service offers a range of support services for all students, to help with choosing a career, job hunting, applications and interviews. (www.careers.qmul.ac.uk/index.shtml).


Location – the heart of London

Why choose a University of London college?

Queen Mary's locations span London's diverse districts. Two of our four campuses are in east London, in the Borough of Tower Hamlets between The City and Canary Wharf, a multicultural and socially diverse area that is one of the most rapidly developing parts of London. Our main residential campus – Mile End – has the advantage of being one of the closest universities to the site of the 2012 Olympic Games, and Whitechapel, a ten minute walk away, is home to part of Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Our other campuses are in central London: at Charterhouse Square and Barts Hospital, on the edge of the City of London, the key financial district; and at Lincoln's Inn Fields, in London's Legal District, the home of our Graduate School of Law and the worldfamous Centre for Commercial Law Studies.

• The University of London is one of the oldest, largest and most respected and famous universities in the UK • You will be able to take advantage of the University’s facilities and the expertise of the staff, knowledge and brainpower in the other 39 institutions in the federation • All Queen Mary students have access to the University of London amenities. This includes the world-famous Senate House

Library, which has more than two million titles and around 5,500 current periodical titles. • The University of London Union (ULU), is one of the UK’s largest students’ unions, and offers cafés, bars, venues and sports facilities • The federal University offers more advantages – there are unique degree programmes and research initiatives, which bring together the best academic staff and facilities across the University.

As the capital city, London holds an unrivalled position within the UK. The city is a net exporter of skills and talent to the rest of the country and is a net importer of young people from all regions. It is the most popular location for European headquarters of international businesses and globally competes with other international cities such as Paris, Tokyo and New York. This combined with its historical significance, political and legal importance, and its status as a renowned centre for the arts, ensures it remains one of the most attractive places to live, study and work in the UK.

“Queen Mary has caught the mood of regeneration in east London.” Sunday Times Good University Guide

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Entry requirements

Undergraduate Entry The majority of undergraduate degrees in the UK are three years in length and an increasing number of Canadian students are choosing Queen Mary for their first degree because of the opportunity to gain an international perspective and earn a world class qualification and at a competitive price. Undergraduate degrees also offer a specific subject focus allowing you to really explore your chosen subject area in detail. The following qualifications are suitable for entry into our undergraduate courses. International Baccalaureate Diploma Holders of the International Baccalaureate Diploma with a minimum of 30 points and marks of at least four or above in three higher level subjects will be considered for admission to first degree programmes. High School Diploma and Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations Students studying for Canadian High School or Secondary School Diplomas will be considered for entry to our undergraduate degree programmes. Whilst we understand that grading schemes in each province varies the following or equivalent applies: You must have achieved at least 5 Grade 12 courses with 75 per cent (Grade B) or higher. The High School Diploma will also be considered if accompanied by AP examinations; scores of four or above must be achieved in at least two subjects relevant to the degree applied for. University transfer students Students who have completed one year at University level are eligible to apply for first year entry at Queen Mary. Students who have completed at least two years of a Canadian degree and are in good academic standing may be considered for transfer into the second year of a Queen Mary undergraduate degree. No students are permitted to transfer into the third (i.e. final) year of the degree.

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Medicine and Dentistry applicants All applicants must have taken either the International Baccalaureate Program (IB) or the Advanced Placement Program (AP). AP - Students must have achieved an average of 85 per cent (A) or higher in their High School Diploma, including a minimum grade B in English. Students must also have taken at least 3 Advanced Placement (AP) examinations and achieve grades of 5, 5, 4 or higher. Two of these subjects must be Biology and Chemistry. IB - Students are required to achieve an overall score of 36 points with grades 665 at higher level. A score of 6 must be achieved in Chemistry or Biology at Higher Level. English should be offered at either Higher or Subsidiary level. Law applicants Please see page 9 for details of our Undergraduate Law programmes

Postgraduate Entry Postgraduate courses in the UK are typically one year in length; an attractive option when looking at cost. We accept undergraduate degrees from all around the world as suitable entry qualifications for postgraduate programmes and below are typical requirements if your degree was obtained in Canada. Postgraduate taught masters A Canadian Bachelor’s degree at a recognized/accredited Canadian institution, with a minimum GPA of 3.2 in an appropriate Major(s) would be considered for entry to taught Master’s programmes. As Canadian degrees are more broad based than UK degrees, close attention should be paid to the course units taken (and grades achieved) in the subject area(s) of the master’s course being applied for. Postgraduate research programmes A Canadian Master’s degree in an appropriate subject from a recognised institution with a GPA of 3.5 or above should be considered for entry to our research programmes.


Popular Undergraduate Courses

Many of the courses listed are offered with minors in another subject. For a full listing of all our courses including descriptions, please visit our website at: www.qmul.ac.uk/about/departments Aerospace Engineering (BEng) Aquatic Ecosystem Management Astronomy Astrophysics Audio Systems Engineering Avionics Biochemistry Biodiversity and Conservation Biology Biomaterials Biomedical Sciences Business Computing Business Management Chemistry with Biochemistry Chemistry with Forensic Science Communications Engineering Comparative Literature Computer Engineering Computer Science Crime Scene and Forensic Investigation Foundation Degree Dental Materials Dentistry Design and Innovation Digital Audio and Music System Engineering Drama Economics Electrical and Electronic Engineering Engineering English English Language and Linguistics English Literature and Linguistics Environmental Biology Environmental Geography Environmental Science Film Studies Genetics Genetics with Microbiology Geography Hispanic Studies

History Information and Communication Technologies International Relations Internet Computing Internet Engineering Journalism and Contemporary History Law Law (Senior Status) Law and Politics Marine and Freshwater Biology Materials Engineering in Medicine (MEng) Mathematics MB BS Medicine Mechanical Engineering (BEng) Modern Languages (French, German) Molecular Biology

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (MSci) Physics Politics Pure Mathematics Russian Sports Engineering Sustainable Design and Manufacture (BEng) Sustainable Energy Engineering (subject to approval) Telecommunications Engineering Theoretical Physics Zoology

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Natural Sciences

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Popular Postgraduate courses

You can find full details of our postgraduate courses on our website at: www.qmul.ac.uk/about/departments Advanced Methods in Computer Science Aerospace Engineering Anglo-German Cultural Relations Astronomy & Astrophysics Astrophysics Bioinformatics (interdisciplinary) Biomaterials (MSc) Biomedical Engineering (MSc) Cancer Therapeutics Certificate in Economics Certificate in Medical Terminology and Healthcare Administration Certificate of Intellectual Property Law Chemical Research Cities and Cultures Clinical Drug Development Clinical Microbiology Computer Science by Research Computing and Information Systems (generalist) Crusader Studies Dental Clinical Sciences Dental Materials Dental Public Health Digital Music Processing (P) (D) Digital Performance (interdisciplinary) Digital Signal Processing (P) (D) Diploma in International Mediation (Law) (Distance Learning) Economics Editing Lives and Letters 1500-1800 Endodontic Practice English Studies: English Literature English Studies: Writing and Society 17001820 English Studies: Writing in the Modern Age European Literature, Culture and Thought Experimental Oral Pathology (Oral Sciences)

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Film Studies Finance and Econometrics Finance and Economics Finance and Investment Forensic Medical Sciences Freshwater and Coastal Sciences Gastroenterology Genomic Medicine Geography Global and Comparative Politics Global and Comparative Politics (MRes) Globalisation and Development Graduate Diploma in Science and Engineering

Medical Electronics and Physics Medical Law and Ethics Medieval and Early Modern Religious Cultures in Europe Migration Migration (MRes) Migration and Law Molecular Pathology and Genomics MPhil and PhD Programme MSc by Research MSc in Equality and Diversity Management MSc in Mathematical Trading and Computational Finance Multimedia Systems Technology New Media Interaction

Healthcare Research Methods History History of Political Thought and Intellectual History Implant Dentistry Information Management Intelligent Imaging Systems Intelligent Web Technologies Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials International Commercial Arbitration (Distance Learning) International Human Resource Management and Employment Relations International Management with Finance International Management International Marketing International Relations Internet Signal Processing (P) (D) Language, Society and Change in Europe LLM LLM Diploma in Computer and Communications Law (Distance Learning) London Studies MA by Research in Law Management of Intellectual Property Marine Ecology and Environmental Management Materials Research Mathematical Trading and Computational Finance Mathematics Mathematics, Astronomy & Computing

Orthodontics (incorporated in MOrth Training) Paediatric Dentistry Performance Periodontology Physical Geography by Research Primary Care Prosthodontics Public Health Public Policy Public Policy (MRes) Renaissance and Early Modern Studies Russian Language and Culture Software Engineering Specialised Diplomas in Commercial Law Sport and Exercise Medicine Surgical Skills and Sciences Sustainable Energy Systems Transcultural Mental Healthcare Twentieth-Century History Vascular and Cellular Inflammation Wireless Networks (Networks Pathway (D)) Wireless Networks (Physical Pathway)


Law School

Queen Mary has one of the largest Law schools in the UK and an internationally renowned academic environment in which to study. Our excellence is reflected in the School achieving the highest possible rating of 5* in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. LLB In the UK you are not required to complete an undergraduate degree before going onto study Law. You can start a LLB programme straight after high-school. This can save you both time and money enabling you to potentially be practicing law earlier than your counterparts in Canada. We do not require the LSAT for entry onto the programme and please see our general entry requirements for further details. The normal LLB is a three-year course. It includes compulsory subjects in the first and second year: property, trusts, contract, criminal law, tort, constitutional and administrative law and EU law. These satisfy professional requirements as to foundations of legal knowledge and skills. From these strong foundations, you are in a good position to choose from a wide array of options for your second and third years. Second and third year choices range from traditional legal courses, such as family law, evidence, commercial law, company law and intellectual property law, to less traditional courses such as the law relating to ethnic minorities and the use of force in international law. In the final year you may replace a taught course with an option in legal research and writing, which involves supervised research in a topic of your choosing.

