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Queen Mary, University of London School of Economics and Finance Undergraduate prospectus

www.econ.qmul.ac.uk


The east London advantage Barts and The London serves a huge population of unrivalled diversity in the east of London, but is also next door to the City of London, one of the UK’s richest neighbourhoods. This means that our medical and dental students encounter a huge range of medical conditions while building the patient contact hours they need to become confident and competent professionals. “East London and the wider Thames Gateway offer our medical students the opportunity to observe a wide range of diseases – from diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, cancer, obesity, TB and even malnutrition. This is a unique learning environment for their medical training.” Cathy Baker, Head of Graduate Entry Programme in Medicine

2012 Olympics on our doorstep The 2012 Olympics are taking place very close to Queen Mary’s Mile and our Endbycampus, Produced the Publications and Web Office, Queen Mary, University of London Whitechapel and West Smithfield - Pub7329 www.corporateaffairs.qmul.ac.uk/pubweb campuses are also not far away. The information given in this prospectus is correct at the time of going to press. Barts Hospital, the The College reserves thenew rightRoyal to modify or cancel any statement in it and accepts London Hospital and our no responsibility for the consequences of any such changes. For the most up-toto the website www.qmul.ac.uk date information, please associated Trusts willrefer provide healthcare Olympic Any section offor thisthe publication is available in large print upon request. If you require athletes and in thea different generalaccessible public format we will endeavour to provide this this publication during the summer games. Thisand assistance, please contact: hrwhere possible. For further information equality@qmul.ac.uk; 7882 will be an exciting +44 time(0)20 to be in 5585. London. This prospectus has been printed on environmentally friendly material from well-managed sources.

Campus-based Barts and The London is part of Queen Mary, the only College of the University of London to offer extensive campus-based facilities. This promotes a sense of community and encourages an active student life. All our first year medical and dental students who live a certain distance from the School are allocated places in residences at the Whitechapel, Charterhouse Square and Mile End campuses. East London also offers affordable privately-owned accommodation at a walking distance from our campuses. See page XX for more details about accommodation.

State-of-the-art clinical facilities We have modern state-of-the art buildings alongside more traditional teaching facilities such as our fantastic library. The Dental School now contains a clinical skills laboratory which closely simulates the real clinical


Contents

Welcome to the School of Economics and Finance

2

Accommodation

Degree Programmes in Economics and Finance

6

School of Economics and Finance Entry Requirements

School of Economics and Finance modules

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Career opportunities and internships

22

Student life, Students’ Union, student support and health services

26

Living in London

Next steps

28 30 32 36


Welcome to the School of Economics and Finance


The School of Economics and Finance

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Welcome to the School of Economics and Finance

Economics is about the production and allocation of resources, a subject which affects everyone on the planet. It’s a major part of current affairs: think how many news items are concerned with tax, interest rates, the price of various items (from food to cars, CDs to petrol), and the job market. Nearly everything is connected to economics. NHS waiting lists: how should we fund health-care? The teacher shortage: can we afford to raise their salaries? Low pay in the developing world: is the West prepared to pay more for designer jeans? Falling house prices: why, and will I ever be able to afford a mortgage? These are all basically economic problems; far from being just graphs and theories, economics is actually very much about the real world, and probably even more relevant today than it ever has been. There are two major strands in economics: • Macroeconomics – or the economy as a whole, covering major themes like unemployment, taxation, investment, inflation and so on; you’ll find out how to interpret the Budget, what causes prices to rise and whether it matters and even be able to explain the arguments for and against the Euro.

• Microeconomics – examines the individual firm and consumer, attempting to understand their behaviour and motivations: why do train operating companies charge different prices for the same journey; why do people have insurance; why are call centres moving to India?

Why study Economics and Finance at Queen Mary? • Outstanding choice of degrees – choose from an excellent range of programmes, both single and joint Honours, outlined in further detail in this brochure. • Modular programme structure – this flexible approach means you can choose from a huge range of modules with help and advice from your Academic Adviser.

Journal of Economics, Econometrica and Journal of Financial Economics, we are actively engaged in research. This feeds into the quality of your lectures and tutorials. • Rated highly for research – our School was placed 6th in the UK in government’s last Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2008). This outstanding result confirms the high calibre of our teaching staff. • High student satisfaction – in the 2010 National Student Survey, over 88 per cent of our students were pleased with their experience of studying at Queen Mary, placing us as the highest ranking School for Economics in London. • Well-qualified staff – all our academics are offered training towards the Postgraduate Teaching Certificate of Academic Practice to support them in their teaching.

• Excellent career prospects – you will acquire valuable • Excellent student support – transferable skills, as well as a you will be offered maths and qualification in an analytical and language support if necessary, rigorous academic subject. helping you to get the most out Some of the destinations of our of your time at university. The graduates are outlined later in School also organises social this brochure, see pages 23 events such as maths and and 24. reading clubs, economic debates and quizzes and was awarded • Inspiring teaching – our School the title of ‘best school for is made up of academics who student support’ by the Students’ are experts in their field. Union for the 2009/10 academic Regularly published in leading year. journals such as American Economic Review, Quarterly


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The School of Economics and Finance

Welcome to the School of Economics and Finance

• Real world connections – our staff have forged strong links with the Treasury, the City, and other important financial institutions, such as the Bank of England, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and Barclays Capital. • Visiting speakers – you’ll be able to attend a varied programme of lectures given by guest speakers such as: Tim Harford, John Roemer (Yale), Lord Meghnad Desai, Professor Charles Goodhart (LSE), Rt Hon Roy Hattersley and Dan Corry, Robert Peston (BBC News Business Editor), Scott Page (Michigan) and Frank Allen (Wharton). • An international outlook – our School is extremely cosmopolitan with staff and students from all over the world. Many are involved in the staff /student liaison committee, a lively forum for the exchange of views.

Specialised IT Resources

The University of London

You will be able to use first-rate computing facilities for economic analysis. We subscribe to Datastream, Barclay hedge fund data and the Wharton Research Data Service (WRDS), providing access to the main financial and macroeconomic data. Students also have access to statistical packages such as Eviews and Stata.

As Queen Mary is part of the University of London, you will graduate with a University of London degree.

International study While at Queen Mary you may also take advantage of the College Exchange Scheme and apply to study for either one semester or a year at a range of universities in the US (in California, Florida and New York), Australia, Denmark, Italy and Spain. You will also have the opportunity to work alongside students visiting the College from these institutions.

The University of London has an outstanding international reputation founded on the quality of its teaching and research. Queen Mary is self-governing; however, all the University of London's central facilities, including Senate House Library, which contains 1.4 million volumes, are available to our students.


