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March/April 2018 “Midcentury modernism is not a style, it’s a language. It stays the same whether it’s spoken in 1955 or 2005. It’s a language that will always be spoken.” William Krisel Page 90

CONTENTS

features COVER PHOTO BY

Casey Dunn ABOVE:

Dating to 1959, the Parker Palm Springs hotel is known for its distinctive concrete-block screen. PHOTO BY Fredrik Broden

76 Out on a Limb Two massive oak trees define a new residence in Austin, with one growing right through the overhanging roof. TEXT

Creede Fitch PHOTOS

84 Self-Restraining Order

90 Palm Springs and Beyond

On a six-acre site in Sullivan County, New York, a couple choose quality over size, creating a pared-down haven in three simple volumes.

The mecca of modernism has been endlessly explored, but it remains a source of inspiration and surprise.

Casey Dunn TEXT

Julie Lasky

PHOTOS

Fredrik Broden

102 Double Vision In a suburb of Chicago, an artist adds her style to the legacy of her home’s midcentury architect and original resident. TEXT

Winifred Bird PHOTOS

Pippa Drummond

PHOTOS

Amanda Kirkpatrick

9


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March/April 2018 118

52

CONTENTS

42

68

departments 13 Editor’s Letter 16 Community

25 Modern World

68 My House

For a special report on the modern office, we conducted a survey about three common types—traditional, coworking, and home— and 2,000-plus respondents told us what they thought. Check out the highlights and consider the next frontier: cars as mobile workspaces. We close with a look at what may be the most overdue-foran-overhaul workplace on Earth: McMurdo Station in Antarctica.

On a commercial site in Cambridge, New Zealand, a family builds a courtyard home complete with art gallery and coffee stand. TEXT BY

Candace Jackson Pippa Drummond

PHOTOS BY

42 Process

58 Off the Grid

110 Backstory

134 Sourcing

From a sketchpad in Brooklyn to a mill in northeastern Pennsylvania, we follow the production of a singular fabric.

In a remote pocket of Ontario, a sustainability-minded architect cuts his design teeth on a summer home for his future in-laws.

A longtime resident of Fire Island, New York, elevates and expands his beachfront cottage, with storm resilience a top priority.

Saw it? Want it? Need it? Buy it.

TEXT BY

Lindsay J. Warner Jamie Chung

TEXT BY

Alex Bozikovic Marcus Oleniuk

TEXT BY

Arlene Hirst Matthew Williams

PHOTOS BY

PHOTOS BY

PHOTOS BY

48 Conversation

64 Small Spaces

118 Big Idea

Todd Oldham muses on creativity and the meaning of modernism.

Two giant Art Moderne columns prove no problem for a duo turning a Brooklyn loft in a former chocolate factory into a fashion entrepreneur’s split-level apartment.

In an inner suburb of Sydney, a couple strive for energy and food independence, introducing gardens, a pond—even a chicken coop—into their radical terrace house rebuild.

PHOTO: MICHAEL LASSMAN (118)

136 One Last Thing Architect Claire Weisz finds inspiration in a carpenter's carved-wood sample tablet. PHOTO BY

Marcus Nilsson

ILLUSTRATION BY

Sam Kerr

52 Renovation Get a full year of Dwell at dwell.com/subscribe.

Enlisting an unused sliver of outdoor space, a couple double the size of their tiny London kitchen. TEXT BY

TEXT BY

J. Michael Welton Michael Vahrenwald

PHOTOS BY

TEXT BY

Elana Castle Murray Fredericks

PHOTOS BY

Iain Aitch Rachel Smith

PHOTOS BY

11


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editor’s letter

Different Is Good

Are architects too in demand? It’s not a question I ever thought I’d ask. One of the principles that animates Dwell is that everyone who’s able to work with an architect should. But what I’ve been hearing lately 7C@>A6@A=6:?E962JC62:DE92EƎC>D2C6EFC?:?8 2H2J4=:6?ED3JE963@2E=@253642FD6E96JkC6E@@3FDJN Maybe that’s good news, maybe the industry is on E96G6C86@723@@>N06E Ǝ?5:E92C5E@36=:6G6E92E all architects in all parts of the country—let alone the H@C=5Y2C6DH:>>:?8:??6H3FD:?6DDN My theory is that people are too keen to work with big-name architects with award-winning portfolios and top clients. They are overemphasizing professional experience and underemphasizing personal connection, simpatico. To them I say, young architects and small studios have a lot to offer. In fact, depending on what kind of ideas you want to explore, an unheralded but accessible designer may be the >@DEDF:E65E@J@FN Take, for example, the multi-use dwelling in New 162=2?5:?E9:D:DDF6_AN `N ?9:DƎCDE@FE:?8H:E99:D own studio, an innovative architect created a home, art gallery, and coffee stand for his former roommates E92E Ə:AD E96 D4C:AE @? E96 DE2?52C5W:DDF6 DF3FC32? architecture of their town. He did it with a hand from 9:D4=:6?EDO965:5:E@?2ƎI653F586EO2?5O>@DE:>A@CE2?EO 96 5:5 :E 3J Ǝ?5:?8 D@=FE:@?D E92E 2? 2C49:E64E with decades of experience might not have seen. In the spirit of embracing new ideas, we’re pleased to announce that we are accepting applications for the 2018 edition of Young Guns, our annual showcase of the best emerging product designers worldwide. Besides having a fresh perspective and a well-rounded portfolio, what makes someone a potential Young Gun? It’s a tricky question. While social media has made it easier than ever for a budding designer to go from a nobody to a name brand overnight, many creatives spend years in school perfecting their craft before bringing a product to market. To ensure we’re being inclusive of all types of career paths, we’re casting a wide net, setting the age limit for applicants at 35. To be part of Young Guns in our September/ October issue, please send images of your work and a little about yourself to yg@dwell.com. Lara Deam, Founder, CEO lara@dwell.com / @laradeam

Symbol Crash Our new icons break down the kinds of bonus 762EFC6DJ@F42?ƍ?5@?=:?6N Aa

LONGER STORIES

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MARCH / APRI L 2018

P.S. Notice those icons on the left? Starting with our

next issue, you’re going to be seeing a lot of them. +96JkC6@FC?6HH2JƎ?5:?8DJDE6>O=6EE:?8J@F<?@H which articles have an online bonus, like video, and H96C6E@Ǝ?5:EN.6kC6=@@<:?87@CH2C5E@E2<:?8J@F 566A6CE92?6G6C:?E@62499@>62?5DE@CJN

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Dwell Editorial Executive Editor Luke Hopping Managing Editor Camille Rankin

Dwell San Francisco 901 Battery Street Suite 401 San Francisco, CA 94111 415-373-5100

Contributing Editor Kelly Vencill Sanchez Technical Editor Bruce Greenlaw

DwellÂŽ, the Dwell logo, Dwell Media, and At Home in the Modern World are registered trademarks of Dwell Life, Inc.

Dwell New York 60 Broad Street 24th Floor, Suite 2428 New York, NY 10004 letters@dwell.com

Copy Editor Suzy Parker Fact Checkers Karen Bruno Brendan Cummings Erin Sheehy Dora Vanette Editorial Fellow Somer Charanek Creative Director Rob Hewitt Designer Erica Bonkowski MASTHEAD

Photo Director Susan Getzendanner

Founder / CEO Lara Hedberg Deam Investor / Board Member Dave Morin Investor / Advisor Jennifer Moores CRO Nicole Wolfgram CCO Stephen Blake

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Executive Editor Jenny Xie VP, Engineering Trey Walker Director, Engineering Wing Lian Lead Developer Jim Redd Director, Product Management Daniel Miesner Social Media Coordinator Erin V. Mahoney Content Interns Samantha Daly Jodie Zhang

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MARCH / APRI L 2018

DWELL MEDIA


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letters

The San Francisco house in the last issue was pretty cool before seeing the exterior . . . then it became AWESOME. I love a surprising mix of design styles and eras. Thanks for sharing! —Jasmine Gurley

FROM DWELL.COM

Imagine my surprise and joy to discover “Home Schooled” in the January/February issue. I came of age in Washington Heights, New York, at the end of the ’60s. There was a nondescript block with a large supermarket and a public library separated by a narrow flight of cement stairs. Those steps led to Sylvan Terrace and The Morris Jumel Mansion. The houses on this hidden street were almost as fascinating as the mansion. Finally, I could visit one of these fabled row houses. [Owner and designer] Tom Givone did a stellar job. The house looks great and seems to work beautifully. —Candida A. Friedman

16

Last year we embarked on a huge renovation project. It included a “floating staircase” with walnut treads that are supported by the wall on one side and a panel of polycarbonate on the other. Unfortunately, we were unfamiliar with the handling of this highly scratchable material, and it ended up being damaged. The article “Life at the Edge” [November/December] mentions polycarbonate panels being used in a house designed by William Ruhl, and I wanted to know if he had the same problem and if he knows of any possible solutions. —Daniela Basevich

Architect and resident William Ruhl responds: You’re right that the

material is very prone to scratching, much more so than glass, although glass also scratches. This is one reason we never use clear polycarbonate, and in my house we used a milky-white honeycomb product: to avoid having the inevitable scratches too readily apparent. Our installers also wore gloves and kept the protective cover on the panels as long as possible. If clarity is an absolute must, then you would probably be better off with glass, although that comes at a substantially higher cost.

Thank you for reimagining Dwell to focus more on the design and craft of architecture and construction as well as attention to details and materials. The stories and profiles on design minds are inspiring. —Lou Maxon I like the curved theme of the Oblong Lake Cottage [January/ February], but the halls are dark. I would have preferred to see white rather than wood, which would have emphasized the sculptural quality of the design and added more light. The curved ceiling is gorgeous as it embraces the vertical glass rising. Not enough circles in architecture! —Colleen Maloney WE INVITE YOU TO SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THIS ISSUE. BE HEARD AT DWELL.COM/ DIFFERENT-IS-GOOD.

MARCH / APRI L 2018

DWELL

PHOTOS: JOE FLETCHER (SAN FRANCISCO); MICHAEL GRAYDON + NIKOLE HERRIOTT (MASSACHUSETTS); BRIAN W. FERRY (NEW YORK)

COMMUNITY

Clockwise from top left: the facade of the San Francisco Victorian renovated by Fougeron Architecture; William Ruhl’s home in Rockport, Massachusetts; the kitchen in Tom Givone’s Washington Heights townhouse.


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COMMUNITY

Don’t miss our new DIY-furniture video series featuring simple instructions for building modern pieces for your home and garden. No frills, no fuss, no jargon—just our expert hosts demonstrating their process, step by step.

DIY Walnut Dining Table Using everyday materials, designer, educator, and entrepreneur Ben Uyeda reveals how to make a solid, live-edge walnut dining table with hairpin legs. Go online for a video of the complete woodworking directions: dwell.com/walnut-dining-table How It’s Built

1

Cut the Wood Slab Halve the walnut slab to yield two new pieces of the same length. Cut one piece in half lengthwise and trim the edges off the other.

18

2

Biscuit-Join the Halves Biscuit-join and glue the liveedge pieces to the trimmed slab, using clamps to apply even pressure.

3

Fasten the Hairpin Legs Trim the short edges of the tabletop, sand the surface, and screw the metal legs onto the underside of the table.

4

Seal the Surface Fill cracks and knotholes with clear resin, resand the surface, and then seal it with several coats of finish.

MARCH / APRI L 2018

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dwell asks

Is It Time to Ban New Construction in High-Risk Flood Zones? Like the Fire Island house featured in this issue (p. 110), millions of existing dwellings in low-lying coastal areas are vulnerable to worsening storms, as the costliest hurricane season in U.S. history just made clear. The question is: Should new construction be allowed in these places?

COMMUNITY

For the safety of homeowners and first-responders, I believe that there are areas that need to be turned back into undeveloped areas. Give them to Mother Nature to take care of. Camille Moore Woodside on Facebook CONTRIBUTOR’S CORNER

You just need to design for a storm surge or flood. An office building I designed in the Caribbean had a parking garage that was 10 feet off the ground, with the building above. The elevator was always parked on the second floor in case of a surge. Similarly, homes there are built on stilts, with parking underneath. Richard Finnegan on Facebook 20

Charleston writer Jennifer Pattison Tuohy, who covered the redesign of McMurdo Station in Antarctica for this issue (p. 40) and has written about coastal building before, weighs in: “The answer depends on how we define ‘highrisk.’ Thirty-nine percent of Americans live in counties prone to coastal flooding. If last year’s hurricanes taught us anything, it’s that FEMA flood maps, drawn more by political pressure than by rising sea levels, can provide a false sense of security.”

Until we stop building structures out of sticks in tornado-prone areas, I don’t think tackling the flood zone issue is warranted. Maybe we could move on to a nationwide building code, instead of the piecemeal garbage USA landowners have to abide by in the present. Steven S. on Dwell

If homeowners have the ability to accept the financial consequences, allow them to build. Here in Southwest Florida, where beachfront homes can be quite expensive, most owners I know don’t even carry wind or flood insurance. The value of the land makes up a substantial amount of the total value of the property, and many homeowners feel they can rebuild out of pocket if the worst happens. A better question would be, should homeowners who build along the coast be eligible for federally backed flood insurance? Jim Barbour on Facebook Areas of land that flood should be saved for wildlife and recreation. Deborah Longworth on Dwell

MARCH / APRI L 2018

DWELL

ILLUSTRATION: RAYMOND BIESINGER

Simply get rid of the Federal Flood Insurance Program. If State Farm wants to insure [these homes], that’s on them. I don't think the taxpayer should subsidize stupidity. Paul Cluverius on Facebook


SEKTION / VOXTORP kitchen

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houses we love

Drop the Top TEXT BY

Somer Charanek

PHOTOS BY

Filip Dujardin

A villa in Leuven, Belgium, has an unusual new roof over its garden extension (below). Instead of being flat on the underside, the steel structure varies in thickness from about 2 inches to 18 inches (with an 8-inch layer of insulation on top). As the ceiling dips, the

1HDULQJLWVĆŁIWKGHFDGHRIXVHWKHUHDU extension of Joris E. Mariaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brick villa in Leuven, Belgium, had become functionally obsolete. With a dilapidated roof that leaked and small windows that provided little light, the 430-square-foot space was dim and gloomy. Joris wanted a bright, cozy place to relax with his two daughters, as well as something with a clearer connection to the garden. So he turned to the D2>62C49:E64EFC6Ć&#x17D;C>969256?ECFDE65E@ update the main house years earlier, ORG Permanent Modernity, led by Alexander Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hooghe and Natalie Seys.

22

floor drops: The living area is four steps below the rest of the room. Fix lights from Lucide hang from above. The Highlands sofa is by Patricia Urquiola. Outside, an oval concrete patio echoes the ceilingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curve (left). The Hopper table is by Extremis.