Year 2

• Media Law

• Law of the European Union (half-option)

• Origins of Western Legal Tradition

• Administrative Law (half-option)

• Public International Law

• Common Law II (Law of Torts)

• Revenue Law

• Law of Property II (Equity and Trusts)

• Sentencing and Penal Policy (Also available as part I and part II )

• Plus one full or two half-options from the list below Year 3 • Jurisprudence • Plus three options or a combination of full/half options totalling three. Options include: • Commercial and Consumer Law • Company Law • Comparative Law: Law of Obligations (also available as a half option) Comparative Law: Asian and African Legal Systems

• United Kingdom Human Rights • Use of Force in International Law Half-Options include: • Aspects of Modern European Law • Civil Rights in the USA • Democracy and Justice • Electronic Commerce • Internet Regulation • Law and Government

• Competition Law

• Law and Government in the USA

• Conflict of Laws

• Law and Literature: Shakespeare

• Constitutional Rights in the USA

• Law and Literature: Western Modernity

• Criminology (Also available as part I and part II)

• Law, Justice and Ethics

• Dissertation • European Comparative Law (Also available as part I and part II) • EU Justice and Home Affairs (Also available as part I and part II) • Economic Approach to Law • Ethnic Minorities and the Law • Family Law • Intellectual Property Law

Programme outline

• International Commercial Transactions

Year 1

• International Environmental Law

• Public Law I (Constitutional Law)

• International Human Rights

• Common Law I (Law of Contract)

• Labour Law

• Law of Property I (Land Law)

• Law and Globalisation: Companies, International Trade and Human Rights

• Criminal Law

• Social and Economic Law of the European Union (Also available as part I and part II )

• Law and Medical Ethics • Law and Social Crisis • Law of Evidence

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Law School (cont)

Senior Status LLB (2 years) Our Senior Status LLB is a two-year LLB programme for advanced students (those with a degree in another discipline). It is primarily designed for graduates who wish to obtain a professionally qualifying Law degree but will also be of interest to those non-law graduates who have in an interest in reading law as a second academic degree. You can find more detailed information of these programmes on our Law School website. A selection of typical entry requirements are as follows: • Carleton University B+ / 77 % • Dalhousie University – B+ / GPA 3.3 • McGill University – B+ / GPA 3.3 • McMaster University – B+ / 77%

Programme outline

• Law and Medical Ethics

Year 1

• Law and Social Crisis

• Public Law I (Constitutional Law)

• Law of Evidence

• Common Law I (Law of Contract)

• Media Law

• Common Law II (Law of Torts)

• Origins of Western Legal Tradition

• Law of Property I (Land Law)

• Public International Law

• Criminal Law

• Revenue Law

Year 2

• Sentencing and Penal Policy (Also available as part I and part II )

• Law of the European Union (half-option) • Administrative Law (half-option)

• Social and Economic Law of the European Union (Also available as part I and part II )

• Law of Property II (Equity and Trusts)

• United Kingdom Human Rights

• Plus two options or a combination of full/half options totalling two.

• Use of Force in International Law Half-Options include:

Options include:

• Aspects of Modern European Law

• Okanagan College (Validated by the University of British Colombia) – 76% / B+

• Commercial and Consumer Law

• Queens University B+ / 75%

• Company Law

• Simon Fraser University – B+ / GPA .33 • University of British Colombia – B+ / 76-79

• Comparative Law: Law of Obligations (also available as a half option) Comparative Law: Asian and African Legal Systems

• University of Calgary – B+ / GPA 3.3

• Competition Law

• Law and Government

• University of Guelph – B+ / 77%

• Conflict of Laws

• Law and Government in the USA

• University of Toronto – GPA 3.2

• Constitutional Rights in the USA

• Law and Literature: Shakespeare

• University of Victoria – GPA 5.5

• Criminology (Also available as part I and part II )

• Law and Literature: Western Modernity

• University of Waterloo B+ / 77% • University of Western Ontario – overall 80%

• Dissertation

• York University – B+ / 7 / 75-79% / Very Good

• European Comparative Law (Also available as part I and part II)

The above are GUIDELINES ONLY. We treat every application on a case by case basis and do appreciate that students may have a combination of qualifications, experience etc.

• EU Justice and Home Affairs (Also available as part I and part II) • Economic Approach to Law • Ethnic Minorities and the Law • Family Law • Intellectual Property Law • International Commercial Transactions • International Environmental Law • International Human Rights • Labour Law • Law and Globalisation: Companies, International Trade and Human Rights

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• Civil Rights in the USA • Democracy and Justice • Electronic Commerce • Internet Regulation

• Law, Justice and Ethics


Postgraduate Law programmes Queen Mary has a wide range of taught and research-based programmes including: • Certificate of Intellectual Property Law (Taught Courses) • Diploma in International Mediation (Law) (Distance Learning) • International Commercial Arbitration (Distance Learning) • LLM • LLM Diploma in Computer and Communications Law (Distance Learning)

English language support at Queen Mary All Queen Mary students can attend insessional English language and study skills courses. These programmes are free of charge. They are intended to support students during their studies and enable them to make the most of their time at university. Each course lasts for 10 weeks with lessons once a week for two hours. There are two main courses:

structuring ideas, revising and redrafting, formal and informal style, as well as the basic features of written English.

Academic Writing: this course develops the skill of writing long pieces of work on academic topics. It covers areas including: analysing questions, developing and

You can find out more about Queen Mary’s language support services online: www.learndev.qmul.ac.uk/elss/insessional

General English: this course focuses mainly on the skills of speaking and listening. It aims to improve overall fluency and confidence, as well as to working on grammar and pronunciation, Everyday English, slang and vocabulary will also be covered.

• MA by Research in Law • Management of Intellectual Property • Medical Law and Ethics • Migration and Law • MPhil and PhD Programme • Specialised Diplomas in Commercial Law • English and European Law Please see our Law school website for further details: www.law.qmul.ac.uk/ English Language Requirements The standard English language requirement for both undergraduate and postgraduate study is that you must achieve a score of IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 580 by the time you begin your course. Some courses, however, require a higher standard of English, notably undergraduate medicine and dentistry and postgraduate business and law. If you have an English language score but it does not meet the College’s requirements you should still apply. The College may ask you to either retake your English test, such as IELTS or TOEFL or attend the College’s pre-sessional English course for a period of either 4,8 or 12 weeks (instead of taking IELTS or TOEFL again). On satisfactory completion of your pre-sessional course you may enter into your undergraduate or postgraduate degree course directly. You can find more information on our pre-sessional English courses here: www.languageandlearning.qmul.ac.uk/elss/p resessional

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Professional Law Admission and Accreditation in Canada

To practise law in Canada there are certain steps that students must complete; students will need to obtain accreditation of their UK law degree. This is done through the National Committee on Accreditation (the ‘NCA’) of the Federation of Law Societies of Canada which issues a Certificate of Qualification (CTQ) to foreign law degree holders once they’ve met Canadian law degree accreditation criteria. The Federation of Law Societies of Canada is the national coordinating body for all the provincial law societies, (with the exception of Quebec).

Completion of Articles & Bar Admissions Law graduates will need to complete articles and a bar admission course in the province in which they intend to practise. To be eligible for articles and a bar admission course in any of the common law provinces (again excluding Quebec), A UK University law graduate will need to file a CTQ issued by the NCA. The certificate will state that you have education and training equivalent to that of a graduate from a Canadian law school. Equivalency consists of two years of university or university equivalent college credit or in Quebec a CEGEP diploma and three years of legal education consisting of a three year LLB degree or a two year accelerated LLB plus a one year LLM course. Application is made to the NCA upon completion of the LLB degree program at Queen Mary. The NCA will assess your academic record and will ascertain whether further examinations in Canadian law must be completed in order to obtain a Certificate of Equivalence. Students who choose to attain the two year LLB will normally be required to write seven challenge examinations to which along with the two year senior status LLB is deemed to

be equivalent to three years of legal education. Students who attain a “Combined” two year LLB plus one year LLM degree will be deemed to have completed three years of legal education and only be required to write challenge examinations in the number of courses they haven’t completed that are core to a Canadian law degree. This usually results in a requirement to write 2-3 challenge examinations but in theory a student who has demonstrated competency in all the Canadian courses is eligible for a CTQ upon submission of their qualifications. The assessment is usually based on students being able to demonstrate competency in ten core courses: 1. Contracts 2. Torts 3. Property 4. Evidence 5. Corporate Law 6. Professional Responsibility 7. Principles of Canadian Administrative Law 8. Canadian Constitutional Law 9. Foundations of Canadian Law 10. Canadian Criminal Law and Procedure.

