Issuu on Google+

Queen Mary University of London School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Undergraduate Studies

eecs.qmul.ac.uk


Produced by Marketing and Communications, Queen Mary University of London 0196_13 The information given in this prospectus is correct at the time of going to press. The College reserves the right to modify or cancel any statement in it and accepts no responsibility for the consequences of any such changes. For the most up-todate information, please refer to the website www.qmul.ac.uk Any section of this publication is available upon request in accessible formats (large print, audio, etc.). For further information and assistance, please contact: Diversity Specialist, hr-equality@qmul.ac.uk, 020 7882 5585 This prospectus has been printed on environmentally friendly material from well-managed sources.


Contents

Introduction

The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science at Queen Mary University of London

Why study at Queen Mary?

Degree programmes

Career opportunities Student life, Students’ Union, student support and health services

2 3 4 8 24

Our home in the east

28 32 34 36

Next steps

38

Accommodation

Living in London


Introduction


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

3

The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science at Queen Mary University of London Opening up the world of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Whether you want to develop the next iPad, teach computers to spot suspicious activities in CCTV footage or unlock the secrets of DNA, electronic engineering and computer science are fascinating fields, which play a key role in solving everyday problems and driving scientific and technological progress that advance society and improve our quality of life. These fields unite diverse subjects, such as software engineering, multimedia, electronics, networking and communications, art, digital music, physics and mathematics, with problem solving as the central theme. Electronic engineers may design flight simulators, body scanners, global positioning satellites or computer information networks. Computer scientists may develop new antifraud technology, design a 3D-computer game, create a new mobile phone application or write code for a new program to support. Both electronic engineers and computer scientists apply analytical thinking, design and programming skills to create innovative solutions. They work on a wide range of problems, from finding new ways to improve things we already do, for example, making computers faster and smaller (even down to the size of a grain of sand!) to discovering entirely new things to do. They address varied questions, such as: How can we develop the next generation of mobile communication devices and apps? How can we embed health monitoring devices into every day clothing items?

How can we teach computers and CCTV cameras to spot suspicious activities in large crowds at train stations? And how do we design alternatively powered vehicles? Electronic engineers and computer scientists operate in a range of fields, including: • Telecommunications – working on radio links, optical fibres and satellites, enabling global digital communication, as well as embedded systems for controlling “smart” homes • Multimedia and creative industries – leading innovations in combining computer vision, music and speech for use in different environments, both real and virtual • Security and finance – developing firewalls, secure e-commerce transactions and anti-fraud technology, crucial in today’s high-tech e-commerce world • IT management – developing engineering solutions that allow companies to make the best use of new technologies and unlock the huge potential of the Internet. Our courses are designed to give you the skills to achieve a career in these growth industries or set you on a path for advanced studies. If you want to use your creativity, vision and talent to help develop and manage tomorrow’s technologies, these are the fields for you.


Why study at Queen Mary?


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

5

Why study at QM?

Queen Mary is the fourth largest college of the University of London and teaches a full range of subjects across science, engineering, medicine, social science and humanities. Studying with us is a challenging and invigorating experience that enables you to develop your life-long career prospects, while studying in a research-intensive environment. You will be taught by worldleading academics in the fields. You will benefit from our strong links with industrial partners. We have collaborations, partnerships, industrial placement schemes and public engagement programmes with a variety of organisations, including Vodafone, IBM, BT, NASA, BBC, and Microsoft.

World-class reputation We have a world-class reputation for delivering pioneering research in the fields of electronic engineering and computer science. Our research covers a wide range of areas including telecommunications, computer vision, digital music and we are leaders in the new field of on-body communications. Some ways in which this research has been applied include remote health monitoring and communications for emergency personnel. The most recent UK Research Assessment Exercise places us in the top 20 UK universities for both electronic engineering and computer science. Our research in the real world We have been the home to a number of original ideas that have subsequently become successful spin-out companies. These include: QApps (provides smartphone and social networking apps); Chatterbox (provides conversation analytics software to

monitor brand-related discussions on social media); and Vision Semantics Ltd (develops software to manage facilities and enhance security). A start-up company, Monoidics (develops automatic formal verification and analysis software), was co-founded by one of our professors, Dino Distefano, and recently bought by Facebook.

Our academics and teaching excellence Our academics are dedicated to sharing their passion for their subjects through teaching and research and have received numerous awards, including: nine awards for teaching from bodies such as the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Royal Academy of Engineering, Royal Society and the European Research Council; a CBE for services to computer science; and a Mountbatten Media Award for excellence in communicating computer science. They publish in leading journals, such as IEEE and ACM transactions, author books, lead international conferences and comment in the media. What this means for you Your teachers will be genuine experts in their fields, who will share their up-to-date knowledge and passion for their subject with you. You will see them apply their knowledge in real-life situations, for example, commenting on news stories on television and in the press, as well as appearing in professional settings. The 2012 National Student Survey (which asks students about their experiences at university) places Computer Science at Queen Mary joint 6th out of 113 institutions


6

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Why study at QM?

in the UK with an overall satisfaction score of 93 per cent. 87 per cent of Electronic Engineering students are satisfied with their personal development. We have seen an 8 per cent increase in the overall satisfaction results over the last three years.

You will have access to three computing laboratories hosting over 300 PCs, with exclusive use of two floors in our purposebuilt, climate controlled, award winning informatics teaching laboratory (ITL) outside of scheduled laboratory sessions.

Queen Mary joins the Russell Group In recognition of our excellence in research and teaching, Queen Mary has joined the Russell Group of leading UK universities. The Group, which includes other top universities such as Oxford, Cambridge and UCL, attracts the brightest students from all over the world. Graduates from Russell Group universities are especially valued by employers, giving you a head start when you apply for jobs.

The ITL hosts over 250 state-of-the-art PCs, running both linux and windows software capable of multimedia post-production and several laser printers. In addition, there are video conference facilities, seminar rooms, and on-site teaching services and technical support. There are also a number of breakout spaces available to students with full wi-fi access, enabling you to connect your own laptops and devices. The ITL is primarily used for taught laboratory sessions and regularly hosts research and industryled workshops and drop-in lab facilities.

School highlights • Most of our degree programmes have professional accreditation from the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) or the British Computer Society (BCS). • The opportunity to take a year-long industrial placement at a wide range of organisations as part of your degree. • Specialist degrees which allow you to focus your programme on your area of interest. • Unique and innovative world-class research facilities including a Virtual and Augmented Human Interaction Laboratory. • We prepare you for the techinologies of tomorrow with research driven teaching and a practical 'learn by doing' cirriculum. Facilities The School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science offers undergraduates students their own computing laboratory in addition to the hundreds of computers available across campus.