Along with project leader Sanne Peeters and her team, they proposed an inventive solution that Joris, a professor of materials and process engineering, could appreciate: Install a new roof, with a waterproof membrane, atop three walls of the extension, thus eliminating the leaks, while knocking out the garden-facing wall and replacing it H:E9Ə@@CWE@W46:=:?8H:?5@HD2?55@@CD for better daylight and outdoor access. To comply with a new ordinance that capped the height of the extension at 11.5 feet above the ground as measured in the front @7E96>2:?9@FD6OE96E62>DA64:Ǝ652 DWELL

MARCH / APRI L 2018

thin prefabricated steel plate with a structural load-bearing section that swoops down into the living space in a reverse curvature. “Often I have to explain to visitors that the shape has a functional origin,” says Joris. Built off-site by Ateliers MelensDejardin, the roof arrived in two pieces and was craned into place in less than a day. Today the asymmetrical dipped ceiling hangs above a sunken living area where Joris likes to unwind. “It’s a totally different atmosphere,” he says, “[It’s our place] for watching TV, reading a book, or just spotting birds in the garden.”

COMMUNITY

“Aesthetically, we explored how the bump could be asymmetrical and what the character of curvature is.” Alexander D’Hooghe, architect

ORG Permanent Modernity renovated the main house in 2003 and the rear extension in 2015, with help from structural engineers UTIL. The breakfast area (above left) features a set of Eames dining chairs from Vitra and a Tulip table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. The ceiling’s central bump and exposed steel grid (above) are structural as well as aesthetic features. A half wall with a fireplace by Kalfire creates division within the space (left).

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Work in Progress What constitutes an office has never been more up for grabs. Thanks to the laptop and smartphone, most “desk jobs” can now be done from almost any location. Where (or whether) we should sit for max productivity is debatable. The cubicle and corner office endure, but open plans full of homey furniture and over-the-top amenities are on the rise. And the very idea that a company needs its own space has been blown to bits by incubators and coworking collectives. To help employees, bosses, and designers figure out what’s going on, we conducted an informal survey, asking our followers about three common office scenarios— traditional, coworking, and home. More than 2,000 people answered back.

Modern Office Illustrations by Tim Vienckowski

PHOTO: FREDRIK BRODEN

No item is too small to be stylized, not even the lowly paper clip. A new book, Clip Art (April 2018, Princeton Architectural Press), highlights 10 designs pulled from historical patent records and comes with actual samples of each.

How would you rate your workspace overall? Traditional Office

p. 26

51% Excellent/Good 30% Satisfactory 19% Not very good/ Unsatisfactory DWELL

MARCH / APRI L 2018

Home Office

p. 30

70% Excellent/Good 22% Satisfactory 8% Not very good/ Unsatisfactory

Coworking Office

p. 34

73% Excellent/Good 21% Satisfactory 6% Not very good/ Unsatisfactory

Essay

p. 38

Slack is just the beginning. Silicon Valley and Detroit want to make work literally mobile. Find out why your next office might come with wheels.

25


Traditional Office Picture the classic corporate office. Fluorescent lights, nylon carpet, sea of cubicles, burbling water cooler, busted copier, right? Not so fast. While the survey confirmed certain Office Space-esque tropes (the thermostat wars are real), the single-company workspace—where the large majority of respondents (62%) go each day— must offer something people like. Only about one in ten traditional office employees said they would work from home full-time if they could.

1. PRIVACY, PLEASE Almost half (48%) of respondents felt that private offices are the most productive work environment, yet only a third of them (33%) actually work in one.

5

2. ON YOUR FEET Nearly a third (30%) of people in a traditional workspace have used a standing desk at some point. This figure is fairly consistent across all three workspace scenarios.

3. THE DREADED CUBICLE Just 37% of people who work in cubicles rated their overall workspace as excellent or good, compared to 58% and 55% of people in private offices and open work stations, respectively. And a mere one in five cubicle dwellers said they were best for productivity. 4. TEMP CONTROL 40% of employees in a traditional office agreed with the following statement: “If I had the option to do my job from home either all or part of the time, I would work from home parttime.” No doubt there are lots of reasons, but could it have something to do with the fact that the most commonly checked complaint about the traditional office was that “the heating/cooling is never right” (58%)?

Modern Office

5. ANALOG PERSISTENCE An overwhelming majority (78%) of workers in traditional offices still have a landline phone (compared to only 55% in coworking spaces). Also commonly found at the desk: artwork (63%); photos (52%); task lamp (40%); hand sanitizer (37%); and extra clothing (35%).

Would you rather have... 72% A private office 28% A private bathroom

26

54% Control of the thermostat 46% Control of the lighting MARCH / APRI L 2018

DWELL


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Task lights for working late (or without a window). 1. FOOT IN THE DOOR Tripod desk lamp by Onefortythree, from $95 Made one at a time by a husband-and-wife duo in southern Nevada, Onefortythree’s playful Tripod desk lamp comes in six colors and two metal finishes and has an optional shade, all at reasonable prices.

2. BIG PROMOTION Tab T lamp by E. Barber and J. Osgerby for Flos, $295 Located on the lower end of the price spectrum for a designer piece, the Tab T light, created by Brits Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby in 2011, is composed of die-cast aluminum with a PMMA diffuser.

3. CORNER OFFICE Pantographe desk lamp by Hermès, $9,950 Surprised? The Parisian fashion house has been in the lighting game for ages. (Its vintage lamps are highly sought after online.) If your top priority is conveying how successful you are, you could do worse than this elegant leather-clad piece.

Good design considers everyone in the office, not just the full-time staff. We asked professional cleaner Consuelo Atehortua how office planners could make her job easier. Limit cabinets. In an open layout, it’s better to keep cabinets all at one end, not in between work stations. That way you don’t have to go around them to clean and the space looks more streamlined.

2

1

1. Traditional

Locate the supply room in a convenient place. It’s best if you have only one large supply room, so you can easily see everything you need to reorder. The best spot is near the restrooms or kitchen, since that’s where you use supplies the most. Remove cubicles. Cubicles are the worst! They’re so hard to keep clean—they have too many corners and people tend to let things accumulate in them. I turned down a job once because there were so many cubicles.

Modern Office

Eliminate hanging light fixtures. Lights that hang from the ceiling collect dust and are hard to reach. I like lighting that’s flush with the ceiling behind a glass or plastic panel that you can remove, wash, and put back. Avoid carpeting. People don’t realize how hard carpets are to keep clean, unless you steam them regularly. They collect and hold dirt, plus they’re not good for people with allergies.

3

What is the most outdated thing in your office? The toxic wall-to-wall carpet...Only higher-ups have private offices, while everyday employees share cubicles...Hard-copy blueprints...The wall mounted VHS/TV combo... The fluorescent lighting...The typewriter we use to complete deposit slips...No lounge or comfortable sitting area...Beepers...Landlines and fax machines...Zero-tolerance workfrom-home policy...High-walled fabric cubicles...Filing cabinets for papers we never reference...My former boss’s Rolodex...

28

MARCH / APRI L 2018

DWELL

Be as open as possible. I prefer open space. It’s easier for me, and it’s better for everyone. The office is cleaner, neater, and more peaceful. You’re there eight hours a day and you need peace.


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Home Office 1. VIRTUALLY NOTHING A solid majority of respondents (57%) said they use telecommuting services like Google Hangouts and Skype either “not very often” or “not at all.”

The personal computing revolution has made the dream of a commute-free existence a reality for many, but is working where you live all it’s cracked up to be? Respondents with home offices, a tribe of self-employed, freelance, and salaried workers, paint a mixed picture. The upsides—no dress code, no sharing a bathroom, no boss over your shoulder—may not make up for the erosion of work/life boundaries: 47% of respondents who work from home said they believe they put in more hours than someone with the same job in a regular office.

2. STAY-AT-HOMES 74% of home office respondents reported spending no time during the week in a traditional office or coworking space, although some do find themselves occasionally working from a coffee shop (38%) or library (13%).

3. A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN Most respondents’ home offices are in a dedicated room of the house (62%)—far more than in part of a room (28%) or detached from the house (9%). And despite the old axiom about starting a business in the garage, only 1% do anything but park their cars there. 4. FEATHERING THE DESK 82% of respondents said they purchased furniture specifically for their home offices, and more than 40% of them reported spending at least $1,000, not including computer equipment.

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5. ON THE RECLINE 10% of people with home offices admitted to occasionally working from bed. 4

6. LOTS TO LOVE Home office was the only category in which the greatest percentage of respondents said their flooring was hardwood (47%) and their primary light source was natural (56%). They were also the most likely group to have artwork around (88%) and listen to music out loud (87%). Best of all, their workspaces were comparatively spacious (more than 100 square feet in 42% of cases).

Modern Office

5 1

6

Would you rather have... 71% A bigger computer screen and smaller desk 29% A bigger desk and smaller computer screen

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58% A state-of-the-art desk chair 42% A top-of-the-line printer/copier MARCH / APRI L 2018

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Lumens is modern like you.

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844.388.2529

Lumens supports

and the future of design.


Storage for files too important to entrust to the Cloud. 1. FOOT IN THE DOOR Wall System by Poppin, from $12 Poppin continues its crusade against dull office supplies with a spacesavvy exclusive for The Container Store. Called the Wall System, the collection actually includes desktop organizers as well as hanging items.

2. BIG PROMOTION Follow Me mobile pedestal by Antonio Citterio for Vitra, from $1,045 As easy to love now as it was when it was released in 2002, the movable pedestal by Antonio Citterio comes in two sizes, both featuring four casters, a rolling shutter cover, and a long strap for towing.

3. CORNER OFFICE Denizen Cube Tower by Jess Sorel & Otto Williams for Coalesse, price upon request Provided there’s enough room in your office, the Denizen tower, which runs 35-to-52 inches wide and offers shelves, cabinets, and drawers, makes an excellent storage solution.

Sit, stand, kneel. Professor and ergonomics expert Alan Hedge says that, healthwise, how you sit (or don’t) is less important than staying active. Here, he shares tips to keep moving.

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2. Home

Sit on a dynamic chair. Choose a chair that doesn’t lock you into one sitting position but allows you to move your body. Look for features like a dynamic back, which both Humanscale Freedom and Steelcase Leap have, or chairs designed for active sitting, such as the CoreChair. Avoid exercise balls unless you’re sitting for only a few minutes at a time. They’re unstable and offer no support. Keep your feet and legs moving. To increase your lower body movement while sitting, consider a foot-operated movable foot rest like the Humanscale Ergo Foot Rocker or the Lorell Ergonomic Rocking Footrest— or even an under-the-desk portable bike pedal like DeskCycle. Try sit-stand working... If you have a fixed-height desk, consider using a retrofit product like the Ergotron WorkFit, which turns it into a sit-stand desk and provides adjustability for different body heights.

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...or replace your desk. Choose a desk that allows for an easy transition from sitting to standing. Evodesk, Eureka Ergonomic, and IKEA all make electric, height-adjustable desks. Workrite Ergonomics and others have models that don’t need to be plugged in.

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What is the hardest thing about working from home? Not ideal for meetings...Remembering what day of the week it is...Distractions, there’s always something to clean...Reduced face-time with coworkers and boss...Not enough exercise...Lack of proper office setup...Staying disciplined and following a set schedule... Forgetting to stop working...Often feeling out-of-the-loop on certain aspects of the overall company...Food is too readily available...

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Increase your daily activity. Up your activity by following the 20:8:2 program (20 minutes sitting, 8 minutes standing, 2 minutes stretching/moving). To stick with it, let an Apple Watch or other activity tracker remind you to stand and move.


Coworking Office The share-everything model of doing business may not be new anymore (57% of respondents who work in offices cohabited by other companies say they’ve been there for three years or more), yet the perks some of them offer—breakfast buffets, yoga, dogs welcome— are still hard to believe. Some say these free-flowing, casual environments encourage employees to do their best work; others say they invite them to slack off. One thing we do know, people who work there aren’t complaining. Just 1 percent of coworking respondents deemed their overall office “unsatisfactory.”

1. GARDEN ENVY 41% of coworking respondents checked outdoor space as an amenity they can access at work. But don’t tell the traditional office crowd: The item they most commonly checked on their wish list was “a garden/outdoor space” (26%).

2. KEEP THOSE MIXERS COMING The data confirms that coworking collectives are also hubs for networking: 62% of respondents said they have made a business or professional connection with someone from another company at their office.

3. WASTED SPACE? 71% of respondents reported that their coworking space offers places to spread out besides their main workstation, yet half (52%) say they spend less than a quarter of their time in them. 4. IT’S THE CONVENIENCE, STUPID Despite having a variety of perks available to them (pets allowed, 43%; free snacks, 31%; beer on tap, 12%), when asked to select the things they like about their coworking space, 40% of respondents included “not having to be responsible for a big space” and 25% included “not having to hire cleaning staff.”

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5 1

Would you rather have... 75% Free 15-minute massages 25% A rock-climbing wall

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58% A fitness room 42% A nap room MARCH / APRI L 2018

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5. QUIET DOWN With 29% of respondents checking it, “too much noise/activity” was by far the most common complaint about coworking spaces (followed by “sharing the refrigerator” and “sharing restrooms” at 22% each, and “messy common space” and “unsatisfactory furniture/décor” at 18% each. Indeed, 55% of respondents reported wearing headphones not to listen to music, but simply to block out noise.


Work bags that put the company tote to shame. 1. FOOT IN THE DOOR Dot bags by Jody Barton for Hay, from $69 Anyone who’s obsessed with Hay’s high-end, nextgeneration Scandinavian furniture, but can’t swing the price tag, should consider picking up one of its graphic bags, designed by artist and illustrator Jody Barton.

2. BIG PROMOTION Kramer bags from Tsatsas, from $765 Based on a design created by German modernist architect and flat-pack furniture pioneer Ferdinand Kramer for his wife, Lore, in 1963, Tsatsas reissued a line of refined leather handbags at imm Cologne in January.

3. CORNER OFFICE Bao Bao Flat Pack by Issey Miyake, $980 The unofficial accessory of architects everywhere, the Bao Bao bag has been through several iterations since Issey Miyake introduced it in 2000. Now its tessellating-triangle design is available in a backpackstyle version.

What does the newest cohort to enter the workforce have to say about offices? We asked recent NBC Universal intern Caroline Fanelli.

3

3. Coworking

On your first day on the job, what surprised you most about the office’s design? The floor didn’t seem to have a cohesive layout. There were departmental separations, but when new employees came, they were sometimes seated in a completely different area.

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How was the communication? The senior members of my department were pretty accessible, even when they were in their offices. The walls were all glass, so I felt like I could get their attention quickly if necessary, but it would have been better if we’d had an instant messaging app. How did your workspace compare to others there? My setup was identical to my direct boss’s, but sometimes excess supplies were stored on my desk. I wished they had more storage. It felt like anything that didn’t have a designated place ended up with me.

Modern Office

2

Any thoughts on cubicles? As drab as they can be, I think they’re a good middle ground between open and separated offices. Cubicles helped us remain discreet. They’re ugly, but they work!

What is the most unusual amenity your coworking collective offers? Wood-burning fireplace...Yoga class...Concierge...Basketball half-court... Bicycles to ride around town...Dinner each night...Aromatherapy... Netflix...Mini-ramp for skateboarding...Sleep pod...Kombucha on tap... 1905 square grand piano...Meditation room

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What one piece of advice would you give to an office designer? Think about the interns! The fact that there was space for me made me feel like a valued part of the team. At past internships, I’ve been secluded in corners, thrown behind coat racks, and made to feel unimportant. Just letting your intern physically share your space means something.


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The World Is Your Office From autonomous cars to rolling, connected office pods, the future of work is likely to be increasingly mobile—think BYOD on steroids.

