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D O N I N G T O N P A R K

C L A S S I C M O T O R C Y C L E

F E S T I V A L

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F R I D AY 9

T H

TIME

EVENT

LAPS

1:30 PM

Practice: 1 Solo Practice

10 mins

1:46 PM

Practice: 2 Solo Practice

10 mins

2:02 PM

Practice: 3 Solo Practice

10 mins

2:18 PM

Practice: 4 Solo Practice

10 mins

2:34 PM

Practice: 5 Solo Practice

10 mins

2:50 PM

Practice: 6 Solo Practice

10 mins

3:05 PM

Practice: 7 Sidecar Practice

10 mins

3:21 PM

Practice: 8 Solo Practice

10 mins

3:37 PM

Practice: 9 Solo Practice

10 mins

3:53 PM

Practice: 10 Solo Practice

10 mins

4:09 PM

Practice: 11 Solo Practice

10 mins

4:25 PM

Race 1: Classic 200cc, 250cc & 350cc Goldstars

6 laps

4:43 PM

Race 2: Lansdowne Cup

6 laps

5:01 PM

Race 3: Formula 750 & Post Classic GP 250/350

6 laps

5:19 PM

Race 4:Classic 350cc

6 laps

5:36 PM

Race 5: Post Classic 500cc Air Cooled & 750cc

6 laps

5:54 PM

Qualifying 1: Wheatcroft Trophy

10 mins

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t i m e t a b l e s

S AT U R D AY 1 0

T H

TIME

EVENT

LAPS

9:10 AM

Race 6: Production 600cc & 1300cc

6

9:27 AM

Race 7: Sidecars (FIM Europe Sidecars)

6

9:45 AM

Race 8: Classic 500cc (FIM Europe 500cc)

6

10:03 AM

Race 9: Post Classic 125cc (FIM Europe Forgotten Era 250cc)

6

10:21 AM

Race 10: Classic 1300cc & Post Classic 1300cc (FIM Europe Forgotten Era 1300cc)

6

10:38 AM

Race 11: Classic 200cc, 250cc & 350cc Goldstars (FIM Europe Pre 1948, 175cc & 250cc)

15 mins

10:57 AM

Parade A PR6 Parade

6

11:15 AM

Race 12: Lansdowne Cup

6

11:33 AM

Race 14: Formula 750 & Post Classic GP 250/350 (FIM Europe 750cc & Forgotten Era 250cc)

6

11:51 AM

Race 15: Classic 350cc (FIM Europe 350cc)

6

12:08 PM

Lunch Break

6

1:08 PM

Race 16: ACU UK Post Classic 350cc

10

1:32 PM

Parade B PR6 Parade

15 mins

1:51 PM

Race 17: Post Classic 500cc Air Cooled & 750cc

6

2:09 PM

Race 18: Production 600cc & 1300cc

6

2:27 PM

Race 19: Sidecars (FIM Europe Sidecars)

6

2:44 PM

Race 20: Classic 500cc (FIM Europe 500cc)

6

3:02 PM

Special Parade

15 mins

3:23 PM

Race 21: Post Classic 125cc (FIM Europe Forgotten Era 250cc)

6

3:41 PM

Race 22: Classic 1300cc & Post Classic 1300cc (FIM Europe Forgotten Era 1300cc)

6

6.30PM

The Seeley Charity Hour

t i m e t a b l e s

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T H E B U L L E T

F A L TIMELESS EVOLUTION

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T H E B U L L E T


C O N T

The Falcon Ten series is named after the raptor genus known as Falco. The ten motorcycles are individually titled after various species of falcon: the Bullet, Kestrel, Black, White, Altai, Merlin, Peregrine, Grey, Saker, and Vespertine.[citation needed] Barry has completed The Bullet (2008), The Kestrel (2010), and The Black (2011). Inspired and powered by a 1950 Triumph Thunderbird, a modified 1970 Triumph Bonneville, and a 1952

Vincent Black Shadow engine, respectively. Barry has previously engaged a staff of up to six craftsmen to assist with the fabrication process of various aspects of his motorcycles. Preferring to work on each par t personally, Barry currently employs only one CNC programmer. The Bullet was a customized factory-made bike. Since completing The Bullet in 2008, Barry has stopped customizing motorcycles and instead has developed a practice of designing, engineering,

and machining each entire motorcycle, with the exception of the engine, carburetor, rims, and tires. Barry star ts each motorcycle with a rare or iconic engine, creating an overall design. He then engineers and fabricates each par t with CNC machine tools and by hand. According to the Los Angeles Times, Barry's work reflects an "ethos of extreme evolution and design", and each motorcycle is "an engineering feat as much as it's a piece of art".