Our Media and Arts Technology Studios house our Mac Pro multimedia editing suite; versatile Live Performance Spaces; and state-of-the-art audio and video recording and production studios and post-production suites. These facilities are used for teaching specialist modules on the Audio Systems Engineering and Multimedia and Arts Technology (MAT) degree programmes. We also host specialist laboratories, to use for carrying out practical experiments and research. Our augmented human interaction (AHI) laboratory combines pioneering technologies including full-body and multi-person motion capture, virtual and augmented reality systems and advanced aural and visual display technologies. We also have specialist laboratories in multimedia; telecommunication networks; and microwave antennas. In addition to these spaces, MAT students have generous study space in our research laboratories. In


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

2011 we completed the £2m development of new experimental facilities in Antennas and Media and Arts Technology. Did you know? • We helped set up the first internet node in the UK and were the first to provide the now popular Apple/Unix workstations for students. • 93 per cent of our students were satisfied with the overall quality of their course and more than 87 per cent praised the level of access to IT resources ranking Computer Science as joint 6th in a recent National Student’s Survey. • We have our own app store, QApps, where apps developed in-house by our staff and students are available for download (qappsonline.com). • We were the first university in the UK to establish a fully collaborative joint degree programme with a Chinese university. • We were one of the first universities in Britain to have an Electrical and Electronic Engineering, teaching and research department. Campus university We are unique in that we are a compact campus university that is 15 minutes from central London and less than a couple of miles from the area around Old Street known as Silicon Roundabout or Tech City, home to at least 400+ digital start-ups, including Last.fm, SoundCloud and TweetDeck. We have links with many companies in the area and are very much part of the IT revolution.

7

Our location allows our students to have the best of both worlds. You can experience life in one of the greatest global cities as well as benefit from the convenience of living on campus. Our campus is well located: we are 10 minutes from the Olympic Park, Stratford City, and Canary Wharf. Student Village

Our Student Village provides accommodation at our Mile End campus for more than 2,000 students. Living on campus is incredibly convenient. Not only are you just five minutes from your bed to your lecture theatre but all the facilities you need including cafes, bars, the gym and squash courts, the library and computer suites are located within a short walk. Our history We have been teaching Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Queen Mary for 125 years. Queen Mary University of London was formed in 1989 from the merger of Queen Mary College and Westfield College, both member colleges of the University of London. The campus is located on the historic home of Queen Mary College which began life in the 19th Century as the People’s Palace, a philanthropic centre for the intellectual and cultural improvement of east Londoners. Westfield College was founded in 1882 in Hampstead as a pioneering college for the higher education of women. In 1995 the College merged again, this time with two leading medical colleges, to create Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry within Queen Mary. The London Hospital Medicine College, England’s first medical school, was established in 1785 and St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical College was founded in 1843.


Degree programmes

EECS Student: Kleomenis Katevas demonstrating his project - The Sign Language Glove - a wearable device that recognises American Sign Language (ASL) gestures and translates them into text.


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

9

Degree programmes

To help you choose the right career path for you, our degree programmes are organised into four themes: • Computer Science • Electronics, Telecommunications and Audio Engineering • Media and Arts Technology • Information Technology Management for Business

Computer Science G400, G401, G450, G4N1, G4N2, GG41 60 years since the introduction of the first commercial computers, they have transformed the way we live and work. Computers are used for communication, entertainment and commerce; controlling robots, monitoring hospital patients, flying aeroplanes and helping us to drive cars. Devices are smaller, cheaper and yet more powerful, and change shows no sign of slowing: new industries are created, existing ones transformed. To stay ahead, it is vital to understand how: computers work, new applications are created, and people and computers work together. This is analytical and logical, yet also innovative and creative. Our Computer Science programmes combine: programming, the design of computers and networks, the theory of computers, as well as usability, media and creativity. IT is vital in so many industries giving you a wide range of career choices. Would you like to work in the finance industry, where computers and networks provide the mechanism for transactions across the world? Or one of London's start-up companies clustered in the East End, many in new media and creativity? Alternatively,

you could join one of the great technology companies or consultancies. Studying Computer Science will give you the confidence to play a significant part in the greatest wave of technological innovation of all time.

Electronics, Telecommunications and Audio Engineering H600, H610, H611, H690, H691, HI61, HI6C, H657, H642 What do the following all have in common: your smart-phone, video streams of important events anywhere in the world, surfing the Internet, processing data from a crime scene, and a surgical procedure to remove a brain tumour? They all rely on electronics. Mankind has travelled from the deepest ocean to the moon, and has sent probes into deep space, and all this has been made possible by electronic systems. You might say that electronic engineers are the people who make the modern world function. Why is electronics so powerful? It is because electronics allows us to make our thoughts and ideas a reality. Due to its power and wide applicability studying electronics is both challenging and rewarding. Here at QM you will learn all the skills you need to prepare you for an exciting career in fields such as digital and analogue electronics, networking, audio systems engineering, and business information technology. And when you graduate, you will be very well positioned to go into the most rapidly expanding sector of the job market with an internationally recognised degree accredited by The Institution of Engineering and Technology.


10

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Degree programmes

Multimedia and Arts Technology

• Social media e.g. Facebook and Twitter;

I150, I151

• Video streaming e.g. YouTube; SmartTV; BBC iPlayer and online shopping e.g. Amazon, John Lewis, Sainsbury's;

There is shortage of talent – those with the combination of creative and technical knowledge and skills – for the UK digital creative industries. Our Multimedia and Arts Technology (MAT) degree is aimed at students who are passionate about the visual arts or sound/music and want to develop technology to change our world. Students on this course will learn the core skills for new media production –interactive media design, programming for arts applications, creating interactive objects – as well as understanding the theory that underpins computer and multimedia systems. To develop these technical and creative skills, MAT students have access to our computer and multimedia labs, our recording studios and our performance space. Modules that the MAT students take include: arts application programming, computer systems and networks, web design and authoring, graphical user interfaces, sound design, digital media and social networks, plus optional modules from our film and geography departments. Students from this degree will have the range of artistic, design and technical skills to fulfill many posts in creative industries within Tech City and beyond.