Modern Office

OVER THE COURSE OF THIS year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, some 400 attendees experienced the future firsthand—as passengers in self-driving vehicles. Courtesy of Lyft and technology company Aptiv, the test rides brought autonomous cars from the imagined to the tangible, albeit with a “safety driver” on hand. Whether or not we’re prepared for fully self-driving vehicles, automakers and a host of innovators are busy harnessing the technology that will transform not just how we move from one place to another, but how—and where—we work. In its rollout of the 2018 Expedition, Ford opened the door to a new audience—busy professionals. It even invited architect and interior designer Clive Wilkinson to consider how automobiles are poised to

Text by Kelly Vencill Sanchez

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evolve into rolling workplaces. Along with the driver-assist features we’ve come to expect, the new Expedition offers things like a larger cabin, wireless charging, four auxiliary power points, six USB ports, and a WiFi hotspot for up to 10 devices—more than enough to support a carload of colleagues en route to a meeting. “The technological evolution that’s allowed us to be super mobile has reached a point where we never have to be stuck behind a desk again,” says Wilkinson, whose creative environments for companies such as Google and TBWA\ Chiat\Day have upended officedesign dogma. Chris Urmson believes the options for mobile working will only expand with driverless vehicles. The former CTO of Google’s self-driving car project, Urmson joined forces in 2017 with fellow autonomous vehicle pioneers Sterling Anderson (formerly at Tesla) and Drew Bagnell (formerly at Uber) to launch Aurora Innovation, which recently announced partnerships with Volkswagen and Hyundai. “Our mission is to get this technology out into the world and see its benefits safely, quickly, and broadly,” Urmson says. “It’ll be less about the feel of the leather than about how you spend your time in these vehicles. You could have a productive meeting on the way to work or spend less time in the office so you can get home to your family sooner. With that, we’ll get improved safety, less congestion in cities, and better-moving traffic.” Jada Tapley, Aptiv’s VP of advanced engineering and external relations, believes

the self-driving cars of the future will require out-of-thebox thinking. “We won’t need a driver’s seat or rear seats. It could be more like a lounge setting, with comfortable chairs and a table for your laptop. Or maybe the walls of the vehicle will become a display and touchscreen. We’ll need to design the technology and the user interface for access and connectivity.” Vehicles as mobile, connected workspaces is at the heart of global design firm IDEO’s Work on Wheels concept for a fleet of customizable self-driving modules outfitted as on-demand conference rooms, with sliding smart panels and privacy screens. “The pods ‘inverse’ the commute,” explains Danny Stillion, IDEO’s executive design director. “It’s not about going to work, it’s about the work coming to us. It’s part of a vision for a shared, autonomous, electronic platform.” Whether the evolution of cars into mobile offices will improve our lives remains to be seen. “People oversensationalize the state of change in technology,” Wilkinson says. “But society has experienced even more dramatic changes. The automobile, the telephone, even the refrigerator were unbelievably disruptive. The better we understand the challenges and the problems, the more we’ll design something we need.” He points to the iPhone, saying, “It came out of the blue, but it was successful because it solved so many problems instantly.”


the sun sets.

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concepts

TEXT BY

ILLUSTRATIONS BY

Jennifer Pattison Tuohy

R. Fresson

Downsizing in Antarctica The largest community on the planet’s coldest continent needs a smaller, smarter facility to continue its crucial work.

How do you solve a problem like McMurdo? More than a hundred structures perched next to a frozen sea, near a volcano, McMurdo Station was originally built to support human life in one of the planet’s most hostile climates for an operational lifespan of two years. It just turned 62. This aging complex is the primary logistical facility for the pursuit of science in Antarctica and at the South Pole. Without it our avenues to understanding our planet and its fragile ecosystem become severely more limited. Established by the U.S. Navy in late 1955, McMurdo is now run by the National Science Foundation (NSF). After years of patchwork additions, the small group of huts has become a sprawling jumble of 105 buildings spread over 164 acres, where old naval barracks sit in the shadow of mod6C?D4:6?E:Ǝ4DECF4EFC6DN+96=24<@72?J >2DE6CA=2?92DC6DF=E65:?2?:?67Ǝ4:6?E 2?55:7Ǝ4F=EA=246E@=:G62?5H@C<7@CE96 DE2E:@?kDC6D:56?EDOH9@ƏF4EF2E67C@> about 150 very hardy souls in winter to roughly 900 in summer. The NSF says a complete overhaul is essential. To achieve this, the NSF formed the Antarctic Infrastructure Modernization for Science program (AIMS) and hired Colorado-based OZ Architecture, which has built sustainable facilities in environmentally sensitive areas like the Grand Canyon. Vast energy and resources are needed to sustain this community, which includes not only scientists, but service and logistical staff and more, in a climate H96C62G6C286E6>A6C2EFC6D9@G6C2EŽt . The new McMurdo must accomplish a multitude of goals. It has to reduce energy

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Unveiled in 2017, OZ Architecture’s plan to renew McMurdo Station consists of a 300,000-square-foot, nine-building campus that will provide for all aspects of living and working at the bottom of the Earth: labs, offices, a cafe, a post office, a gym, a barbershop, lounges, a cutting-edge lecture hall, and more.

demand so the fuel tanker that supplies the station annually can cut its load from 4.6 million gallons of jet fuel to 800,000. It has to make the icy landscape a safer environment for workers, so no one will ever again have to tie themselves to a rope to venture between buildings during storms. And, of course, it has to advance the mission. “It’s all in support of the science,” says Rick Petersen, OZ’s project lead. OZ’s solutions range from the simple— putting the pantry next to the kitchen, not across a frozen roadway—to the more complicated, like improving the skin-tovolume ratio of the buildings using an igloo model. Consolidating the current 105 3F:=5:?8D:?E@?:?667Ǝ4:6?EDECF4EFC6D would achieve both these goals and lessen energy demands. Fewer buildings would also mean fewer bodies needed to maintain them, reducing personnel. Finally, cutting the cost of doing business in Antarctica could play well in Washington, where the budget will have to be approved. Petersen’s design calls for double-wall enclosures with outer structural insulated panels and inner stud walls. Optimized foam insulation would provide an R-value of 72, and expanses of triple-glazed, low-e coated windows would be strategically placed to provide light and reduce heat loss while improving gain. Instead of an ugly “mining camp,” as Anthony Bourdain once described McMurdo, the new station, scheduled for completion in 2027, is being billed as a marvel of modern architecture on Earth’s most remote continent. Says Petersen: “Working as an architect to support a mission like this is a career high.”

Consolidation

Take Five

1

OZ Architecture shares its fivepoint plan to make McMurdo Station more energy-efficient.

Using the igloo as a geometric model, the new plan calls for condensing McMurdo Station into fewer, larger structures so that minimal surface area encloses maximum volume.

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concepts

The new design contains big ideas for reducing McMurdo’s lighting, heating, and water-energy demands, as well as minute details for improving residents’ quality of life. In the dorms, lights will cycle through the natural phases of the sun to support well-being. (With only one sunrise and sunset a year in Antarctica, a

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Thermal Jacketing

In architect and project lead Rick Petersen’s recommended layout, spaces that require less heat, like warehouses, would act as physical buffers, “thermally jacketing” areas that require more heat, like offices.

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person’s circadian rhythm can get pretty confused.) The benches in the hallways are intended to promote community and the sharing of ideas, says Petersen: “When a scientist in one realm has a conversation by bumping into another in the hallway, there may be an exchange that advances both of their realms.”

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Waste-Heat Recapture

Waste-heat recycling will promote energy sharing across the various program functions. “We are using heat-exchangers to capture and redirect waste heat from generator exhaust stacks and wastewater drains,” says Petersen.

4

Double Wall

OZ proposed a double-wall envelope with structural insulated panels outside and stud walls inside, for a total thermal resistance of R-72. (For reference, in less extreme climates, Passivhaus buildings usually have R-40 to R-60 walls.)

5

Triple-Glazed Windows

Triple-glazed, low-e coated windows would account for 11 percent of the building envelope, welcoming in the otherworldly landscape. Says Petersen: “The views give you a sense of inspiration to remind you of why you’re there.”

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process

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

Lindsay J. Warner

Jamie Chung

Bolt Out of the Blue Following a stroke of inspiration, Rebecca Atwood Ć&#x2122;ſğĆ&#x2020;Ä­Ć&#x2122;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;ÄźĹ&#x2021;ĂŹĂŽÄźĂ&#x2021;Ĺ&#x153;Ä&#x161;ÄźĆ&#x2122;Ä&#x161;ğÝĂ&#x201C;Ç?Ă&#x201C;ſœÄ&#x161;Ć&#x2020;Ă&#x201C; into a new line of fabrics.

Rebecca Atwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pillows, duvets, wallpapers, and other designs are made in many places, from Rhode Island to India, but almost all of them start as ideas in her sketchbook. The Tidal Wave fabric series is based on painted squiggles she did in 2016.

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When artist and designer Rebecca EH@@5A:4<65FA2H:56OĆ?2E3CFD92?5 DE2CE65A2:?E:?8Ć?@H:?8:?5:8@DEC:A6D:? 96CD<6E493@@<@?652J:?=2E6 OD96 H2D?kE?646DD2C:=J=@@<:?8E@4C62E62?6H

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process

To bring her painting to life as a fabric, Atwood worked with designers and weavers at MTL, a mill in Jessup, Pennsylvania. MTL is one of a very small number of textile mills left in the United States; it specializes in weaving jacquard velvets and high-end upholstery fabrics.

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process TIDAL WAVE FABRIC How a design created in Brooklyn becomes a textile spun in northeastern Pennsylvania.

Ǐ

MAKE THE DESIGN

TRANSFER TO LOOM

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process



DWELL

Dz

WIND THE WARP

CREATE TENSION

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Ȃ

TIE THE WARP

PREPARE THE LOOM

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+96+:52=.2G6A2EE6C?:DH@G6?FD:?82!24BF2C5=@@>O 2>249:?6E92E52E6DE@  N+@52JO$+#FD6D2 4@>AFE6C7:=6E92E24ED2DE96=@@>kDj3C2:?l2?54@?EC@=D E963:?2CJH62G:?8AC@46DDN

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45


process

46

INTRODUCE COLOR

WEAVE THE PATTERN

+96H2CAOH9:49:D>256@7E9@FD2?5D@77:?6J2C?DO24ED2D2 j42CC:6Cl7@CE963=F62?5@77WH9:E64@EE@?H67EJ2C?DN+96 3:?2CJ7:=64@?EC@=D9@H2?5H96?E96H2CAE9C625D2C6>2?:AW F=2E65E@>2<6H2J7@CE96H67EJ2C?N

DE96H2CA:DC2:D65@C=@H6C65O:E4C62E6D2?@A6?:?8 E9C@F89H9:49E96H67EJ2C?:D:?D6CE65N+96D6 :?E6C=246>6?ED4C62E6E9656D:8?E92EkDG:D:3=6@?E967246@7 E96E6IE:=6Y:?E9:D42D6OE96DBF:88=J=:?6DN

Ʊ

Ǐʲ

INSERT THE WEFT

TRIM THE SELVEDGE

7E6C6249A2DD@7E96H67EA:4<_2D:?8=6J2C?4C@DD:?8E96 H2CA`OE96J2C?D2C6j362E6?l@C4@>365:?E@A=246E@6?DFC6 6G6?E6?D:@?N+96H67EA:4<>@G6DD@DH:7E=J24C@DDE96H2CA E92E:EkDD@>6E:>6D5:77:4F=EE@EC24<H:E9E969F>2?6J6N

DE96=@@>H62G6DOE96723C:44@?E:?F@FD=J 25G2?46D7@CH2C52?5:DC@==65@?E@2362> 2EE967C@?E@7E96=@@>ND:EC@==D@FEO4FEE6CDEC:> E966586DO4C62E:?8E96E6IE:=6kDƎ?:D965H:5E9N

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process

“It’s not like fashion, where color is always evolving. You want to create a palette that is enduring.” Rebecca Atwood

Each finished run of Tidal Wave fabric is stretched across a frame and carefully inspected for imperfections. Any textile that doesn’t meet industry standards is either repaired or, in rare cases, scrapped, depending on the severity of the flaw. Once the fabric passes inspection, it is sent to the warehouse to be sold or made into pillows.

47


conversation

ILLUSTRATION BY

Sam Kerr

Todd Oldham The tireless multihyphenate talks about his heroes, theories on color, and why every designer should own a makeup kit.

You’ve worked in fashion, interiors, photography, crafts, book publishing, and more. Through it all, one constant has been a focus on modern design. What does “modern” mean to you? $@56C?:D2Ǝ=E6CN EkD?@E2723C:4N EkD 23@FED6CG:?8@E96CDC2E96CE92?J@FCD6=7N =6I2?56C:C2C576=E96H2DE96C6E@>2<6 6G6CJ@?6kD=:7636EE6CN6D:?46C6=J<?6H 964@F=55@:EO2?596H2DC:89EN EH2D=:<6 AC6D6?EDN6@776C65J@FAC6D6?EDN <RXHGLWHGWKHGHƣQLWLYHERRNRQ Girard’s career, as well as several books related to the artist Charley Harper. What was it like getting to know these

two giants of American design so intimately through their life’s work? +96D63C:==:2?E>6?OH9@> 92527C@?EW C@HD62EE@OH6C6G6CJ5:776C6?EO2?5E96 4:C4F>DE2?46DH6C65:776C6?EOE@@N ?6G6C >6E$CN:C2C5N6A2DD65367@C6 8@EE@ H@C<@?E963@@<NFE 8@EE@DA6?5E96 =2DED6G6?J62CD@792C=6JkD=:764@==23@C2E:?8H:E99:>O2?586EE:?8E@>66E9:>2?5

New York–based designer Todd Oldham credits his color sense to artist Charley Harper, whose vibrantly hued illustrations fill The Giant Golden Book of Biology, Oldham’s favorite growing up. The bug drawing is from Charley Harper’s Animal Kingdom, which Oldham edited in 2015.