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The first six common law subjects are generic and can theoretically be studied anywhere in the world. The latter four subjects will usually be studied upon return to Canada. The NCA requirement usually requires Queen Mary graduates from the two year senior status LLB degree program to write challenge examinations in the four core Canadian law courses numbered six through ten, plus three additional courses that are either selected from among the six generic courses they haven’t included in their legal studies or from among an optional list. Examinations in these Canadian law subjects can only be taken: post-graduation at the

completion of an evaluation of the degree by the NCA, either through self-study ‘challenge’ examinations administered by the NCA or through study at some Canadian law schools. The overwhelming majority of applicants choose the self-study challenge examination route. Once the student meets NCA requirements and is issued a CTQ they are in the same category as domestic a law graduate and are eligible to apply for bar admissions in the province they wish to practice in. Bar admission consists of a combination of an articled clerkship in which the “articled clerk” works under the supervision of a lawyer and a provincial bar admission course.

Staying in the UK to Practise Law In order to stay in the UK to practise law graduates will need to be in possession of a work visa. This is a separate issue and students are encouraged to check UK immigration guidelines during their course of study. Often students will need to apply for work and graduate visas before the course of study finishes. Canadian law graduates are automatically entitled to apply for bar admission in the UK and have the advantage of being eligible to practise law as a barrister or solicitor in the UK. Please note this information is intended as a brief guide only, information changes frequently, therefore we urge you to conduct your own research and contact the relevant legal organisations in your province. Useful Links Canada Law from Abroad (local representative who specialises in law); http://www.canadalawfromabroad.com Federation of Law Societies of Canada; www.flsc.ca/

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Undergraduate courses popular with Canadian students

BA History and Politics This degree is jointly taught (50:50) by the Departments of History and Politics, and reflects the close links between the two Departments and their subject areas. It provides an opportunity to understand the modern world by studying the evolution of political ideas and institutions alongside the historical development of the major powers.

Year 3

Programme outline

History options include:

Year 1

• History Research Dissertation

Core modules:

• Kennedy Years

• Introduction to Politics

• Cabinet and Premiership

• International Relations since 1914

• Concepts of Europe

• Political Analysis, either

• Politics in the Age of the Pits

• Comparative Government and Politics, or one other module

Politics options include:

Year 1

• Case Studies in Ethnic Conflict: Ireland and Northern Ireland

• chosen from another department, for example Modern Languages, History, Geography

• Making History

• Electoral Behaviour

Year 2

• Historical Writing for Undergraduates

• Theories of the Self

Core modules:

History options include: • Road from 1945: Britian Since World War II

• European Integration and the European Union as a Political System

• International Relations in a Globalising World

• Europe Since 1890

• The Politics of Economic Ideas

Programme outline

Politics options include: • Introduction to Politics • International Relations since 1914, or • Comparative Government and Politics Year 2 History options include: • Methods of History • Britain and Europe 1945-73 • From Napoleon to Berlusconi • Left in Western Europe • Victorian Political Tought Politics core module: • Modern Political Thought Politics options include: • British Political System • Latin American Politics • The Comparative Politics of the Middle East • Nations, States and Nationalisms • The Politics of Post-Communist Europe

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• French Politics

BA International Relations International Relations (IR) at Queen Mary covers the broad themes and theories associated with the study of IR, but also draws on the Department of Politics’ distinctive expertise in a number of areas. Students undertake the historical study of International Relations since 1914, through the Cold War, and into the current era of globalisation and the ‘war on terror’. They also examine Theories of International Relations, applying them and reflecting on their relevance through the use of both historical and contemporary examples.


Options include:

Options include:

• International Security in the Contemporary World

• Themes and Issues of the Comparative Politics of the Middle East

• Political Economy of Global Development • Modern Political Thought

• European Politics: National Identity and Ethnicity

• British Political System

• War in World Politics

• Latin American Politics

• Alternative Approaches to International Theory

• The Comparative Politics of the Middle East • Nations, States and Nationalisms • The Politics of Post-Communist Europe

• Globalisation: Issues and Debates • US Foreign Policy

• The Nation in the Global Age

• Case Studies in Ethnic Conflict: Ireland and Northern Ireland

• Debates in Contemporary Political Theory

• Electoral Behaviour

• Options from other departments

• Theories of the Self

Year 3

• European Integration and the European Union as a Political System

Core modules: • The International Relations Research Project

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Undergraduate courses popular with Canadian students (cont)

BSc Economics

Year 2 Core modules:

This degree offers professional training in economics and finance, providing an excellent basis for employment in the private or state sector and for further academic study. The first two years cover a core of macroeconomics, microeconomics and the quantitative techniques used in economic analysis and investigation. Final-year options enable you to apply this core knowledge to a variety of more specialised areas. For each module you will have a weekly two hour lecture followed by a one-hour class. Some of your work will be computerintensive, using networked terminals in the Department’s computer laboratories.

• Games and Strategies • Macroeconomics 2 • Statistical Methods in Economics 2 • Microeconomics 2 • Selected Topics in Macroeconomics • Introductory Econometrics Options include (two options from the following) • Statistical Methods in Economics 2 • Macroeconomics 2 • Games and Strategies • Economics of Social Issues

BSc Economics, Finance and Management This programme is of particular relevance if you are considering a career in business and/or finance. A range of choices enables you to develop your own areas of interest, ranging from the economic analysis of strategy, industrial organisation and new technologies, to the study of the contribution of sociology and politics to the complexity of business decisions. Programme outline Year 1 Core modules: • Principles of Economics

Programme outline

• Financial Markets and Institutions

Year 1

• Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1

• Money and Banking

Core modules:

• Spreadsheets and Data in Economics

• International Finance

• Principles of Economics

• Fundamentals of Management

• Corporate Finance

• World Economy

• Microeconomics 1

• Microeconomics 2

• Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1

• Macroeconomics 1

• Selected Topics in Macroeconomics

• Statistical Methods in Economics 1

• Spreadsheets and Data in Economics

Year 3

• Elements of Accounting

• Microeconomics 1

Options include (at least six options from the following)

Year 2

• Macroeconomics 1 • Statistical Methods in Economics 1 • Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 2

• Investment Analysis • Econometric Theory • Economics Project 1 (1 module) • Advanced Microeconomics • Health Economics • Development Economics • Applied Econometrics • Economics Project 1 (1 module) • Industrial Economics • Business Cycles • Environmental Economics • Public Economics • Labour Economics • Futures and Options

Core modules: • Games and Strategies • Business Law • Financial Markets and Institutions • Corporate Finance • Microeconomics 2 • Marketing • Managerial Accounting Options include (at lease one option from the following) • Introductory Econometrics • Statistical Methods in Economics 2 • Money and Banking • Macroeconomics 2 • International Finance • Selected Topics in Macroeconomics

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Year 3

Year 2

Core modules:

Compulsory modules:

• Fundamentals of Corporate Strategy

• Biomedical Pharmacology

• Human Resource Management

• Essential Biochemistry for Human Life

Options include (at least six options from the following): You must take at least three options from:

• Human Molecular Biology • Biomedical physiology II • Techniques in Biomedical Sciences

• International Finance

• Basic Immunology

• Investment Analysis

• Clinical Microbiology

• Management of Technology • Futures and Options • Advanced Microeconomics

Options include: • Fundamentals of Neurobiology • Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics

BSc Biomedical Sciences

Year 3

Many students studying our highly-rated Biomedical Sciences degree subsequently apply as postgraduates

Compulsory modules:

for entry to medicine, dentistry programmes, other healthcare related courses and higher degrees such as MSc and PhD. The programme is designed with this in mind, with modules in the preclinical subject areas including anatomy, physiology, microbiology, molecular sciences and pharmacology. The curriculum also includes specialised modules such as immunology and cancer biology, many of them taught by staff at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

• Endocrine Physiology and Biochemistry

• Biomedical Sciences Case Approach to Problem Solving

BSc Business Management The Business Management programme aims to develop the ability to make critical analyses and evaluations relevant to management. This is achieved by building an understanding of the forces at work in business, alongside knowledge of techniques, mainly through active exposure to the process of critical analysis. This programme balances the development of concepts and techniques, and their application. Firstly, economics, accounting, law, research methods and organisational behaviour are introduced in the context of current business issues. Later, modules in marketing, human resource management, corporate strategy and the management of technical change reinforce and extend concepts and analyse their application.

• Final Year Project

This broad-based degree places business issues in their economic, social and technical environments; and can be complemented by taking modules in other departments, such as politics, geography, modern languages, economics and finance.

Options include:

Programme outline

• Neuroscience: From Molecules to Mind

Year 1

• DNA Evidence in Forensic Science

• Academic Communication for Business and Management

• Cancer Biology • Human and Medical Genetics • Cell Pathology and Blood Science

Programme outline

• Economics for Business

Year 1

• Financial Accounting

Compulsory modules:

• Fundamentals of Management

• Chromosomes and Gene Functions

• Organisation Behaviour

• Biomolecules of Life

• Qualitative Research Methods

• The Microbial World and Humans

• Quantitative Research Methods for Business

• Biomedical Physiology I • Human Anatomy

• Work, Employment and Society

• Tissue Biology • The Human Cell • Essential Skills for Biologists

Queen Mary, University of London 17


Undergraduate courses popular with Canadian students (cont)

Year 2 • Human Resource Management • Marketing • Operations Management • Organisation Theory • Research Methodology 3 • Strategy Two options from: • Business Law • Company Law for Business • Coordination and Social Dynamics • Critical and Post-modern Theories of Organisations • Financial Institutions • Managerial Accounting • Managing Knowledge • Microeconomics for Managers

BSc Computer Science This broad degree programme provides the necessary foundation for a career in IT. You will cover core topics such as software engineering, computer systems and applications. You can specialise in subjects including computer graphics, artificial intelligence and distributed systems. You will gain practical experience in building a variety of computer systems in progressively demanding situations. The Industrial Experience option allows you to spend a year working in industry.