Information Technology Management for Business NI11, I100 “Information = Data” The world today is driven by the collection, analysis and strategic use of data. The Internet is therefore being improved to cope with increased data use for:

• Crime analysis e.g. Metropolitan Police; • Research analysis e.g. GlaxoSmithKline and • Online banking and finance e.g. HSBC, MorganStanley. The list of organisations that rely on the Internet for data collection, analysis and their strategic decisions is exhaustive. But, who manages all this data? Who analyses the data and uses it to predict financial market trends, shopping behaviour trends; societal trends etc? Who decides what infrastructure is needed to support this data collection and analysis? Who manages the projects that implement and manage the infrastructure in order to carry out the data collection and analysis? Well, it’s those people employed in Information Technology Management. Virtually every organisation; from companies whose product is technology like Cisco; to those who use technology to deliver their core business like John Lewis and HSBC; they all need and use information (Data) and Technology – and it all needs managing. Those Information Technology Management people have a foundation in programming, network infrastructure, information systems, databases, economics, accounting, marketing, data mining and this is what a degree in Information Technology Management can offer you. Our three programmes will prepare you for this exciting world of data.


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Computer Science BSc BSc MSci

3 Years (G400) with Industrial Experience – 4 Years (G402) 4 Years (G401)

Computer systems are some of the most complex human artefacts ever created. A degree in computer science takes you into a world that combines logical thinking with creativity and challenges you to imagine the technology of the future. The degree starts with core topics in programming, algorithms, software engineering, databases, computer systems and networks. You can specialise in subjects such as computer graphics, artificial intelligence and distributed systems. Much of the learning is practical, building a variety of software systems in progressively more demanding contexts. The MSci (G401) follows the same structure as the BSc (G400) at first but includes an additional year of specialist study in such topics as computer vision, human-computer interaction and the semantic web. The Industrial Experience option (G402) combines academic study with a one-year industrial placement between your second and third years of study. This option gives you an important edge in the graduate job market as well as a chance to earn while you learn. Careers in computer science Did you know that over 1.5 million people in the UK work in IT and Telecoms, in over 100,000 businesses? Growth is predicted at over 3 per cent a year in the London area. A typical graduate starts as a software engineer or systems analyst, later moving on to be a system architect, project manager or consultant. There are roles in many industries including finance, health and

11

engineering, working for either an IT company or a user of IT, and media, including music, video and games. Core modules include: • Information Systems Analysis • Object-oriented Programming • Computer Systems and Networks • Internet Protocols and Applications • Operating Systems; Database Systems • Algorithms and Data Structures • Graphical User Interfaces Option modules include: • High Performance Computing • Distributed Systems • Computer Graphics • Image Processing • Artificial Intelligence • Algorithms and Complexity • Web Programming • Interaction Design

STUDENT PROFILE Tanvi Srivastava BSc Computer Science “I chose Queen Mary because it has an excellent national and international reputation. The fact that I was offered a scholarship was the icing on the cake! “My course is very well-structured. You are constantly on your toes learning one new thing after another and you get a lot of feedback in the form of coursework, projects and so on. The most interesting thing I have done on my course so far has been a Java adventure game I programmed. The best part was that I got to lay down the rules of the game!”


12

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Degree programmes

Entry requirements For G400: typical AS/A-level tariff: BBB (300 UCAS points). For G401/G402: typical AS/A-level tariff: AAB (340 UCAS points). For all programmes a minimum of Grade B GCSE mathematics is required. Computing A2 is not essential for BSc computer science programmes, but is useful. Sciencerelated subjects are preferred. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/ undergraduates/programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

Computer Science and Multimedia BSc

Full-time – 3 Years (G450)

Digital technologies including graphics, animation, video and audio, are transforming the world of media. This degree programme covers computer science with a specialised focus on multimedia. The degree starts with core topics in programming, multimedia, web technology, software engineering, databases and graphical user interfaces. You can specialise in subjects such as computer graphics, image processing and social networks. Much of the learning is practical, building a variety of software systems in progressively more demanding contexts. Careers Did you know that over 1.5 million people in the UK work in IT and Telecoms, in over 100,000 businesses? Growth is predicted at over 3 per cent a year in the London area, much of it in digital and social media. Graduate jobs include game designers, web developer, software engineer and business analyst in media and IT companies or in companies using IT including finance, health, government and engineering.

Core modules include: • Procedural and Object-oriented Programming • Computer Systems and Networks • Information Systems Analysis • Web Technology • Multimedia • Internet Protocols and Applications • Database Systems • Operating Systems • Website Design and Authoring • Graphical User Interfaces • Interaction Design • Digital Media and Social Networks Option modules include: • Computer Graphics; Image Processing • Web Programming; Artificial Intelligence Entry requirements Typical AS/A-level tariff: BBB (300 UCAS points). A minimum of Grade B GCSE mathematics is required. Computing A2 is not essential for BSc computer science programmes, but is useful. Science-related subjects are preferred. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/ undergraduates/programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Student profile

Name: Arya Hajarha Job title: Application Developer Organisation Name: ServiceNow How was your work placement? My work placement was a positive eye opener to the real world of development. I had a great time learning new technologies and picking up knowledge from my colleagues. What was the organisation like? The culture represented a very collaborative and open environment where any member could be contacted or directly worked with. Especially in development, this factor had made it very easy for me to approach my teammates. What work did you do? I used technologies such as Java and JavaScript to create applications on the company’s platform; a tool designed for IT service management. I also had the opportunity to make APIs for use in our automated testing. What types of skills did you develop? Through demonstrations and meetings I held with colleagues I was able to improve on a range of interpersonal skills. The ability to negotiate is important when discussing an implementation with a product owner, whilst maintaining a degree of assertiveness. Of course in a role like this, problems exist in most of our activities, so I was able to further hone my skill to problem solve. How do you think this placement will help you find graduate work? The placement has been a great help as I have been offered the role upon graduation, as my manager put it, it should seem like I have just been on a year’s break.

13


14

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Degree programmes

Computer Science with Business Management / Accounting BSc BSc

Full-time – 3 Years (G4N1) – Business Mgt. Full-time – 3 Years (G4N2) – Bus. Mgt. + Accounting

Computer systems are essential tools for modern businesses. These programmes combine study in computer science (75 per cent) while providing a foundation in business management (25 per cent). The core computer science study covers programming, computer systems, networks and databases. Much of the work is practical, with group and individual project work. The core business management study covers the fundamentals of management, marketing and economics for business. The G4N2 programme covers financial and management accounting in more depth. Topics include financial statements and accounting techniques, sources of finance, ratio analysis, legal and economic considerations. You will also study managerial accounting, exploring the finance function and particularly planning and control, cost management, financing and investment decisions. Business Management at Queen Mary The study of business and management helps students develop the understanding and work skills necessary to prepare for the challenging worlds of business. The disciple draws on a range of other subjects including economics, social geography and politics, feeding into a deeper understanding of business and management practices and how they shape society as a whole.

