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Winter 2011/2012

Quarterly Speed Bump magazine Slow Down & Relax Slow Down & Relax Slow Down & Relax Slow Down & Relax Slow Down & Relax

Volume 1

QSB No. 2


Contents 2

Frontage: From the Editor

36 In the Word Zone: Puzzle Pages

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Mileposts: Things to Do

39 Interchange: Get Ready to Read

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Detour: Get Out of Your Rut

42 Off the Beaten Tracks

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Red Light: Backyard Astronomy

43 Undulations

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On the Corner: Sara Teasdale's Winter Stars

14 Roundabout: Magical Migrating Monarchs 17 On the Road to...Family History Research 22 Roadside Stand: Meyer Lemons 25 The Fork: Cook Something for Yourself 32 Chains Required: Crocheted Coffee Cozy

A note on the products in our pages: QSB only features items that we like and actually use. We haven't been paid for any of our comments or recommendations; we just like to share. QuarterlySpeedBump.com

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Frontage

From the Editor J. Vaughn

The production of this issue has been plagued by technical issues (you name it, it went wrong) but, you're obviously reading it now (finally!) and nobody died. We appreciate your patience as we worked to make it available. Also greatly appreciated are the new people who joined the Quarterly Speed Bump team. And, many thanks for those who stuck with us for another issue. You'll find everyone listed in the contributors box on this page. So, let's look ahead to the new year. 2012! Can you believe it? I like new years; they're like an artifical restart button for the brain. Didn't like how things went in 2011? Doesn't matter. It's a whole new year now. I'm not big on the traditional resolutions; they're kind of a drag. Instead, I advocate picking some things that you've always wanted to do and giving yourself the time and resources to get them done. The key here is want to do--skip all those should do type things. Making things, learning things, getting outside and doing things. Those are ways to get away from the grind and slow down and relax. Once again this issue, we've gathered some ideas that you might like to try. Join us, check out our website and blog at QuarterlySpeedBump.com, and have a wonderful Winter. May 2012 be everyone's best year yet! Cheers, Editor/Publisher: Rebecca L. Wendt Rebecca L. Wendt Editor-in-Chief Editor@quarterlyspeedbump.com

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Columnists: Jessica Herrick Jessica Knox Contributors: Linda Johnson Jeff Kreis Joseph Vaughn Scott Wendt


Mileposts: More Things To Do January 1NewYear's Day 3J. R. R.

5Twelfth Night/ 6 Epiphany

16 13 Michael Bond's

18 24 27 A. A. Milne's Gold (starting Wolfgang

Tolkien's Birthday (1892)

Birthday (1926) [creator of Paddington Bear]

Martin Luther King Day (actual birthday the 15th)

Umberto Eco's Birthday (1932)

Birthday (1882) [creator of Winnie the Pooh]

(Christmas is Over)

the Gold Rush) discovered in California (1848)

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2012 Baseball Hall of Fame inductee class announced

Amadeus Mozart's Birthday (1756)

12 Haruki

Murakami's Birthday (1949)

28 Jane Austen's

Pride & Prejudice first published (1813)

30 Barbara

Tuchman's Birthday (1912)

February 7Charles Dickens' 8Jules Verne's

9Beatlemania

12 Abraham

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18 Discovery of

22 George

23 George

26 29 Victor Hugo's Leap Day

Birthday (1812); Laura Ingalls Wilder's Birthday (1867)

Pluto by Clyde Tombaugh (1930)

Birthday (1828)

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Ansel Adams' Birthday (1902)

starts in the US (1964)

Washington (1732) & Edward Gorey's (1925) Birthdays

Lincoln's Birthday (1809)

Frederick Handel's Birthday (1685)

Valentine's Day

15 Susan B.

Anthony's Birthday (1820)

Birthday (1802)

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March 1Yellowstone

2MLB Spring

6Elizabeth

17 St. Patrick's

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21 Expect Spring

National Park established (1872)

Day/Wish QSB Editor's dad a Happy Birthday!

Training Begins

First day of Spring

Barrett Browning's Birthday (1806)

7Luther

Burbank's Birthday (1849)

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Douglas Adams' Birthday (1952)

15 Ides of March

2012 QSB soon!

You know J.R.R. Tolkien, right? Prepare yourself for the December 2012 release of The Hobbit movie by re-reading all his books this year. Have you read or seen Shakespeare's Twelfth Night? Cross-dressing, mistaken identity, and mischief plus you've probably heard the line, "If music be the food of love, play on." That's all in this play. Find it for free on Project Gutenburg at http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1526. See our "Interchange" column for more on Haruki Murakami. Also, if you're a runner, want to be a runner, or know a runner, his What I Talk About When I Talk About Running is a great read. Ah, Jane Austen. Pride and Prejudice ties for first with Persuasion in my mind. If you just can't seem to get into the books, try the movies first (the Colin Firth/Jennifer Ehle production of P&P and the Amanda Root/Ciarรกn Hinds production of Persuasion) so you get the subtle humor. Then go back to the books. Barbara Tuchman's book on World War I, The Guns of August, is a classic and very approachable. Poor Pluto, it's not considered to be a planet anymore. Learn more about that bombshell at imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/pluto.html. Have you listened to Handel's Concerti Grossi? I like his 2nd Concerto (hear it at www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cnl_0uVP3rM) best. What's your favorite? Beware the Ides of March. You know why? Julius Caesar was murdered that day in 44 B.C. On March 11, Google: "the answer to life the universe and everything =" 'Nuff said.

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Detour: Get Out of Your Rut and Try Something New

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1. Fast Fitness: Jillian Michaels may be annoying to some but her workouts do work. The two approximately 30 minute routines in Ripped in 30 and 30 Day Shred are a good place to start. Her workouts are geared toward women (but men can do them too) and you should steer clear if you have any knee issues. Maybe your library has a copy you can try? If you don't like DVD workouts, how about the 100 Pushups Training Program (hundredpushups.com)? There are training programs for situps, pullups, squats, and dips linked there as well. I'm trying for 100 pushups (I can only do 11 real ones in a row right now) by the end of 2012. How about you? 2. Eat At Home More Often/Eat Seasonally/Pack Your Lunch: Melissa Clark's cookbooks, like Cook This Now, are straightforward but clever with ingredients. This volume is organized by what's available in each season and there's some yummy stuff. If you already have Clark's excellent In the Kitchen with a Good Appetite, some of the recipes are duplicates (called "bonus" recipes in Cook This Now) but you'll be familiar with her entertaining narrative style and lack of photographs. Heidi Swanson writes the popular food blog, 101cookbooks.com and has written several vegetarian cookbooks that use natural, whole, and seasonal ingredients. Her latest book, Super Natural Every Day is another winner and she takes her own photographs too.