The School of Economics and Finance

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Economics and Finance degree programmes


The School of Economics and Finance

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Economics and Finance degree programmes

We offer the following single and joint Honours degee programmes: Single Honours • L100 (BSc) Economics • LN12 (BSc) Economics, Finance and Management • LN13 (BSc) Economics and Finance Joint Honours • LL12 (BSc) Economics and Politics • LG11 (BSc) Economics, Statistics and Mathematics • LL71 (BSc) Geography and Economics • GL11 (BSc) Mathematics, Statistics and Financial Economics. For each programme there is a recommended selection of modules, which is outlined in detail in this brochure. Entry requirements can be found on page 31.

Single Honours Economics degrees Our modular system offers flexibility. You benefit from being able to follow your interest in your choice of modules – from the School of Economics and Finance as well as other academic schools. Each year, you will take at least six modules (out of a total of eight) in Economics. Any remaining modules may be chosen from other Schools offering modular degrees, (for example, Geography, Modern Languages, Physics and Mathematics). Please bear in mind that your choice of modules may be limited by pre-requisite module requirements, as well as timetabling restrictions. You will also need to get permission from the School or Department offering the module you wish to take, as well as from your Academic Adviser. Your Academic Adviser will be able to advise you on your module choice.

L100 Economics In the first two years of our single Honours Economics programme you will cover a core of macroeconomics, microeconomics and the quantitative techniques used in economic analysis and investigation. Final-year options enable you to apply this core knowledge to a variety of more specialised areas such as labour economics, industrial economics, health economics, financial economics, business cycles, and so on. Some of your work will be computer-intensive, using networked terminals in the School’s computer laboratories. In the course of your studies, you will acquire a range of transferable skills through: individual and group work, oral presentations, writing essays and reports, problem solving, numeracy, and proficiency in a variety of IT skills.

Programme outline Year 1 – Semester 1 • Principles of Economics • Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1 • Spreadsheets and Data in Economics • World Economy


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The School of Economics and Finance

Economics and Finance degree programmes

STUDENT PROFILE Ammar Mahmood Economics “I always wanted to study in London, and Queen Mary offered an excellent choice of courses, as well as a campus style experience right here in the heart of the city. My course is flexible and has put me in charge of what I would like to specialise in, as well as leading to a worldrenowned qualification.”

Year 2 – Semester 4 • Microeconomics 2 • Selected Topics in Macroeconomics • Econometrics 2 • Your choice of module option Year 3 At least six modules must be taken from the following list (module options available may be subject to change):

Semester 5 • Development Economics • Corporate Strategy

“The staff are incredibly helpful, and the academic and study facilities are superb. There is never any shortage of workstations which are dotted all around the campus, and the online student services are comprehensive and easy to use.

• Topics in Econometrics

“The social life at Queen Mary is great with the Students’ Union putting on some sensational nights at the Drapers’ bar on campus, as well as at Fabric and the Ministry of Sound nightclubs in central London. My personal hangout place of choice has to be the Hive (a study area next to the Library). It is newly refurbished with comfy sofas and computers, and there are no restrictions on talking to your mates like in the Library. Now that there are vending machines in there I never have to leave!

• Applied Econometrics

“I have been involved with the Queen Mary Economics Society and I also participate in the staff vs students fortnightly football match. Being part of the Economics Society puts me at the forefront of organising extra-curricular events and activities for other students, something I very much enjoy.”

• Advanced Microeconomics • Health Economics

• Corporate Finance 1 • Macroeconomic Policy

Semester 6 • Corporate Finance 2 • Industrial Economics • Economics of Innovation • Business Cycles

Year 1 – Semester 2 • Microeconomics 1

Year 2 – Semester 3 • Games and Strategies

• Environmental Economics

• Macroeconomics 1

• Macroeconomics 2

• Labour Economics

• Statistical Methods in Economics

• Econometrics 1

• Futures and Options

• Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 2

• Your choice of module option

• Public Economics

Semester 5 and/or Semester 6 • Economics Project 1 • Economics Project 2


The School of Economics and Finance

LN13 Economics and Finance

Year 1 – Semester 2 • Microeconomics 1

This degree will prepare you for a career in economics, banking and finance. It provides an entry route for both private and public sectors as well as for further academic studies. After core modules in macroeconomics, microeconomics and quantitative analysis in the first year, you will study more applied microeconomics and macroeconomics as well as financial topics such as asset pricing and corporate finance. The wide choice of optional modules in the third year will also allow you to direct your studies to the areas that interest you most. The latter could range from quantitative methods in finance to corporate strategy and management of technology.

• Statistical Methods in Economics

• Macroeconomics 1

• Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 2 Year 2 – Semester 3 • Macroeconomics 2 • Econometrics 1 • Games and Strategies • Financial Markets and Institutions Year 2 – Semester 4 • Money and Banking • Microeconomics 2 • Econometrics 2 • Capital Markets 1 Year 3 – Semester 5 • Corporate Finance 1

In the course of your studies, you will acquire a range of transferable skills through: individual and group work, oral presentations, writing essays and reports, problem solving, and proficiency in a variety of IT skills.

Year 3 – Semester 6 • Futures and Options

Programme outline

• Corporate Finance 2

Year 1 – Semester 1 • Principles of Economics • Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1 • Spreadsheets and Data in Economics • Financial Accounting

• Your choice of module option • Your choice of module option • Your choice of module option

• Your choice of module option • Your choice of module option Remember that at least six economics modules in total must be at level 3.

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LN12 Economics, Finance and Management This programme places emphasis on those modules that are most relevant to future careers in business and/or finance. You will take basic modules in microeconomics, macroeconomics, fundamentals of management, and quantitative analysis in the first year. For the remaining two years of the programme you will combine modules in microeconomics, financial economics and business studies. A wide range of module options means you can direct your studies to the areas that interest you most. These could range from the study of mathematical and statistical techniques in finance through the economic analysis of strategy, industrial organisation and new technologies, to the study of the contribution of sociology and politics to the complexity of business decisions. In the course of your studies, you will acquire a range of transferable skills through: individual and group work, oral presentations, writing essays and reports, problem solving, and proficiency in a variety of IT skills.


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The School of Economics and Finance

Economics and Finance degree programmes

Programme outline

• International Finance

Year 1 – Semester 1 • Principles of Economics

• Selected Topics in Macroeconomics

• Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1 • Spreadsheets and Data in Economics • Fundamentals of Management Year 1 – Semester 2 • Microeconomics 1 • Macroeconomics 1 • Statistical Methods in Economics • Elements of Accounting

Note: Options available may be subject to change. Year 3 • Fundamentals of Corporate Strategy • The Management of Human Resources. Plus at least three options from: • Economics of Technology and Innovation. • Advanced Microeconomics • Futures and Options

Year 2 – Semester 3 • Games and Strategies • Business Law • Financial Markets and Institutions • Your choice of module option Year 2 – Semester 4 • Capital Markets 1 • Microeconomics 2 • Marketing • Managerial Accounting Options must be taken from the Economics Level 5 list. At the time of writing these include:

• Corporate Finance 1 • Corporate Finance 2 The remainder of your modules will be chosen from the Economics and Finance list, adding up to at least 6 modules at Level 6.