Careers Did you know that over 1.5 million people in the UK work in IT and telecoms, in over 100,000 businesses? Growth is predicted at over 3 per cent a year in the London area. Furthermore, over 55 per cent of the UK economy is classified as ‘IT intensive’ creating a reliable demand for graduates who are both skilled with technology and knowledgeable about business in roles such as a business analyst. Core modules include: • Computer Systems and Networks • Fundamentals of Management • Object-oriented Programming • Economics for Business • Information Systems Analysis • Financial Accounting • Database Systems • Marketing Additional specialist modules include: • Financial Management • Advanced Databases; Data Mining • High Performance Computing; Distributed Systems • Digital Media and Social Networks; • Risk Assessment • Web Programming; Interaction Design Entry requirements Typical AS/A-level tariff: BBB (300 UCAS points). A minimum of Grade B GCSE mathematics is required. Computing A2 is not essential for BSc computer science programmes, but is useful. Science-related subjects are preferred. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/ undergraduates/programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Computer Science and Mathematics BSc

Full-time – 3 Years (GG41)

This programme, taught in collaboration with the School of Mathematical Sciences, provides a solid foundation for a number of IT careers, including systems analysis and design. You will cover core topics such as logic and algorithms. In addition, the programme emphasises the use of computers to solve mathematical problems, including topics such as programming and algorithms. You can choose option modules from across the range of mathematics and computer science. You will be equipped for working in, for example, big data analysis and simulation of complex systems, and you will have a solid grounding for careers like quantitative analysis. Careers in computer science Typical jobs after graduation include software engineer, programmer, systems analyst, software risk analyst, system designer and engineering research and development. These jobs can be in the IT sector, but not necessarily: professionals with IT and maths skills are in demand in the financial sector. There are also opportunities for self-employment – consultancy, for example – and every year a number of our students pursue postgraduate study.

15

Core modules include: • Procedural Programming • Logic and Discrete Structures • Calculus • Object oriented Programming • Algorithms and Data Structures • Database Systems • Geometry • Introduction to Statistics Option modules include: • Algorithmic Graph Theory • Introduction to Mathematical Finance • Chaos and Fractals • Cryptography Entry requirements Typical AS/A-level tariff: AAB (340 UCAS points). A minimum of Grade B GCSE mathematics is required. Computing A2 is not essential for BSc computer science programmes, but is useful. Science-related subjects are preferred. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduates/ programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

“I work in investment banking (asset management). [My career plan is to be] selfemployed in an all-singing all-dancing tech start-up.” Nzube Ufodike Founded Amoo Venture Capital Advisory in 2009 and is currently Managing Director.


16

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Degree programmes

Electrical and Electronic Engineering BEng

Full-time – 3 Years (H600)

Electrical engineering is concerned with electric power generation transmission and electrical machines. Electronic engineering deals with the study of electronic systems such as computers, communication systems, integrated circuits, and radar. This programme combines a solid foundation in both electrical and electronic engineering, covering the principles of electrical science, systems and electronics, control, and programming. In addition, you will study specialisations including power engineering, microprocessor system design and digital signal processing. Careers in Electrical and Electronic Engineering Electrical engineers design, build and maintain electrical control systems, machinery and equipment. In addition the electronic engineering element of this degree covers computing systems and hardware design. This programme prepares you for a wide range of careers in electrical and electronic engineering, including: • Transport networks, including signalling • Power generation, transmission and distribution • Renewable energy, hydroelectric and wind turbines • Manufacturing and construction • Building services, such as lighting, heating • Telecommunications and data-communications • Medical instrumentation • Aerospace – fly-by-wire systems, radar, navigation and communication systems

• Manufacturing domestic appliances – programmable logic controls (PLCs) and industrial machinery. Core modules include: • Microprocessor System Design • C Programming • Electric and Magnetic Fields • Signals and Information • Internet Protocols and Applications • Analogue Electronic Systems • Procedural Programming • Electrical Power Engineering • Integrated Circuit Design • Microwave Electronics • Control Systems Option modules include: • Digital System Design • Communication Systems Electronics • Digital Signal Processing Entry requirements Typical AS/A-level: tariff for H600 is BBB (300 UCAS points) including A-level mathematics. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/ undergraduates/programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Electronic Engineering BEng BEng

Full-time – 3 Years (H610) Full-time – 3 Years + 1 Year in Industry (H611)

This programme covers digital and analogue circuit design, programming, microprocessors and communications systems. Emphasis is placed on systems and the design of digital and analogue circuits using advanced software tools. You may study very large-scale integration (VLSI), communication systems and digital signal processing (DSP). A design and build group project is taken in the second year and develops team-working skills. The final individual project allows you to tackle in depth a topic of your choice. The Industrial Experience option enables you to spend a year working in industry. The H611 sandwich degree programme combines academic study with a one-year industrial placement between your second and third years of study. Taking the Industrial Experience option as part of your degree gives you a route to develop realworld, practical problem solving skills in a professional context. This can give you an important edge in the graduate job market. Careers in electronic engineering This programme prepares you for a wide range of careers related to the engineering sector, including industries such as: aerospace, automotive, construction, electronics, defence, petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, transportation and telecommunications. Although you will have a solid foundation in programming, the emphasis of these degrees is on digital and analogue hardware design.

17

Core modules include: • Microprocessor System Design • Digital Systems Design • Electric and Magnetic Fields • Signals and Information • Internet Protocols and Applications • Analogue Electronic Systems • Analogue Circuit Design and Applications • Procedural Programming • Telecoms Systems Option modules include: • Integrated Circuit Design • Communication Systems Electronics • Control Systems • Digital Signal Processing Entry requirements For H610 AS/A-level typical tariff required: BBB (300 UCAS points) including A-level mathematics. For H611 AS/A-level typical tariff required: ABB (320 UCAS points) including A-level mathematics and physics. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduates/ programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


18

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Degree programmes

Electronic Engineering and Telecommunications BEng MEng

Full-time – 3 Years (H691) Full-time – 4 Years (H690)

This programme covers the most rapidly growing areas of electronic engineering and all aspects of communications. You will learn about microwave and optical systems as well as the design, operation and management of large-scale communication networks for computers and voice and video signals. A range of technical and business modules provides a strong engineering foundation to this specialised degree. The MEng programme has the same first three years as the equivalent BEng, with the inclusion of a team project in the third year. The MEng has an additional fourth year of study of advanced postgraduate modules, on topics such as security and authentication, network modelling and performance, mobile and WLAN mobile technologies. Careers in telecommunications This programme prepares you for a wide range of careers related to the computing and telecommunications industry, as well as manufacturing industry. Telecommunications engineering involves the design, implementation and maintenance of complex systems including telephony, cellular networks, radio and television, the internet, wireless local area networks, and high-speed optical backbone networks.