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Red Light:

Backyard Astronomy

The moon controls tides on Earth and is the biggest object to be seen in the sky. Yet how many people pay that much attention to it? We'll try to change that. A full orbit for the moon lasts 29.5 days which means the moon phases repeat every 29.5 days--the lunar month. That means you'll have plenty of opportunities to practice this year. 6

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On the Bright Side We always see the same side of the moon because of its locked orbit. So the "dark side of the moon" was a mystery until well into the 20th century with the advent of spacecraft. However, humans have long been looking up to the moon. Crops were planted according to its phases and it was a useful light on dark nights. It's just in recent decades that it pretty much seems like modern pace has allowed us to ignore our biggest satellite.

Waxing Gibbous (no symbol) = more than half the circle of the moon is visible and getting bigger. Full Moon (empty circle) = the entire circle of the moon is visible - Day 14. Waning Gibbous (no symbol) = more than half full but getting smaller.

Let's change that… Grab a calendar. If it's a good one, the moon phases will be indicated. If they're not indicated on your calendar, the dates for each of the moon phases can be found at eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/phase/ phase2001pst.html. Remember that moon phase dates are calculated based on time zone and will vary across zones and locations.

MARE SERENITATIS

Last Quarter (half white, half black circle with black on the right) = ½ the cirle of the moon is visible - Day 22. MARE TRANQUILLITATIS

MARE IMBRIUM

Waning Crescent (no symbo usually given but there would be a sliver on the leftl) = a sliver of the moon is visible and getting smaller.

MARE NUBIUM

Here's an explanation of the phase terminology. And, please note that the same symbols are used but, in the Southern Hemisphere, the actual appearance of the moon is opposite that in the Northern Hemisphere. The below explanation refers to the Northern Hemisphere. New Moon (black circle) = No moon visible Day 0. Waxing Crescent (no symbol usually present but would be a sliver on the right) = moon a sliver but getting bigger.

And repeat every 29.5 days. Oh, were you wondering why sometimes the moon is visible only during the day or only during the night? It's visibile during the day (at least for a time) for most of the month, except near new moon (too close to the sun), and right at full moon (directly opposite the sun) because of its position in relation to the sun. Wondering why sometimes it seems like you can see all of the moon even when it's only supposed to be at crescent? Well, moonlight is really reflected sunlight. Sometimes more of the moon is faintly illuminated by light reflecting off Earth.

First Quarter (half black, half white circle with black on left) = ½ the circle of the moon is visible - Day 7.

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Although the full moon is beautiful, its brightness makes it hard to see the moon's features. And surrounding stars are washed out as well. Details are easier to make out when the moon is at Quarter phase even though there's less of the moon to actually see. Darker areas on the moon are called maria which is the Latin term for seas because early observers thought they were seeing water on their nearest neighbor. The singular form of maria is mare. So, we have Mare Imbrium (used as a character by Piers Anthony in his Xanth books), Mare Tranquillitatis (the Sea of Tranquility), and so forth. With practically no atmosphere to protect it, the poor moon is also pocked with craters from all the objects that have crashed into it. Some of the larger craters also have names. They're difficult to see on the moon map picture that I've provided here (see previous page). Luckily, there are many moon maps available. The basic information on the Sky and Telescope website will give you more detail (www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/moon). So, go check out the moon. Notice its phases. Take out binoculars or a telescope to see even more features. It's interesting once you start looking. No human has been on the moon in my lifetime which I think is kind of a shame. If nothing else, it would be amazing to see Earth from another planetary body.

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On The Corner: Poetry to Read Aloud

This season we're featuring now-considered-minor American poet, Sara Teasdale. Born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1884, she published her first poem in a newspaper and her first volume of poetry in the same year, 1907. Her work is romantic and lyrical, often containing nature themes and classical references, and definitively feminine. In 1918, she won the precursor to the Pulitzer Prize for poetry--then called the Columbia University Poetry Society Prize--and continued to write poetry up until her death from sleeping pill overdose in 1933. On the following pages we illustrate her 1920 poem, "Winter Stars," which was originally published in the volume Flame and Shadow. As always, try reading it aloud. Turn the page to enjoy.

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Winter Stars by Sara Teasdale I went out at night alone; The young blood flowing beyond the sea Seemed to have drenched my spirit's wings -I bore my sorrow heavily.

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But when I lifted up my head From shadows shaken on the snow, I saw Orion in the east Burn steadily as long ago.

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From windows in my father's house, Dreaming my dreams on winter nights, I watched Orion as a girl Above another city's lights.

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Years go, dreams go, and youth goes too, The world's heart breaks beneath its wars, All things are changed, save in the east The faithful beauty of the stars.

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Roundabout: Go Somewhere

Magical Migrating Monarchs

A magical thing happens in winter in a very few places in the world. You can see enormous flocks of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) hibernating in trees. Monarchs are migratory making their way between Canada and Mexico. The round trip isn't made by one individual so in winter, the butterflies go into diapause (semi-hibernation) and can live much longer than usual in order to continue their journey and their reproductive cycles when the weather warms again. In California, the best place to see this phenomenon is the eucalyptus grove at Natural Bridges State Beach. The State Beach is fortunately not one of the many on the California State Parks closure list. You'll find it located off Highway 1 in Santa Cruz. Watch for the signs. Oh, and the natural bridge formations in the ocean that gave the State Beach its name have fallen down. The last one bit the dust in the Loma Prieta Earthquake of 1989. 14 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


There's a Monarch Trail (less than a mile) that has a boardwalk for you to stay on. The visitor center is small but sells lots of monarch-related merchandise (good books to be had!). The monarchs hang around between October and March so plan your trip accordingly. They occasionally flap lazily around if the sun is out. They might land on the boardwalk at your feet. Be sure to take your camera. You're also in Santa Cruz and by the Pacific Ocean so there are lots of things to do after you've marveled at the monarchs. If you go, I think you'll agree that it truly is a magical experience.

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On the Road to. . .