Joint Honours Economics degrees There is a common structure to all joint Honours degrees: at least nine Economics modules should be taken (around 12 will normally be taken). The only difference between programmes is in the timing of the modules taken.

LL12 Economics and Politics Politics and Economics are closely related disciplines and this degree is especially suited to those with an interest in public policy and governmental decision-making. In the first year, you will take four Politics modules and four Economics modules. In your second and third years, you can continue to split your studies in equal proportions, or you can choose to specialise more.

Programme outline Year 1 – Semester 1 • Principles of Economics • Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1 Year 1 – Semester 2 • Microeconomics 1 • Macroeconomics 1

• Econometrics 1

• Money and Banking

Year 2 – students must take: • Statistical Methods in Economics

• Macroeconomics 2

• Macroeconomics 2

• Econometrics 2

• Microeconomics 2 • Games & Strategies


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Year 3 – you will have a wide choice of modules from which to choose.

LG11 Economics, Statistics and Mathematics This degree will prepare you for a career involving quantitative methods in economics. It provides an entry route for both private and public sectors as well as for further academic studies. After core modules in macroeconomics, microeconomics and quantitative analysis in the first year, you will study more applied microeconomics and macroeconomics. The wide array of optional modules in the third year will also allow you to direct your studies to the areas that interest you most. The latter could range from quantitative methods in economics and finance to corporate strategy and management of technology. In the course of your studies, you will also develop a range of transferable skills, eg, how to work individually or in groups, how to do oral presentations, how to write essays and reports, problem solving, and proficiency in a variety of IT skills.

Programme outline Year 1 – Semester 1 • Economic Principles • Calculus 1 • Introduction to Probability • Geometry 1

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STUDENT PROFILE Ankur Goenka BSc Economics, Finance and Management “I just started my second year of Economics, Finance and Management. As we get a really long summer holiday, I decided that I should do something productive and do an internship. I was fortunate enough to have good links in the financial world so I approached Sun Global Investment Limited and was luckily offered an internship opportunity. I worked there for a month shadowing the traders, managers and accountants. “When I was with the trader, I was not allowed to do the actual trades because I am not regulated by the FSA but I was explained each and every process in detail. I observed the traders very carefully. They also taught me all the different types of financial products traded all over the world and how each one differs from the other. I found that the trader's life is a very hard one and it can get very stressful at times, but it is equally exciting at the same time. “I was also involved in analysing markets and companies with the analyst. I was explained the key details to look for when evaluating a company. It is a very long process, as you can imagine, but being alert and patient was the key to be successful. “When I worked with the accounting team, I was given many tasks according to my skill level such as data reconciliation, creating reports, calculating brokerages and other similar work. It helped me to start thinking creatively and ways to save time and become more accurate. Accounting required me to do a lot of number crunching which I enjoyed. “Overall I think it was an excellent learning process, everyone was incredibly helpful and helped me a lot in deciding my future career. The main benefit for me was that it made me a lot more confident, taught me how to present my work, and helped me get used to the office environment.”


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The School of Economics and Finance

Economics and Finance degree programmes

STUDENT PROFILE Selina Dhesy BSc Economics “I have just started the final year of my BSc Economics degree. Over the summer I completed an internship at NHS West Kent Primary Care Trust (WKPCT). I was placed in their business planning department working with Contracts and SLAs (Service Level Agreements). I was happy with this placement as it introduced me to a whole new field of work in which I had no prior experience. Moreover, it was a paid internship and lasted for two months.

Year 1 – Semester 2 • Microeconomics 1 • Macroeconomics 1 • Introduction to Statistics • Calculus II Year 2 – Semester 3 • Games and Strategies • Macroeconomics 2 • Linear Algebra 1 • Statistical Methods Year 2 – Semester 4 • Microeconomics 2 • Econometrics 2 • Statistical Modelling 1 • Statistical Theory

“Throughout the internship, I worked closely with the project manager of the NHS WKPCT, assisting her with current SLAs and contracts. My main roles were helping to compile contracts, updating the spreadsheet on the current status of contracts, researching new contracts and even producing a 'Policy and Procedures,' and a 'Standard Operational Procedure,' which will be used by the PCT.

Year 3 – students must take at least six modules at Level 6, including two level 6 modules from the School of Economics and Finance.

“During my time working with WKPCT I used many different programs, including some which were familiar such as MS Word and MS Excel; and others I had no previous experience of, such as MS Visio and Project Planner. Furthermore, I acquired and strengthened many other essential office skills.

GL11 Mathematics, Statistics and Financial Economics

“This internship introduced me into the world of project management – something I previously knew nothing about, but is now a career I am considering pursuing after my degree. I learnt all about how to plan big projects as well as the common methodology known as PRINCE2. I also used many of the templates that other corporations will use in their projects. “Overall, I had an excellent experience and enjoyed my time there thoroughly. I would definitely recommend such an internship to anyone who is unsure exactly of what they are looking for after their degree or to anyone who does not want anything strictly financial.”

This degree will prepare you for a career involving quantitative methods in business. It provides an entry route for both private and public sectors as well as for further academic studies. After core modules in macroeconomics, microeconomics and quantitative analysis in the first year, you will study more applied microeconomics and


The School of Economics and Finance

introductory financial economics. The wide choice of optional modules in the third year allows you to direct your studies to the areas that interest you most. In the course of your studies, you will acquire a range of transferable skills through: individual and group work, oral presentations, writing essays and reports, problem solving, and proficiency in a variety of IT skills.

Programme outline Year 1 – as Economics, Statistics and Mathematics (LG11) above Year 2 – Semester 3 • Games and strategies • Financial Markets and Institutions • Linear Algebra 1 • Statistical Theory Year 2 – Semester 4 • Microeconomics 2 • Capital Markets 1

• Statistical Theory

Programme outline

• Statistical Modelling 1

Year 1 – Semester 1 • Principles of Economics

Year 3 – students must take at least two of • Corporate Finance 1

• Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1

• Futures and Options

Year 1– Semester 2

• Corporate Finance 2

• Microeconomics 1

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• Macroeconomics 1

LL71 Geography and Economics This programme allows you to apply the analytical approach of economics to the various topics studied in Geography modules. Your understanding of political economy will inform your views of contemporary geographical issues, such as the production and allocation of natural resources, and how this affects taxation. Together with compulsory core modules in both subjects, you also have a choice of optional modules in Years 2 and 3, allowing you to develop your own interests.