Core modules include: • Communications and Networks • Microprocessor System Design • Digital Systems Design • Electric and Magnetic Fields • Signals and Systems Theory • Internet Protocols and Applications • Communications System Electronics • Analogue Circuit Design and Applications • Network Planning, Finance and Management • Telecoms Systems Option modules include: • Integrated Circuit Design • Next Generation Mobile • Digital Signal Processing • Microwave and Optical Transmission Entry requirements Typical AS/A-level tariff for H691 is: BBB (300 UCAS points) including A-level mathematics. For H690 typical tariff is AAB (340 UCAS points). Both programmes require A-level mathematics with physics as a preferred science. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/ undergraduates/programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

“The support and enthusiasm for the subjects from all the staff in the School make it a really great place to learn.” Sally Young


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Electronic Engineering and Computing BEng MEng

Full-time – 3 Years (HI61) Full-time – 4 Years (HI6C)

This programme includes the digital circuit design elements of the electronic engineering programmes, but emphasises computer systems and software. It also focuses on the increasingly important areas of artificial intelligence and network computing, internet computing and ecommerce engineering. Beyond these core themes there is an opportunity to specialise by selecting from optional modules in security – developing firewalls, secure ecommerce transactions and anti-fraud technology, networking – enabling sensors, home appliances, entertainment and security systems to be networked to each other and the internet; and control systems – focusing on embedded systems, the Internet of Things and mission critical systems. The MEng includes all the material from the BEng but the extra year allows you to study advanced modules on machine learning, music, speech, video and image processing, quality management and network modelling and performance. Careers in Electronic Engineering and Computing This programme integrates electronic engineering and computer science to provide skills in many hardware and software aspects of computing, from the design of individual microprocessors, circuit design, to distributed-computer systems. The course prepares you for a wide range of careers related to the computing industry, the internetworking industry and the

19

manufacturing industry. Example careers include: embedded systems engineer, test engineer, hardware engineer, and systems engineer/analyst. Core modules include: • Communications and Networks • Digital Systems Design • Computer Systems and Operating Systems • Signals and Information • Internet Protocols • Programming and Databases • Software Engineering and Systems Analysis Option modules include: • Real-time and Critical Systems • Security and IT • Mobile Devices and Social Networks Entry requirements For the BEng programme typical AS/A-level tariff required is: BBB (300 UCAS points). For the MEng degree the tariff is: AAB (340 UCAS points). A-level mathematics is required. For more information, please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduates/ programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


20

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Degree programmes

Audio Systems Engineering BEng MEng

Full-time – 3 Years (H657) Full-time – 4 Years (H642)

This programme uses mathematics and engineering techniques to enable you to understand how technology is applied to music and audio. You will learn how computers and electronics shape electronic musical instruments, digital audio systems, sound effects and games. In addition to a team project in your second year, you will complete an individual final-year project that will be supervised by a researcher in our world-leading Centre for Digital Music (C4DM). Martyn Ware, founder of ‘80s bands The Human League and Heaven 17, record producer and world-leading 3D sound artist, is a Visiting Professorial Fellow in the School and takes an active interest in C4DM, where he brings a wealth of experience and enthusiasm to these programmes. The MEng follows the same structure as the BEng for the first two years with an additional two years of specialisation in advanced multimedia, music analysis and synthesis and statistical methods for signal processing. Careers in audio systems engineering As well as opening up exciting possibilities for progression to further study, this programme prepares you for a wide range of careers related to the music industry, recording industry and the creative arts.

Typical careers range from sound production engineering, studio engineering, DSP engineering and software development. Some of our recent graduate has gone on to work for companies including: • Creative labs • FXpansion • Sonnox • Intrasonics • EMI • Rockstar Games.

Core modules include: • Analogue Electronic Systems • Digital Systems Design • Audio and Sound Design • Multimedia • Interactive Media Design and Production • Digital Studio Techniques • Music Synthesis • Digital Audio Effects • Music and Speech Processing Entry requirements Typical AS/A-level grades required for BEng programme: BBB (300 UCAS points) and AAB (340 UCAS points) for the MEng programme. A-level mathematics required. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduates/ programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Multimedia and Arts Technology BSc(Eng) BSc(Eng)

Full-time – 3 Years (I150) Full-time – 4 Years (I151) …with Industrial Experience

The Multimedia and Arts Technology (MAT) programme (I150) covers fundamental aspects of the digital economy, creative multimedia production, multimedia social networks, computer-driven animation, multimedia scripting, interactive multimedia design, 3D graphics, web-based advertisement production, and management and planning of media assets. This programme emphasises computer systems, digital installations and software with a special focus on new media creation, and provides core knowledge of media production and multimedia system design. Graduates from this programme will effectively combine technical and creative skills. In addition, the I151 programme provides industrial experience between your second and third years of study. Taking the Industrial Experience option as part of your degree gives you a route to develop realworld, practical problem solving skills in a professional context. This can give you an important edge in the graduate job market. Careers in MAT This programme prepares you for a wide range of careers related to the media, gaming, sales/advertising and computing industry as well as other parts of the creative sector. Careers include video editing, 3D modelling, animation, web development, and multimedia designer.

21

Core modules include: • Introduction to Audio • Bridging Arts and Technology • Arts Application Programming • Fundamentals of Web Technology • Information Systems Analysis • Computer Systems and Networks • Creating Interactive Objects • Internet Protocol and Applications • Graphical User Interfaces • Sound Design • Business Information Systems • Interactive Media Design and Production • Production Skills • Creative Production • Digital Audio Effects • C++ for Image Processing Entry requirements For both I150 and I151 typical AS/A-level: tariff required is: BBB (300 UCAS points). Grade B GCSE mathematics minimum Computing A2 is not required, but is useful. Science-related subjects are preferred. For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduates/ programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk


22

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Degree programmes

Information Technology Management for Business (ITMB) BSc(Eng) BSc(Eng)