Family History Research with Linda Johnson

The On the Road to‌column is an opportunity for a Quarterly Speed Bump writer to sit down with a hobbyist and talk about how to get into their particular hobby and what they find to be rewarding about it. In this issue we're on the road to family history research. We were pleased to sit down with Linda Johnson to learn more. QSB: Do you think of yourself as a genealogist, family historian, or other? Linda: I tend to lean toward the family historian label. Genealogist and family historian seem to be used interchangeably today but genealogy to me seems to be more the science of tracing one direct line of your family back.

QSB: What about family history appealed to you? Linda: I always liked history and was lucky to have family members still around. I heard stories from my great grandmother about her childhood in Norway. I am close to my family and wanted to hear the stories. So, at first I was just learning more about the people in my life.

Linda's Great Grandmother is the tallest young woman standing in the back row. This picture was taken a few years after the Semeling family arrived in America from Norway.

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QSB: How long have you been doing this type of research? And how did you get started with the formal research? Linda: Since 1988. I enrolled in a class at Sacramento State University. I needed to fill a time slot to get financial aid. The class is no longer offered but it was part of the liberal studies and library studies programs. It was a night class and most of the students were a little older. I actually chose my career as an archivist because of the genealogy class. It was the first time I ever went to an archives to do research and it was fascinating.

well as a society located in the area you're doing research. Also check to see if there is a single name association. If you have a somewhat unusual surname, see if you can find the association for your surname. And don't expect everything to be online! QSB: What was your most memorable research find and why? Linda: Every once in a while I do a Google search. I was working on my 3rd Great Grandfather, Samuel Kingsley,

QSB: What do you recommend to others who might be interested in taking up the hobby? Linda: Pick up how-to books. The Source [Ed. note: The Source: A Guidebook Of American Genealogy by Loretto Dennis Szucs and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking] is a good one with information for beginners as well as more advanced researchers. Record information from your own family. I was fortunate to have great grandparents and two sets of grandparents to talk to. Start with family first and don't think that you'll be able to get back to Adam & Eve at the beginning of your search. QSB: What tools do you use and what tools would you recommend to a beginner? Linda: I use a software program called Legacy (free standard version at LegacyFamilyTree.com). There is Personnel Ancestry File (free on FamilySearch.org) and Family Tree Maker. If you have the ability to use a software program, use it. I used to use the Ultimate Family Tree program but it was bought out and I had to import the data to a new program. A lot of these programs have user groups that can be very helpful. I also highly recommend a system to organize paper records--it's pretty easy to organize the electronic records but the paper files can get out of hand. I use the Family Roots Organizer system for the paper files (Mary Hill is the developer) and, if you use Legacy, you can color code digital files to match. The Mary Hill system is the one I started out on so I find it works really well for me. A Newbie should also join a local genealogical society as 18 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012

who is one of my "brick walls." I do know he moved from New York to Michigan in about 1852. Lo and behold, up popped a little website that showed the househe built. It now houses the historical society for Romulus, Michigan. I'm an archivist so I got excited. The house is a nice example of the architectural genre and maybe was a stop on the Underground Railroad though I haven't been able to confirm that.


QSB: Is there a research breakthrough you'd most like to make? Linda: I want to get the Kingsleys "back over the pond." I can't find my 3rd Great Grandfather's parents. Samuel Kingsley was born in 1810 and his parents were born in New York. You look back about twenty years for a generation. He seemed to follow his wife's family as they moved around so that may be an indication that he was orphaned at a young age. Online, I found another Kingsley house in the same area and they might be related. They were all Wesleyan Methodists.

I started just for myself but it's amazing how much people are interested and want to know the stories. Three of my nephews had to do research for classes and interview family members. They were able to get information from my dad who rarely talked about his time in the Navy. But he talked to the boys about his time on board the ship and about a fire on board after a munitions explosion. He had to escape through a porthole or whatever the windows are called on a ship. I never knew how close he came to not making it. My nephew Carlos is also learning Norwegian and I'm looking forward to having him help me translate 18th and 19th century Norwegian parish registers. What my plan is for when I retire is to return to where my family came from and trace their migration west. I also plan to compile what I've found. QSB: What have you gotten from doing family history? Linda: A sense of self and a sense of accomplishment. My family has never been rich and fabulous nor do I want to connect with someone rich and famous. It's a sense of being a part of this big thing. QSB: What are you working on now? Linda: I'm cleaning up citations because I'm not always very good about keeping up on that. It's really important to cite sources so you can get back to that original document. QSB: Are there any other books or websites that you've found to be particularly useful?

QSB: Did doing family history research match your expectations? Or what has surprised you the most? Linda: I think starting out I really didn't know what to expect. I found a lot of my early information through letters to others family members and online and in books. I have been surprised how much interest my family shows.

Linda: Free sites like Cyndi's List [www.cyndislist.com]-she's compiled literally a list of every genealogical site she can find. She's got them arranged in various ways so you can search by names or location or other subject. FamilySearch [FamilySearch.org] is, I think, the best free search for people just getting started. USGenWeb [usgenweb.org] has websites for all the states. FindAGrave [www.findagrave.com] has a lot of cemetery information. You have to remember that anyone can add to it so take the information with a grain of salt unless there's a photo that proves a tombstone is actually there. QuarterlySpeedBump.com 19


There are a couple of books by William Dollarhide that are good. His US Census book [The Census Book: A Genealogist's Guide to Federal Census Facts, Schedules and Indexes] has state pages that give former county boundaries and tell what information is available for each state. A book that explains townships is also good, like John Andriot's Township Atlas of the United States. If you're not familiar with the Township and Range system--especially in the West where there are so many wide open spaces that Township and Range is very important, then this book will help. It's not as useful for the East where they use Metes and Bounds.

Linda: I want to emphasize: Start now. Don't wait until your elders pass on. We know people aren't writing letters and diaries like they used to. Don't be afraid to ask questions. But be gentle--especially with people in their eighties or older. Try not to put your personal opinions and beliefs on what someone did in the past because you don't know what really happened. Some people can get so embarrassed about what they find in court records or some such but you don't know. Have fun. When it stops being fun, put it away for a while. I've had to put it away for a while for a different reason: When I get working on something, sometimes it's all I want to do.

QSB: It there anything you'd like to add?

¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯

Linda Johnson, our interviewee, received her Master’s Degree in Public History from California State University, Sacramento in 1993 and has been an archivist at the California State Archives since 1997. She has given many talks about genealogy and genealogical resources in the years since. In her spare time she continues to do her own family history research as outlined above. She's traced some of her Norwegian line back to the 1720s.