Year 2 – Semester 3 • Statistical Methods in Economics • Games and Strategies Year 2 – Semester 4 • Macroeconomics 2 • Microeconomics 2 Year 3 – students must take at least six modules at Level 6, including one Economics and Finance Level 6 module.


School of Economics and Finance modules


The School of Economics and Finance

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School of Economics and Finance modules

ECN102 World Economy 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 2 The aim of this module is to introduce the basic concepts and methods that economists employ to analyse economic growth and international trade. It will review and analyse the current macroeconomic issues and events from the perspective of the business community and policymakers, including: strategies for growth; causes of trade deficits; consequences of government deficits; short-and long-term effects of monetary policy; and the globalisation of finance markets. The module will feature examples from both developed and developing countries to enhance knowledge of the world economy and skills in solving practical problems.

ECN106 Macroeconomics 1 (Macro 1) 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 2 This module is an introduction to what economists know about how

goods, labour and financial markets interact to determine aggregate variables (in particular output, employment and the aggregate price level). It aims to provide the essential concepts to understand the economic debate in the press and the foundations for further study in macroeconomics.

ECN121 Statistical Methods in Economics (SMIE) 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 2. This module is an introduction to probability and statistics. Topics include: descriptive statistics and linear regression; probability theory; random variables and probability distributions; sampling distributions; estimation; confidence intervals; hypothesis testing. The objective of this module is to give you a grounding in the use of data for description and inference. Topics include: descriptive statistics; probability theory; random variables and probability distributions; sampling

distributions; properties of estimators; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing.

ECN111 Microeconomics 1 (Micro 1) 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 2 Pre-requisite: ECN113 Principles of Economics or ECN199 This module is the first in a sequence of three modules intended to provide you with a thorough introduction to microeconomic theory. You will cover: introduction to microeconomic modelling; elementary theory of markets; consumer theory; preferences, budgets, and demand; expected utility theory; and inter-temporal choice.

ECN112 Spreadsheets and Data in Economics (SADIE) 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 1 This module concentrates on practical work related to the analysis of the UK economy. The initial section develops the skills to use spreadsheets in the graphical and tabular presentation of data, and an awareness of the sources, methods of construction and limitations of economic data. Students will then undertake brief investigations (involving institutional arrangements as well as data presentation) on three specified topics, covering such issues as consumer expenditure, government expenditure, and the measurement and interpretation of unemployment.


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The School of Economics and Finance

School of Economics and Finance modules

ECN113 Principles of Economics 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 1 Overlap: BUS017, ECN199 This module provides an introduction to economic reasoning and analysis. No prior knowledge of economics is necessary. The module will cover standard topics such as: demand, supply and price in consumer markets; demand, supply and price in labour markets: returns to education, the New Deal; competitive equilibrium: optimality; trade; market power; price discrimination, oligopoly, government policy; externalities and the environment; public goods, taxes and free-riding; globalisation; and growth.

ECN114 Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1 (MMEB 1) 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 1 Overlap: MTH4100, MTH4107 Topics include: concept of a function; linear functions; simultaneous linear equations; quadratic functions; rational functions; the concept of a derivative; rules of differentiation; the inverse function; optimisation of a function of one variable; second and higher derivatives; partial differentiation – conditions for relative extremum of a function of two variables; differentials and derivatives; total differentials; implicit functions; exponential and logarithmic functions and their derivatives – logarithms and

elasticity. A test (only to determine students' levels) will be held before the module begins. Students with unsatisfactory results in the pre-test will be required to attend support classes.

ECN120 Elements of Accounting 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 2 Pre-requisites: None Overlap: BUS021 This module will offer students a grounding in financial accounting from basic book keeping to the preparation of financial statements for sole traders and limited companies and an understanding of the way in which accounts are analysed using accounting ratios. Students will also learn the basic concepts of accounting and international accounting standards.

ECN124 Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 2 (MMEB 2) 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 2 Pre-requisite: ECN114 Mathematical Methods in Economics and Business 1 Topics include: extreme values of a function of two variables; optimisation with equality constraints; linear models and matrix algebra; optimisation problems: the n-variable case; optimisation with equality constraints: the n-variable case; integral calculus; first and second order differential equations; and first and second order difference equations.

ECN199 Economics Principles 15 credits, Level 4, Semester 1 Overlap: BUS017, ECN113 This module is a version of ECN113 intended only for LG11 and GL11 students.


The School of Economics and Finance

ECN205 Money and Banking 15 credits, Level 5, Semester 4 Prerequisite: ECN106 The aim of this module is to study the role of money in the macroeconomy, the behaviour of interest rates, banks and other intermediaries, and the regulation of both money markets and the banking system.

ECN206 Macroeconomics 2 (Macro 2) 15 credits, Level 5, Semester 3 Prerequisite: ECN106 Macroeconomics 1 This module looks at three main issues: open economy macroeconomics (as a continuation of the closed economy outlook taught in Macroeconomics I), growth theory (main approaches, their conclusions, and the check of evidence), and third, the supply of the economy (aggregate supply curve and Phillips curves, issues on stabilization policy and trade offs).

ECN209 International Finance 15 credits, Level 5, Semester 4 Prerequisites: ECN106, ECN111, and ECN206 Topics include: balance of payments; definitions; international consumption smoothing; nominal and real exchange rates; interest rate parity; elasticity approach to the trade balance; macroeconomic policy in an open economy; exchange rate determination under flexible and sticky prices,

and under exogenous and endogenous expectations; exchange rate regimes and speculative attacks; and optimal currency areas.

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ECN222 Financial Markets and Institutions (FMI) 15 credits, Level 5, Semester 3 Prerequisites: ECN106, ECN111. Overlap BUS201

ECN211 Microeconomics 2 (Micro 2) 15 credits, Level 5, Semester 4 Prerequisites: ECN111 ECN214. This is the second, in a sequence of three modules, intended to provide students with a thorough introduction to microeconomics. Topics covered include: producer theory (technology, cost functions, profit maximization, firm supply, monopoly); general equilibrium and exchange; welfare economics (theorems, externalities and public goods, surplus); and an introduction to asymmetric information.

ECN214 Games and Strategies 15 credits Level 5, Semester 3 Prerequisite: ECN111 Overlap BUS202 This module provides an introduction to game theory, a framework for studying situations of strategic interdependence. Students are shown how to describe such situations formally, how to analyse them using concepts of dominance and equilibrium, and how the theory can be applied to questions arising in various social sciences.