Plus six optional modules units - options include • Specification and Reasoning • Multimedia • Computer Graphics • Advanced Database Systems and Technology • Algorithms and Complexity • Distributed Systems and Security • C++ for Image Processing • Computability

Programme outline

• Computational Genomics

Year 1

• High Performance Computing

• Procedural Programming

• Interaction Design

• Computer Architecture

• Artificial Intelligence

• Logic and Discrete Structures

• Machine Learning Techniques for Data Mining

• Computers and Society • Language and Communication

• Software Risk Assessment

Year 3

• Object-Oriented Programming

• Entrepreneurship in Information Technology

• Corporate Social Responsibility

• Probability and Matrices

• Digital Systems Design

• International Business

• Fundamentals of Web Technology

• Algebraic Structures I

Year 2

• Number Theory

• Organisational Change and Development • Theories of Management

• Software Engineering (two course units) Four options from:

• Essential Networks and Operating Systems

• Dissertation • Extended Essay

• Algorithms and Data Structures in an Object-Oriented Framework

• Financial Management

• Systems Analysis

• Games of Strategy

• Further Networks and Operating Systems

• Innovation and Enterprise

• Database Systems

• Managing Diversity

• Graphical User Interfaces

• The Market and Social Order • Social and Political Marketing • Social Networks

Year out • Extended Work Placement (Industrial Experience, option only) Final Year • Computer Science Project (two course units)

18 Queen Mary, University of London


MBBS Medicine The five year course leading to Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery is designed to give you appropriate knowledge and understanding of medical, scientific and clinical principals so that you are able to apply them to the prevention, cure and alleviation of disease. Key features of the curriculum include: • Practical approach. You study integrated modules relating to the body systems, for example cardiovascular, respiratory etc. • Early clinical experience. You will meet your first patient in your first term. • Wide ranging clinical experience in our hospitals in London and the South East. From Year 3, a range of clinical and GP attachments. • Emphasis on communication skills throughout the course. • Wide choice of selected study modules each year where you can follow your own interests, for example Brain Structure and Function, History of Medicine, Diabetes and more. • Significant element of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) • You are expected to work a 35-hour week and are allocated a senior tutor to ensure you are supported throughout the course. This programme is divided into four phases (cores) • Phase 1 – Body in Health • Phase 2 – Mechanisms of Disease • Phase 3 – Clinical Basis of Medicine • Phase 4 – Preparation for Practice

Student Profile Ashton Chang, MB BS 5-year programme in Medicine Graduate of St. George’s School, Vancouver, Canada ‘I chose Queen Mary as I wanted to study in the East End of London, this is an area that is different to the stereotypical tourist image many people have. I also wanted to be in a part of London that is very ethnically and socially diverse. During my time in London I want to explore and see parts of the city that people don’t usually get to see. The campus was also an important part of my decision to study here as it is unusual to have a campus in London. It is great being able to live on campus and have everything you need close by. I have my own bedroom but share a kitchen/living area with a mixture of British and overseas students, just by coincidence they are mostly from North America. I chose medicine as I have always had an interest in science. The course is a good balance of theory and practice. There are also placements with a local general practitioner at local medial surgeries throughout London in the first year. Therefore it is very hands on from the start. As you would imagine with medicine the course is very challenging and vigorous, some days there could be lectures from 9am – 6pm. Though that said there is a lot of support both from the college and other students; there is an international students’ committee to help students get settled in which I found very useful. I love living in London, I’m from Vancouver so am used to living in a city but London is bigger and obviously very different. I enjoy exploring the city and discovering new places. My favourite part of the British lifestyle is the pubs as this is different to the pub culture in Canada. My advice for prospective students would be to thoroughly research the college and the area so you know what to expect. As I don’t graduate until 2015 I don’t know what area of medicine I will specialise in, at the moment I am keeping my options open!’

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Professional Medical Admission and Accreditation in Canada

To practise medicine in Canada there are certain steps that students must complete. Students who have received their medical qualifications abroad are known in Canada as ‘international medical graduates’ or (IMGs). IMGs must start the licensure/accreditation process by confirming that their medical degree is from a recognised medical school. Queen Mary is a recognised overseas medical school. Please view the International Medical Education Directory for further information; www.faimer.org

20 Queen Mary, University of London

IMGs are then asked to take an online selfassessment exam and submit their credentials to the Medical Council of Canada's (MCC) Physician Credentials Repository, before taking the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE). Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) For further details about the procedure for the exam and to ensure you are prepared please refer to the Medical Council of Canada webpage; www.mcc.ca/en/obtaining_license.shtml All provinces have the right to request additional assessments to qualify for residency positions in their province.

Residency Residency is a required period of supervised graduate training and is completed before a student can progress to practising medicine. Competition for residency places is competitive. A good resource is CaRMS - The Canadian Resident Matching Service. Please view their web-site at; www.carms.ca Staying in the UK to Practise Medicine In order to stay in the UK to practise medicine graduates will need to be in possession of a work visa. This is a separate issue and students are encouraged to check UK immigration guidelines during their course of study. Often students will need to apply for work and graduate visas before the course of study finishes.


In the UK the General Medical Council (GMC) is responsible for determining who may practice medicine in the UK and which medical schools are accepted. All doctors who want to practice in the UK must obtain GMC registration. Please refer to the GMC for further information; www.gmc-uk.org Please note this information is intended as a brief guide only, information changes frequently, therefore we urge you to conduct your own research and contact the relevant medical organisations in your province. Useful Links Queen Mary School of Medicine and Dentistry; www.smd.qmul.ac.uk International Medical Education Directory www.faimer.org Medical Council of Canada www.mcc.ca The Canadian Resident Matching Service www.carms.ca UK General Medical Council www.gmc-uk.org

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Postgraduate courses popular with Canadian students

MA Migration and Law In an increasingly globalised world, migration and the legal issues involved is a matter of growing importance. The Masters in Migration and Law programme acknowledges the demand for a postgraduate degree which incorporates the intricate relationship between the movement of people and the legalities that surround those migrations. The interdisciplinary degree, offered jointly by the Departments of Law and Politics, enables the student to correlate the theoretical and empirical, legal and political, aspects of the migrant experience. Those undertaking the degree will be introduced to the main theoretical and legal issues in the study of migration and be equipped with knowledge of key themes and approaches to the movement of people. At the same time, the programme emphasises the need for students to develop critical and analytical approaches to the study of migration and law. Programme outline On completion of the programme you will be able to demonstrate a critical understanding of the main theoretical approaches and legal issues relating to the study of migration both nationally and internationally and to practically apply the knowledge and skills acquired during your period of study. You will take the core modules - Typologies and Theories of Migration. You will also take one further module from the options listed below. You will prepare an independent dissertation of 15,000 words on a migration topic of your choice. Each individual student will be assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme. Core modules • Typologies and Theories of Migration (30 credits) • Migrants, Diasporas and Law 1 (30 credits) or Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law (30 credits) • Research methods for Migration (0 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits)

22 Queen Mary, University of London

Module options include: • Typologies and Theories of Migration 2 • Housing, Health and Education in a Metropolitan Environment • International Public Management • Globalisation and International Relations • Issues in Democratisation • Migrants, Diasporas and Law 2 • Ideas and Power in Spanish America 1512Now • Policy Analysis for the Developing World • Implementation and Evaluation • Case Studies in British Policy Making • Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development

Programme outline The programme is built around a core module – Theories of International Relations – which provide points of entry to the optional modules listed below. In addition to the core module, students choose three other modules in the second semester. On satisfactory completion of coursework you will independently research and write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a topic of your choice. Each individual student is assigned a personal supervisor to give advice and assistance for this part of the programme. Core modules: • Theories of International Relations (30 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits)

• International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context

Optional modules include:

MA International Relations

• Globalisation and the International Political Economy of Development

The MA in International Relations is concerned with analysing the key theoretical and empirical issues and concepts in international relations. You will discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations. You will also undertake a critical survey of the main theories associated with the study of international politics. It is primarily concerned with the varying theoretical explanations for why things happen in world politics. As well as addressing analytical questions the programme will also address the normative and political dimensions of theory. There is an extensive list of module options designed to allow students to develop their expertise and apply theories and concepts within particular issue areas. The programme provides students with a set of analytical skills and knowledge that will allow them to think, talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as a firm foundation for further study.