Full-time – 4 Years (NI11) …ITBM with IE Full-time – 3 Years (I100) …ICT

The e-Skills-endorsed Information Technology Management for Business ITMB programme (NI11) gives you a broad knowledge of the IT industry, ensuring that you obtain both technical; and business knowledge and skills. The combination of IT expertise with strong business skills will equip you to pursue a career in technology management. The ITMB programme combines academic study with Industrial Experience a one-year industrial placement between your second and third years of study. In addition, we hold events that are solely aimed at students on our ITMB degree. These include weekly 'Guru Lectures' where students have the opportunity to meet industry practitioners, and two events where students from other institutions ITMB programmes can meet with employers who are involved in the degrees. The Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) programme (I100) focuses on the integration of telecommunications, computers as well as necessary enterprise software, middleware, and audio-visual systems, which enable users to access, store, transmit, and manipulate information. While computer science focuses on the theoretical and academic background behind computers, ICT develops skills that are in wide demand

in the workplace, and will help prepare you for work in IT support, as an IT manager or independent infrastructure consultant. Careers in information technology These programmes prepare you for a wide range of careers related to the computing industry, both within technology and nontechnology organisations ranging from systems analyst, technical support / sales / marketing to project management and business analyst. Core modules include: • Computer Systems and Networks • Business Modelling • Fundamentals of Web Technology • Accounting (NI11 only) • Information Systems Analysis • Internet Protocols and Applications • Economics for Business (NI11 only) Option modules include: • Internet Computing • Project Risk Management • Network Planning, Finance and Management • Data Mining. Entry requirements Typical AS/A-level tariff required for NI11 is: ABB (320 UCAS points). For I100 typical AS/A-level tariff required is: BBB (300 UCAS points). For more information please visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduates/ programmes or contact: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk

e-skills UK – the Sector Skills Council for Information Technology and Business


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

23

Entry requirements

A/AS-levels

Tariff/grades required: 340+ for MEng, MSci programmes, 320+ for BSc, BEng programmes with industrial placement options and the MAT programme, 300+ for BSc, BSc(Eng), BEng programme. A-level Mathematics required for all MEng and BEng programmes and recommended for MAT. A-level Physics required for selected MEng and BEng programmes. Check www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk for the most up-to-date information on all our degree programmes. Additional information: Grade B GCSE Mathematics minimum • Computing A2 is not required for BSc Computer Science programmes, but is useful • Science-related subjects are preferred

Advanced Diplomas

Acceptability: The School warmly welcomes applications from students taking Advanced or Extended (level-3) Diplomas in Information Technology or Engineering as an admissions qualification for the courses detailed below. Tariff/grades required: 360 UCAS tariff points (BSc, BEng and MEng Programmes). (The total UCAS points required is the same for the Advanced or Extended Diploma.) Additional information: Applicants must also have passed GCE A-level Mathematics grade C for BSc and BEng programmes and grade B for MEng programmes.

Vocational or applied A-levels

Acceptability: Accepted and subject to the above tariff requirements for A/AS-levels. Additional information: Must be in related subject, Electronic Engineering or Engineering for MEng and BEng programmes • Grade B GCSE Mathematics minimum.

BTEC National Certificate (12 units)

Acceptability: Not accepted

BTEC National Diploma (18 units)

Acceptability: Acceptable on its own and combined with other qualifications. Subjects and grades required: DDM for BEng to DDD for BSc(Eng), BSc • Must be in a related subject: Engineering, Electronic Engineering for MEng and BEng programmes, Computing or related subject for BSc • IT practitioners is only accepted for BSc(Eng) programmes. Additional information: Grade B GCSE Mathematics minimum.

International Baccalaureate

Acceptability: Acceptable on its own and combined with other qualifications. Subjects and grades required: 32 points overall for BEng, BSc, 34 points for MEng and BSc(Eng) • Must include Mathematics HL at least five points for all MEng and BEng programmes (Physics required for selected MEng and BEng programmes); see programme details. • Must include Mathematics HL at least six points for all BSc programmes.

European Baccalaureate Acceptability: Acceptable on its own and combined with other qualifications. Subjects and grades required: 80 per cent including grade eight minimum Mathematics for all MEng and BEng programmes. Physics at grade eight required for selected MEng and BEng programmes; see programme details. Access to HE Diploma

60 level-three credits, all distinctions in relevant subjects • Minimum grade B GCSE Mathematics. Recognised by the Quality Assurance Agency for HE

European and international qualifications

The College accepts a wide range of EU and international qualifications, including selected international foundation programmes. For further information please contact the Admissions Office, or visit: www.qmul.ac.uk/international/countries/index.html

Other qualifications

The College welcomes applications from those holding qualifications not listed above. Staff in the Admissions and Recruitment Office will be happy to advise you on the acceptability of your qualification.


Career opportunities


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

25

Career opportunities

Career prospects are good and salaries are competitive for electronic engineering and computer science graduates. Recent research by e-skills UK estimates numbers of IT and telecoms professionals will grow at four times the average for the UK during 2010–2020. The Institute for Employment Research also predicts a need for 587,000 engineering jobs over the next decade. Transferable skills In addition to the technical skills you will gain through your degree you will also develop a range of valuable transferable skills in areas such as team-working, project management, entrepreneurship and problem solving.

GRADUATE PROFILE Name: Shabbir Naqvi

Studied: MSci Computer Science

Currently: Overseas Developer at property website Rightmove

Why did you choose Queen Mary? It is a well-respected university with a proven track record, and I liked the campus.

How did your course prepare you for work? It was full of a variety of technical and interpersonal activities. The large amount of group work meant that I was able to fit easily into the work environment. Also, having worked with a range of programming languages, I didn’t have much trouble adapting to new languages or picking up technical points when I came across them for the first time.

What is a typical career path?

What are the best and worst aspects of your job?

There is no typical career path. With a degree focused on electronic engineering, you may find yourself researching and designing new technologies in a multinational organisation, developing new applications for a start-up or becoming involved in engineering management. Job opportunities can be found in a wide range of industries including transport, telecommunications, energy and electric power, IT, aerospace, manufacturing and education and research. Typical roles include electrical engineer, network engineer, digital/audio media specialist, computer hardware engineer and communications engineer.

I enjoy the technical challenge each project presents. Successfully completing a project, watching it go live and knowing that it will help the end user is very satisfying. My least favourite aspect of the job is debugging just before a feature goes live! It adds a bit of pressure, but it’s part of the job.

A computer science degree could see you testing trading systems at an investment bank, designing alternatively powered vehicles or researching innovations in combining computer vision, music and

speech for use in different environments. You could use your degree to work in a range of sectors such as finance, education, health, entertainment and media as well as IT. Typical roles include software engineers, business analysts, games designers, multimedia specialists, web developers, database managers, IT consultants or network engineers. We offer Industrial Experience options which combine academic study with a one-year industrial placement between your second and third years of study. Taking the Industrial Experience option as part of your degree gives you a route to develop


26

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Career opportunities

real-world, practical problem-solving skills in a professional context. This can give you an important edge in the graduate job market. As a leading research School, we have excellent links with industry. We also employ dedicated staff to help you arrange your year in industry. We have a number of programmes endorsed by e-skills UK – the Sector Skills Council for Information Technology and Business. Developed after a consultation with the biggest global employers, the Information Technology Management for Business (ITMB) degree programme is an exciting option for students interested in IT and business. Most of our degree programmes have professional accreditation from the IET or the Chartered Institute for IT (BCS). How we can help Finding your first job is made easier through our strong links with industry. We work with a range of organisations that offer graduate opportunities in electronic engineering and computer science, in sectors including banking, media, telecommunications and technology. Help is also available from the university’s careers team as well as our industrial placement manager. We offer a range of networking events from the IT and Technology Fair where recruiters such as Barclays Capital, Logica, IBM, and Transport for London, seek new talent. We aslo offer ‘Start Up, Stand Up’ led by QM Careers and QM Entrepreneurs, and Meet – a Mentor, networking event with professionals from the QM graduate developer community.