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Start Your Own Family History Research Fill in the 4-generation chart on the next page with your name, your parents' names, and so on. Beneath the names fill in as much information as you can find regarding birthdates, birthplaces, marriage dates, death dates, and places of death when applicable. You may wish to assign a number to each individual for tracking purposes. Remember, this is just one way for you to collect the basic information that will give you clues on where to look next (many other ways of organizing such information exist--find one that's right for you). Talk to any older relatives you may have. If you have no one left to talk to, start with what you remember and then do some basic online research at the sites Linda recommends above. Previous page photo spread: The Samuel Kingsley home with the last Kingsley owners pictured out front.

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My Spouse

Me

My Mother

My Father

Four Generations of My Family

Maternal Grandmother

Maternal Grandfather

Paternal Grandmother

Paternal Grandfather

Great-Grandmother

Great-Grandfather

Great-Grandmother

Great-Grandfather

Great-Grandmother

Great-Grandfather

Great-Grandmother

Great-Grandfather


Roadside Stand: Save Some for Later

Meyer lemons are available now. Run, don't walk, to the nearest lemon purveyor and buy all you can. Or sweet-talk any of your neighbors who have lemon trees. Better still, maybe you have your own tree (plant one if your climate allows--they can also be grown indoors if there's sufficient light). Meyer lemons are slightly sweeter and more fragrant than regular lemons. Of course, you can use run of the mill lemons for the following recipes but you'll be missing that special something. 22 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


Lemon curd is by no means a light food--it's more of a custard. This one has a good balance of sweet and tart and is slightly less rich than some of the others I've tried. Use it on toast, to fill tart shells, or as a filling for cakes. There are many ways to use it so it probably won't last long. Plus it takes less than a half hour to make.

Meyer Lemon Curd Makes about 3 cups

1 cube butter, softened (I actually like salted butter here) 4 Meyer lemons (about 3 ounces each) 1 ½ cups sugar 2 large eggs plus 2 more egg yolks the juice of all four lemons (zest them first!) Using a micro-plane, grate all the zest from the four lemons--just get the yellow, none of the white pith underneath the zest. Using an electric mixer, cream the butter, sugar, and lemon zest together in a bowl that can be used as the top of a double boiler. Then add the whole eggs and the egg yolks, one at a time, continuing to mix all the while. Mix in the lemon juice. Once all is blended, place bowl over a pot of boiling water as a double boiler and whisk lemon mixture continually until it reaches about 170° F and thickens. This will take between 10 and 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let come to room temperature, stirring occasionally so a skin doesn't form. When it's cool, move the lemon curd to freezer-safe, airtight containers. The curd can be frozen for up to a year or will keep for a couple of weeks in the refrigerator.

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Preserved lemons are so easy to make, I'm not quite sure why more people don't make them. The process takes about 10 minutes and within two weeks you can use your creation. The preserved lemons can be chopped finely and used as seasoning for couscous. Or find one of the many Moroccan recipes out there that uses them. Traditionally, just the rind is used in recipes. Taste the flesh to see if you'd like to use it as well. You'll most likely need to rinse your lemons before using them because they can be overpoweringly salty. As always, taste it and see what you think. If it's not too salty, then leave it alone. And use the least blemished ORGANIC LEMONS you can find here and scrub them well. Since the skin is the most important part of the recipe, why shouldn't you start with the best?

Preserved Meyer Lemons 10 Meyer lemons Kosher or sea salt (start with 1/2 cup) Microwave for of the scrubbed lemons on high in the microwave for 1 ½ minutes (do this in 30 second bursts). When the four lemons have colled, cut them into sixths, lengthwise. Sprinkle salt all over them and massage it in. Place 2 more tablespoons of the salt in the bottom of a 2-cup sealable glass jar. Then arrange the salted lemon wedges in a pleasing pattern in the jar, squishing as many of the wedges in as possible but leaving enough space so liquid can cover the very top layer (for the small sealed jar pictured on the previous page, I ended up with 3 wedges that wouldn't fit). Juice the ramaining lemons and pour the strained juice over the lemon wedges in the jar. Keep adding lemon juice until you've completely submerged the wedges. Top off with another tablespoon of salt and then seal the jar. Shake vigorously to distribute the salt, juice, and lemons. Store in the refrigerator and wait two weeks before using. Continue to give the jar a shake every once in a while when you think about it. The preserved lemons will keep indefinitely in the refrigerator. Use them up, you can always make more.

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The Fork: Cook Something For Yourself It's odd that my family has only one "traditional" recipe. It’s Italian; we are not. And, said recipe didn't enter the family until the late 1930s when my grandmother learned it from a Mrs. Ianni. It seems my grandparents were living in the Lakeside, Utah desert right along the railroad. Many of my grandmother's early cooking failures (particularly cream puffs) were buried in the desert there but she was an excellent cook by the time I knew her. Mrs. Ianni's recipe was apparently “a litt-lee of this, a litt-lee of that” and my written version is more like suggestions rather than directions. The version presented below is much more fleshed out. I often wonder how the final dish has evolved since its introduction to my family. Certainly the name of the dish isn't very descriptive--it only means "dry pasta," i.e. pasta in a sauce that isn't soupy or using dry pasta. Not only does it taste great but I have fond memories associated with it. I used to go to the italian grocery store with my grandmother to get the special pasta (it came in plain cardboard boxes in 4 pound amounts). When I was little, my job was to fill the emptied tomato paste cans with water. Later on I got to open said cans using the very-cool-to-me electric can opener. We didn’t have one of those at my house.

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This recipe serves a crowd but you can easily cut it to one third (i.e. to serve 4) by using 1 pound of steak, 1 can of tomato paste, and 1 pound of pasta. Cut the rest of the ingredients down too except leave the onion and garlic amounts as they are.

Past'asciutta

Serves many (or at least twelve--see note above for adjustments) 3 pounds round steak, cut into 1"-1.5" cubes 3 - 6 ounce cans tomato paste (I like Contadina) 54 ounces of water - fill each empty tomato paste can up three times to get out every last bit of paste 2 tablespoons olive oil (more if needed) 1 onion, diced 2 garlic cloves, chopped fine 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon ground cloves Ÿ teaspoon allspice pinch of sugar salt & pepper to taste 3 pounds of dry shell pasta (You want one that is a little over an inch from tip to tip. The best one I've found lately is the Conchiglie rigate no. 50 made by De Cecco.) Brown meat in the oil in a large pot. Do this in batches so the meat actually browns and doesn't just steam. Remove meat and saute onions in the same pot (add more oil if necessary) then add the garlic. Add all other ingredients, including the meat, and simmer. When the meat is tender and the sauce is thickened (about two hours), taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Mix the meat and sauce with the shell pasta that has been cooked to the package directions and is still slightly al dente. Reserve some of the pasta cooking water in case you need to add a little moisture to the mixed dish. Enjoy thoroughly with plenty of freshly grated parmesan. Serve with a nice green salad and warm garlic bread.