• International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context • International Public Management • Globalisation and International Relations • Issues in Democratisation • Migrants, Diasporas and Law 1 • Typologies and Theories of Migration 2 • Ideas and Power in Spanish America 1512-Now • Policy Analysis for the Developing World


MA Global and Comparative Politics The MA in Global and Comparative Politics will provide you with an intellectually stimulating analysis of the key issues in international and global politics, such as the changing dynamics of state power, the dimensions of regime change, and the challenge posed to states by ethnonationalism and cosmopolitanism. The programme will provide you with advanced skills in comparative analysis, as well as a developed understanding of methodological approaches to the study of Political Science. Programme outline You will take the core module Global and Comparative Politics and three further modules from the options listed below. Core modules: • Global and Comparative Politics (30 credits) • Dissertation (60 credits) Study options include: • Issues in Democratisation • International Security: War and Peace in a Global Context • Nationalism, Democracy and Cosmopolitanism • Policy Analysis for the Developing World. • Ideas and Power in Spanish America 1512now • Globalisation and International Relations • Peace in a Global Context This MA is an intercollegiate programme, which draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. The MA Programme as a whole offers advanced training in intellectual history, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, spanning the period from the ancient world to the twenty-first century. It also provides students with essential grounding in the various methods

and approaches associated with the study of the history of thought developed over the past quarter-century in Europe and the United States.

MA History of Political Thought and Intellectual History (University of London Intercollegiate Masters Programme) The MA consists of the core module: Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History, a selection of modules chosen from the below, and an individually supervised dissertation. Programme outline Below is a typical sample of modules that may be offered in a given year: • Democracy: Ancient and Modern, Richard Bourke (Queen Mary) • Ideology and Propaganda in the Roman Republic, Valentina Arena (UCL)

• Republicanism and Liberalism: Historical and Analytical Perspectives, Cecile Laborde (UCL) • Languages of politics: Italy 1250-1500, Serena Ferente (KCL) • Crisis and Future in Nineteeth-Century European Thought, Axel Korner (UCL)

MA MSc Geography The MA/MSc in Geography is designed to provide an advanced understanding of a variety of specialisms in human geography. A key feature of the programme is its flexibility. It can be taken in three different modes, enabling you to choose the length of dissertation and number of optional modules (whether in Geography or a cognate discipline) you take. The programme has proven especially popularnot only to recent graduates but also to professionals who want to update their qualifications and widen their research and writing skills. The MA/MSc in Geography (Mode C) is recognised under the ESRC’s 1+3 funding scheme.

• Political Thought in Renaissance Europe, Angus Gowland (UCL)

Programme outline Compulsory modules:

• Hobbes' Politics in Context, Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary)

All students take the compulsory module Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies.

• The Theory and Practice of Golden Age Kingship, Alexander Samson (UCL) • Political Thought in the British Atlantic World, c 1660–1801, Ian McBride (KCL) • The Public and its Spheres in Britain, 1476 – 1800, Jason Peacey (UCL) • Religion, Science and Production of Knowledge, Adam Sutcliffe (KCL) • Infamous Writings: Controversies and Receptions in the History of Political Thought in Early Modern Europe, Peter Schroeder (UCL) • Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary)

MA/MSc in Geography Modes of Study Mode A MA/MSc Geography (Research) Students complete the core module Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies • A dissertation of 30,000 words • One specialist module from the list of options offered Mode B MA/MSc (Named Specialism for example Cultural Geography) Students complete the compulsory module Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies • A dissertation of 22,000 words • Two specialist modules from the list of options offered

Queen Mary, University of London 23


Postgraduate courses popular with Canadian students (cont)

Mode C MA/MSc Geography (ESRC recognised) Students complete the compulsory module Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies • A dissertation of 15,000 words • Three specialist modules from the list of options offered Modules options include: • Culture, Space and Power

studentships for this programme for those students intending to apply subsequently for a PhD. Programme outline Compulsory modules: • Social Science Research: Methods and Methodologies (jointly taught with Geography at UCL) with the accompanying ‘Thinking Geographically’ seminar series unique to Queen Mary. • 15,000 word dissertation

• Art, Performance and the City

Those registering for the MSc in Finance and Investment take four core modules in the first semester and four core modules in the second semester. In order to reflect the practical and applied side of this programme the department organises a number extra optional modules, whose subject matter changes from year to year, that aim to provide further practical training to students. These modules are often taught by City practitioners, who provide an insider’s view on topics of interest to the financial community.

• Cities, Empire and Modernity

Module options include:

Programme outline Pre-sessional modules:

• Empire, Race and Immigration

• Culture, Space and Power

• Mathematics

• Understanding Globalisation and Development I

• Art, Performance and the City

• Statistics

• Understanding Globalisation and Development II

• Option of taking one other approved module in another department in place of one of the specialised modules

• Globalisation and Development in Practice

MA Cities and Cultures The MA Cities and Cultures is an exciting programme that combines the study of cultural geography with a specific focus on urban cultures both past and present. The course takes in a wide range of urban settings, from imperial Delhi and Calcutta to Chicago during the height of modernity and contemporary cultural formations in London and Los Angeles. Taught by leading geographers in the field, the programme considers how cities are socially produced, imagined, represented and contested. It engages with original texts that have informed thinking about urban spaces and cultures as well as a range of other source materials – including the built environment, art practices, literature, music and film – through which the meanings and politics of urban spaces can be analysed. Optional modules introduce students to a wide range of intellectual approaches to urban living and social life: from literary analysis to pyschogeography and performativity. MA Cities and Cultures is recognised under the ESRC’s 1+3 funding scheme. The Arts and Humanities Research Council also offers

24 Queen Mary, University of London

• Cities, Empire and Modernity Core modules: • Quantitative Techniques • Money and Banking

MSc Finance and Investment

• Investment Analysis

This programme aims to train you in areas of finance which have major practical and theoretical interest, especially investment analysis, corporate finance issues such as optimal capital structure and mergers and acquisitions, banking, derivatives, finance microstructure and taxation. The programme is intended to give professional postgraduate training to students wishing to pursue careers in the City, Government or elsewhere in the private sector.

• Corporate Finance

• Behavioural Finance • Empirical Finance • Financial Derivatives • International Finance


MSc Economics This is a well-established intensive programme providing rigorous training in modern economic theory and applications. It is best suited for students who wish to train for careers as professional economists in the private sector or the government, or who wish subsequently to follow an academic career or to pursue research in economics. The programme has a research dissertation component and has recognition as a Research Training degree by the ESRC under their “1+3” scheme. Those registering for the MSc in Economics take four core modules in the first semester and four modules in the second semester, of which three are core modules and one is an option. MSc Economics students are also required to take pre-sessional modules in Mathematics and Statistics, designed as refresher courses so that their background knowledge is at the level of required for postgraduate study in Economics. Programme outline Pre-sessional modules: • Mathematics • Statistics Core modules: • Macroeconomics A • Microeconomics A • Econometrics A

• Financial Derivatives

Optional modules may include:

• Quantitative Asset Pricing

• E-Marketing

• International Finance

• Innovation and Global Competition

• Financial Econometrics

• Markets and Society

• Time Series Analysis

• Qualitative Research Methods

MSc Marketing This programme will provide you with a comprehensive knowledge of the working practices, theories and issues connected with the dynamic and increasingly important field of marketing in the global business arena. It will be attractive to both graduates and professionals who are interested in a career in marketing, or who wish to widen their knowledge and competencies in this field. The programme will identify processes of globalisation and their impact on multinational enterprises and national firms. It will compare strategies involved in marketing, examine the growing field of e-marketing, discuss the contemporary debate over marketing ethics and contrast different approaches to the study of marketing and their implications. You will gain an understanding of the nature of global brands and their centrality for sustainable relationships with major stakeholders. You will also learn about the appropriateness of the use of qualitative and quantitative research methods for marketing, how to perform market research and how to design marketing programmes.

• Mathematics for Economists

Programme outline You will take the following core modules:

• Macroeconomics B

• Brand Management

• Microeconomics B

• International Marketing Communications

• Econometrics B

• International Marketing

Module options include:

• Research Methods for Business and Management

• Economic of Industry • Labour Economics • Corporate Finance

• The Firm and the Market • Understanding Consumer and Market Behaviour

• Quantitative Research Methods

Alumni Profile Des Alvares B.Eng. MBA, MBCS CITP, CMA (Mechanical Engineering, 1987) Desmond Alvares who has been working and developing his career in Canada for the last nineteen years having worked for eight years in the UK following graduation is our contact for alumni in Canada. While a student, Des was active with the Student Union. He was the Clubs and Society representative. He also represented the Engineering students on the School Advisory board as well as being Union representative at the National level. Des is currently serving on the boards of the Risk Management Committee of Ontario as Regional Director for GARP, and the BCS, the Chartered Insitute for IT as coucil member for the International Sections. In 2012, he will volunteer with the Olympic Games in London.

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Research areas of interest to Canadian students

Queen Mary has internationally renowned research groups in fields as diverse as the humanities, law and social sciences; science and engineering; and medicine and dentistry.

Humanities, Social Sciences and Laws Our Humanities and Social Sciences Research Centre provides a dedicated site for externally funded research projects (totalling more than £10 million since 2000) - including bodies such as the Arts and Humanities Research Board, the Economic and Social Research Council and the Leverhulme Trust. This includes our top rated Centre for Commercial Law Studies, which aims to promote the systematic study and research of national and international commercial law and its social and economic implications. It focuses strongly on the global development of international commercial law. The £800,000 Centre for Editing Lives and Letters (CELL) is unique to Queen Mary, and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Board. This is a world class facility for large and small-scale editing projects in historical biography, diaries and correspondence, lead by renowned academic Professor Lisa Jardine.