This module covers the basic economic principles underlying the working of national and international financial institutions. It introduces the basic theory and operation of financial systems from an economist’s viewpoint. The stress is on financial instruments, markets in which they are traded, and attendant structures. Students are expected to learn applying an economics perspective to the study of financial assets and institutions, and to form a coherent view of the disparate variables in financial activity, markets, and their governance as well as to understand these in the context of the current financial crisis.

ECN223 Selected Topics in Macroeconomics 15 credits, Level 5, Semester 4 Prerequisite: ECN206 Topics include: Consumption – lifecycle and permanent-income hypothesis; Inflation: causes and effects of inflation, disinflation, seignorage, dynamic inconsistency, and hyperinflation; Debts and deficits: the government budget constraint, Ricardian equivalence, fiscal policy, and output stabilization. In addition to these three topics, the module may cover additional topics such as Basics of monetary policy (eg money targets versus


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The School of Economics and Finance

School of Economics and Finance modules

interest targets); Rational expectations (eg policy ineffectiveness, Lucas critique); Investment; the Euro; Globalisation.

ECN224 Econometrics 1 15 credits, Level 5, Semester 3 Prerequisite: ECN121, ECN114, ECN124 This module builds on students’ basic understanding of statistics acquired in their first year to introduce them to the basic theoretical and practical principles of econometric analysis. There are two main goals: to strengthen and widen students’ knowledge and understanding of statistical analysis, and to provide a solid grounding of the theory and practice of simple and multiple regression analysis.

ECN225 Econometrics 2

ECN226 Capital Markets 1

ECN302 Corporate Strategy

15 credits, Level 5, Semester 4

15 credits, Level 6, Semester 5

Prerequisite: ECN111.

Prerequisite: ECN214

Overlap BUS306

This module provides an overview of corporate strategy in a global context and will enable students to become familiar with the core concepts of: External environmental analysis, models of internal and external analysis, models of internal and external analysis, analysis and management of resources: analysis of corporate strengths and weaknesses; knowledge management; development of strategic choice; elements influencing implementation of strategy.

This module is an introductory module in financial economics and it aims to develop an understanding of the foundations of modern portfolio theory. Topics to be covered include: risk and return, risk preferences and asset allocation, portfolio optimisation and its equilibrium implications, index models, CAPM, multifactor models, the efficient market hypothesis, behavioural finance, empirical evidence on security pricing, bond prices and yields, term structure of interest rates, and bond portfolios.

ECN231 Economics of Social Issues 15 credits, Level 5, Semester 3

15 credits, Level 5, Semester 4

Prerequisite: ECN111

Prerequisite: ECN224

This is a module in the applied microeconomic analysis of social issues of topical importance in the UK. Issues examined will vary according to topicality, but the following subjects illustrate the range of the course: income inequality and poverty; labour market policies; education; pensions; crime; and pollution.

This module builds heavily on Econometrics 1 module, equipping students with further econometric tools that are relevant in current applied economics. Topics include nonlinear regression functions, instrumental variables regression, stationary and nonstationary time series, panel data and regression with binary dependent variable.

ECN322 Topics in Econometrics 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 5 Prerequisite: ECN202 Introductory Econometrics This module develops the knowledge of econometric methods that are useful in the analysis of economic phenomena and financial markets. The module is suitable for students with interest in theory and empirical applications of econometrics and for students considering master studies. The topics considered may differ over years. Candidate topics are maximum likelihood estimation, GMM estimators, panel data, limited dependent variable models, ARCH and GARCH models, structural change and time series.


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ECN326 Economics Project 1

ECN336 Applied Econometrics

15 credits, Level 6, Semester 5 or 6

15 credits, Level 6, Semester 5

Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211 Overlap: ECN325 Economics Project 2 Independent work on a topic in economics, which can be of a theoretical or applied nature and can involve the use of any appropriate techniques.

ECN325 Economics Project 2 30 credits, Level 6, Semester 5 and 6 Overlap: ECN326

Prerequisite: ECN224 This module provides students with a “hands on� environment in which they learn how to analyse real economic data by applying economic theories and econometric methods in combination. This module also aims to develop students' abilities in data collection, information gathering and critical evaluation of what is taught in textbooks. Assessment is through coursework only.

Prerequisite: ECN206 or ECN211

ECN331 Industrial Economics

ECN344 Economics of Technology and Innovation (Economics of Innovation)

15 credits, Level 6, Semester 6

15 credits, Level 6, Semester 6

Prerequisites ECN211 and ECN214

Prerequisite: ECN211

This is an expansion of ECN326.

This module deals with intra-firm behaviour and industrial organisation. Topics covered in past years include: performance pay, Coase's theory of the firm, price discrimination, quantity competition, differentiated products, cartel formation, antitrust policy, advertising, research and development, and entry deterrence.

This module examines the challenges, and the opportunities, that technological innovation and

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information management present companies and managers. The emphasis is on the development and application of conceptual models that clarify the interactions between information management, technological change, competition, firm positioning, and the structure and development of internal firm capabilities. Topics addressed include: understanding information technology markets; technology discontinuities; technology forecasting; network externalities and standards competition; profiting from innovation; new market entry strategy; and organising to innovate.


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School of Economics and Finance modules

ECN346 Business Cycles 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 6 Prerequisite: ECN206 This module aims at evaluating how business cycle theories perform when confronted with business cycles stylised facts. The theories are presented based on a micro-founded inter-temporal model of the economy that provides understanding on how different types of shocks cause macroeconomic fluctuations.

ECN351 Environmental Economics 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 6 Prerequisite: ECN111 Topics include: sustainable and unsustainable development; the economic determinants of population growth; strategies of population control; inter-temporal resource management; renewable and exhaustible resources; global warming, ozone depletion and acid rain externalities and the control of pollution; economic management of forest resources; and the exploitation of the sea.

ECN352 Public Economics 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 6 Prerequisite: ECN211, ECN214 This module aims to show how economic theory can help us to design and evaluate public policy. The main focus of the module is to familiarise students with basic notions, models and results of Public Economics. Primary attention will be given to the expenditure side of the economy, especially to externalities, public

goods, social choice, and local public goods. We take examples from environmental and tax policy, as well as the analysis of projects and inequality.

ECN355 Macroeconomic Policy 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 5 Prerequisite: ECN206 This module presents the theoretical underpinnings of modern macroeconomic policy, providing a critical understanding of the policy debate and knowledge of the tools of the trade. Topics covered include: fiscal policy, temporary vs. permanent tax changes, policy sustainability, money creation, seignorage, inflation, monetary policy rules, UK monetary arrangements and liquidity traps.