How about Cinnamon Rolls for dessert? If that sounds good, turn the page

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This is another Edith Davis recipe. I remember her making them (with raisins!) for a treat when we'd arrive at my grandparents' house to deliver their Christmas tree to them.

Cinnamon Rolls Makes 2 dozen rolls

2 packets of yeast (4 ½ teaspoons) 2 tablespoons sugar 2 cups scalded milk, cooled to lukewarm 6 cups all-purpose flour (divided) 1 egg, slightly beaten ½ cup butter, melted 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup sugar ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon For filling: 1-2 teaspoons cinnamon, 2-4 tablespoons sugar, ¼-½ cube melted butter 1 cup chopped nuts (optional) 1 cup raisins (optional) Add yeast and 2 tablespoons of sugar to the warm milk. Let stand until yeast bubbles. Add 3 cups of the flour and beat well. Let rise for one hour then add beaten egg, melted butter, vanilla extract, sugar, salt, cinnamon, and remainder (3 cups!) of flour. Knead well until dough forms a smooth ball (I usually do this by hand right in the mixing bowl for about 10 minutes but you can use your favorite method). Let dough rise for 2 ½ hours or until double in bulk. Roll out to a 24 inch long rectangle that's about a half inch thick and spread with more butter, more sugar, and more cinnamon (and raisins and nuts, iif desired). Roll up and cut into 1 inch slices. Put slices, ½ inch apart, in well buttered pans. Let rise again until light. Bake at 375° F for 20 minutes. Frost when cool. 28 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


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To really go over the top (and to ensure that you're well padded for Winter), have your cinnamon roll with a mug of hot chocolate. This recipe comes from my great aunt, Afton Ficarra (my grandmother, Edith Davis's youngest sister). Normally, I shy away from the artifical and the pre-packaged. The sum of the parts of these ingredients, however, outmatches other pre-prepared cocoa mixes. So, I go for it. You'll need an extremely large mixing bowl to make the amount indicated here. It's intended to get you through the entire winter with enough to share with your friends. The mix pictured in the container (right) is a very small fraction of the completed recipe.

Hot Cocoa Mix Makes A LOT Pay attention to the weights and package labels here. Package sizes keep changing so you may need a scale and/or some measuring cups. 2 pounds Nesquik (formerly NestlĂŠ's Quick) 1 pound powdered sugar 1 pound Cremora Non-Dairy Creamer 20 quarts powdered milk Mix all ingredients together (a large metal slotted spoon seems to be the ideal tool here), sifting if necessary to remove any lumps. Store in a sealed container in a dark, cool place until ready to use. To serve, half fill you mug of choice with the hot cocoa mix (play with the ratio of mix to water until you get your desired strength...the original recipe indicates 1/3 cup mix to 1 cup hot water but that hardly fills a mug). Fill mug with just boiled water and stir to dissolve. Enjoy with marshmallows, a sprinkling of ground cinnamon, a dash of vanillia extract, your other flavoring of choice, or just straight up.

A large container of the cocoa mix along with a mug and a mug cozy (turn the page for a pattern!), makes a great gift. Don't forget to include the serving instructions.

Before you turn the page, if you don't yet know how to crochet you'll need some extra instruction. Our pattern assumes basic crochet stitch familiarity. To prepare youself, try The Happy Hooker: Stitch 'n Bitch Crochet by Debbie Stoller. Or, there are many tutorials and videos online. A good glossary of terms and information about stitches is available at www.crochetme.com/glossary. Try YouTube if you're a visual learner and would like to see someone going through the stitches.

30 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


QuarterlySpeedBump.com 31


Chains Required!

PPaatttteer n aand tteextt by Jeesssiiccaa K Knnooxx Phhottoggrrappheedd bbyy JJeefff Kreis

This quick and simple project uses single, half-double, and slip stitches to create slightly varied stripes in alternating colors. Perfect for repurposing scrap yarn—try out yarns of different colors and textures to make it your own! 32 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


Crocheted Coffee Cozy Pattern Abbreviations

SC = Single Crochet HDC = Half-Double Crochet

You'll Need:

• Medium-worsted weight yarn in small amounts of four colors. To duplicate the exact look shown here, use Vanna’s Choice Lion Brand Yarn in colors Linen (white), Deep Burnt Orange (orange), Kelly Green (green), and Sapphire (blue). • Size G (4.25 mm) crochet hook • Darning needle • Thread • 2 buttons of your choice

Pattern

Using green, chain 30 (can be adjusted to fit different sized cups). Being VERY careful not to twist, join in first chain. Round 1 Chain 1. SC in each chain, join. Round 2-3 Chain one; SC in each stitch; join. After round 3, join and cut green. Round 4 Join white; slip stitch in each stitch; join. Cut white. Round 5 Join orange. Chain one; working behind slip stitches, SC in each stitch from Round 4; join. Cut orange.

Round 4

Round 5

QuarterlySpeedBump.com 33


Round 6 Join white in back loop of orange. HDC in the back loop of each stitch; join. Cut white. Round 7 Join blue in back loop of white. HDC in the back loop of each HDC; join. Cut blue.

Round 6

Round 7

Round 8 Join white; slip stitch in each HDC; join and do not cut. Round 9 Chain one; working behind slip stitches, SC in the back loop of each HDC from Round 8; join. Cut white.

Round 8

Round 9

Round 10 Join orange. Chain one; SC in the back loop of each HDC stitch from Round 9; join. Cut orange. Round 11 Join white; slip stitch in each stitch; join. Cut white. 34 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


Round 12 Join green. Chain one; working behind slip stitches, SC in each SC from Round 11; join. Round 13 Chain one; SC in each stitch; join, tie off and cut green. Weave in all ends. Use a needle and thread to sew on decorative buttons along the joining seam. This hides any bumps created while joining yarn of different colors, and gives the cozy the appearance of a sweater!