Science and Engineering Queen Mary continues to invest in supporting excellence in science and engineering, as an integral part of our multi-faculty mission. Queen Mary's Astronomy Unit is one of the UK's premier astronomy centres, with a number of researchers involved in international space programmes. This includes NASA's ongoing Cassini-Huygens mission to Jupiter and Saturn, and the Rosetta mission to Mars. We are the main UK institution involved in the research and development of the world's longest physics linear collider. Our computer scientists work on core developments - like building fast reliable networks and smart secure software as well as on novel technologies applied in things like insect motion , playing jazz and recognising faces. Their most recent EPSRC grant of £230,000 will investigate human error.

26 Queen Mary, University of London

Student Profile Janta Quigley, Senior Status “As a graduate in business on a limited budget, studying a 2-year LLB at Queen Mary saves me both time and money, yet offers me an internationally recognised University of London degree. “In addition, my participation in Queen Mary’s student-led Pro Bono Group, Law Society, Bar Society, and Mooting Society have given me valuable voluntary experience and allowed me to establish important contacts within top City law firms. “Finally, Queen Mary’s law department demonstrates a very high quality of teaching. It is clear from the time and personal interest demonstrated by each of my lecturers and tutors that they are committed to helping me succeed, both scholastically and in my future career. “As a result of the skills I am gaining at Queen Mary, I am currently applying for training contracts in 2011 and hope to qualify as a solicitor in a UK commercial law firm by 2013.”


Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry Throughout the Medical School there is a large range of internationally recognised and pioneering research. The School boasts leading SARS and HIV/AIDS research units, and some of the most eminent research teams in fields from flu to cancer. Queen Mary boasts the first Cancer Research UK Clinical Centre to be based at a university. This £11million project, launched in 2004, takes an innovative 'molecules to patient' approach to research. The William Harvey Research Institute is devoted to understanding basic pathogenic mechanisms in cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases, and aims to discover and develop novel opportunities for therapy. The Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine includes the Centre for Environmental and Preventive Medicine (CEPM) headed by Professor Nick Wald, and the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Epidemiology, Mathematics, and Statistics (EMS) unit, led by Professor Jack Cuzick. The Institute of Cancer is awarded grants totalling more than £5million per annum, with the NHS committed to building an international cancer centre at the Medical School.

Student Profile David O’Hare Senior Status student from Canada President of the Law Society. "While I was first drawn to Queen Mary because of its good reputation and London location, it was not until after my first contact with the Admissions team at the School of Law that I felt certain the College would be a good fit. As an international student, I had specific questions about life in London, student accommodation, and the courses on offer. Those I spoke with provided me with detailed answers and seemed genuinely interested in discussing things over. “My transition to life in London and the study of Law was also made easier by the good work carried out by the Graduate Student Advisors (or GSA`s), who are happy to meet and assist with study habits, exam techniques, or for a chat. A reassuring word or two goes a long way at exam time and I think they provide a valuable service. “If willing to make a commitment to study, I believe students here are given the support needed to succeed. This year the Department is introducing a `buddy program` that will see third-year students teamed up with new students to assist with the transition. I have signed up and look forward to taking part."

Queen Mary, University of London 27


Fees and Scholarships

International student tuition fees - September 2012 Entry Please note these fees are for 2011 entry. Fees for 2012 entry are subject to rise. For a full list of courses and fees please refer to: www.qmul.ac.uk/international/feesfinance/ Presessional Courses

ÂŁ

5 week presessional English language programme (tuition only) (Y2E1)

1,700

9 week presessional English language programme (tuition only) (Y2E2)

2,700

13 week presessional English language programme (tuition only) (Y2E3)

3,900

Undergraduate International Foundation Course (Social Sciences) (Y2JE)

10,200

Undergraduate Science and Engineering Foundation Programme (FGHS)

10,200

Postgraduate International Foundation Course in Arts, Social Sciences and Law (Y2PE)

10,200

Postgraduate Science and Engineering Foundation Programme (FGHD)

10,200

Undergraduate Courses Standard Arts/Classroom based Courses

12.250

Standard Laboratory-based Courses

13,925

Medicine Years 1 and 2 * (A100)

16,442

Dentistry Year 1* (A200)

TBC

Exceptions to the above: Single Semester associates (Y2AE autumn) (Y2BE spring)

5,650

Full year associate (Y2FE)

11,300

Postgraduate Taught Courses

ÂŁ

Arts/Classroom based Courses

12,000

Laboratory-based Courses

13,925

Exceptions to the above: MSc Investment and Finance (L1T1)

15,000

MSc Banking and Finance (L1S3)

15,000

MSc Management and Organisational Innovation (N1Q1)

15,000

MSc International Financial Management (N1Q6)

15,000

MSc International Human Resource Management and Employment Relations (N1S3)

15,000

MSc Marketing (N1Q2)

15,000

MA International Relations (L1T1)

13,000

LLM (M2Q1)

14,000

28 Queen Mary, University of London


Living expenses

Students who pay their entire tuition fee at enrolment will receive a two per cent discount on their total tuition fee.

Fees We recommend that you allow GBP 8,500 living expenses for one academic year. This includes: Accommodation

Study related books and equipment

Utility bills

Clothing

Food

UK Travel (not international travel)

enrolled at Queen Mary, University of London automatically become a member of the University of London Students’ Union (ULU), which gives them discounts on many everyday expenses. Queen Mary is also a member of International Students’ House (www.ish.org.uk). ISH provides a number of discounted sporting, travel, cultural and social opportunities and events for international students across the UK.

Scholarships

You can find a more detailed breakdown of a typical yearly budget online at: www.welfare.qmul.ac.uk/international/ money/planning

We constantly seek students of the highest quality, and, in recognition of the important investment that international students are making in their education, we are pleased to offer a range of scholarships to reward outstanding academic achievement. You can find out more online at: www.qmul.ac.uk/international/scholarships

Like all capital cities London can be expensive but if you are careful, you can find ways of living cheaply. There are numerous student discounts available (including travel) and there are many cultural, musical, theatrical events that are free. Students

Most departments also seek excellent PhD candidates and funding opportunities are available, particularly for students that have done well in their MSc degrees. For further information, please contact the relevant department directly.

Part-time employment Most international students can work parttime during their studies. Whether or not you can work will depend on the conditions written on the UK immigration sticker or stamp in your passport. International students can work up to 20 hours a week during term-time, and full-time during College vacations. College vacations are the Christmas and Easter breaks, and during the summer if you are studying on an undergraduate course. The Careers Service at Queen Mary provides details of many part time work opportunities both within the university and off campus. You can find out more about vacancies and Queen Mary’s careers service online at: www.careers.qmul.ac.uk/index.shtml

Queen Mary, University of London 29


Living at Queen Mary

Location Queen Mary, University of London, is located over five campuses across the city – from Mile End and Whitechapel in the east to Charterhouse Square, Lincoln’s Inn Fields and West Smithfield in central London.

Mile End Mile End is Queen Mary’s largest campus, with teaching, research and residential facilities – including library, cafés, bars and shops as well as comfortable accommodation for up 2000 students in the award-winning Student Village. Getting to the Mile End campus • By underground – nearest stations on the London Underground are Mile End on Hammersmith and City, District and Central lines; and Stepney Green on the Hammersmith and City and District lines. • From Mile End station, turn left and cross Burdett Road and Mile End road at the traffic lights. Continue along Mile End road until you reach the College buildings on the right. From Stepney Green, turn left out of the station, cross Globe Road and continue along Mile End Road.

30 Queen Mary, University of London

• By Bus – busses 25 (Oxford Circus to Ilford) and 205 (Mile End Park to Paddington) stop right outside the College, along with a number of other busses stopping a few minutes walk away.

• By Bus – busses 25 (Oxford Circus to Ilford) 205 (Mile End Park to Paddington), and 254 (Aldgate to Holloway) stop right outside the Hospital, along with a number of other busses stopping a few minutes walk away.

Check the Transport for London website for more details: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/

Check the Transport for London website for more details: www.tfl.gov.uk/

• By car – visitors are strongly advised to use public transport as parking spaces on campus are extremely limited. If you do come by car, you will need to arrange for a visitor’s parking permit in advance.

Whitechapel Our Whitechapel campus is home to Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. You’ll find it right behind the Royal London Hospital on Whitechapel Road in east London. Getting to the Whitechapel campus • By underground – the nearest station on the London Underground is Whitechapel on the Hammersmith and City, District and Central lines. The Royal London Hospital is directly opposite Whitechapel station, come out of the station and cross Whitechapel Road.

• By car – visitors are strongly advised to use public transport as parking spaces on campus are extremely limited. If you do come by car, you will need to arrange for a visitor’s parking permit in advance.

Charterhouse Square Based in the City of London, close to the Barbican, Charterhouse Square is five minutes walk from St Bartholomew's Hospital, and not far from the main University of London campus. Getting to the Charterhouse Square campus • By underground – nearest stations on the London Underground are Barbican and Farringdon on Hammersmith and City, Metropolitan and Circle lines.


From Barbican station, turn left onto Aldersgate, and left again on Carthusian Street. Cross the road and take the first right on Rutland Place, and walk through two sets of gates. Dean Rees house will be on your right hand side. • By Bus – busses 4 (Waterloo to Archway), 56 (St Bartholomew’s to Whipps Cross, Leyton) and 100 (Elephant & Castle to Shadwell) stop close by on Aldersgate, along with a number of other busses stopping a few minutes walk away. Check the Transport for London website for more details: www.tfl.gov.uk • By car – visitors are strongly advised to use public transport as parking spaces on campus are extremely limited. If you do come by car, you will need to arrange for a visitor’s parking permit in advance.