D66E96G@=F>6@79:DH@C<H2D6IEC2@C5:?2CJN92C=6J925:==FDEC2E65>J72G@C:E6 3@@<2D249:=5OThe Giant Golden Book of Biology. E:8?:E65:?>62=@G6@7?2EFC6O D4:6?46O2?53:@=@8JO3FE2=D@24@=@CD6?D6 E92E4@>A=6E6=JD92A652?5:?7@C>65H92E 5@N2D:42==J6G6CJE9:?8 <?@H23@FE 4@=@CH2D7C@>92C=6J3J@D>@D:DN What else impressed you about them? @E9>6?H6?EE967FCE96DEE96J4@F=5 E@>2<6D@>6E9:?8=FD4:@FD7@CJ@FOE@ 6:E96C:>A2CE:?7@C>2E:@?@CE@DFAA@CE J@FC=F>32CO@CE@>2<6J@F=@@<8@C86@FD 2?5D>2CEDE2?5:?8?6IEE@24FCE2:?N EkD @?6@7E9636DE=6DD@?D 4@F=592G6=62C?65O H9:49:DE92EJ@F>FDEOJ@F;FDE>FDEO8@ E967FCE96DEJ@F42?N 7J@F92G6:E:?J@FO J@F92G6E@5@:EN+96J2=D@D6E7@CE9249@D6?A2E9@7362FEJE92EO:7@E96CDH2?E65 E@DEC@==5@H?:EOE96JH@F=5D66E963=@DD@>DOE@@N+96JH6C623D@=FE6=J96C6E@ D6CG62?5H2?E65E@5@E96:C36DE7@CJ@FN It’s that idea of having empathy as a designer, which is so important. 06DO2?56DA64:2==JH:E9:?E6C:@C56D:8?O 3642FD6J@FkC6E96C6E@DFAA@CEH9@6G6CkD :?E96C@@>N0@FkC6E96C6E@>2<6E96> 766=E96>@DE362FE:7F=OE96>@DEA@H6C7F=O E96>@DE8@C86@FDE96J42?N.96?D@>6@?6:DA:4<:?82A2:?E4@=@CO E6==E96>O 5@?kE=@@<H:E9J@FC6J6DO=@@<:?E96>:CC@CH:E9:E?6IEE@J@FC7246O3642FD6E96? J@FkC6E96DE2C@7E96C@@>N That’s such an interesting approach. EkD@?6@7E96C62D@?D k>D@:?EC:8F65 H:E9>2<6FAN E9:?<>2<6FA:D6IBF:D:E6N $JA2C6?EDD@>6E:>6D3FJ>6E96D68:82?E:4>2<6FA<:ED:?+2C86E@C">2CEH:E92 E9@FD2?54@=@CDN+96D62C64@=@CDE92E2C6 >256E@8@H:E9A6@A=6N):89EE96C6J@F 92G624@>A=6E6=J5:776C6?E>@E:G62?5 A2E9H2JE92?=:E6C2==J6G6CJ@E96C3FD:?6DDE92E564:56D4@=@CN 7J@FDE2CEH:E9 25>:C:?8@C;FDE24<?@H=658:?8E964@=@CD E92E2C6>256E@8@H:E9A6@A=6O:ED6ED E9:?8D@77:?2C62==JF?:BF6H2JN FC86

48

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conversation

6G6CJ3@5JE@86E>2<6FAN?J56D:8? DEF5:@O8@3FJ2D>F49>2<6FA2DJ@F42?N When you were growing up, how did \RXƣQGUHIHUHQFHVWRLQVSLUH\RX" 5:5:EE9C@F89EC2G6=:?8H:E9>J72>:=JN 5:5:EE9C@F89>J@H?A9@E@8C2A9JN 5:5:EE9C@F89DA6?5:?89@FCD2EE96 *>:E9D@?:2?2?5E96-V2?56G6CJ >FD6F> 4@F=586EE@N+962>@F?E@7 E:>6=@@<:?82E:?5:86?@FD2CE2EE96 *>:E9D@?:2?OF?56CDE2?5:?8E96DA2E:2= BF2=:E:6DOE964@=@COE964F=EFC6YE92EkD 2C:496IA6C:6?46N0@F4@>62H2J G:3C2E:?8N EkD=:<682D@=:?67@C4C62E:G:EJN <RXVKRZHG\RXUƣUVWIDVKLRQFROOHFtion when you were 19. What do you tell young people just starting their careers? .6==OE@368:?H:E9O>@DE5@?kEF?56CDE2?5E92E:7J@FkC62C62==J4C62E:G6 A6CD@?OJ@F42?24EF2==JDFCG:G6@77J@FC :562DN%@@?6E6==DJ@FE92EH96?J@FkC6 C62==JJ@F?8O3FE:EkD23D@=FE6=JECF6N k> H@C<:?8@?23@@<42==65The Other Road. EkD:?E6CG:6HDH:E9A6@A=6H9@E@@<2 5:776C6?EA2E9N H2?EE92E3@@<E@36@FE E96C63642FD6E96?@C>2=C@25DH6C6?kE 7@C>6O3@E9:?DA:C:E2?5E96?3J49@:46N It’s also so important to ask questions, to be curious. 28C66N EkD2H2J@7D66:?8N 5@?kE6G6? <?@H9@HE@E6249E96>E@364FC:@FDN 7 J@F5@?kE92G6:EOJ@FkC6?6G6C8@:?8E@86E :EN@C>6O:EH@F=536=:<6>:DD:?8@IJ86? :7 H2D>:DD:?84FC:@D:EJN One of your most recent projects is the line Kid Made Modern, which grew out of a series of books. What prompted you to start it? E9:?<:E9252=@EE@5@H:E9>JA2C6?EDN +96JDA6?E6?5=6DD2>@F?ED@7E:>6E6249:?8FD6G6CJE9:?8E96J<?6HO2?5H92E E96J5:5?kE<?@HH6=62C?65E@86E96CN+96J 4C62E65E9:D=FDE7@C25G6?EFC6OE9:DDA:C:E @7j@Ǝ8FC6:E@FENl+96@C:8:?2=Kid Made Modern3@@<42>67C@>E92E=@G6@7>2<:?8 2?5=@G6@725G6?EFC6E92E 6IA6C:6?465 2D249:=5N+96?E96C6H2DE96D6C:6D@7 3@@<DH65:542==65All About,:?H9:49H6 56>JDE:7J4C27EE649?:BF6D2?5>2E6C:2=DO

Inspired by a series of books, Oldham’s arts-and-crafts line, Kid Made Modern, was launched in 2015 and expanded to include clothing like the Menagerie Dress (above left) last year. The animal print is by Patrick Hruby, one of several artists

E9:?8D=:<66=64EC:42=E2A62?58@F2496N C6>6>36C<?@H:?8H92E8@F2496H2D H96? H2DD6G6?N+96C62C66?@F89=:EE=6 H6:C5@D@FEE96C6H9@56D6CG6E92E:?7@C>2E:@?:7E96JH2?E:EN

H6H2?E65E@5@H:E9E963@@<2?5=2J:?8 E92E@FE=:?6@G6C2==<:?5D@7E9:?8DN .6<6AE8@:?824C@DD6G6CJE9:?8E92E :?E6C6DE65FDO<66A:?8@FC324<3@?623@FE H92EH2D:>A@CE2?EN E;FDEH@C<65N

How did the books morph into all the other elements in the line, like the crafts kits and the clothing? H2DDFCAC:D652E9@HH2C>=JE96ƎCDE 3@@<H2D8C66E65N E9@F89EOj 7A6@A=6 =:<6E9:DA9:=@D@A9JO9@H42?H6>2J36 2EE249:EE@2AC@5F4ES DE96C6C@@>S D E96C6C62D@?7@CFDE@2AAC@249E9:DSl .65:52=@E@7C6D62C492?5H67@F?5@FEO J6DO49:=5C6?56D6CG6E96G6CJ36DE2?5 :EkD?@E2G2:=23=6E@E96>OD@=6EkDD66H92E H642?5@N.6;FDE<6AE>28?:7J:?8H92E

Sounds like you’re trying to provide a pattern of thinking for young people to get their hands dirty. E9:?<H6F?=62C?49:=5C6?>@C6H96? H6E6249E96>N 5@?kEH2?EE@362A2CE@7 E96F?=62C?:?8OD@E92EkDH9JH6kG67@4FD65 @?2==E9:D?@?AC6D4C:AE:G6O?@?W@FE4@>6W 32D65A=2JE@E6249<:5D9@HE@36AC@46DDW @C:6?E65N 7J@FkC6AC@46DDW@C:6?E65OJ@FkC6 25:776C6?E<:?5@79F>2?O2?5H92EkD :>A@CE2?EE@J@F:D5:776C6?EN0@FH@?kE E2<6?@7@C2?2?DH6CN EkD2G6CJC:49E9:?8N

“I remember knowing what gouache was when I was seven. There are enough little weirdos out there who deserve that information if they want it.” TODD OLDHAM 50

Oldham enlisted to create Kid Made Modern coloring books (top right). Oldham’s tome on Alexander Girard drew extensively from the modernist icon’s archives, including designs he did for the restaurant La Fonda del Sol in the 1960s (above right).

You seem to like to challenge yourself. 8F6DD 5@N3DEC24EE9:?<6CD2C6E96 >@DE:?E6C6DE:?8A6@A=6E@>6N C6>6>36C H2D8@:?8E@2E96C2A:DEJ62CD28@N 624EF2==JD2:5E@>6Oj0@F?665E@>66E D@>6?@C>2=A6@A=6Nl E9@F89EOj ?665E@ ?@ED66J@F2?J>@C6Nl

MARCH / APRI L 2018

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renovation

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

Iain Aitch

Rachel Smith

Better Half A modest expansion is a major improvement for a Victorian “half-house” in London.

By filling in the “side return”— a narrow outdoor area typical to London terrace houses (inset)— Andrew and Emma Boyd were able to double the size of their kitchen. “We both really love to cook, but the kitchen was so small, only one of us could be in there at a time,” says Emma.

52

0RVWKRPHRZQHUVƣQGWKHLUDUFKLWHFW through friends or by browsing online. London doctors Andrew and Emma Boyd found theirs at their local pub. The pair were sketching out ideas on the back of an envelope for a possible extension to their compact southeast London home when they spied a couple at the next table doing a similar thing, but better and on tracing paper. Striking up a conversation, they discovered that

one of their fellow drinkers worked for A Small Studio, an architecture, planning, 2?5=2?5D42A6ƎC>N Within days, an appointment had been made for the company’s principal, Helena Rivera, to visit the Boyds and discuss ideas for expanding their “half-house”—a local name for one side of a Victorian terrace house that’s split vertically down the middle, with the two neighbors sharing a main front entrance and hallway. A rear

MARCH / APRI L 2018

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renovation

addition would swallow what little garden the Boyds had. But Rivera came up with a plan to transform their 53-square-foot 62EW:?<:E496?3JƎ==:?8:?E96jD:56C6EFC?Ol a narrow outdoor space that is a feature of many Victorian terrace homes. These spaces were designed to allow in daylight and, once upon a time, provide access to an outside toilet and coal bunker. Rivera’s design would eliminate the return and more than double the kitchen size, with a skylight in a new peaked roof and new windows to make up for lost daylight. Her plan also called for soundAC@@Ǝ?8E@96=A4@>A6?D2E67@CE96

Architect Helena Rivera of A Small Studio worked with VA Build to complete the renovation in less than three months. In the dining area,

built-in storage was added beneath the staircase (below and inset). The table is by Ebbe Gehl for John Lewis and the pendant is by Anglepoise.

A cerulean espresso machine by Gaggia anchors a kitchen counter tableau. The cabinetry doors are Lastra in Fjord blue by Crown.

N

Half-House ARCHITECT LOCATION

A Small Studio London, England

C

D

G

H

F

I

A Communal Hallway B Sitting Room C Dining Room D Kitchen E Patio F Hallway G Master Bedroom H Guestroom I Bathroom

ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT

E

Upper Level

A

Lower Level

B

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MARCH / APRI L 2018

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See the color you expect to, for as long as you expect to.

You can tell when the color in the store doesn’t match the color on your wall. When we reinvented our paint, we created our exclusive Gennex® Color Technology which makes our paint simpler on the inside and truer on the outside. So you get exactly what you expect. That’s proudly particular. To find a local retailer, go to benjaminmoore.com


renovation

Above the kitchen extension, Rivera installed a peaked roof and, as part of the new design, placed a triangular window that follows the roofline (below). “I remember looking at that little triangle, which was quite

expensive, and thinking, is it really necessary?” says Andrew. “But Helena said, ‘Just trust me, you should do this.’ And of course, it looks so much better this way than it would have without it.”

“The house is very near a park, but the green spaces weren’t coming across, so we designed something that allowed the light and the green to come in.” HELENA RIVERA, ARCHITECT

The floor tiles, which create a seamless transition from kitchen to patio, are from the Illustrate line by Solus (below). The appliances are by Neff and the wall lamp is by Anglepoise (right). In the backyard, the couple installed a shed for storing their bicycles. The window seat was an item on Emma’s wish list.

single-brick-width walls separating the Boyds’ home from their neighbors’. The planning took place while the couple were organizing their wedding and Emma was studying for her master’s exams. Neither wanted to spend their honeymoon in a construction site. So, two days after the wedding, Emma and Andrew packed away everything breakable, handed their keys to the builders, and headed for the airport. “Our honeymoon was spent cycling from Vancouver to San Francisco on our tandem bike,” says Andrew. Ə:89EE@*C:#2?<22?5>@C63:<:?8

56

across the tropical island followed. “We’d be in the middle of nowhere and would log on to a Dropbox folder that A Small Studio had set up for us,” says Emma. “We’d look at a load of photos and just see our house being torn apart.” Happily, the builders put most of it back together in the two months the couple were away (they completed the job three weeks later), and Andrew and Emma came home to 63 extra square feet. The kitchen/dining area is now the center of the house, with the deck tiled to match the interior for a continuous indoor/outdoor space.

MARCH / APRI L 2018

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Tetra House by B e r cy C h e n St ud i o L P Photograph y by P a ul B a r d a g j y

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off the grid

Vince and Adrienne Murphy’s rural retreat is clad in gray shingles and gray-stained pine (right). “They wanted the cottage to meld into the woods and be visually quiet,” says architect Kelly Doran, who

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

Alex Bozikovic

Marcus Oleniuk

worked with Portico Timber Frames to build the 2,500-square-foot home. Large south-facing windows by Loewen and a high-efficiency Rais X wood-burning stove help to reduce energy demands (below).

Here and There An architect designing hospitals in ^ǘļÇñſƆƙ ſŇƩûĔƙƆƩƆƙĚļ ĚĭĚƙǞ to a lakeside dwelling in Ontario. 58

Many of us like to get away from it all, but the Murphy family goes farther than most: 160 miles from their house in Toronto to the end of a private logging road deep in a thick wood, where their cottage shares a lake with just three neighbors and wolf packs roam the surrounding wildlife reserve. Their home coexists quietly with its environment. The long, narrow roof evokes a portaged canoe, and gray shin8=6DAC@G:5642>@FƏ286282:?DEE96>:I65 forest. This is exactly what owners Vince and Adrienne Murphy, who commissioned the house as they prepared for retirement, were looking for. “There’s a kind of

MARCH / APRI L 2018

DWELL


PRADO sofa with cushion & EVERYWHERE sideboard. Design: Christian Werner LUMIÈRE NOIRE floor lamps. Design: Philippe Nigro ligne-roset.com


off the grid

serenity about the place,â&#x20AC;? says Adrienne, a former teacher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very calming.â&#x20AC;? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a similar atmosphere within, thanks to the cottageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elegantly simple layout. The porch, kitchen, dining room, 2?5=:G:?82C62Ć?@H:?24@?E:?F@FD=:?6 from west to east, with a wood-burning stove at the center and double-height win5@HD7C2>65:?@F8=2DĆ&#x17D;CND6E@7E9C66 bedrooms follows, each with a private view toward Lake Havelock and access to the deck that runs the length of the house. The corridor along the landward side is =:?65H:E93F:=EW:?Ć&#x17D;C3@@<42D6D2?5423:nets and topped by clerestory windows for cross-ventilation. At one end of the house, a bathtub provides a place to soak and contemplate the forest. (None of the neighborsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cottages is visible from here, or from anywhere else in the home.)