ECN356 Labour Economics 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 6 Prerequisite: ECN111 Topics include: the supply of labour; the demand for labour; labour market equilibrium; human capital and signalling; labour market discrimination; trade unions; compensating wage differentials; incentive pay; labour mobility; unemployment; and labour market policy.

ECN358 Futures and Options 15 credits, Level 36 Semester 6 Prerequisite: ECN226 Topics include operation of forward and futures markets; arbitrage and its application to forward and futures prices; hedging; options – use of options in hedging and speculation; price bounds and put-call parity; elements of stochastic calculus and its application to the BlackScholes model; delta hedging; binomial pricing models, early exercise and exotic options; regulatory issues.

ECN361 Advanced Microeconomics 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 5 Prerequisites: ECN211, ECN214 This module aims to help students bridge the gap between undergraduate and postgraduate economics. It is therefore strongly recommended for all students who are considering continuing to a taught Masters degree in Economics. The module will attempt to develop students’ capacity for strategic reasoning via the translation of economic stories into simple models, spelling out every step of each argument in detail. Topics covered include: individual decision-making; efficiency of competitive market economy and causes of market failure; social choice and welfare; and information economics.


The School of Economics and Finance

ECN369 Health Economics 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 5 Prerequisite: ECN211, ECN231 is also advised. This module covers the application of economic principles to the study of health. Topics will include the demand for health care and its supply; issues in health care finance, including uncertainty, insurance, and the rationale for public and private provision; the extent to which welfare economics can be applied to health, including definitions of inequality and the links between inequalities in income and health; overview of reforms of the health care sector; and evaluation of health care treatments (cost effectiveness and cost utility analysis).

ECN370 Development Economics 15 credits, Level 6, Semester 5 Prerequisites: ECN206, ECN211 This module is concerned with the analysis of economic problems faced by developing countries from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It focuses, on the one hand, on the meaning, measurements, and comparability of growth and development across countries (ie income per capita, income distribution and poverty) and, on the other hand, on the availability and characteristics of resources (ie labour, land, capital, savings), and the problems with their use in the context of

developing countries vis-Ă -vis OECD countries. The above is presented in the analytic context of (historical) alternative development models and globalisation issues. Although the module does not demand advanced mathematics it does require the use of some mathematics and a fair amount of reading.

ECN371 Corporate Finance 1 15 credits, Level 6 Semester 5 Prerequisite: ECN226 This module is part of a twomodule sequence that studies how firms make their investment decisions and design their capital structure. This first part deals with Capital Budgeting, building on the asset pricing notions acquired in the Capital Markets 1 module. Topics covered include: finance and the financial manager, present values, the objective of the firm, and corporate governance, how to calculate present values, the value of bonds and common stocks, superiority of decisions based on present value methods making investment decisions with the net present value rule, risk-return and the cost of capital, recap on portfolio theory, capital budgeting and risk, and the practical problems in capital budgeting.

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ECN372 Corporate Finance 2 15 credits, Level 6 Semester 6 Prerequisite: ECN371 This module is part of a twomodule sequence that studies how firms make their investment decisions and design their capital structure. This second part deals with issues of capital structure, mergers and acquisitions, and looks at topics of capital structure with asymmetric information and corporate governance. Topics include: The Modigliani-Miller theorems, optimal debt/equity mix with taxes and costly bankruptcy, bankruptcy costs and debtholderequityholder conflicts, managerial incentives, basic credit rationing models with asymmetric information, optimal capital structure and agency costs, the information conveyed by financial decisions, and corporate governance models. For further information please see the School of Economics and Finance website: www.econ.qmul.ac.uk You may also find the following website interesting: www.whystudyeconomics.ac.uk


Career opportunities and internships


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Career opportunities and internships

Career opportunities You will have excellent career prospects with a degree in Economics from Queen Mary. Our graduates follow careers across a wide range of sectors, and a number go on to postgraduate study. According to the latest graduate salary and vacancy review from the Association of Graduate Recruiters (AGR), the top recruiting sectors continue to be accountancy and banking, which between them offer a third of all vacancies. Economics is especially good preparation for work in the financial and business services sector, for example in chartered accountancy firms, banks and finance houses of various types. In recent years, past graduates have found employment in Barclays, Barings Asset Management, Deloitte Touche, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan and KPMG as well as a host of smaller firms in and around London. You could also consider financial and economic journalism, management traineeships and employment in the public sector. Of those graduating in recent years, around one third have gone on to do a postgraduate Masters degree in Economics, Finance, Management or Information Technology.

Graduate profile: Pavlo Smoliy Studied: BSc Economics, Finance and Management, Currently: Assistant Manager, Reorganisation Services Tax, Deloitte LLP Why did you choose Queen Mary? As an international student I found Queen Mary offered great teaching for a reasonable tuition fee. Having a University of London degree from Queen Mary certainly helps in the job market. How did your time at Queen Mary prepare you for work? For some modules I was required to prepare professional presentations and deliver them to a wider audience. These skills proved to be very important at my workplace. Did you encounter any difficulties securing this job, and how did you get over them? The greatest challenge was getting through the initial application screening stages in order to secure an interview. Your job application has to clearly stand out from the rest of the crowd. What does your current job involve day-to-day? • Tax efficient planning and reorganisation of financially distressed businesses. • Tax compliance and tax audit of large multinationals. • Providing advice on tax risk minimisation strategies • Assisting clients with their future expansion plans etc.


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Career opportunities and internships

Transferable skills

Graduate profile: Punit Harish Ghumra

More than 65 per cent of graduate jobs do not specify a subject: they are open to people with a degree in any subject. Studying at degree level gives you the opportunity to develop valuable transferable skills, from conducting research and factual analysis, through to using IT, and delivering effective presentations. Many economics modules use assessed group work specially designed to develop your numeracy, interpersonal, timekeeping and managerial skills. The Careers Service at Queen Mary can help you find vocational, part-time and vacation work that will help you develop valuable work experience, something that will make you more attractive to potential employers. At Queen Mary, you will also have plenty of opportunity to get involved with student-run initiatives, such as writing for cub – the official Students’ Union magazine, or running a club or society of your choice, including the Economics Society run by students in the School of Economics and Finance.

Studied: BSc in Economics 2010 Currently: Student Finance and Banking Advisor, RBS How did you find out about your current job and what does it involve? I applied online and was called for interview. My duties are very varied. Without going into too much detail, I sell the banks products targeting students, for example investigating university accommodation insurance policies and ISAs for unused student loans. What can current students do to prepare for getting a job in your area? Be familiar with domestic banking operations and engage yourself in the investment pages to become acquainted with up and coming financial changes. A client will never appreciate it if you do not have your finger on the pulse, especially when their money is at stake. Remember banking is not just about a savings account but a whole variety of finance options from insurance through to mortgages which is where the bank really makes its money.