QuarterlySpeedBump.com 35


R L W J L V G D W R A W S A W E E O D C V D M D H W E F

L I T T L F C W N A R Y C J L I U Q N V I S E F C R I S

G N I H T O B O L W X E O T E L T S I M O P A R K H E A

N L L A L R E O L O L F A A B E B C I O E O S E E N P N

U F E C I F U L D N U B T N R L L S O G O T H E S E E R

S O U O H N F E B U A R Y E C E L L X I R S T Z T W O R

Y T S D L I E R A B Q O E I H E C I S P E Y E I H Y S E

N O S D E B L N O A U S S K I I N G L D B R E N K E Z O

M N E W Y E A B E Z C T N I L L A T E N M I L G T R E R

I F N N A L B K I L E Z O P L J N J E U E A I T A K S L

H E L S O G U R R S E N W O Y A A A I O C F I R D N I E

C V L S V S L A E E P H F L N C S C O R E M C A N D L C

G E I C I C L E C T I H L E K H I K Y G D U E C A E R I

O R T Y A U E Y N T G O A R E O M S R S P L O Y R A U N

H G S L D N X W E I B Z K B T C T E A R E P S N I U G N

D R K L E O D E E M B R E I Z A W L U E N R K A T A S K

N E O E H V I L I E A E S E L F E D N F G A E D L F I T

U E O B J I S L E E L E C L O I N N A F I G O H E O W G

O D H A E S N A L S O D I I C R H A J U N U V O C L C L

R S C E L E H T G L P N E D T E A C A M S S E L W N E O

G K S V L L R S R E E I H I S S D W N E A D R I L I A O

F C F E Y D E Y A O R E B L O P L H D R E H T A E W D L

In the Word Zone: I U O R E M N R E L Z R O O L G I O R E A S A S K O D W

R A L G L H I C B L O C O H G E I L S I S A D L O H I E

E F U R L U T H R M P T O I A L R I K N E H B S E R N I

P D F E O A W A A S U T L B L R A F A D R E R E L F F U

L N L E B H E W E N E W Y E A R E E T T I M O D B R R K

A U W N E B R A M W L E U R V A B F I C E E Z U O M E W

G O O N R E F E H I D E R N A T I O N Z W R E T E U E A

E R A A A H K A V N N O C A J L T E G E U T N I T F Z C

I L L G I B C U T I U B C T A L O P H N P H U L T F L R

B O E A R L A G F E B R U A R Y N P A T N T A O A H A N

P F K N B H J R F I E C A L P H S A S D T E R S M E T M

Winter Wonderland

Answers to this puzzle and available in the

36 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


M A S K W A N S A Y E U L T S L

H E O T L E S S I M T R C I I O

K T F C A O N F D A A S H D T E

G R E V E R I S N E L O O W H N

E T A E W S A B J O O C O I E A

S S L P I N R R S Y C F E N B G

BLANKET BUNDLE UP CANDLES CHILLY COLD WEATHER CRYSTALLINE DECEMBER EVERGREEN FEBRUARY FIREPLACE FOG FREEZING FROZEN HIBERNATION HOLIDAYS HOT CHOCOLATE

W J H L A J J K J K S E E C S E

F H O T C H O T G M O A I T H D

A V S M O C A O I N C A T Y I T

R A E N B L A N K E T L M N N L

L I G R A E D E S S O A A I T U

F W A T C O L O N I H N S U A Y

S N E F O O W L D N A C A G N T

ICICLE IGLOO JACK FROST JANUARY MISTLETOE MITTENS MUFFLER NEW YEAR OVERCOAT PARKA PENGUINS POLARBEAR REINDEER SKATING SKIING SLEET

O P U R H L I U N R H V S R G I

E P A I P F A T A I O O L N O Y

I N G R L M R T E E L S L B V F

R C E A K T U D U T I L O S E I

S O R C N D N L R I G A U H C E

G T H T L E O K R A P N O T A P

H I A L B E I T N L G T H T T L

O C P E P R T R C E S U I O H A

A E R H W A A E A E N E S N R C

SLEIGH SNOWFLAKES SOLITUDE SOLSTICE STILLNESS SUGARPLUM FAIRY SWEATER TOBOGGAN UMBRELLA WHITE WINTRY WOOLENS

O F Y D A E S L H E F G E G R R

R V E Y E S N E T T I M N E O E

H T A W N H R S P S G S O N U N

M O H E T E E T C H N U G I S O

C W S S E N I L I S P O A R R A

T A I P E T H S R L R T B A E C

Y N J E R N N U A K I M O W U E

E O U T G O A C E R E A T I H W

M D A M A M E I R N H G T A E R

Y B E S O T D E E W T A H S A W

Clue to 2nd unlisted word: Important figure on February 2.

Clue to unlisted word: It may overtake you on the slopes.

B E R T N L B N E V E A G S E T

d the one on the next page Spring 2012 Issue.

QuarterlySpeedBump.com 37


Pile-Up: A Scrambled Letters Game by Scott Wendt

On the High Seas

TSTCY UARK YAMLFOWER EBAGLE ANSWER:

—— Answers to the Puzzles in the Autumn 2011 Issue: Due to a bone-headed editorial error, the Pile-Up puzzle in the Autumn 2011 Issue was presented incorrectly and therefore impossible to solve. The corrected puzzle, should you like to go back to it, is available at quarterlyspeedbump.com/puzzlesfrom-the-mag. The Editor apologizes for the error. Once you have completed the corrected puzzle, the answer to the Autumn 2011 PileUp can be found below: ROUTES 38 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


In Winter, there seems to be more time to read. It might be stormy and cold outside but, inside, you can dive into a book and go anywhere you'd like. Lately, I've been thinking about the marvels that are works in translation. Without learning another language, we can read the literature from other countries. These books are special. They have to make sense across cultural boundaries and to people of different backgrounds. It's no wonder that there's a special prize-the Oxford-Weidenfeld Prize--for any book-length translation into English from any other living European language. This issue we feature 5 works in translation--four of them from other living European languages. Go on a trip by staying at home.

Interchange: Get Ready to Read

Italian Italo Calvino's If on a Winter's Night a Traveler (translated by William Weaver) is an inventive novel about books--both writing and reading. It starts off with two Readers who have purchased the new novel by Italo Calvino, If on aWinter's Night a Traveler. However, there has been a printing mishap and what they have isn't the complete story and it might not even be by Calvino. Hooked anyway, the Readers try to track down the rest of the story and odd adventures ensue. The story line spirals ever outward and we participate in the fun reading more and more novel fragments until the resolution (or is there a resolution?). Calvino is one of my three favorite Italian authors (the others, probably unsurprisingly, are Umberto Eco and Primo Levi).