ĹšhÄ&#x201D;Ă&#x201C;Ä&#x201D;Ĺ&#x2021;ĆŠĆ&#x2020;Ă&#x201C;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x2020;Ć&#x2122;Ç&#x2DC;Ă&#x201C;Ä­Ç&#x2014;Ă&#x201C;ġÄ&#x161;Ä­Ă&#x201C;Ć&#x2020;ĂŹĹżĹ&#x2021;ġĆ&#x2122;Ä&#x201D;Ă&#x201C; ÄźĂ&#x201C;ĹżĂ&#x201C;Ć&#x2020;Ć&#x2122;Ĺ&#x153;Ĺ&#x2021;Ç&#x2DC;Ă&#x201C;ſĭÄ&#x161;ÄźĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x201A;Ć&#x2020;Ĺ&#x2021;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x2122;ĹźĆ&#x2020;Ĺ&#x2021;ĂŹĂŹÄ&#x2DC;ÝſÄ&#x161;Ă&#x2021;ġÄ&#x161;ğĭÇ&#x17E; Ç&#x17E;ÄźĂ&#x201C;ÂśĂ&#x201C;Ć&#x2020;Ć&#x2020;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x2122;Ç&#x17E;ĹŹhÄ&#x201D;Ć&#x2122;ġĂ&#x201C;ÄźĆ&#x2122;ĹżĂ&#x201C;Ä­Ç&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ğÝĹ&#x2021;Äź Ć&#x2122;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x161;ğÝĆ&#x2020;Ä­Ä&#x161;ÄŞĂ&#x201C;œſĹ&#x2021;Ć&#x2020;Ć&#x2020;Ä&#x2DC;Ç&#x2014;Ă&#x201C;ÄźĆ&#x2122;Ä&#x161;Ä­Ć&#x2122;Ä&#x161;Ĺ&#x2021;ÄźĂ&#x201A;Ă&#x2021;Ç&#x17E;Ä­Ä&#x161;ĂťÄ&#x201D;Ć&#x2122; Ć&#x2020;Ć&#x2122;ĹżĆ&#x2122;Ă&#x201C;ĂťÄ&#x161;Ă&#x201C;Ć&#x2020;Ă&#x201A;ÄźĂ&#x2021;Ä&#x201D;Ă&#x201C;Ć&#x2122;Ä&#x2DC;ĂťÄ&#x161;ğſĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;ĆŠÂśĆ&#x2122;Ä&#x161;Ĺ&#x2021;ğŏź KELLY DORAN, ARCHITECT

Recessed built-ins made of Douglas fir (top and above) were milled by TJM Custom Interiors. The furniture is a combination of family heirlooms and newer items, such as the Hiroshima Woodseat armchairs by

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Naoto Fukusawa for Mjolk that surround the dining table. Two Glo-Ball pendants by Jasper Morrison hang in the living/dining area, while Drop 1 pendants by Peter Bowles (foreground) light the kitchen.

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off the grid The cottage stretches for more than 110 feet, with a Muskoka room, or screened-in porch, at the northwestern end (right). A perpendicular wing houses the garage (below). The house has no air conditioning,

The design was a family affair, conceived by architect Kelly Doran, who is currently 2D6?:@C5:C64E@C2EE96)H2?52@7Ć&#x17D;46@7 E96@DE@?W32D65?@?AC@Ć&#x17D;E$**6D:8? Group and is married to the Murphysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; daughter, Adrianna. To be more precise, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re married now; the design process began just a month into their relationship, H96?@C2?H2DH@C<:?82E*G%C49:E64ED :?+@C@?E@Nj+96Ć&#x17D;CDEE:>6 >6E>J:?W laws, they let me design them a house,â&#x20AC;? Doran says in wonderment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Adrianna and I were on our fourth date, and I convinced them to entrust me with their life savings. I still canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe it.â&#x20AC;? The Murphys recall Doranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pitch fondly: â&#x20AC;&#x153;His ideas were absolutely clear and very strong,â&#x20AC;? Adrienne says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being off-grid was really important to us, so we decided to buy in and build on that with Kelly.â&#x20AC;? The cottage is highly sustainable. The tightly insulated structure draws its energy from a nearby bank of solar panels. The water is supplied from the lake and

relying on lake breezes and crossventilation for cooling. Each bedroom has a screened door that opens to the deck and an adjustable transom above the hallway door to encourage the circulation of air.

treated with a UV system. Wastewater is AC@46DD65:?2D6AE:4E2?<2?5=6249Ć&#x17D;6=5N To keep demand down, there is no airconditioning, and the kitchen has a grill instead of an energy-intensive oven. *FDE2:?23:=:EJ:D2<6JA2CE@7@C2?kD H@C<H:E9$**OH9:4956D:8?D9@DA:E2=DO schools, and other community-oriented projects in the developing world. But â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the only dimension,â&#x20AC;? Doran explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We keep asking the big questions: What do our clients want to achieve? What is it weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to build?â&#x20AC;? Doran is currently completing several hospital projects in Rwanda and a university library in Uganda. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a long way from Kigali to the woods of Ontario, but some principles carry over. The Murphys report that their cottage is doing its job of bringing their family together in grid-free comfort. And design matters. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As professionals, we need to communicate that architecture is not a luxury, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a need,â&#x20AC;? Doran says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because design can add so much value.â&#x20AC;?

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House on Lake Havelock ARCHITECT

Kelly Doran SvN Architects Haliburton, Ontario

ARCHITECT OF RECORD LOCATION

A B C D E F G H I J K L M

Entrance Master Suite Bathroom Bedroom Living Area Dining Area Kitchen Laundry Powder Room Screened-in Porch Deck Mudroom Garage

B C D D E K

Ĺš2şġÇ&#x2014;Ă&#x201C;ĹżÇ&#x17E;ġƊœÄ&#x201D;Ç&#x2014;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x2020;ĆŠÄ­Ĺ&#x153;Ă&#x201C;ĹżĆ&#x2020;Ĺ&#x2021;ÄźĂ&#x201A;Ć&#x2020;Ĺ&#x2021; Ä­Ä­Ć&#x2122;Ä&#x201D;Ć&#x2122;ÝĭĆ&#x2020;Ć&#x2020;Ç&#x2DC;Ć&#x2020;Ä&#x161;ġĹ&#x153;Ĺ&#x2021;ĹżĆ&#x2122;ÄźĆ&#x2122;Ć&#x2122;Ĺ&#x2021;ġĂ&#x201C;ĹŹ Ç&#x2014;Ă&#x201C;ĹżÇ&#x17E;Ć&#x2122;Ä&#x161;ġĂ&#x201C;Ç&#x2DC;Ă&#x201C;ĂťĹ&#x2021;ĆŠĹ&#x153;Ć&#x2122;Ä&#x201D;Ă&#x201C;ĹżĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x201A;2Ć&#x2020;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C; Ć&#x2020;Ĺ&#x2021;ġĂ&#x201C;Ć&#x2122;Ä&#x201D;Ä&#x161;ğÝÄźĂ&#x201C;Ç&#x2DC;Ä&#x161;ÄźĆ&#x2122;Ä&#x201D;Ă&#x201C;Ä­ÄźĂ&#x2021;Ć&#x2020;ÂśĹ&#x153;Ă&#x201C;ĹŹĹş

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F ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT

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ADRIENNE MURPHY, RESIDENT 62

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small spaces

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

J. Michael Welton

Michael Vahrenwald

Loft in Transition A fashion label founder refuses to hide the rough side of her Brooklyn apartment, exposing pipes, columns, vents, and more.

New Affiliates transformed Victoria Bartlett’s 1,000-square-foot loft in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, using everyday materials like brass and plywood. The shelves are made with Home Depot hardware.

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From the moment they met, Victoria Bartlett knew that she and designers Jaffer Kolb and Ivi Diamantopoulou were on the same wavelength. “When we got together, there was a true meeting of the minds—an organic, harmonious merger of thoughts and ideas,” D2JD-:4E@C:2@796CƎCDE6?4@F?E6CH:E9 E96A2CE?6CD2E%6H7Ǝ=:2E6D56D:8?DEF5:@N The trio clicked to create an unusual new loft in an old Brooklyn building, Victoria is the founder of fashion label VPL (short for “visible panty line”) and director of Neverbefore, a new athleisure brand. In early 2017, when she was ready to move from a brownstone in Boerum Hill to a loft in a 1947 chocolate factory in Bedford-Stuyvesant, she called on Kolb and Diamantopoulou to renovate it. “The space was dark and cluttered and closed,” Kolb recalls.

The sink’s copper pipes were rerouted to come down from the ceiling instead of up through the cabinets. Some of the storage units have lacquered MDF faces.

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small spaces

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Bed-Stuy Loft DESIGNER LOCATION

A B C D

New Affiliates Brooklyn, New York

Living/Dining Area Kitchen Study Guest Bedroom

E Bathroom F Sleeping Platform G Dressing Area

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B F

C G

D

E Loft Level

Designers Jaffer Kolb and Ivi Diamantopoulou had to contend with the apartment’s two giant columns. The loft’s outline conforms to one of them (above). In the kitchen, a quartz Caesarstone countertop hugs the other (top right).

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For inspiration, Victoria referred the pair to Donald Judd’s sculptures and the artist’s Spring Street studio, which is now a museum. She wanted the loft to be a little rougher around the edges than her brownstone. “Victoria was very gifted in elaborating the aesthetic she had in mind,” Diamantopoulou says. “We came back with ideas, and she said: ‘Yes, this is perfect!’ It was kind of seamless.” Seamless is an interesting word choice, because seams—the thin lines between >2E6C:2=DYƎ8FC6962G:=J:?3@E9%6H 7Ǝ=:2E6DkH@C<2?5-:4E@C:2kD4=@E9:?8N All three designers prefer to expose and draw attention to seams rather than hide them. “Instead of saying that something is held together by some magical force that’s invisible, we’d rather show the way things are held together,” Diamantopoulou says. To start, the designers broke the loft :?E@ƎG6=:G:?8DA246DN-:4E@C:22D<657@C

a sleeping area for herself and another for guests. She wanted a study, a new kitchen, and a living/dining area. The bath was acceptable as it was. “I wanted an open environment, something that didn’t feel like I was in a cave,” she says. Kolb and Diamantopoulou chose a palette of affordable materials. For walls, panels, and cabinets, they hand-selected sheets of radiata pine plywood, which they picked for its marble-like veins, lack of knotholes, and almost rosy color. “It’s closer to a pink spectrum than to yellow,” Kolb says. They secured each sheet with brass fasteners that complement the hardware on the new kitchen dishwasher and the rerouted copper pipes descending from ceiling to sink. “VPL is about bringing the inner out, and it’s kind of the same thing here,” Victoria says. “It’s a very simple understanding of design and pureness, and not overdesign.”

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ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT. PHOTOS: MICHAEL VAHRENWALD/ESTO

Main Level


small spaces

The loft’s four-foot-high rail was fabricated by general contractor Create NYC Contracting, using metal mesh from McNichols (below). The bed is by Nathaniel Wojtalik. Victoria

collects paraphernalia from medical catalogs, like the model spine on display in her study (bottom). The chrome Triennale Atomic Orbiter floor lamp is by Robert Sonneman.

The apartment’s 13-foot ceilings weren’t tall enough for two full levels, but New 7Ǝ=:2E6D255652?6=6G2E65WDBF2C6W foot sleeping loft with a four-foot-tall, wire-mesh guardrail. “It performs—when you look at it front-on, it’s more transparent, and when you look at it from an angle, :EkD>@C6@A2BF6Ol"@=3D2JDN They deftly handled two existing threeand-a-half-foot-wide Art Moderne columns. “In the kitchen, we built the island around the column, so it’s really hugging it,” Kolb says. “In the sleeping area, the shape of the sleeping platform is determined by the shape of the column.” Their estimated budget was $150 per DBF2C67@@EO3FEE96C6?@G2E:@?42>6:? closer to $100—a client-pleaser, for sure. But so was their design. “It’s womblike, as well as warm and nurturing,” Victoria says. Which proves that, sometimes, great minds really do think alike.

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my house

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

Candace Jackson

Pippa Drummond

Architect Christopher Beer helped his DIY-friendly former roommates Karen and Grant Jack create a mixed-use dwelling in a town located about 90 miles south of Auckland.

Coffee Fable A budget-savvy, well-caffeinated couple get their hands dirty building a house, art gallery, and coffee kiosk on New Zealandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North Island.

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P R O M OT I O N

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Do you have a place to share? Add your rental today to connect with an ever-growing audience of modern travelers.

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my house

When Karen Jack, an elementary school teacher, and her artist husband, Grant, were looking for a home in Cambridge, New Zealand, they knew they wanted to replicate the walkable village lifestyle they’d enjoyed living in Britain several years before. So it felt appropriate to enlist their friend and roommate from that time, Christopher Beer, an architect who had also moved to Cambridge, to help. The Jacks spent about $600,000 on the project, including the land, saving money by building parts of the interior themselves. The result is a 1,710-squarefoot three-courtyard home with an art gallery and coffee kiosk—smack in the middle of town. Shortly before the business opened, the Jacks recounted how their busy little home came to be.

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Town House

LOCATION

Christopher Beer Cambridge, New Zealand E F G H I

A Entry Courtyard B Gallery/Studio C Coffee Kiosk/ Laundry D Bathroom

Master Bedroom Master Bathroom Bedroom Hallway/Study Courtyard

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built the steel-and-cypress gate. On the other side, he set up his coffee kiosk and art gallery (above left). Potential buyers can browse his prints, sip espresso, or lounge in the NY chair by Takeshi Nii (below).

Living Area Dining Area Kitchen Utility Courtyard

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ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT

ARCHITECT

“The project reverses the traditional suburban pattern of a house centered on its site and surrounded by empty space,” says Beer. Instead of a lawn, it has three courtyards behind a brick wall (top). Grant

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my house

“With this kind of house, you’re not really looking outward toward the street and people. You’re looking inward toward yourself.” KAREN JACK, RESIDENT

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my house

Karen Jack: When we were looking at houses, we looked at a few older places to renovate. Eventually, we thought the houses we saw would cost a bit too much. And as we were looking, we realized we wanted something quite close to or in the village. Grant saw a place for sale, but it was an empty retail store. Grant Jack: Karen wasn’t into it. Karen: But there was this plot of grass next to it… Grant: It looked like a convenient location to live, where we could easily get around. And I wanted a place where I could also sell art out of the front. Karen: It’s a commercial site, which means we could build quite differently from the way we would build a residential site. You can build right up to the edges. Grant: I’d seen small houses in Tokyo that are surrounded by an exterior wall but still have lots of light. And I liked the idea of not having much gardening.

Low-cost materials like plaster board, knotty cedar, and polished concrete appear in the gallery (above) as well as in the residence. In the living area (opposite), a cedar

storage unit made by Grant features a five-by-five-foot sliding panel that conceals shelving and the television. “It’s a way to make it feel less like a TV room during the day,” Beer says.

Karen: We were really willing to do something different with the design, but we had to make sure our house was compatible with the surroundings as well. It couldn’t look like a normal house, because that would just look weird on a commercial street. There’s a school across the road, a supermarket next door, and a cafe across the back. Grant: There are no other houses. Karen: The corrugated steel and the brick @?E966IE6C:@CH2==96=AE969@FD6ƎE:? with the rest of the buildings around it. Grant: The bricks were rejected materials from an old folks home being built nearby. Karen: There’s a courtyard in the front. When Grant gets his gallery up and running, that’s where people will come in. Grant: I built a coffee kiosk that opens to the courtyard. I thought it would go well with the gallery and I just really like coffee. Karen: Farther inside, there’s a second 4@FCEJ2C5H:E92ƎC6A=246N+96C62C6

The sunken sofa—a throwback to the residents’ childhoods in the 1970s— is from the Houdini collection by King Living. The dining chairs were a secondhand purchase.