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T H E B U L L E T

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T H E B U L L E T


What is a custom motorcycle? Is it a 300 rear tire, a big V-Twin with loads of chrome and paint as loud as the pipes or is it more than that, ... or less? Ian Barry, of Falcon Motorcycles, builds one of a kind, redesigned British classics. Beginning with salvaged frames and engines, everything is rebuilt, redesigned and doesn't fit into anyone's preconceived idea, just high quality, hands on work with a British twist. The bike shown here, the Triumph based and board track inspired Bullet Falcon, is the first of the "Concept Ten," 10 machines, each unique and based on Norton, Velocette, Ariel, BSA, Matchless, Royal Enfield, Brough Superior and Vincent. The next bike, now in progress, the Kestrel, will be the last Triumph. The Bullet, was awarded Best Custom at the Legend of the Motorcycle Concours, (pretty cool because it was just on display and not entered in the competition) and was built for actor Jason Lee. It's nice to see a break from the V-Twin customs, of course the Vincent and Brough could be a nice variation on that idea as well. Very nice work! I'm looking forward to seeing the the rest of the series. Hmm ..., a custom Brough Superior, a custom Vincent, this could be interesting. Falcon Motorcycles press release: A Slice of British History - Made in the USA ‘Throughout history, culture and

myth, Falcons have symbolized, vision - elegance - speed and power’. These fundamental qualities inspired Ian Barry of Falcon Motorcycles to pursue the creation of the ‘perfect motorcycle’. A postwar British motorcycle fanatic (Vincent/ Norton /Triumph/ Rudge/ BSA etc.), Barry makes history as he embarks on the ‘Only Ten’ project - to build 10 Falcon motorcycles from the most revered, sought-after historic British marques. Each Falcon will be unique, using derelict frames and engines from the pre and post-war era (circa 1930-1960). Falcon ‘Concept 10’ series will include: (Bullet - already made for actor Jason Lee), The Kestrel (currently in process and will be the last Triumph made by Barry), Rudge, Ariel, BSA, Norton, AJS, Velocette, Royal Enfield and Vincent. The essence of these classic bikes will be distilled and filtered through the inimitable Falcon aesthetic as abandoned skeletons; derelict engines and far-thrown parts will be reconstructed and fully resurrected.

EARLY DAYS... The first Falcon the ‘Bullet’ (a breed of falcon) was a board track racer-inspired Triumph motorcycle commissioned by and custom-made for actor, Jason Lee (My Name Is Earl, Vanilla Sky, Almost Famous). The unique balance of beauty and function both raised eyebrows and gained respect from esteemed motorcycle experts when it was named winner of the ‘Best Custom Motorcycle Award’ at The 2008 Legend Of The Motorcycle International Concours (The ‘Oscar’ of Motorcycle Awards). The award was presented by Jesse James, and chosen from a field of motorcycles built by the custom motorcycle elite. The astonishing thing was that the motorcycle won despite being only on display at the event, and not actually entered into the competition. Paying homage to the British gentlemen of a more civilized era – a sophisticated classic culture exuding grace and charm, Falcon Motorcycles are in sharp contrast to the over-the-top ‘muscle’ bikes seen so often in today’s custom motorcycle culture. Barry’s artisan approach to the creation of his bikes, his integrity, combined with his philosophy of following a perfect form, balanced asymmetry and functionality, is what makes Falcon Motorcycles stand, some say, in a league all of their own.

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FILM LEGACY When Triumph released their 650cc vertical-twin Thunderbird in 1950– their racing legacy was off and running. Right away Triumph became the bike of choice for many serious riders– again because of its lightweight, speed and maneuverability on the track and off-road. They soon cemented themselves as an iconic motorcycle brand in the U.S., setting new standards for the rapidly growing sport. The Triumph Bonneville bike has been an undeniable legend for over 50 years. It’s namesake is a tribute to Johnny Allen’s 193mph World Record run at the Bonneville Salt Flats back in 1955 in a normally aspirated 650cc Triumph powered streamliner called “The Devil’s Arrow”. 1956 brought an unofficial record at Bonneville for another Stormy Mangum-Jack WilsonJohnny Allen streamliner, ”The Texas Cee-Gar”. Yup, these were Texas boys, and darn proud. They’d tell ya that Triumphs were made in Great Britain– made better in Texas! Obviously the Bonneville’s impact on racing was huge. It was an immensely critical building block for many motorcycle land speed world records and attempts.