Portuguese In Jose Saramago's The Elephant's Journey (translated by Margaret Jull Costa who has won the OxfordWeidenfeld Prize a couple of times), it's the 1500s and the middle of the Inquisition. The king of Portugal has given the Archduke of Austria an elephant as a belated wedding gift. We follow the elephant (Solomon), his mahout (Subhro), and their entourage on their journey through

rough terrain and horrible weather as they make their way to Austria. Most people along the way have never seen an elephant and you can imagine what they do. This is based on an actual event but Saramago uses it to philosophize and comment on the past vs the present, religion, and everything else in an addicting way. Anachronisms are intentional. Fair warning: Proper names are not capitalized unless they begin a sentence and dialogue is separated solely by commas with each new speaker's line starting with a capital letter. Confusing at first!

German The Hangman's Daughter by Oliver Pรถtzsh (translated by Lee Chadeayne) is based on a historical character in the author's ancestry, Jakob Kuisl, a Bavarian hangman, executioner, torturer, and street cleaner. In the 1600s, the townsfolk of Schongau are startled by the murders of some children and they think witchcraft is the cause. The hangman and his friend, the young physician Simon, (both of whom are considered necessary parts of society but ostracized nonetheless) are the only ones who believe that there must be a rational (or at least not supernatural) explanation for the deaths and other mayhem. Can they find the answer in time to save the woman accused as a witch?

QuarterlySpeedBump.com 39


Can they save other children? Can they save themselves? Read it to find out; you won't be sorry. I do think the book is misnamed, though, for the hangman's daughter is certainly not the main character even if she is a spunky and appealing one.

French Hunting and Gathering by Anna Gavalda (translated by Alison Anderson) is the gentle story of four people who've been rather damaged by the circumstances of their lives. There's the starving but brilliant artist, Camille Fauque, who has made some serious mistakes in the past; the tortured and guilt-ridden chef, Franck Lestafier; Philibert, the courtly but backward member of an aristocratic house, in whose grand apartment they all live; and Franck's elderly grandmother, who is going blind and cannot take care of herself properly anymore. It's bittersweet, there's a love story or two, and of course they mostly all live happily every after. A quick and fun read.

Japanese The first thing to know about Haruki Murakami's fiction is that it's reality-warping and mind bending. Half the time you have no idea what's going on yet you're compelled to keep reading. He's also obsessed with pop culture. In his Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World (translated by Alfred Birnbaum), this is all true. We follow the narrator (who may be a victim of a mind-altering experiment), on subterranean journeys as he avoids thugs, the mysterious INKlings, and info warriors. Then there's the town at the End of the World that also has secrets...and shadows. There's a librarian (of course!) involved in the whole thing. Hard to describe, just like all of Murakami's novels, but worth the read.

40 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


Library List Books on astronomy can be found in the 520 section of the Dewey Decimal System with books on the moon hanging out in the 523s. Search for the the 292 section of the Dewey Decimal System if you want to learn more about family history research and genealogy. You can also look for biographies, state and local histories, and anything else that might help you search. Ask a librarian. Linda Johnson also recommended some great volumes in her interview earlier in this magazine (see the On the Road to... article). Books on butterflies can be found in the 595.78 section of the Dewey Decimal System. Both Four Wings and a Prayer by Sue Halpern and Chasing Monarchs: Migrating with the Butterflies of Passage by Robert Michael Pyle are excellent books about monarchs and their migratory habits. Cookbooks are located in the 641 section. While you're in the 641s, see if your library has Mourad: New Moroccan by Mourad Lahlou for great ways to use your preserved lemons and for other yummy Moroccan dishes. Another cool book in that section is The Geometry of Pasta by Caz Hildebrand & Jacob Kenedy. You need this book if only for the black and white illustrations of various pasta shapes. Manuals on how to crochet as well as crochet patterns in case you get hooked (hahaha) are located in the 746 section of the Dewey Decimal system. If you just feel like reading poetry, head to the 811 and other 8XX sections. You'll find lots to ponder there. Volumes of Sara Teasdale may be hard to find but other american or world poets will be sitting on the shelves waiting for your visit. As always, if you want to read up on ballroom dance before you hit the floor, you need to be in the 793 section of the Dewey Decimal System.

QuarterlySpeedBump.com 41


テ(ne Minogue Celtic Meditation Music www.minogue.com

Rolf Lislevand Ensemble Diminuito player.ecmrecords.com/lislevand

Off the Beaten Tracks

Norwegian baroque lutenist Lislevand and his ensemble play mostly italian Baroque music. Their style makes it seem fresh. Although there is some singing, the voices flow gracefully with the music and the lyrics aren't in english so they don't intrude. Favorite tracks: "Ricercate" and "La Perra Mora."

This is the type of music that was popular in a new age-y way a couple of years back. This particular album, however, still has merit for relaxation and demonstrates genuine musical talent and not new ageiness only. We're not big on the whole meditation-to-Celtic-music concept but we like what we hear here. Favorite tracks: "Dark Island" and "Easter Show."

by RLW & JLV

The Jazz Mandolin Project The Deep Forbidden Lake www.jazzmandolinproject.com

Familiar songs go acoustic and lose their lyrics. You can get lost in the timelessness of this music which is by no means muzak nor suitable for an elevator. The old is new (Radiohead, Tom Waits, Leonard Cohen, et al.) with a jazzy lilt and everything is awesome. Favorite tracks: "Winterlong" and "Halleluljah."

Winter calls for a slower tempo, fewer lyrics, older instruments, and a push toward introspection as the world stills until Spring. We need background music as quiet as the winter landscape that doesn't trip off onto the New Age-y path. And, the string instruments should be plucked rather than bowed for the majority of the time. Opinionated much? Who, us?! All of these albums meet the above criteria plus they're beautiful too. We hope you enjoy them as much as we do.

Robert Barto Lute Sonatas 10 polyhymnion.org/barto

Barto has been systematically making his way through the lute music by Sylvius Leopold Weiss and this is the latest recording. The songs are mellow and Barto seems to be one with his instrument. This is different from your usual music. Favorite tracks: "Lute Sonata No. 40 in C major: IV. Sarabande" and "Tombeau sur la mort de M. Comte de Logy."