Make It Yours The Jacks call attention to some of their more ingenious weekend projects.

COFFEE KIOSK

KITCHEN COUNTERTOPS

CABINETRY

DOOR PULLS & LIGHTS

Accessible through a sliding millwork wall, the coffee kiosk doubles as a laundry room (the washer and dryer are hidden behind cabinets). A hatch window opens the space, which is outfitted with a refurbished 1997 Elektra espresso maker.

The Jacks saved about $6,500 by skipping counter-sized marble slabs and using one-by-two-foot marble tiles, sealed with silicone. “The counters are thin and highly polished, but the sides have a rough texture,” Beer observes.

The owners’ biggest savings came from building the cabinetry themselves. Because the house has no garage, the couple wanted lots of indoor storage, which they mostly hid behind flush, full-height “secondgrade” cedar doors.

Grant made many of the light fixtures and door pulls himself using brass tubing. For the lights, he realized that a New Zealand dollar coin was the perfect size for the end caps, a discovery that saved him $36 on store-bought versions.

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my house

In the middle courtyard, the Jacks landscaped a small grass mound for Sadie, five, to play on (right). The house is topped with corrugated steel. “It’s essentially the cheapest material you can get for roofing

sliding walls that can tuck away to open it to the living areas. It’s a great space—it’s become like another room for us. We put a little mound in it. We wanted a bit of :?E6C6DE:?DE625@7;FDE2Ə2EDA246N&FC daughter, Sadie, goes up on the hill and has picnics with her friends. With this kind of house, you’re not really looking outward toward the street and people. You’re looking inward toward yourself. Grant: The inside of the house has quite a big volume because the ceilings are quite high. It doesn’t feel claustrophobic. Karen: Because we’ve got one space for the kitchen, dining area, and lounge, we needed to be able to separate things, so the lounge is sunken. Grant: We’re both kids of the ’70s, so we liked that. Karen: The walls are all cedar millwork. We call it a second-grade cedar here. Grant: EkDF?Ǝ?:D9652?5<:?5@7C@F89N To save money, I did all the painting and the cabinetry. Karen: It’s really cool because you actually feel like you’re in a tree house with all this wood around you.

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in New Zealand,” says Beer. Grant painted the master bedroom (left) and the rest of the interior Alabaster by Resene. For big jobs, like framing the walls, they relied on Langsford Construction.

Covered in slate squares from Cambridge Tile, the master bathroom includes a double shower with rain heads by M&Z Rubinetterie. A skylight lets in natural light while maintaining the residents’ privacy.

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Apothecary Chandelier by Hubbardton Forge

Lightology.com


Out

dwellings

on After an architectural epiphany, a family of traditionalists builds a monument to organic modernism in Austin. TEX T BY

PHOTOS BY

Creede Fitch

Casey Dunn

a Limb

Julie and Chris Hill’s home in Austin is built around a pair of massive oak trees, one of which shoots through an ipe deck, past a Loll deck chair, and into a void in the overhanging roof. “The hole

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also allows light to penetrate deeper into the house,” notes designer Kevin Alter. A limestone brick wall mirrors the curves of the Western red cedar roof, the edges of which are coated in stucco.

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dwellings

During their 15 years of marriage, Chris and Julie Hill have lived in many homes, most of them large and traditional. But it wasn’t until after they retired and changed cities that they found a house that challenged their architectural worldview. Chris used to work a fast-paced job in the investment world. In 2011, he and Julie, who’d worked in the criminal justice system, were living in a 9,000-square-foot stucco home in Houston. Yet it was at their weekend lake house near Austin that they felt truly at ease. And as Chris puts it, “Driving from Austin back to Houston on Sundays got old, so we decided to make the lifestyle change and move here.” They settled in the lake house provisionally, but with two school-age kids in tow, E96JH2?E65E@6G6?EF2==JƎ?52A=246:? a good school district. While driving through blocks of Spanish-style colonials in Westlake Hills, Julie happened upon something unusual—a modern, glasswalled gem for sale. “It was different from anything in the neighborhood,” she recalls. They toured the property, and although they didn’t buy, it planted a seed in their heads for what their next home could be: bright, airy, and suffused with nature. A =:EE=6C6D62C49C6G62=65E92E2=@42=ƎC>O

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Alterstudio Architecture, had designed it. “It was subtle from the outside and gave a great sense of privacy amid a fairly dense collection of suburban houses,” says principal designer Kevin Alter of the project in Westlake Hills. A few years later, when the Hills purchased a poorly built home at the end of a pitched, dead-end street in the Rolling Hills West area, they knew exactly whom to see about it. “They had the ambition to build something that we would be really proud of,” says Alter. “It was a fabulous and daunting requirement from a client.” Everyone agreed that the house itself wasn’t worth saving, but its steep lot with a wet-weather creek in back and adjoining plot of undeveloped city-owned land provided a rural idyll right in the middle @7FDE:?N+96Ə2EWC@@765O8=2DDW46?EC:4 structure that Alter and his partners, Ernesto Cragnolino and Tim Whitehill, created takes the site’s natural splendor and, through architectural sleight of hand, enhances it. The 3,600-square-foot house assumes something of an H-shape, with a garage, kitchen, and living/dining area connected to a sleeping wing by a glass hall. But its meandering Western red cedar roof,

The insulated glass at the front of the house (above left) was glazed on-site. “The result is far more glass and far less mullion than in a typical glass wall,” says Alter. Both the niche and the base of the kitchen island are covered in reclaimed endgrain red oak (above). Because the property slopes to the rear, the home’s eastern view is of treetops right outside (opposite). In the dining nook, Executive Armchairs by Eero Saarinen join a Warren Platner table beneath a Serge Mouille ceiling light. A patterned rug by AVO rests on the terrazzo tile floor.

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Chris, a retired commodities derivatives trader, served as the general contractor, with guidance from builder Mike Paulsen. Decorum Arch Stone fabricated the waterfall countertop made of Colorado Gold marble; Scott Cabinets did the millwork. The cooking range is by Wolf. Trove wallpaper accents the far wall of the powder room at the end of the corridor.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The house is designed to accentuate the beauty of the tree and be a datum against which the natural surroundings are measured.â&#x20AC;? K E V I N A LT E R , D E S I G N E R

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which curves from 4 to 48 feet beyond certain walls, disguises its true form, making it look more like a C from above. Entering the property through a metal fence built by Chris, who taught himself to weld for the project, the two wings of the home appear to reach outward, as if to embrace visitors. Next to the pivoting steel front door, a 200-year-old oak emerges through a deck and stretches its branches through an ovoid hole in the overhanging roof, which swerves to avoid a second oak nearby. “The trees are large enough to be considered ‘heritage trees’ in the City of Austin, but we had a lot of leeway because the house isn’t technically in the city,” Alter notes. “That said, incorporating them into our design was an opportunity to make the house that much better.” The interior is as much a machine-àhabiter as it is a gallery for the residents’ collection of nearly two dozen paintings and sculptures by artists such as Donald Baechler and John Chamberlain. The art played an integral part in the design, with each piece assigned a dedicated wall 367@C6E969@FD6H2D6G6?Ǝ?:D965N ?E96=:G:?82C62OƏ@@CWE@W46:=:?8H:?dows connect the home to the front yard. Thanks to the grade of the lot, similar windows in the rear provide views into the treetops. Just outside, the roof shades a gracious outdoor area, with another gaping aperture above the pool. “The opening

substantially increases the natural light in the middle of the building,” says Alter. “It’s sublime when it rains.” Chris was intimately involved in the construction and acted as the general contractor, something his background in Ǝ?2?465:5?kEBF:E6AC6A2C69:>7@CNFE what he lacked in hardhat experience, he made up for with his self-described “typeA” personality and eye for detail. Alter might have hesitated to work so closely with a client if he hadn’t already gotten to <?@H9C:DNj.96? ƎCDE>6E9:>96H2D restoring an old Land Rover,” the designer recalls. “I could tell he takes incredible pride in his work.” The project was a two-year endeavor, during which Chris learned to perform a variety of jobs, sometimes through trial and error. The limestone blocks of the ƎC6A=2462C6D@F?:7@C>3642FD696DA6?E weekends with the kids sorting through all the stones and then sanded them to a D>@@E9Ǝ?:D9QH96?96?@E:465E962=:8?ment of the ceiling beams was off by a few inches, he and the subcontractors tore them down and started over. The house represents a major shift for the Hills. On paper, it’s less than half the size of many places in which they’ve lived, but if you asked them, they’d say it feels bigger. According to Julie, “Once you have a house with this much glass, it would be hard to ever go back to anything else.”

Constant Springs Residence

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ARCHITECT

Alterstudio Architects LOCATION

Austin, Texas A B C D E F G H

Entrance Game Room Bathroom Bedroom Master Bathroom Master Closet Master Bedroom Powder Room

I J K L M N O

Deck Living/Dining Area Kitchen Laundry Mudroom Office Garage

G F J

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L M

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E D C C

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A second aperture in the roof is located over the shallow end of the pool. An alfresco dining area, with seating by Kettal, is perched a few steps below. Drapes by Cush Cush Design offer privacy in the master

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bedroom (opposite, bottom). An Andy Moses painting hangs above the bed. The bathroom is covered in Heath tile and indigo Eskayel wallpaper (opposite, top). The Ghost chair is by Philippe Starck.

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Set on six acres in Sullivan County, New York, Jason Shannon and Paola YaĂąezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekend getaway is a study in minimalism. The couple chose to work within a small footprint for both aesthetic and financial reasons. On the patio, the Maya modular seating is from Room & Board and the Ball light is by Smart and Green. Jason and Paola designed the fire pit, which they also use as a grill.

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TEX T BY

PHOTOS BY

Julie Lasky

Amanda Kirkpatrick

Self-Restraining Order

A designer couple force themselves to think small in creating a jewel-like retreat on an expansive Catskills site.

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Just as they were wrapping up the plans 7@CE96:CH66<6?59@FD6:?E962ED<:==DO 2C49:E64E!2D@?*92??@?2?59:DH:76O 56D:8?6C'2@=202ľ6KO564:565E@255EH@ 766EE@E96H:5E9@7E96<:E496?N +9:DH2D?@D>2==EH62<3FE2>2;@C 25;FDE>6?E7@CE964@FA=6OH9@H6C6 56E6C>:?65E@>2<6E96:C9@>62D4@>A24E2DA@DD:3=62?5H6C664@?@>:K:?8@? 6G6CJDBF2C6:?49N+96J925:?:E:2==J6?G:D:@?652 W7@@EW=@?882==6J<:E496?H:E92 D:?8=6H2==7@C423:?6ECJ2?52AA=:2?46DN FE4@>>@?D6?D6AC6G2:=65O2?5E96JAFE E96@AA@D:E6H2==:?E@A=2JNjG6CJ@?6 2=H2JDH2?ED>@C6E92?E96:C3F586EO?@ >2EE6CH92EE96:C3F586E:DOl!2D@?D2JDN j E4@F=5362>:==:@?5@==2CD2?5E96Jk5 H2?E2EH@W>:==:@?W5@==2C9@FD6Nl*E:==O 96kD8=25E96<:E496?:D3:886CN *6G6C2=J62CD28@O962?5'2@=2OH9@ =:G6:?!6CD6J:EJ2?592G62AC24E:46 42==65!ZDAJ_E96?2>6:D24@>3@@7E96:C :?:E:2=D`OD6E@FEE@4C62E6O@?2=:>:E65 3F586EOE9636DEA@DD:3=6C6EC62E7@CE96>D6=G6D2?5E96:CE9C66WJ62CW@=552F89E6CO @C2N642FD6E96J5:5?kEH2?EE@D4C:>A @?>2E6C:2=DOƎ?:D96DO46:=:?896:89EO@C E966IA6C:6?46@782K:?8E9C@F899F86

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H:?5@HD2EƎ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j k>?@E2 72?@7D966EC@4<Ol!2D@?D2JDN FE2=E9@F89E969@FD6:DC:8@C@FDO:EkD 92C5=J2FDE6C6N+964@?4C6E63=@4<D92G6 A@=:D9656IA@D657246DE92E2C6G@=FAEF@FD=JD>@@E9N+96Ə@@CWE@W46:=:?8H:?5@HD2C67C2>65:?>29@82?JN+96 4@?4C6E6Ə@@CD2C6H2C>65H:E9C25:2?E 962EOAC@5F4657C@>286@E96C>2=H6==O H9:4996=AD=:>:EE969@>6kD>@?E9=J 6=64EC:43:==E@23@FE N


“Volume is important to us. Everyone ƆĪƆǘĔǞǘÓÇŇļżƙĔǗÓƆÓ¶ŇļÇõŇŇſŬ It’s because we want the high space.” PA O L A Y A Ñ E Z , D E S I G N E R A N D R E S I D E N T

Polished concrete blocks and a concrete floor are contrasted by a birch plywood tray ceiling (above). Paola and Jason cut the vertical strips in the ceiling themselves and placed fabric behind to soften the acoustics. Custom brackets were added to the modular seating DWELL

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from West Elm, the table top and legs were found on Etsy, and the chandelier is by Avenue Lighting. A vintage shelving unit (opposite, far left) provides storage and hallway separation. “God Save Dali,” by the artist BNS, hangs above a bench in a corner (opposite, bottom).

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Other energy-saving features include a tankless hot-water system, a condenser clothes dryer, and spray-foam insulation in the walls and ceilings. The building is so tightly sealed against thermal loss that the couple had to introduce a duct with a fan to bring in enough fresh air to make the =:G:?8C@@>ƎC6A=246@A6C23=6N +92EƎC6A=246H2D6DD6?E:2=E@!2D@?2?5 Paola’s living/dining room concept. They had seen enough big homes where, despite 6=23@C2E6Ə@@CA=2?DOj6G6CJ@?66?5DFA:? E96D2>6C@@>2?JH2JOlD2JD!2D@?N+96 main room has a 14-foot-high tray ceiling covered in birch plywood inlaid with strips of fabric to absorb sound bouncing off the hard surfaces. A skylight adds illumination. The bedrooms are as minimal as can be: The larger of the two accommodates a queen-size bed, a small closet, and a stacked washer/dryer; Cora sleeps next door on a trundle that slides out from a bunk bed. One door down is the bathroom, with a jazzy blue tile pattern that Paola

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designed. Next is the kitchen, with its IKEA cabinetry and gleaming copper-colored backsplash tiles, an homage to French cookware and Paola’s birth country, Chile, where copper is a major export. =@?8E96D:56@7E969@FD6O!2D@? scraped away the rough terrain and sowed ƎDE7F=D@7H:=5Ə@H6CDN+96=2?5:D23F?dant with blueberry bushes, pine trees, and milkweeds. Deer have already gnawed on their magnolia sapling, and a black bear was spotted pawing apples from a tree. Ultimately, the project cost about $285 A6CDBF2C67@@EO:?4=F5:?8ƎIEFC6D2?5 appliances. But in trimming the home’s size, was there anything the owners left @FESj$2J362A@H56CC@@>OlD2JD!2D@?N j?52?6?EC2?464=@D6EOl'2@=249:>6D:?N j*E@C286:DD@>6E9:?8H656Ǝ?:E6=JD24C:Ǝ465OlD96255DN*@>652JE96C6>:89E362 garage with guest apartments, but not ?646DD2C:=JNj#6EkD>2<6@?6?:46C@@>Ol !2D@?D2JDOC642==:?8E96:CD6=7W:>A@D65 3C:67Nj@H>F49>@C65@H6?665Sl


“This was our chance to say, ‘Let’s design the house as modern as we think we would like to be in the rest of our work.’” JASON SH A N NON, A RCHITECT A N D R ESIDEN T

ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT

Catskills House

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ARCHITECT

LOCATION

J_spy Architecture

White Lake, NY

A B C D E F

Entrance Bedroom Bathroom Kitchen Patio Living/Dining Room G Mechanical Room

B

B

C

D

In the kitchen (opposite, far left), copper-colored stainless steel tiles from TileBar create a glowing backsplash. The cabinetry is by IKEA, the countertop is Caesarstone, and the induction cooktop is by Bosch. The house’s concrete and metal are warmed

by mahogany-framed windows from Duratherm (above and opposite, bottom). Structural engineering firm Robert Silman Associates was key in helping the couple execute their design, particularly the cantilevered standing-seam aluminum roof.