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T H U N D E R B I R D

TRIUMPH THUNDERBIRD

T

he 6T Thunderbird was launched publicly at MontlhĂŠry near Paris, where three standardproduction bikes were ridden around a circuit by a team of riders who between them averaged a speed of 92 mph (148 km/h) over a distance of 500 miles (800 km). All three machines were ridden to the circuit and back to the Meriden factory. Triumph obtained further lasting publicity with Marlon Brando's 1953 motion picture The Wild One, in which he rode a 1950 6T Thunderbird. In the book Triumph Motorcycles In America, there is reproduced a letter from Triumph's importers objecting to the producers as to the use of their machine in

this film about rowdy motorcycle gangs. From 1960, the Thunderbird acquired Turner's rear fairing nicknamed the 'bathtub' on account of its shape. This unpopular feature, dropped quickly in the USA market, remained in ever-abbreviated forms for the home market until disappearing altogether for the final year of production, 1966. Before then, in 1963, the Thunderbird, along. Planned for 1984, a custom-styled and fur ther sleeved-down TR60 600 cc Thunderbird was

exhibited but not produced, the co-operative closing down towards the end of 1983.The scheduled price for this model was ÂŁ2181. The prototype Thunderbird 600 was conver ted by the factory into a conventional TR65 to fulfil Triumph factory production records held by the Vintage Motor Cycle Club, that TR65, made on 1 June 1983, was the last 650 cc motorcycle and the second last motorcycle made at Meriden before the factory's closure that August.

THE BULLET IS A CUSTOM TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLE THAT STARTED AS THE DERELICT FRAME AND ENGINE OF A 1950 PRE-UNIT TRIUMPH THUNDERBIRD T H U N D E R B I R D

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F E A T U R E B I K E S

MIKE HAILWOOD ON THE 250CC HONDA 6 AT MALLORY PARK The most iconic bike of its generation, designed by the 24 year old Honda engineer Soichiro Irimajiri in accordance with the Honda’s commitment of using the cleaner, quieter and more efficient four stroke engine. The bike was a masterpiece of miniaturisation that included a separate carburettor for each cylinder to feed fuel to the 24 valve engine before it was exhausted through six separate exhaust pipes. To produce the 60bhp that was needed to keep ahead of the Yamaha two strokes, the bike had to spin to 18,000 – a figure previously unheard of. Designated the RC165 it was introduced at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza, and won its second race at the Japanese GP, before Mike Hailwood took the World Championship in 1966 with ten wins from ten starts.

HONDA ...

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B I K E S MAKE SURE YOU C ATCH THE STAR BIKES APPEARING AT 26 22

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C A F E R A C E R

D U C AT I D R E A M I N G THE BULLET IS A CUSTOM TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLE, THAT STARTED AS THE DERELICT FRAME AND ENGINE OF A 1950 PRE-UNIT TRIUMPH THUNDERBIRD

T

he Ducati Monster. The backbone of Ducati's sales figures. It's the bike that Ducati designers imagined Brando would be riding in a modern day remake of the "Wild One". With styling that has been attributed to single handedly re-popularising the naked bike category why would anyone customise one? ...Because they can; and because like every motorcycle that rolls out of a factory, they can be improved upon. The S2R version of the Ducati Monster may have been short lived, but it is still regarded as one of the best in the long running, Monster range. While some think of it as a budget version of the S4R, the S2R's air cooled, 800cc engine packs plenty of punch (77bhp), it's celebrated for being the perfect street riding machine and it costs a fraction of the S4R. But as I mentioned it has it's flaws. Stiff forks, low spec brakes and lackluster power delivery are common complaints but these issues are relatively easy to fix.