Excellent starting salaries Queen Mary, University of London graduates are in the top 10 for starting salaries in the UK, according to the Sunday Times (2010), and we have been for the last four years. According to the Annual Graduate Recruitment survey (summer 2010) graduates entering the investment banking sector can expect a starting salary in the region of ÂŁ35,000.

Internships Many students undertake internships to get a taster of life as an Economics and Finance graduate. See the student profiles on pages 11 and 12 for examples from some of our students.


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Student life – Students’ Union, student support and health services


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Student life – Students’ Union, student support and health services

Students’ Union All Queen Mary students automatically become members of QMSU, an active and flourishing Students’ Union run by students for students. Best known for its clubs and societies, there are literally hundreds to choose from, whether your interests lie in football or philately. And if you have a passion that isn’t represented, you can always start your own club. Clubs and societies provide a great opportunity for meeting people, especially those who are studying a different subject to you. One of the aims of QMSU is to ensure that your time at university is not just about work, but also includes socialising and personal development.

QMotion QMotion is Queen Mary’s recently refurbished Health and Fitness centre. Equipped with a great range of exercise machines and weights, there’s also a women only area and loads of classes including yoga, spinning and Pilates. There’s a squash court and sports hall on campus, and a swimming pool a short distance away.

Sports Playing sports is a good way to relax after a day spent studying. Queen Mary teams regularly compete against other college teams, and there’s a great social scene with after-match drinks and a regular social night, Hail Mary, hosted by one of the SU’s sports teams. There’s even a team of cheerleaders, the Queen Mary Angels!

QM Provide: Volunteering Volunteering with charities and non-profit organisations is a brilliant way to explore what London has to offer, make a difference and really get involved in your local area. You can volunteer on a regular basis in a placement with a local charity or organisation, doing anything from mentoring local school students, to volunteering in local hospitals, to becoming a helpline volunteer and managing a local sports team. See: www.providevolunteering.org

Student support You will be assigned an academic adviser when you start at Queen Mary who will stay with you throughout your studies. Your adviser will help you choose modules (some programmes offer greater flexibility when it comes to module choice), sign any forms you need and help you with any academic or personal problems that you have.

Most students find it extremely helpful to have one adviser on hand throughout their time at Queen Mary.

Health services All the services are provided for all students and staff living in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. In order to access these services and other available services under the NHS, you need to register with the Globe Town surgery at the Student Health Centre at the beginning of term. Students living outside Tower Hamlets can be treated on campus in the event of an urgent medical situation. For more information see: www.globetown.org/qmu/

Advice and counselling Our advice service offers in-depth and specialist advice on a range of financial, practical and legal issues, such as student finance, housing rights, immigration law and international student issues. Counselling is also available – from cognitive behavioural therapy, ongoing weekly therapy groups and support groups on specific issues such as anxiety, academic performance. Our advice and counselling service is a completely free and confidential service. For more information see: www.welfare.qmul.ac.uk


Accommodation


The School of Economics and Finance

Accommodation

If you live close enough to the College to commute, you will normally be expected to live at home until rooms become available after term begins, once all those students who cannot commute are housed. Once you have firmly accepted your offer to study at Queen Mary, full details on how to apply for College housing will be sent to you by the Admissions Office. Queen Mary students also have access to places in the fullycatered Intercollegiate Halls in central London, which are owned centrally by the University of London.

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You feel like you belong a bit more, living on campus. The place is packed with people all doing the same thing, unloading their cars at the beginning of term. It’s really sociable. Jen Holton

Another option is a house share. There are a number of privately let houses in the area suitable for groups of students to share. The residences office can put you in touch with local landlords, as well as groups of students who are looking for extra people to make up numbers. For more information, see: www.residences.qmul.ac.uk

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If you are a single full-time firstyear undergraduate, apply during the normal admissions cycle, and have not lived in Queen Mary’s housing before, you may be eligible for accommodation on campus. Priority is given to those applying by the deadline of 30 June of the year of entry, and those who live furthest away. This offer does not extend to students who join through the Clearing process or those holding insurance offers with Queen Mary, although every attempt is made to accommodate them, subject to availability.

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Queen Mary is unique among central London's universities in being able to offer a completely integrated residential campus, with a 2,000-bed award-winning Student Village on its Mile End campus.

I had a beautiful canal view from my room. I just can’t believe this is student accommodation – it’s very airy, bright, fresh and clean. Fariah Khan

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School of Economics and Finance entry requirements


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School of Economics and Finance entry requirements A-levels

Grades requirement: AAB from three A-Levels. Additional information: Must include A-level maths. Excluded subjects: General studies, critical thinking, use of maths.

Vocational or applied A-levels

Accepted only when combined with other qualifications must include A level maths.

Key Skills

Results of key skills tests will not form part of the offer of a place.

BTEC National Certificate (12 units)

Not accepted.

BTEC National Diploma (18 units)

Not accepted.

International Baccalaureate

Accepted.

European Baccalaureate

Accepted.

Access to HE Diploma

Not accepted.

European and international qualifications

The university accepts a wide range of EU and international qualifications, including selected international foundation programmes. For further information please contact the Admissions Office, or visit: www.qmul.ac.uk/international/

Additional information Must be in a related subject such as maths or economics.

Subjects and grades required: 36 points • Must include HL Mathematics 5.

Subjects and grades required: 80 per cent including Mathematics.

countries

Entry requirements for GL11, Mathematics, Statistics and Financial Economics

A-levels

Grades requirement: AAB from three A-Levels. Additional information: Must include A-level maths. You must also have at least grade C in GCSE English Language, or equivalent.

International Baccalaureate

Accepted.

Subjects and grades required: 36 points total including at least 6 points in Higher Level Mathematics

For other qualifications please see www.qmul.ac.uk/entryrequirements/35653.html Entry requirements for LL71, Geography and Economics

A-levels

Grades requirement: 340 points from the best three A-levels. Though Geography A-level is preferred, it is not required. We usually ask for a grade B in Geography or another appropriate subject. Additional information: Grade B in A-level maths. Excluded subjects: General Studies

International Baccalaureate

Accepted.

Subjects and grades required: 36 points overall. Must include HL5 for Geography and Mathematics.

For other qualifications please see www.qmul.ac.uk/entryrequirements/35580.html


Living in London


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Living in London

With eight million residents, London is up there with Tokyo and NYC in terms of sheer size. Yet rather than a single city, London is actually a patchwork of different areas – many of them former villages in their own right. Many retain their own centres, with a parade of shops, bars and restaurants that reflects its own particular and historic character. Depending on your mood, the occasion and the kind of place you are looking for, you can make this diversity work to your advantage – there’s always somewhere that will suit your mood, budget, and the kind of occasion you are looking for. Queen Mary’s main campus is at Mile End, well connected to the rest of the city by tube. Mile End (Central line) and Stepney Green (Hammersmith and City, and District lines) are both a short walk away.