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LM SPR NGS

Revisiting the landmarks and legends of the desert modern oasis

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A ND BEY ND S ( and its neighbors ) with a new eye.

PHOTOS BY

FREDRIK BRODEN

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The Desert House is about 40 miles outside of Palm Springs, sited on a pile of boulders at the edge of Joshua Tree National Park, and it was finished in the early 2000s, long after the heyday of post-and-beam modernism. Yet there may not be another residence more attuned

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to the hardened landscape of the Coachella Valley than Kendrick Bangs Kellogg’s most outré experiment in organic architecture. Its cast-concrete roof slabs evoke any number of desert sights—the fronds of a palm, the faces of stones, even the armored plates of an armadillo.

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Hugh Kaptur, whose work references the pueblos of Arizona with thick walls, inset windows, and deep overhangs, may not be as famous as some of his midcentury contemporaries, but appreciation for his work is on

the rise. Last year, Tahquitz Plaza (this page and opposite), a business complex he designed in the 1970s, underwent a restoration, which he helped oversee. Read our Q&A with Kaptur on page 98.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Midcentury modernism is not a style, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a language. It stays the same whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spoken in 1955 or 2005. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a language that will always be spoken.â&#x20AC;? / ! $ $ !  % # * ! +  $ Çł   Dz    Ç´


dispatch

IF

E XC U R SIONS

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;VE EVER STUDIED PALM

Springsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wealth of modernist architecture, you probably imagine that every house in every neighborhood sports the same proĆ&#x17D;=6P3FEE6CĆ?JC@@7OA:6C4654@?4C6E63=@4< screens, post-and-beam open plan. And if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking of Vista Las Palmas or Racquet Club Estates, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right. But Palm Springs is much more than its Alexander Homesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as these houses, named for the Alexander Construction Company, are called. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an oasis of bigidea architecture, from the Spanish Colonial and International Style buildings of the 1920s to â&#x20AC;&#x2122;40s, to the postwar ranch houses, to the full-blown desert modernism of the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50s, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s, and beyond. Most developers took ordinary materialsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;corrugated iron and glass, aluminum H:E932<65W6?2>6=Ć&#x17D;?:D96DO4@?4C6E6 block, striated plywood, pecky cypressâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and pushed and adapted them. Steel was prime, impervious to warping and allowing for wide spans of sliding glass doors. Those who built on the ridges and in alluvial plains incorporated the surrounding rocks and boulders into their projects. The townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s civic buildings, schools, 32?<DOD9@AA:?846?E6CDO82DDE2E:@?DOĆ&#x17D;C6 stations, churches, libraries, medical centers, museum, and airport were all designed by the architects who made Palm Springs their homeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;John Porter Clark, Albert Frey, Robson Chambers, William F. Cody, E. Stewart Williams, Donald Wexler, Richard Harrison, Howard Lapham, and Hugh Kaptur. And each architect who arrived to help shape the village into a city brought a different progressive vision. +@E96D6A:@?66CDOH9@Ć?@4<657C@>2== around, Greater Palm Springs presented a sun-bleached canvas on which to try out 2=>@DE2?JE9:?8P4FDE@>9@>6DOEC24E housing, shared-amenity condos, country clubs, and even mobile home parks. It was, and remains, the perfect marriage of small town and grand ideas.

BY A D E L E C Y G E L M A N

In these pages, visit classic sights and lesser-known destinations in and around the city, hear from new and familiar voices about the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past and present, and discover once more what makes Palm Springs one of this countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest design treasures.

Architecture thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth a trip outside Palm Springs.

SA N DPIPER ÇĽ o T [  $ ) u ) q { ÇŠ

Many of the stylistic hallmarks associated with architect William Kriselâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm Springs tract housesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;patterned concrete-block facades, thin clerestories, deep setbacksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; can be found in abundance at the Sandpiper, a low-density, 306-unit condo development that was erected in Palm Desert between 1958 and 1970. SUNN Y LANDS ÇĽ q  \  A a [ D q  ; ) ÇŠ

0@F42?Ć&#x17D;?53F:=5:?8D by A. Quincy Jones in Palm Springs proper, but none like Sunnylands. Built for a pair of philanthropists in 1966, the ritzy 25,000-square-foot estate has hosted Bob Hope, Queen Elizabeth II, and no fewer than seven U.S. presidents under its distinctive roofâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a pink pyramid intersecting with >@56C?:DEĆ?2E=:?6DN

Where Design Hunters Load Up Every February, during Modernism Week, midcentury fanatics descend on Palm Springs to peek inside rarely opened houses, catch panels, and, of course, comb the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s furnishings boutiques. The eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top organizer, Chris Mobley, shares where he shops the other 51 weeks of the year. G RAC E H O M E F U R N I S H I N G S

Founded by designers Michael Ostrow and Roger Stoker, Grace Home Furnishings offers interior design services and a thoughtfully curated selection of Hollywood Regencyâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;inspired furnishings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their wallpaper selection is out of this world,â&#x20AC;? says Mobley. A  R É A a [ ) â&#x20AC;˘ H3K is a one-stop shop for Palm Springs residents in search of furnishings to go with their midcentury homes. Mobley is fond of their newly opened downtown showroom and their Mod Dog pet design collection. C H R I S T O P H E R K E N N E DY

â&#x20AC;˘

Relocated in the Uptown Design District, this local favorite doubles as a studio for designer Christopher Kennedy and a retail showroom

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full of original and retro-inspired furnishings.

â&#x20AC;˘ Destination PSP offers a selection of Palm Springsâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;inspired merchandise ranging from the essential (an extensive book and print collection) to the quirky (tissue boxes in the shape of midcentury houses and a Kaufmann Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;branded messenger bag).

D E S T I N AT I O N P S P

P E L AG O PA L M S P R I N G S â&#x20AC;˘ After 20 years of curating midcentury modern furnishings and home accessories in the Montclair area of the Oakland Hills, Pelago brought its colorful collection to the Uptown Design District of Palm Springs. With its ample array of furniture, lighting, jewelry, and accessories, says Mobley, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This store has it all.â&#x20AC;?

THE NORTH SHORE YAC H T C LU B ÇĽ\aq{ Au Aaq )ÇŠ

In a time before the Salton Sea was toxic and smelled of rotten eggs, everyone from The Beach Boys to the Marx Brothers wanted to belong to the North Shore Yacht Club. Now used as a community center, the 1959 building (based on an Albert Frey design), isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even on the water anymore, due to accelerated evaporation. It lives on as a potent reminder of a societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delicate dance with nature and how fast a boom can go bust.

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“Where I brought the desert into architecture, William Cody brought Beverly Hills into the desert.” ) DZ u { )  q {  D T T D  [ u  ǥǎ ư ʱ ư  Ŭ   ʱ ʱ ǩ

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Better known for its swanky hotels and club houses, Palm Springs also contains an abundance of religious architecture. On any Sunday, congregants can be found at places of worship by Albert Frey (Wiefels Mortuary), William Cody (Saint Theresa Catholic Church), and Howard Lapham (First Baptist Church of Palm Springs). Built in 1973, Laszlo Sandor’s concrete Seventh Day Adventist Church (this page) borrows ideas from brutalism, with thin horizontal and vertical windows and a blocky steeple.

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TOU R GU IDE PICK S

Four home-tour guides tell us their favorite stop in the city. ZEN HOUSE

FREY HOUSE II

EDRIS HOUSE

â&#x20AC;&#x153; Built before their â&#x20AC;&#x153;It might be diminutive â&#x20AC;&#x153; Designed by E. famous Steel Houses, in scaleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only 800 Stewart Williams and Zen House was the square feetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but built in 1954 for hotel Ć&#x17D;CDE9@>63J@?2=5 thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wonderful owners from Seattle, Wexler and Richard sense of oneness that the Edris House is Harrison in Deepwell exists throughout Frey pure, honest, organic Estates, a quiet south House II. A marvel of architecture. Rescued end neighborhood. Swiss engineeringâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; by its current owner The post-and-beam Frey was from from an earlier gut dwelling has a boardSwitzerlandâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the job, the house and-batten exterior house rests seamlessly is a time capsule, that doubles as both on its mountainside down to the built-in fence and facade, site and all of the fur9:WĆ&#x17D;6BF:A>6?EO while the slatted roof niture is ingeniously Lucite drawer pulls, of the entry paints the built-in.â&#x20AC;? original bathroom courtyard with stripes M I C H A E L S T E R N , tile, and stainless of sunlight and shade.â&#x20AC;? T H E M O D E R N T O U R kitchen appliances.â&#x20AC;? K U RT CY R, PA L M S P R I N G S M O D S Q UA D

OCOTILLO LODGE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gene Autry, known as the Singing Cowboy, commissioned George and Robert Alexander to build the Ocotillo Lodge in 1958. Its 124 condos were owned or rented by the likes of Marilyn Monroe, Lucille Ball, and the Rat Pack, who would perform at the piano bar overlooking the martini-glass-shaped pool.â&#x20AC;? TIM BA N N ISTER, PA L M S P R I N G S CEL EBR I T Y TOU RS

T R E VOR Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;D ON N EL L , PS A RCHIT ECT U R E TOU RS

Q&A: Hugh Kaptur Looking back on Palm Springsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Golden Age with one of the last living architects who shaped it. When did you arrive in Palm Springs? How did you get started? My wife and I arrived in Palm Springs in 1956, and I went to various 2C49:E64EDk@7Ć&#x17D;46D2?5D9@H65E96> my work. First I went to Bill Cody, but he was gruff, and barked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, what the hell good are you!?â&#x20AC;? I was only 23 or 24, and had always been a quiet kid, and he scared the hell out of me. Next, I went to E. Stewart Williams, I was very impressed with his work. But I ultimately went with Wexler & Harrison because they were my age. What do you consider the highs and lows of your career? Well, the low point came early on. After about six months at Wexler & Harrison, there was a recession and I got laid off. Everyone was looking for work, no one was hiring, and here I am with a wife to support and a baby

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on the way. That was the bottom of the pit. I went to Howard Lapham, an architectural designer, and asked him for work. He had none but said I could do renderings for him, $25 each. I started doing them for him, Wexler & Harrison, and others. Then, I started working with developers designing spec houses. Soon I was making more than the $325 a month I â&#x20AC;&#x2122;d made at Wexler & Harrison, so I ;FDEĆ&#x17D;8FC65 H@F=5DE2J:?3FD:?6DD as a building designer. How does your style compare to that of your contemporaries like Donald Wexler or Albert Frey? I learned the post-and-beam style from Wexler & Harrison. When I was young, I did the Steve McQueen house. That was my experiment in steel and concrete. But when I was in school I was an avid admirer of Frank Lloyd Wright. I always felt that in

Phoenix the architecture was more in tune with the desert than it is here. The architecture of the Southwest, and the pueblos, with deep-set windows and spaces providing shelterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; that was my inspiration. Now, I can look at Neutraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kaufmann House, and, of course I respect it and am impressed by it, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not my style. Is there a project youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re most proud of? What about an unbuilt project you wish had been built? My favorite project was the house I did for William Holden. He was a real gentleman. Bill was one of my superstars, and I was anxious to meet him. When I went to his house and knocked, he came to the door and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, hi, Hugh, come on in,â&#x20AC;? like we were old friends. Right away I relaxed. I took him hunting, had him on my boat. We became good friends. On the other hand, I designed

the Caballeros Tennis Club for Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh, with developer Roy Fey. They were not like Bill Holden. They were young, very successful movie stars, and they let you know it. They were impressed with themselves, but to be honest I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t impressed with them. I liked the design of the tennis club, but in the end, it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t built. Now that your work has been â&#x20AC;&#x153;rediscoveredâ&#x20AC;? somewhat, what do you want your legacy to be? When I was working as an architect, I was making a living, trying to support my family. I never thought of ever having any recognition. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather have my buildings get the rec@8?:E:@?E92?>6A6CD@?2==JN Ć&#x17D;?5:E embarrassing. Now, of course, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s this recognition, I still donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand it, but it is very humbling. BY S T E V E N K E Y L O N

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The desert transformed Albert Frey—providing an endlessly intriguing counterpoint to his International Style designs—and he, in turn, transformed Palm Springs. From a dusty village of a few thousand souls when the Zurich-born architect arrived in 1939, it bloomed into a widely recognized ideal of California life and architecture by the time he retired in 1990. The Tramway Gas Station (opposite), created with Robson Chambers, and City Hall (this page), designed with Chambers and John Porter Clark, are two of his and the city’s best-known buildings.

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“When I saw the landscape of the desert, I knew I found a place I could call home.”

Donald Wexler arrived in Palm Springs in 1952 after a stint at Richard Neutra’s office in Los Angeles eager to build on a large scale with steel—hence the prefab Steel Development Houses (below). The Parker hotel, which was the first Holiday Inn in California when it opened in 1959, has been updated twice by Jonathan Adler. Its decorative concreteblock entrance screen remains in place (opposite).

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A Resort Town’s Last Resort '2=>*AC:?8DE9C:G6D2D286E2H2JO3FE=2E6=J2?:?ƎFI@7A6@A=6G:D:E:?8E9C@F899@>6WD92C:?8services has some people concerned. One idea, which will be put to a vote via ballot measure on June 5: Prohibit rentals of fewer than 28 days in certain residential areas. With similar short-term rental bans being debated in cities from Santa Monica to Asheville, we invited two Palm Springs locals on opposite sides to present their cases.