Recent graduate destinations Within six months of graduation, 77 per cent of electronic engineering and 78 per cent of our computer science graduates from 2011 had found jobs or were in further study. Employers included Accenture, Acer, Bank of America, Barclays Capital, the NHS, BT, Deloitte, Goldman Sachs, HSBC, IBM, ITRS Group, Rightmove, e-Bay and TfL. Finally, we are less than a couple of miles from the area around Old Street known as Silicon Roundabout or Tech City, home to at least 400+ digital start-ups, including Last.fm, SoundCloud and TweetDeck. We have links with a number of companies in the area and also sponsor the annual Digital Shoreditch Festival.


Student life – Students’ Union, student support and health services


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

29

Student life – Students’ Union, student support and health services

Students’ Union All Queen Mary students automatically become members of our Students’ Union (QMSU). An active Union run by students for students, QMSU is best known for its clubs and societies – there are literally hundreds to choose from, whether your interests lie in football or kickboxing. And, if you have a passion that isn’t represented, you can always start your own club. Clubs and societies provide a great opportunity for meeting people, especially those who are studying a different subject to you. One of the aims of QMSU is to ensure that your time at university is not just about work, but also includes socialising and personal development. Qmotion Qmotion is Queen Mary’s recently refurbished Health and Fitness centre. Equipped with a great range of exercise machines and weights, there’s also a women-only area and loads of classes including yoga, spinning and Pilates. There’s a squash court and sports hall on campus, and a swimming pool a short distance away. Sports Playing sports is a good way to relax after a day spent studying. Queen Mary teams regularly compete against other college teams, and there’s a great social scene with after-match drinks and a regular social night, Hail Mary, hosted by one of the SU’s sports teams. There’s even a team of cheerleaders, the Queen Mary Angels!

Volunteering Volunteering with charities and non-profit organisations is a brilliant way to explore what London has to offer, make a difference and really get involved in your local area. You can volunteer on a regular basis in a placement with a local charity or organisation, doing anything from mentoring local school kids, to volunteering in local hospitals, to becoming a helpline volunteer and managing a local sports team. See: providevolunteering.org

Student support You will be assigned an academic adviser when you start at Queen Mary, and the same adviser will stay with you throughout your studies. Your adviser will help you choose which modules to take (some programmes offer greater flexibility when it comes to module choices), sign any forms you need and help you with any academic or personal problems that you have. Many students find it extremely helpful to have one adviser on hand throughout their time at Queen Mary.


30

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Student life – Students’ Union, student support and health services

Health services Health services are provided for all students and staff living in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. In order to access these services and other available services under the NHS, you need to register with the Globe Town surgery at the Student Health Centre at the beginning of term. Students living outside Tower Hamlets can be treated on campus in the event of an urgent medical situation. For more information, see: globetown.org/qmu Advice and counselling Our advice service offers in-depth and specialist advice on a range of financial, practical and legal issues, such as student finance, housing rights, immigration law and international student issues. Counselling is also available – from cognitive behavioural therapy, ongoing weekly therapy groups and support groups on specific issues such as anxiety or academic performance. Our advice and counselling service is a completely free and confidential service. For more information, see: www.welfare.qmul.ac.uk


Accommodation


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

33

Accommodation

If you live close enough to the College to commute, you will normally be expected to live at home until rooms become available after term begins, when all those students who cannot commute are housed. Once you have firmly accepted your offer to study at Queen Mary, full details on how to apply for College housing will be sent to you by the Admissions Office. Queen Mary students also have access to places in the fully-catered Intercollegiate Halls in central London, which are owned centrally by the University of London.

You feel like you belong a bit more, living on campus. The place is packed with people all doing the same thing, unloading their cars at the beginning of term. It’s really sociable. Jen Holton

Another option is a house share. There are a number of privately let houses in the area suitable for groups of students to share. The residences office can put you in touch with local landlords, as well as groups of students who are looking for extra people to make up numbers. See what it’s like: For tours of our rooms and full details of the accommodation options, visit www.residences.qmul.ac.uk

‘‘

‘‘

If you are a single full-time first-year undergraduate, apply during the normal admissions cycle, and have not lived in Queen Mary’s housing before, you may be eligible for accommodation on campus. Priority is given to those applying by the deadline of 30 June of the year of entry, and those who live furthest away. This offer does not extend to students who join through the Clearing process or those holding insurance offers with Queen Mary, although every attempt is made to accommodate them, subject to availability.

‘‘

‘‘

Queen Mary’s Student Village incorporates 2,000 rooms on campus, all provided in self-catered, flats and maisonettes. All rooms in the Village have a bathroom en-suite, and there are shared kitchen facilities.

I had a beautiful canal view from my room. I just can’t believe this is student accommodation – it’s very airy, bright, fresh and clean. Fariah Khan


Living in London


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

35

Living in London

With eight million residents, London is up there with Tokyo and NYC in terms of sheer size. Yet rather than a single city, London is actually a patchwork of different areas – many of them former villages in their own right. Many retain their own centres, with a parade of shops, bars and restaurants that reflects its own particular and historic character.

Depending on your mood, the occasion and the kind of place you are looking for, you can make this diversity work to your advantage – there’s always somewhere that will suit your mood, budget, and the kind of occasion you are looking for. Queen Mary’s main campus is at Mile End and is well connected to the rest of the city by tube. Mile End (Central line) and Stepney Green (Hammersmith and City, and District lines) are both a short walk away.

‘‘

‘‘

A world-famous city and the nation’s capital, London is an exciting place to live. If you’re new to the city, you’re in for a treat; and if you’ve lived here before, then you’ll know there’s always more to explore. Either way, student life in London promises to be an adventure.