CAFE RACER... Café racer styling evolved throughout the time of their popularity. By the mid-1970s, Japanese bikes had overtaken British bikes in the marketplace, and the look of real Grand Prix racing bikes had changed. The hand-made, frequently unpainted aluminium racing fuel tanks of the 1960s had evolved into square, narrow, fibreglass tanks. Increasingly, three-

cylinder Kawasakis and four-cylinder Hondas and were the basis for café racer conversions. By 1977, a number of manufacturers had taken notice of the café racer boom and were producing factory café racers, most notably the Harley-Davidson XLCR.[12] In the mid-1970s, riders continued to modify standard production motorcycles into so-called "café racers" by simply equipping them with clubman bars and a small fairing around the headlight. A number of European manufacturers, including Benelli, BMW, Bultaco and Derbi produced factory "café" variants of their standard motorcycles in this manner, without any modifications made to make them faster or more powerful. [citation needed] Eventually the café racer style became just a styling exercise that served no functional purpose and simply made the bike less comfortable to ride; so the trend quickly waned in popularity. Soon afterward, most new sport bikes began featuring integral bodywork from the factory, negating the need or ability to retrofit an aftermarket café fairing.r. The café racer is a motorcycle that has been modified for speed and handling rather than comfort. The bodywork and control layout of a café racer typically mimicked the style of a contemporary Grand Prix roadracer, featuring an elongated fuel tank, often with dents to allow the rider's knees to grip the tank, low slung racing handlebars, and

C A F E R A C E R

a single, rearwardly mounted, humped seat. One signature trait were low, narrow handlebars that allowed the rider to "tuck in" to reduce wind resistance and offered better control when in that posture. These are referred to as "clip-ons" (two-piece bars that bolt directly to each fork tube), or "clubmans" or "ace bars" (one piece bars that attach to the standard mounting location but drop down and forward). The ergonomics resulting from low bars and the rearward seat often required "rearsets", or rear-set footrests and foot controls, again typical of racing motorcycles of the era. Distinctive half or full race-style fairings were sometimes mounted to the forks or frame. The bikes had a raw, utilitarian and stripped-down appearance while the engines were tuned for maximum speed. These motorcycles were lean, light and handled road surfaces well. The most defining machine of the heyday of the type was "The Triton", which had a homemade Norton Featherbed frame and Triumph Bonneville engine. It used the most common and fastest racing engine combined with the best handling frame of its day, the Featherbed frame by Norton Motorcycles. Those with less money could opt for a "Tribsa"—the Triumph engine in a BSA frame. Other combinations such as the "Norvin" (a Vincent V-Twin engine in a Featherbed frame) and racing frames by Rickman or Seeley

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D U C A T I S P O R T

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arely does one witness the birth of a classic and realise it at the time ... The Ducati SportClassics were a range of retro styled motorcycles first introduced by Ducati at the 2003 Tokyo Motor Show, and put on sale in 2005 for the 2006 model year. The Paul Smart version was made for the 2006 model year only, while the Sport1000 ran from 2006 through the 2009 model years, and the GT1000 ran from the 2007 through 2010 model years.[3] They were the product of Ducati's design chief Pierre Terblanche, who said the series started with the Evoluzione MH900e replica of Mike Hailwood's victorious 1978 Isle of Man TT bike. The different variations are based on similar frames, and powered by the Desmodue 992 cc (60.5 cu in) air-cooled L-twin Ducati 1000 Dual Spark engine, also called the DS9 engine. The Sport1000 took its inspiration from the 1973 Ducati 750 Sport and related 750 Imola Desmo, and had the look of a classic lightweight single-seat cafe racer. It used a two valve 1000DS motor with a 1,425 mm (56.1 in) wheelbase, trellis tube frame. The suspension used three way adjustable single Sachs rear shocks, and non-adjustable 43 mm Marzocchi front forks. The wheels were wire spoke large section alloy rims with tubed Pirelli Phantom tyres. Borrani were approached to supply the rims, but could not supply the volume, so Excel rims were used. The Sport1000 was

available in black with a white stripe, red with a white strip, or amber with a black stripe. The 2006 model, known as the monoposto (solo) had a well gusseted 60 mm section asymmetric swingarm and a single shock, with stacked mufflers on the right side, low clip-on handlebars, and a dry-clutch. In 2007, a variation was made to taller clip-on handlebars, a wet-clutch, and the GT1000's dual-shock swingarm with mufflers on both sides. This change created space for passenger footpegs and a removable rear seat cowl covering a pillion seat was added, prompting the name change to Sport1000 biposto (tandem). In 2007, a Sport1000SE was also produced in a limited run of 100, available only in the US, which used the configuration of the 2006 model and a black and gold paint scheme reminiscent of the square-case 1980 Ducati 900SS. This paint scheme was inspired by a custom scheme done to a 2006 model by a US dealer.. The Ducati GT1000 used a similar steel tubular trellis frame to the Paul Smart and the Sport1000, and the same Desmodue 992 cc (60.5 cu in) engine. It was designed with comfort in mind and intended for sport-touring riders.[4] The frame differed from the Sport1000 in the addition of mounting points for twin shocks and side panels. The GT1000 had touring handlebars, mounted on the same front forks as the Sport has clip-ons: non-adjustable 43 mm Marzocchi upside-down forks..