Lincoln’s Inn Fields The Postgraduate Law Centre at Lincoln's Inn Fields is home to the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and a base for LLM teaching and postgraduate research students. It is close to the Courts of Justice as well as many national and international law firms.

• By car – visitors are strongly advised to use public transport as parking spaces on campus are extremely limited. If you do come by car, you will need to arrange for a visitor’s parking permit in advance.

West Smithfield Based in the City of London within the historic St Bartholomew's Hospital, this campus is five minutes walk from St Paul's Cathedral.

Getting to the West Smithfield campus • By underground – nearest stations on the London Underground are Barbican and Farringdon on Hammersmith and City, Metropolitan and Circle lines, and St Paul’s and Chancery Lane on the central line. From St Paul’s station, turn left and cross Newgate Street. Turn right up King Edward’s Street, and left on to Little Britain. This will bring you directly within the hospital grounds. • By bus – busses 4 (Waterloo to Archway), and 100 (Elephant & Castle to Shadwell) stop close by on Aldersgate, and the 56 takes you directly in front of the hospital (St Bartholomew’s to Whipps Cross, Leyton). There are many other busses stopping a few minutes walk away. Check the Transport for London website for more details: www.tfl.gov.uk • By car – visitors are strongly advised to use public transport as parking spaces on campus are extremely limited. If you do come by car, you will need to arrange for a visitor’s parking permit in advance.

Getting to the Lincoln’s Inn Fields campus • By underground – the nearest station on the London Underground is Holborn on the Central and Piccadilly lines. From Holborn station, turn left on to Kingsway, and left again on Remnant Street. The school of Law is on your left hand side. • By bus – busses 8 (Bow to Victoria), 25 (Oxford Circus to Ilford) 242 (Homerton to Tottenham Court Road) and 521 (London Bridge to Waterloo) stop at Holborn station. There are many other busses stopping a few minutes walk away. Check the Transport for London website for more details: http://www.tfl.gov.uk/

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Accommodation

The College provides a range of attractive accommodation options. Mile End’s award-winning Student Village provides 2,000 rooms on campus and students are able to apply for a place in accommodation as soon as they have an offer of a place from Queen Mary. The majority of our rooms are single occupancy, although we do have some provision for families, and single sex en-suite accommodation is also available. Features of our ensuite and non-ensuite bedrooms: • All bedrooms are carpeted and are equipped with a single bed, wardrobe, bookshelves, desk, chair and storage space • Computer data connections (except in the smaller Student Houses) • Communal kitchens for 3-11 students that are fully equipped with refrigerators/freezers, cookers, microwave ovens (six person or over flats only), washing up facilities, storage cupboards, food preparation surfaces and dining areas • A personal refrigerator is provided in all of the ensuite bedrooms at Mile End, Dawson Hall and Floyer House. • Basic insurance up to £4,000. • Launderettes situated in, or close to all residences • Shop, café bar, 200 seat restaurant, central reception and security office (which is manned on a 24 hour a day basis) at the Mile End campus

In addition to our own halls of residence, Queen Mary has an allocation of approximately 220 places reserved in University of London inter-collegiate halls for first year undergraduates and first year postgraduates, full year associates, IFC and SEFP students. Located in Central London, these halls offer the opportunity to meet students from other Colleges of the University of London. These halls are centrally located and may suit students studying at Lincoln’s Inn Fields and Charterhouse Square, whilst being easily commutable to Mile End and Whitechapel campuses. There is no requirement for students to live in Queen Mary accommodation, and in fact, many of our students do live elsewhere – sometimes with family or friends. There is a wide range of private accommodation available with varying facilities and costs in the East London area. Our Residences Office can provide advice and guidance on all aspects of renting in the private sector. The office also offers lists of rooms/flats/houses and a contract reading service. You are

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advised that you should be in the UK before you begin your search, as private accommodation must be inspected and cannot be pre-booked from overseas. You can find out more about accommodation at Queen Mary online at: www.qmul.ac.uk/qmliving/accommodation/


Student Life: Student Union, Sports and Societies

Student Union Queen Mary's Students' Union, QMSU (www.qmsu.org), is located on the main Mile End campus. It is one of the most active unions in the University of London and forms an important part of College life. QMSU is split into three sites: the main site in Mile End and the Students’ Association in Whitechapel and Charterhouse Square. Through an everdeveloping range of services and facilities, the aim of QMSU is to ensure that your time at university is not just about work, but also includes socialising and personal development. Sports Taking part in sport at university is a great way to keep fit, make friends and generally have a good time. Queen Mary Students’ Union has over 50 sports clubs ranging from Aikido to Rugby, Fencing to Rowing. The Students’ Union has recently undergone a multi-million pound refurbishment, so in addition to the sports hall and squash courts, there’s a brand new Health and Fitness Centre, QMotion. QMotion is home to a whole host of gym equipment including a cardiovascular zone, a resistance zone, and free weights. You can use these facilities with the expert advice of fully trained gym instructors who will be on hand for pointers on training regimes and to instruct approximately 30 classes per week. We also offer classes such as yoga and pilates. Membership for the Health and Fitness Centre are at subsidised low rates for students.

Our entertainments programme aims to please everyone with a range of events including typical student ‘cheese’ nights, r’n’b, alternative/indie, live music and cinema. Clubs, societies and the community The Union is not just about entertainment and commercial services. It’s an excellent starting point to meet people, make friends and learn new skills. We fund more than 100 clubs and societies, so whether your interest lies in sport, politics, history or conservation, the Union is the place to make it happen. Furthermore, through a variety of Student Community Action projects such as working with children, the disabled and the homeless, Union members also have the opportunity to get involved with the local community via our accredited volunteering programme, Provide.

Societies include: Afro-Caribbean; Anime; Arabic; Arts; Bahai; Bengali; Buddhist; Business; Catholic; Chinese International; Christian Union; Computer Science; QM Conservatives; Cypriot; Debating; Economics; East London Health; Electronic; Engineering; Every Nation; Forensic; French; Geography; Hindu; Human Resources; Islamic; Jewish; Korean; Krishna Consciousness; Latino; Law; Literature; Mah Jong; Malaysian; Model United Nations; Music; Pakistani; Persian; Politics; Pool; PsiStar; Salsa; Science Fiction; Sikh; Singapore; Somali; Sri Lankan; St John's Ambulance; Theatre Company; Young Socialist and more. A full list can be found online at: www.qmsu.org

Special interest societies The Union offers a host of leisure activities to satisfy every taste and if your particular interest is not listed here, you can always start a society yourself.

Bars The Students’ Union runs a number of bars, the biggest of which is the recently refurbished Drapers Arms. A large investment has enabled the QMSU to offer a very high-quality social space. During the day it offers fresh coffee and juices, smoothies and a range of food options from healthy salads and wraps to more traditional bar food, as well as range of vegetarian options. In the evening it is a stylish bar with great faculties for showing live sport in high definition, and transforms into a nightclub with state-of-the-art light and sound systems.

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London

With 7 million inhabitants from all over the world, and 300 hundred languages spoken, London is one of the great global cities. Being a student here means that you are right at the centre of things, right as they happen. And you can enjoy a wide range of activities around the city for free. Galleries, museums and more The majority of galleries and museums in London offer free entry, with a discretionary donation. This means that you have access to such wonders as The British Museum, The National Gallery, The Science Museum, Natural History Museum, Tate Britain, Tate Modern and many more. Short-term exhibitions may often have an entry charge, but you can enjoy the world-class permanent exhibitions at all these venues free of charge.

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Walks London is full of surprises, and without doubt, is best experienced on foot. On the Tube or even on a bus, it’s difficult to get a sense of the shape of the city and you may miss unexpected sights and hidden corners. Several websites offer walking plans including www.tourcaster.com and www.bluebrolly.com Markets The major markets include Petticoat Lane, Portobello Road, Covent Garden (not strictly a market anymore, but still a great tourist attraction with buskers, street artists and stalls), The Columbia Road Flower Market, Borough Market, Camden Market and Spitalfields Market. Music There is always live music in the capital, and often, there’s often a performance you can enjoy for free. For more information go to www.allinlondon.co.uk/whats-on for listings of free venues and events around the city. You can also check www.timeout.com/london for the latest arts and entertainment listings.

Food and eating out London’s many retaurants offer almost every type of food. Within five minutes walk of Queen Mary’s Mile End campus you will find Greek, Middle Eastern, Indian and Japanese restaurants. There are also many places to buy affordable food – from supermarkets and street markets nearby to more specialist shops. For example, you can find Bangladeshi foods and ingredients in and around Brick Lane and Spitalfields, Turkish in Walthamstow and Green Lanes, Vietnamese in Mare Street and Kingsland Road, West African in Dalston, Pakistani in Queen’s Road and Leyton, Portugese around Stockwell Road, Japanese in Ealing, Greek in Camberwell, Caribbean in Tottenham, Chinese in Poplar and Russian in Mayfair.


Welfare, support and health care

Canadian students at Queen Mary

Welfare and support

There are currently around 80 students from Canada at Queen Mary on a variety of courses.