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A world-famous city and the nation’s capital, London is an exciting place to live. If you’re new to the city, you’re in for a treat; and if you’ve lived here before, then you’ll know there’s always more to explore. Either way, student life in London promises to be an adventure.

It love the feel of London. It’s the perfect place to be a student, there’s so much to do. Jen Holton, Drama student


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Living in London

1 Old Street, and surrounding EAT… Yelo, on Hoxton Square (Thai food) Shish, an upmarket kebab restaurant. VISIT… White Cube2 Gallery. This area is the epicentre of the East End’s artistic community. SHOP… The Hoxton Boutique. The Sunday Flower Market at Columbia Road is legendary amongst Londoners.

2 Shoreditch, and Brick Lane EAT… Brick Lane is London’s ‘Curry Capital’– an entire street lined with Indian and Bangladeshi restaurants. Brick Lane Beigel Bake, open 24-hours (great for bagel emergencies). VISIT… The Old Truman

Brewery, a converted brewery and home to numerous fashion designers, artists and DJs. All Star Lanes, a boutique bowling alley serving burgers and cocktails.

3 Bow Wharf The complex includes: The Fat Cat Café Bar; The Thai Room; and Jongleurs Comedy Club, which, as well as the comedy, has a bar and restaurant plus postcomedy disco on Friday and Saturday nights.

4 Docklands, and Canary Wharf EAT… Ubon by Nobu (the sister restaurant to the West End favourite of the stars), or Carluccio’s, an Italian chain serving exceptional food. Wagamama in the Jubilee Place Mall. Bene Bene, which offers a huge selection of seriously cheap sandwiches, salads, bagels and desserts. VISIT… The Museum in Docklands, which explores the story of the docks from Roman settlement through to recent regeneration.


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Kings Cross British Library

Victoria Park

3

EAST LONDON

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To Olympic Stadium

Bethnal Green

Euston

TOWER HAMLETS

Islington Bloomsbury

Stepney Green

Clerkenwell

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Mile End

ULU: Students’ Union

1 Leicester Square

Chancery Lane Barbican

Liverpool Street

Shoreditch Mile End Park

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Holborn

CITY OF LONDON

HOLBORN St Paul’s

Temple

Blackfriars

Bank

Whitechapel Aldgate

Limehouse

Tower Hill Tower of London

4 Canary Wharf

Mansion House Monument

Charing Cross

To O2 Arena

St James’ Park

SOUTHWARK

London Bridge

Wapping

Waterloo

5 Bethnal Green, and Victoria Park

6 Mile End, and surrounding area

EAT… E Pellici, on Bethnal Green Road, an Italian greasy spoon café which has been around since 1900. Broadway Market has a great choice restaurants, pubs and bars. VISIT… Modern Art and Vilma Gold galleries on Vyner Street, just north of Bethnal Green.

EAT… with Mile End’s big range

of eating places, our students never go hungry, whatever their culinary skills. The small parade of shops between the College and Mile End Station includes a Nando’s barbecue chicken restaurant, Roastars coffee, a Budgens with a hot food counter, and the Golden Bird, a popular Chinese restuarant. Turning right out of the College towards Stepney Green, there’s the Pride of Asia (Bangladeshi), and The

Half Moon, a Wetherspoon’s pub serving traditional pub fare. The Palm Tree pub by Regent’s Canal and The Crown pub at the top of Grove Road are also both highly recommended. VISIT… Mile End Park, 90 acres of greenery in the heart of the East End where you’ll find an ecology park, an arts park, and a terraced garden and a sports park. The Mile End Stadium includes an eight lane athletics track, artificial hockey/football pitches and grass football pitches. The Genesis Cinema – go on Wednesday night for a student discount. The Whitechapel Gallery is famous for exhibitions by big name artists.


Next steps


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Next steps

There are three types of applicant:

The best way to find out about Queen Mary is to visit; talk to academic staff in the school you are interested in, see the halls of residence, sample a sandwich from a campus café.

1 Students at a school or college registered with UCAS All UK schools and colleges (and many establishments overseas) are registered with UCAS to manage their students’ applications. Advice is available from your teacher or a careers adviser at your school or college. You fill in an online application and submit it to a member of staff.

The College runs two annual Open / Visit Days (find out when the next one is at: www.qmul.ac.uk/visitus/ campusvisitdays/), as well as bookable Campus Tours throughout the year. You’ll be shown around by one of our students in a small group – so you’ll have the chance to ask as many questions as you like. Find out more about visiting the College at: www.qmul.ac.uk/visitus/

Applying to Queen Mary For all full-time higher education programmes at universities and colleges in the UK, students must apply online at: www.ucas.com You’ll find full instructions to help you fill in your online application, plus help text where appropriate. UCAS also has a comprehensive guide called Applying Online, which can be downloaded from the website (www.ucas.com). Offers are made on the basis of your interview performance and your UCAS form.

After checking your details, and having added the academic reference, your school or college submits the completed application online to UCAS. You pay online using a credit card or debit card. You may also be able to pay through your school or college. 2 Independent applicants in the UK Other UK applicants, who are not at school or college, apply online independently. It is likely that you are a mature applicant, who, unlike school and college students, cannot readily seek advice from your teacher, but can instead consult with various careers organisations (such as Connexions). You are responsible for paying the correct application fee, for obtaining and attaching the academic reference and for submitting the completed application online to UCAS.

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Visit us

I can’t stress enough how important it is to go to the university and have a look around, and talk to a student who can tell you about what it’s like to be there.” Helen Pritchard-Smith. Student

3 International applicants outside the UK (EU and worldwide) Except for those whose school or college is registered with UCAS, individuals from the EU (excluding the UK), and worldwide, apply online independently. Advice is available from British Council offices and other centres overseas, such as your school or college or one of our overseas representatives. You will find a step-by-step guide to applying at: www.qmul.ac.uk/international/ howtoapply/index.htm

Contact us Admissions Coordinator School of Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7355 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 7032 email: econfin-admissions@qmul.ac.uk For more information see: www.econ.qmul.ac.uk


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Notes


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Notes

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Notes


For more information see: www.econ.qmul.ac.uk

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Admissions Coordinator School of Economics and Finance Queen Mary, University of London London E1 4NS Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7355 Fax: +44 (0)20 7882 7032 email: econfin-admissions@qmul.ac.uk


Economics Undergraduate brochure 2011