John Doan A Celtic Pilgrimage www.johndoan.com

The sound of a harp guitar (20 strings!) is, well, ethereal and soothing without being boring. Doan plays traditionally-inspired Celtic tunes here at a slower place in this intimate recording. Favorite tracks: "Gazing on the Face of the Sea" and "Where Horses of Feary Hide." 42 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine | Winter 2011/2012


du ati U n l on s

Essays in Dance

Photos and text by Jessica Herrick

“Let us read and let us dance - two amusements that will never do any harm to the world.” —Voltaire Ever wondered what a ballroom dance competition is like? A real ballroom dance competition, not the so-called “reality” shows like Dancing with the Stars and SoYou Think You Can Dance? Yeah…me neither. Until I found myself hurtling through a drizzly October morning, on my way to participate in one. At the time, I had only been dancing about six months. I caught ballroom fever in April 2010, and was happily immersed in my addiction when Djimi, my dance instructor, suggested that we give competition a try. “It’ll be fun,” he asserted. “It’s a fun game.” So we started to prepare for the Eighth Annual UC Berkeley Beginner’s Competition. Given my inexperience, we signed up for the Newcomer category in International waltz and quickstep. As the competition approached, I became more and more nervous. It had seemed like a good idea at first, but now I was going to have to actually do it, and the fun factor began to dwindle. By the night before the event, I had

worked myself into such a state that I could barely remember the basic footwork, let alone any of the technique that I had learned. Djimi and I had one final practice, during which I became convinced that I was going to embarrass the entire ballroom community with my pathetic attempts at dancing…and Djimi lost the heel off of one of his shoes. I took that as a sign and fled the studio in a vain attempt to calm my nerves. The next morning found me awake well before dawn, applying makeup, curling hair, packing my shoes and dress, and trying not to hyperventilate. I loaded everything into the car and headed out to Berkeley, about an hour and a half’s drive from Sacramento. I was in pretty good shape time-wise (my father having taught me that to be fifteen minutes early is to be unforgivably late), planning to meet up with Djimi and the studio’s other competitors in the Bay Area. The Universe, however, had other ideas. When I stopped to top off my gas tank, I heard a clanking noise emanating from underneath the car. This is not a good sound to hear at the best of times, and my stress level immediately arrowed into the stratosphere. Upon investigation, I discovered a half-inch bolt embedded in my left front tire. Insert a streak of blue-tinged epithets. After exhausting my reserve of naughty vocabulary (which took several minutes, I won’t lie), I frantically considered my options. I was still in Sacramento, but no tire store was going to be open for at least another three hours, by which time the competition would have already started. I could just take my chances and shoot off down the highway hoping for the best, but my mother’s voice shrieked such a protest about safety that I quickly rejected that (potentially suicidal) idea. I finally settled on the only viable alternative – I called Djimi. QuarterlySpeedBump.com 43


Luckily, he had not yet left for Berkeley. Mortified, I pled car troubles and begged him for rescue. After he kindly agreed, I gave him directions to a gas station about a halfmile from my house, figuring that would be easier for him to find on short notice than trying to navigate the twists and turns of my neighborhood. I then drove my poor wounded car home, collected my bags, took a deep breath, and ran for the meeting point. Have I mentioned that it was drizzling that morning? I don’t think a single dog barked at me…they were all too stunned at the pre-dawn sight of a harried beginning ballroom dancer juggling her garment bag, shoe bag, makeup case, and purse in a mad dash down the sidewalk, muttering expletives and trying not to sweat her mascara off while also hoping that the mist wouldn’t turn her hair into a frizzy tangle of wet. Not an auspicious start to the day. The studio contingent, including yours truly, managed to reach Berkeley without further incident. We found our way to the university’s gymnasium a bare fifteen minutes before the dancing was to begin, hurriedly registering and then searching for a changing room that was not an open gym floor full of UC freshmen even more nervous than me. So what was the actual competition like? For me, most of it was a jumbled blur of controlled chaos. Competitors milling about, doing last minute fixes on costumes and hair (because in ballroom’s crazy world, appearance matters). Organizers rushing to and fro, checking lists, bellowing numbers, and trying to herd the competitors into some sort of order. Judges trying to find their places, DJs finetuning music. Spectators, mostly family and friends, snapping pictures, giving hugs, and cheerfully wishing for broken legs. Only a few images stand out clearly in my head. Djimi trying to settle me down by leading me through some Argentine tango steps. Taking a deep breath before going out onto the floor for the first time, hoping desperately that we would at least make it through the first round of heats. Floating through a waltz and realizing that it was 44

actually working. Kate, one of the other dancers from the studio, giving Djimi and myself high-fives when the entire studio contingent made it into the final rounds for each dance. Having a judge pause next to me after my finals were finished, to earnestly tell me that I did very, very well. And walking up to the judges with Djimi at the end, to receive our third place ribbon in waltz, and our fourth place ribbon in quickstep. One of Djimi’s firmly held beliefs, about competitions and dancing in general, is that it should be fun. There is nothing more important when on the floor, because if you are having fun, then, and only then, can you truly dance. All of the stress and anxiety I put myself through preparing for and then participating in the competition was useless. Worse than useless, for it hampered my enjoyment of something that I love deeply, to the depths of my soul. It was only once I got onto the dance floor that I remembered why I wanted to be on that floor. Unfortunately, in my personal quest for perfection I struggle with this issue each time we compete or perform. But I am slowly learning how to remind myself of what is important despite the turmoil both inside and around me. Perhaps some might call that the beginning of wisdom. Me? I just want to dance. Oh, and for the next competition? Three days beforehand, Djimi lost the heel off of his other shoe. Two days beforehand, I found my car’s right front tire flat as a board. The Universe…she has a sense of humor. Luckily, so do I.

¯¯¯¯¯ Jessica Herrick is a regular columnist for Quarterly Speed Bump. Learn more about her continuing adventures in ballroom dance in our next issue. Contact Jessica at undulations@quarterlyspeedbump.net or learn more at www.any2cantango.com.


Don't forget to enjoy the journey.


We'll be Back wi t h t h e S p r i n g 2 0 12 I s s ue S o me t i me Around March 20, 2012. Have a Good Wi n t er !

Profile for Rebecca Wendt

Winter 2011/12 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine  

A quarterly magazine full of Things to Do. Articles on ways to help you slow down and relax including hobbies, recipes, and reading.

Winter 2011/12 Quarterly Speed Bump Magazine  

A quarterly magazine full of Things to Do. Articles on ways to help you slow down and relax including hobbies, recipes, and reading.

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