The Advice and Counselling service at Queen Mary offers professional advice and support to international students throughout your time with us. Our areas of expertise include finance and funding, visa extension issues, advice on student immigration requirements and counselling support for personal/ emotional issues. We also organise a number of social activities throughout the year including a trip to Stonehenge for summer solstice. In last year’s i-graduate international student survey our Advice and Counselling Service was ranked 3rd in the UK (i-graduate 2007). As a member of the international community at Queen Mary, you will automatically have membership of International Students’ House (ISH). ISH offers a wide range of services to international students including an advice, travel, accommodation and extensive social programme. For details of these and other services please see the ISH website: www.ish.org.uk

Healthcare There is a Health Centre on campus where you can make appointments with local General Practitioners from the Globe Town Surgery Practice. You (and your family) are entitled to free medical treatment under the UK health service (NHS) if you are registered on a course lasting six months or more. If you coming to the UK for less than six months, you should make sure you have adequate medical insurance cover.

Student Profile Jennifer Watts, Department of Law Choosing the right law school is both an exciting and daunting task for anyone. Probably the most essential qualities to me are the reputation, the quality of teaching and the location. All of which are difficult to judge from overseas. I was educated at the undergraduate level in Canada and decided to study law with the goal in mind of practising. Thus I was keen to pick a program that was preferably shorter in duration but still had the quality and caliber expected of a law degree. The Senior Status course provides both. At just two years in length it still manages to cover all the relevant requirements at a standard far above my expectations. I knew the law school had a five star research rating, but did not anticipate such high quality teaching. The professors here are approachable, extremely intelligent and passionate about what they do. I have no doubts that after studying at Queen Mary I will have both a valuable and world-class degree. Having visited London in the past, my second criterion was that I study in the city. With the largest and most successful firms in the world, the countless law conferences and the political centre of the UK – London is a constant source of legal inspiration. Study breaks, although rare, are probably the best in the world. When in London you cannot be at a loss for something to do. The museums and galleries are for the most part fully funded and the parks and architecture make for incredible walking scenery. My peers are from all around the world, bringing in not only diverse perspectives in the classroom but also interesting cultural experiences outside of college. Studying should not only be about doing well and spending hours in the library, although admittedly we all do our fair share of that! I am pleased to say I have also made great friends.

You can find out more about Queen Mary’s Advice and Counselling service online at: www.welfare.qmul.ac.uk/

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Canadian students at Queen Mary (cont)

Careers for international students For details of post study work schemes please visit www.ind.homeoffice.gov.uk. Over the years, many of our international graduates have gone on to successful careers in their chosen field both in the UK and overseas. By choosing to study in London, our students enhance their career prospects by gaining a diverse network of friends and contacts while developing their potential in a vibrant, creative and stimulating environment. As well as being the centre of governance in the UK, London is one of Europe’s principal business centres and one of the World’s truly global cities: Law – Five of the world’s six largest law firms have head quarters in London and one third of all the UK's practising solicitors are employed by companies based in London. 60% of large solicitor's firms (those with 26 partners or more) are in London. London is home to bodies that regulate and control the legal profession such as the Law Society, The Inns of Court and the General Council of the Bar. Business Management and Finance London is the World’s largest international banking centre with more overseas banks than any other city in the world. The London Stock Exchange is the largest foreign exchange market in the world, bigger than New York and Tokyo combined, and accounts for nearly a third of total world activity. There are almost 14,000 overseasowned companies based in London from 92 countries. More than 300,000 people are employed in financial services in London and 75% of the Fortune 500 companies have London offices. Humanities and Media - London is home to the world’s largest PR agencies; seven of the top ten agencies worldwide have their corporate head quarters in London, raising combined revenues in excess of $3.5 billion. London is also home to one of the largest concentrations of national and international news outlets in the world. The Foreign Press Association is one of the oldest clubs for

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foreign correspondents in the world. Media companies based in London include BskyB, BBC, ITV, CNN, MTV, Reuters, Associated Press, Disney, News International, Time Warner and Virgin. Science, Engineering and IT – London is Europe's IT and telecommunications capital as well as a city with an eminent history of scientific exploration and applied engineering. It is home to over 100 biotechnology companies, five internationally renowned medical schools, 1,300 biomedical researchers in 28 universities and over 50 clinical research centres. It is also home to the largest concentration of IT software and services companies in Europe; 19 of the top 25 European software and IT service suppliers have their HQ in London. 46 of the World's top pharmaceutical companies are located in London and the Home Counties and the city leads the way in the growth areas of mobile, broadband and wireless technologies. It is at the forefront of developing Europe's third generation wireless networks.

At Queen Mary, we are committed to providing students with the best possible environment for learning, so that they can get the best out of their degree – and aim high in their future career. Our careers service can also help, offering one to one advice sessions, general career information, vacancy information, aptitude tests, careers talks, seminars, recruitment fairs, employer presentations and workshops. We’ve also recently launched a new law careers portal. Our academic departments maintain good links with industry and ‘Provide’ – our student run volunteer exchange - offer a range of volunteering opportunities in the local community that our international students can take advantage of. You can find out more about Queen Mary’s careers service online at: www.careers.qmul.ac.uk/


Arrival/Welcome programme

Airport collection New international students are offered a free airport collection service before the start of term each year. In 2012 this will be on the 15 and 16 September. This Service will be advertised on the international pages of our website along with an online booking form: www.qmul.ac.uk/international/index.html Welcome Programme The College runs a two-day welcome programme for all new international students. This is a programme especially designed to introduce international students to the College, London and the UK dealing with academic, cultural and social aspects with special sessions on immigration and visa issues. Students will be introduced to college facilities and services including library and computing services, health advice and other support services. Students will also be enrolled as part of the programme.

Term Dates 2012-2013 Semester A

19 September to 14 December 2012 3 week Christmas vacation

Semester B

7 January to 28 March 2013 4 week Easter vacation

Exam period

29 April to 7 June 2013

Semester C (Taught Masters students only)

29 April to 7 June 2013 Writing up dissertation/research project

You can find out more about the Welcome programme for International Students online at: www.qmul.ac.uk/prearrival

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How to apply

Foundation courses Applications should be made directly to the Admissions Office using the foundation application form available at www.qmul.ac.uk/international/foundation/. For more information and assistance please get in touch with one of the contacts listed in the section of this brochure ‘Finding Out More and Getting Help’. Undergraduate Degree Applications must be made through the UK universities central applications procedure UCAS (University and Colleges Admissions Service). The deadline for international students is the 30 June of the same year you want to apply. However, places are sometimes available after July through clearing. For more information and assistance with UCAS view the web site: www.ucas.ac.uk or please get in touch with one of the contacts listed in the section of this brochure ‘Finding Out More and Getting Help’. Masters Degree Applications must be made directly to the Admissions Office using the postgraduate application form available from www.qmul.ac.uk/postgrad/. You will need to send the following information in your application pack: 1. A completed application form 2. English Transcript of your bachelor degree 3. Two Academic references 4. Evidence of English language ability (or state when you will be taking an IELTS/ TOEFL test (if appropriate) 5. Personal Statement There is no fixed closing date for applications but you should remember that decisions on applications will be made as quickly as possible and popular courses may become full. We strongly advise all students to apply early, particularly those students who wish to get financial support from Research Councils or other award giving bodies. If you would like more advice on making an application please see the section of this brochure entitled ‘Finding Out More and Getting Help’.

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Research Degrees (MPhil/PhD) Applications should be made directly to the Admissions Office using the Queen Mary University of London application form available from www.qmul.ac.uk/postgrad.

Local representatives Queen Mary works with local representatives in Canada who provide a free service to students seeking support and guidance when applying to UK Universities;

There is no deadline for applications.

Across the Pond; http://ca.studyacrossthepond.com/home.asp

If you are applying for a MPhil or PhD degree you should send a research proposal explaining in as much detail as possible the particular area in which you wish to research in addition to the documents listed above. If you would like advice on your application please see the section of this brochure entitled ‘Finding Out More and Getting Help’. Applying for a Visa All students coming to study in the UK for longer than six months must apply for permission to come to the UK (some students need a 'visa' and others need 'entry clearance' - both are permission to enter the UK ). It is not difficult for genuine students to obtain permission to come to the UK. However, you do need to complete the application form carefully and provide the correct documentation and information for staff in the embassy to make decisions on your application. You can apply for a visa when you have your offer letter. You can find more information about this on the UK Border Agency website: www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/

Barclay and Knap Educational Services; www.barclayknap.com/uk.php Canada Law from Abroad; www.canadalawfromabroad.com/canadalawf romabroad/Welcome.html Global Links Abroad; www.degreesoverseas.com Student Solutions; www.studentssolution.co.uk/contact.html Finding out more and getting help My name is Ceri Bevan and I am the International Officer with responsibility for Canada. Please contact me by email on c.bevan@qmul.ac.uk. I am familiar with the requirements of Canadian students. I am frequently in Canada and available to hold one to one informal counselling sessions. www.qmul.ac.uk/international/countries/ canada


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This guide has been produced by the Publications and Web Office for the International Office – Pub8879 For further information contact: Ceri Bevan Study Abroad Officer Corporate Affairs Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: +44 20 7882 3672 Fax: +44 20 7882 5556 email: c.bevan@qmul.ac.uk www.qmul.ac.uk/international


International brochure Canada