Why, Sir, you find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford. Samuel Johnson


36

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Our home in the east

Queen Mary is based in east London, the hub of London’s creative community, and home to its financial centres, Canary Wharf and the City. The area is steeped in history, yet always looking to the future, and is uniquely British in its diverse character. The 2012 Olympics – held less than two miles from our campus – has sealed east London’s status as ‘the place to be’ in the capital city. Mile End, and surrounding area EAT… The area around Queen Mary has a range of good value cafés, restaurants and pubs. Close to Mile End Station there’s a Nando’s chicken restaurant, a Costa coffee shop, a Budgens, and the Golden Bird, a popular Chinese restaurant. Towards Stepney Green, there’s the Pride of Asia (Bangladeshi), and The Half Moon, a Wetherspoon’s pub serving traditional pub fare. The nearby Greedy Cow pub is good for a burger and chips. The Palm Tree pub by Regent’s Canal and The Crown pub at the top of Grove Road are also highly recommended. 1

VISIT… Mile End Park, an unusual 90-acre linear park in the heart of the East End with a ‘green bridge’, a terraced garden, and ecology, arts and sports parks; the independent Genesis Cinema (go on Wednesday night for a student discount). 2 Stratford VISIT… The Olympic Park is undergoing an amazing £300m transformation and will reopen as the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in the spring of 2014. There will be five state-ofthe-art sporting venues: the Stadium, the Aquatics Centre, the Copper Box (a leisure centre and venue for basketball, volleyball, etc), the Lee Valley VeloPark and the Lee Valley Hockey Centre and Tennis Centre. There will also be cafés, restaurants, cultural venues and lots of green space – around 4,000 trees are being planted as part of a plan to double the green space in the park. noordinarypark.co.uk

SHOP… Westfield Stratford City – Europe’s largest urban shopping centre with over 300 shops, from high-street staples such as Uniqlo to high-end designers such as Armani. There are also over 70 restaurants (including GBK, Busaba Eathai, and Pho), a 17-screen cinema and a 14-lane bowling alley. 3 Old Street, Shoreditch and around EAT… Yelo, on Hoxton Square (Thai food); Big Apple Hot Dogs, a mobile cart selling seriously tasty... hot dogs; also in Hoxton – the Breakfast Club, the perfect spot for a slap-up breakfast after a night out; Cay Tre a delicious, reasonably priced Vietnamese restaurant on Old Street.

VISIT… Ibid Projects gallery on Hoxton Square; Hales Gallery off Shoreditch High Street (this area is the epicentre of the East End’s art scene); The Geffrye Museum of English domestic interiors. SHOP… The Columbia Road Flower Market on Sunday mornings; KK Outlet art and design book shop. Brick Lane, Spitalfields and Whitechapel EAT… Brick Lane is London’s ‘Curry Capital’ – an entire street lined with Indian and Bangladeshi restaurants; Brick Lane Beigel Bake, open 24-hours (great for bagel emergencies). 4

VISIT… The Old Truman Brewery, a converted brewery and home to numerous fashion designers, artists and trendy bars; All Star Lanes, a boutique bowling alley serving burgers and cocktails; the acclaimed Whitechapel Gallery.


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

SHOP… Spitalfields market, with arts and craft stalls, restaurants, and high-street shops. Nearby is Urban Outfitters, a temple to hipster fashion! 5 Bow Wharf EAT... Canal-side bars and restaurants The Fat Cat Café Bar and The Thai Room. VISIT... Jongleurs Comedy Club, with a bar, restaurant and post-comedy disco on Friday and Saturday nights.

Docklands, and Canary Wharf EAT… Jamie’s Italian (part of Jamie Oliver’s growing empire); Wagamama for noodles; Canteen for good value British food in a stylish setting. VISIT… Museum of London Docklands, which explores the story of the docks from Roman settlement through to recent regeneration. 6

Bethnal Green, and Victoria Park EAT… E Pellici, on Bethnal Green Road, an Italian café and local institution which has been around since 1900. Near Victoria Park, Lauriston Road has some great cafés and restaurants including: Su Sazzagoni (Sardinian), The Fish House (posh fish and chips) and the Empress of India (a gastropub). 7

37

VISIT… the art galleries on Vyner Street; The V&A Museum of Childhood on Cambridge Heath Road; Bethnal Green market, a daily street market with fresh fruit and veg, clothes and other essentials. A Mile End Our main campus and home to the Student Village; most undergraduate students are based here.

Whitechapel Home to the School of Medicine and Dentistry and The Royal London Hospital; our undergraduate medicine and dentistry students are based here. B

C Charterhouse Square Headquarters for a number of our medical research facilities; there is also a hall of residence here. D West Smithfield Home to Barts Hospital and some medical research facilities; some undergraduate medical teaching takes place here. E

Lincoln’s Inn Fields Home to the Postgraduate Law Centre and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies.


Next steps


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

39

Next steps

The School runs numerous events for students thinking of studying electronic engineering or computer science at university. From one-day taster courses to week-long summer schools. For more information on these activities, visit: eecs.qmul.ac.uk and sign up to our newsletter In addition to the School activities, we have two open days each year: one in April and a second in September. If you are unable to visit us at any of these times then you can book a campus tour. Information can be found online at: qmul.ac.uk/visitus

Applying to Queen Mary For all full-time higher education programmes at universities and colleges in the UK, students must apply online at: ucas.com You will find full instructions to help you fill in your online application. UCAS also has a comprehensive guide called Applying Online, which can be downloaded at ucas.com You can also visit our QM:Insight pages which offers guidance on applying to university. qmul.ac.uk/qminsight There are three types of applicant: 1 Students at a school or college registered with UCAS All UK schools and colleges (and many establishments overseas) are registered with UCAS to manage their students’ applications. Advice is available from your teacher or a careers adviser at your school or college. You fill in an online application and submit it to a member of staff. After checking your details, and having added the academic reference, your school or college submits the completed application

online to UCAS. You pay online using a credit card or debit card. You may also be able to pay through your school or college. 2 Independent applicants in the UK Other UK applicants, who are not at school or college, apply online independently. It is likely that you are a mature applicant, who, unlike school and college students, cannot readily seek advice from your teacher, but can instead consult with various careers organisations. You are responsible for paying the correct application fee, for obtaining and attaching the academic reference and for submitting the completed application online to UCAS.

‘‘

One of the best things you can do is visit a university and find out from the students what they think about studying there Asmi Barot

‘‘

Visit us

3 International applicants outside the UK (EU and worldwide) Except for those whose school or college is registered with UCAS, individuals from the EU (excluding the UK), and worldwide, apply online independently. Advice is available from British Council offices and other centres overseas, such as your school or college or one of our overseas representatives.

You will find a step-by-step guide to applying at: qmul.ac.uk/international/howtoapply

Contact us School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary University of London Mile End Road, London E1 4NS Tel: 0207 882 7332 Fax: 0208 980 6533 email: ug-enquires@eecs.qmul.ac.uk eecs.qmul.ac.uk


40

School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Notes


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science Queen Mary University of London Mile End Road London E1 4NS Tel: 020 7882 7332 Fax: 020 8980 6533 email: ug-enquiries@eecs.qmul.ac.uk www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk


School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science UG Studies