DUCATI

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D U C A T I S P O R T


c i s s a s l ati Sport C

Duc

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D O N I N G TO N PA R K

C I R C U I T M A P D OO YW LL HO

ES RV U C ER AN R C

D OL

N PI IR A H

RE

DG AT E

DUCATI SYMPOSIUM

AMENITIES INSIDE CIRCUIT

T IGH TRA S FT CRO T A E WH

AIR COOLED RD CLUB PADDOCK SUITE DISPLAY PITSTOP DINER

MAD BONES GIG (SAT)

IDGE

BR KEYS STAR

FIRST AID

ROBERTS

CRMC RACE PADDOCK PADDOCK GATE

MELB OURN E HA IRPIN

CIR

UIT ENTRC ANCE

ES Y ESS FOGG

1 2 A G TE CIRCUIT

ENTRANCE

DONINGTON PARK FARMHOUSE HOTEL

20

GATE

MOS CK A D NCE E D T/PA TRA EN

KEY Point of interest

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Food / Drink Outlets

Food / Bar Outlets

Shows / Attractions

Camping/ Accomodation


C I R C U I T M A P

RACK GRASST

6

GATE

PUBLIC CAMPING

E

IT CU CE CIRNTRAN

STARKEY’S BAR

ANS MCLE

9

E

T CUICE CINRTRAN

GATE

VE CUR Z T N WA SCH

E PIC COP

E

UIT CINRTRCANCE

HT RAIG T S LOP DUN

0 1 A G TE

CLASSIC BIKE CLUB SHOW (EXHIBITION CENTRE)

CIRCUIT

ENTRANCE

19 GATE

CIRCUIT OFFICE

G & LIC PIN PUBOR CAM IBIT EXH

GRAND PRIX CAFÉ

GRAND PRIX COLLECTION

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GATE Toilets / Disabled Toilets

Ticket Sales

Gate Number

Trade Stands

Info Point

C I R C U I T M A P

Kids Playzone

IUNITE A MCIRTCRANC EN

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V I S I T O R I N F O R M A T I O N

V I S I T O R I N F O 10

GATE

OPENING TIMES

SALES

Gates open at 07.30 each day and the circuit action starts at 09.10, running through to 18.30 on the Friday, 19.30 on the Saturday and 18.30 on the Sunday.

MAGAZINES/NEWSPAPER SALES Shop next to Pitstop Diner.

C AT E R I N G CAFÉ NAME

CAFÉS Grand Prix Café – Main entrance next to the museum. Pitstop Diner – Opposite the main Paddock area. FOOD STALLS Located at various points around the circuit.

TO I L E T S Opposite the Exhibition Centre. Paddock area next to Pitstop Diner. Next to the Paddock Suite by pit garage No. 38. Entrance to Gate 20. Paddock Gate entrance. Entrance to Gate 10 near Coppice. Please note: additional toilets are available on site for major events and situated around the circuit. See map on pages 8-9 for more locations.

SERVICE & SUPPORT FIRST AID Located at the Medical Centre, next to Goddards.

TICKETS INFORMATION & TICKET SALES Gate 20, just past the Exhibition Centre and through the Exhibition Centre itself Gate 21, opposite the main Paddock Gate Gate 10 (disabled access), Coppice Corner just past the Circuit Office Gate 6, Starkeys Bridge, just next to the Grasstrack area ORGANISERS OFFICE Located in Race Control OPERATIONS OFFICE Located in Race Control PRESS OFFICE Located in Race Control

SHOPPING The Trade Village, located in the heart of the Race Paddock (opposite the Pitstop Diner), gives festival visitors the chance to shop for everything from memorabilia and art, to photographs, books, clothing, toys and accessories.

ARK TON P NING O D O T OME WELC

V I S I T O R I N F O R M A T I O N

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