PRO BA N

The purpose of residential zones is to offer a place for people to live long-term. But in Palm Springs, a radical change has occurred. Our neighborhoods are being converted to commercial use, as “mini-hotels” take over single-family homes. The scale of this phenomenon is unprecedented. To date, there are close to 2,000 registered short-term rentals in Palm Springs, the highest per capita rate in a city of our size. In '2=>*AC:?8DE96EJA:42=AC@Ǝ=6@7 a short-term rental owner is not a mom and pop renting out an extra

A N TI BA N

bedroom to make ends meet—the vast majority of short-term rentals are run as full-time commercial resorts, where the owner is absent. Even with perfect enforcement policing the behavior of tourists, short-term rentals are simply incompatible with residential neighborhoods. The rhythm of life for a resident will never be in tune with that of a short-term visitor. ROBERT GRIMM

Campaign Manager, Palm Springs Neighbors 4 Neighborhoods

The ballot measure that seeks to prohibit the short-term rental of single-family residences in “R1”type zoned neighborhoods is a de facto ban on all short-term rentals in Palm Springs, since the vast majority of permitted vacation rentals are in these areas. The ban would, by and large, eliminate this housing option for visitors. And the huge number of room nights lost for visitors would make it impossible for Palm Springs to host events and conventions of the size and scale that we currently enjoy. A ban on

short-term rentals would have severe 25G6CD6ƎD42=2?564@?@>:467764ED on the city. This is about a revitalized, lively, welcoming, and fun Palm Springs versus the alternative. KEITH CROSLEY

Member, Vacation Rental Owners & Neighbors of Palm Springs As we went to press, a report was released by consulting company Tourism Economics that suggested Greater Palm Springs could lose up to $199 million annually in direct and indirect revenue if the ban passes.

SU PPORT THE BA N ?

AG A I NST I T ?

Take a virtual tour of The Parker Palm Springs (opposite), a retro-glam hotel twice C67C6D9653J!@?2E92?5=6CPdwell.com/parker-palm-springs

We go inside one of Donald Wexler’s iconic steel prefabs (similar to the @?623@G6`OH9:49:D2G2:=23=6E@C6?EPdwell.com/steel-house-rental

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Taking an active role in the restoration of a midcentury house she and her husband bought near Chicago in 2013, Eva Kowalow honored the vision of the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architect and previous owner, Jack Viks, while updating the structure to fit her

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style and the needs of her family. On the exterior (opposite), Eva chose to cover the existing yellow brick with Prodema wood paneling installed by GFS Architectural Systems, Inc. The entrance gate, designed by Viks, is original.

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AN ARTIST RECASTS A NEGLECTED MIDCENTURY GEM, TURNED GREEN WITH MOLD, AS A MINIMALIST HAVEN.

D U BLE V ISI N TEX T BY

PHOTOS BY

WINIFRED BIRD

PIPPA DRUMMOND

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For convenience, Eva and restoration architect Victor Drapszo moved the kitchen from the second floor to the first floor (bottom), which originally housed a garage, laundry, and guest room. The cabinetry is Gamma by Arclinea,

the countertops are Lagoon quartz by Silestone, and the floor is polished concrete. The helix staircase (below) is original, but it was adjusted to accommodate a larger landing. The Link suspension light is from Lzf Lamps. Outside

Eva Kowalow leans over a table in her Lake Forest, Illinois, painting studio, paging through a sheaf of architectural plans. The plans, each drawn in pencil on yellowing tracing paper and dated 1959 to 1964, depict the 2,960-square-foot house that DE2?5D@?E96D2>6Ć&#x17D;G6W24C6H@@565=@E2D the studio. On paper, it looks like two neatly stacked rectangles, the top one exactly twice as large as the bottom. In real life, it :D2D=66<8=2DDW2?5WDE66=3@IĆ?@2E:?82>:5 the trees on a wood-paneled pedestal. G2O2?2CE:DEOA2FD6D@G6C@?6@7E96 D966ED2?5A@:?ED@FE2?6G6CW4@?DECF4E65 skylight atop the steel spiral staircase that pierces the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We should think about that,â&#x20AC;? she says as she traces E96=:?6DH:E996CĆ&#x17D;?86CNj+92EH@F=536 really beautiful.â&#x20AC;? The plans were drawn by Jack Viks, the architect and engineer who designed both E96DEF5:@2?5E969@FD62?5=:G65:?E96 latter from the early 1960s until some years before his death in 2011. By then, the

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(opposite), Eva and landscape designers Rosborough Partners thinned the trees directly surrounding the home. The paint on the steel beams is Extra White by SherwinWilliams, coated in Duration Exterior Acrylic Latex.

AC@A6CEJH2DD6G6C6=J5:=2A:52E65NG22?5 her husband, Paul, a senior systems analyst, purchased it from Viksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family in 2013, but they knew little about the archiE64EN+96J?6G6CDA@<6H:E99:DH:76@CD@?O 2?5E96 ?E6C?6EC6G62=65@?=JE2?E2=:K:?8 traces of his life (the 1963 theft of a thousand-dollar mink coat from the home, for instance). Yet through the meticulous 2C49:E64EFC2=C64@C5D-:<D=67E369:?5OG2 H2D23=6E@7@C8624C62E:G64@??64E:@?H:E9 her homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original designer. Working with Chicago-based architect and family friend -:4E@CC2ADK@O@7)65C49:E64EDOD96 >2DE6C>:?56528FEC6?@G2E:@?E92E92D brought new life to the residence while respecting its open interior spaces, clear geometric lines, and complete integration with surrounding nature. G25:D4@G6C65E969@FD6:?2?@?=:?6 real estate listing. She and Paul were look:?8E@>@G67C@>E96:C9:428@2A2CE>6?E E@2=2C86C9@>6O2?5E96J925K6C@65:? on the wealthy North Shore suburb of

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“THE GLASS BOX WAS LIFTED OFF THE GROUND AND YOU COULD SEE NATURE ALL AROUND YOU. THAT STRUCK ME VERY DEEPLY.” V ICTOR DR A PSZO, A RCH I T ECT

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In keeping with Viksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design, the living room remains on the second floor. A bright yellow artwork by Kenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ichiro Taniguchi complements the Bend Sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia. The Random

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pendant lights are by Bertjan Pot for Moooi, the Yo-Yo coffee table is by Emanuele Zenere, and the Maltino Rug is by Linie Design. The hardwood flooring is from the Admiration line by Mirage.

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“THE FIRST TIME WE SAW THE HOUSE, IT WAS DARK AND EVERYTHING WAS COVERED WITH ALGAE AND MOLD. BUT I KNEW WHAT I COULD DO WITH IT.” E VA K O WA L O W, R E S I D E N T

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Ć&#x17D;?:D96DH6C6E@@G:?E2867@CE9672>:=JkD minimalist tastes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We knew that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like E@92G66G6CJE9:?8?6HO?@E;FDE9:56H92E H2DHC@?8OlD2JDG2OH9@DEF5:652CE2?5 56D:8?:?96C?2E:G6'@=2?5N G22?5C2ADK@564:565E@C6>@G6 6G6CJE9:?86I46AEE966IE6C?2=J6==@H3C:4< H2==D@?E96Ć&#x17D;CDEĆ?@@COH9:49E96JDFDpected played a structural role, and the DE66=7C2>6OH9:49:?4=F56DĆ?@@CD2?5 ceilings made up of double-layered steel decking running lengthwise through the house. They tore out the pool, replaced the septic tank with a sewer connection, and took down many of the trees growing dangerously close to the home and the studio. The next step was to restore the exterior by adding a new roof, Prodema wood pan6=:?8@G6CE963C:4<OH:?5@HD7C@>E96 same local company Viks had used 50 years earlier, and a Farnsworth-inspired white paint job. ?D:56OG2H2?E65E@C6E2:?E966IA2?D:G6D64@?5WĆ?@@C=:G:?8C@@>3FE4C62E6 >@C6:?5:G:5F2=C@@>D7@C96C72>:=J2?5 eliminate the hassle of carrying groceries up those spiral stairs to the small existing <:E496?@?E96D64@?5Ć?@@CN*@D962?5 C2ADK@EFC?65E96Ć&#x17D;CDEWĆ?@@C82C286:?E@

â&#x20AC;&#x153;IT WAS GREAT TO WORK FROM THE PLANS OF SOMEONE WHO WAS A PART OF THE HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE.â&#x20AC;? V ICTOR DR A PSZO

2=2C86<:E496?H:E9C25:2?EĆ?@@C962E:?8 and transformed the former kitchen into a master suite, creating a total of three bedrooms upstairs. C2ADK@D2JDE96F?FDF2=DE66=564<:?8 and wraparound windows posed a number @756D:8?492==6?86DN==E966=64EC:42=H:Cing and plumbing had to be hidden in newly constructed interior walls, and E96C6kD=:EE=6AC:G24J@CC@@>E@5:DA=2J2CEH@C<N6?6G6C4@?D:56C65>@5:7J:?8E96 H:?5@HDO9@H6G6CNj.65:5?@EH2?E2?J walls against the glass because that would @3D4FC6E96362FE:7F=G:6HOlC2ADK@D2JDNj  36=:6G6-:<DH2?E65E@92G6E9:D766=:?8@7 G@J6FC:D>O3642FD6J@FkC6:?E96C62== exposed, yet your drapes are nature.â&#x20AC;? G292?5=65E96:?E6C:@C56D:8?H@C< 96CD6=72?52=D@D6CG652D86?6C2=4@?EC24E@CE@D2G6>@?6JN.9:=6D96EC2565-:<DkD H2C>3=24<W2?5W3C@H?D496>67@C2G6CJ different and minimalist white one, the 492?86@?=JD6CG6DE@9:89=:89E9:D>@DE important design element: the natural H@C=5@FED:56N>@?8E965@4F>6?ED-:<D =67E369:?5OG292D7@F?5D6G6C2=7@=56CD =236=65j:8+C66DNl*9636=:6G6DE9:DH2D his nickname for the home. That, at least, :D9@HD9692D:?E6CAC6E659:DG:D:@?N

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Victor Drapszo

Lake Forest, Illinois

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Lake Forest because they wanted good schools for their son, Nikko, and daughter, Giselle. The listing caught her eye immediately. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was like, God, it looks like the 2C?DH@CE9@FD6OlD96D2JDND:E92AA6?DOD96925E@FC65$:6DG2?56C)@96kD Illinois masterpiece just two weeks before 2?5925=@G65E96Ć?@@CWE@W46:=:?8H:?dows and feeling of being â&#x20AC;&#x153;in a treehouse,â&#x20AC;? as she puts it. Here were the same 360-degree glass wallsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;albeit in a twostory black building rather than a singlestory white oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the same striking steel frame. She dug a little further and 5:D4@G6C65E92E-:<D925DEF5:65F?56C Mies at the Illinois Institute of Technology, where the former Bauhaus director had headed the architecture department from 1938 to 1958. 6CĆ&#x17D;CDEG:D:EE@E969@FD6H2DA2CE shock, part inspiration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was dark,â&#x20AC;? she recalls, with forest growing right up to the H2==DO2?5j6G6CJE9:?8H2D8C66?H:E9 2=8262?5>@=5Nl+96=:G:?8C@@>H2D=:Etered with buckets to catch rain dripping through the age-battered roof, and the whole house smelled of wet wood. The A2CBF6EĆ?@@CDH6C652>2865OE96H@@5 paneling was warped, and the other


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A Minimikado light from Lzf Lamps hangs at the top of the staircase (opposite). All of the existing windows were replaced with newer versions by the company that did the originals, Arcadia. The master

bedroom and bathroom are located where the kitchen and dining area once were. The floating bed is by TemaHome and the Mirror Ball pendant is by Tom Dixon (below); the bathtub is by Victoria + Albert

and the Terre Ruggine tiles are by Iris Ceramica (bottom right). A Tribeca desk from Jesper Office furnishes one of the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bedrooms (bottom left). The cable-knit pumpkin is from Target.

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backstory

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

Arlene Hirst

Matthew Williams

Heightened Security Two of the worst hurricanes in New York history bookend the saga of a Fire Island cottage.

Three-quarters of a century after it was built, a beach home in Saltaire, New York, was elevated eight feet and enlarged by adding a new second story. Its cedar shingles were given a Cabot gray stain.

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Michael Silber spent twenty years on Fire Island in three communities, living in many houses before he found the one that was right for him. The house that put an end to his search was a 1939 bungalow in the village of Saltaire, just 50 yards from the beach. With its combination of distinctive architecture, good light,

and oceanfront location, it completely won the Manhattan-based management consultantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heart. The shingle cottage is one of many that were built by master carpenter Mike Coffey after the record-shattering Great New England Hurricane of 1938 hit the area. Michael rented it for three years

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backstory

before buying it in 2011, at which point he decided to renovate and expand. Through a mutual friend, he found Eric Schiller, a Brooklyn-based architect who worked for  J62CD:?E96@7Ǝ46@7 N$N'6:2?52=D@ has a house and practice on Fire Island. Schiller had a clear brief: “Michael wanted the house to be big enough for his sister and her family to visit, but it had to be done in the character of the Coffey house,” he remembers. “It had to be light and airy but retain the original’s spirit.” And, set at the foot of a dune, right near the water, it had to meet the strictest FEMA requirements. The restrictions didn’t deter either man. “Everything is planned for disaster,” says

Schiller, who adds that houses that were fully FEMA-compliant and were prepared following FEMA storm guidelines avoided D:8?:Ǝ42?E52>2867C@>FCC:42?6 Sandy, the superstorm that swept through the region in 2012, just months before Michael began construction. The rules require that the house be elevated eight feet above the ground. To avoid a leggy look, Schiller set it on a plinth with a base that tapers upward at an angle. A steel frame is hidden beneath the cedar shingles, which are covered with a gray-blue stain. “We wanted it to go dark, so that the white trim around the windows would pop,” explains Schiller. He also thought to add the

Owner Michael Silber introduced an eclectic mix of furniture with help from interior designer Tracey Garet. By the front door, an antique mirror hangs over a rattan desk; the leather

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T chairs are by Katavolos, Littell & Kelley (below). In the dining room (right), there’s a Poul Henningsen pendant, a Hans Wegner table, and Ward Bennett Landmark chairs.

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Silber Beach House ARCHITECT LOCATION

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Architect Eric Schiller built storage units underneath the stairs in the kitchen (above) and had them painted Geranium by Benjamin Moore. Old Herman Miller posters

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hang on a nearby wall. In the living room (top right), a yellow fiberglass stool by Nanna Ditzel sits alongside a French chain-link floor lamp from the 1940s.

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“Fire Island is a critical levee for the mainland. There’s a commitment to maintaining it. If you grow up here, you get the bug.” ERIC SCHILLER, ARCHITECT

geraniums to brighten the window boxes. While the project had a happy ending, the process was bumpy—not because of Sandy, which thankfully spared Michael’s home, but because he lost almost a year :?23:EE6CK@?:?8Ǝ89EN66IA=2:?DE92E:? 1939 the setback had been 10 feet, but that later it was changed to 15 feet, so he actually needed a variance to build on the original footprint. (He also discovered that the existing detached garage was built one foot over the property line, so it was lifted,

The sun-filled second story, which serves as the master bedroom and lounge, is pierced by a metal chimney. The Fusion bed by Zeitraum is flanked by nightstands by Robert

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inched over, and attached to the house, where it now serves as a guest bedroom.) Michael thought getting a variance wouldn’t be a problem, but anxious neighbors protested his design to the zoning board. A long approval process and hefty =682=3:==D6?DF65N6Ǝ?2==JH@?@G6C the board when he presented them with a drawing of a starkly modern cube and said, “I could have built this.” Michael decided to keep the layout of E96OWDBF2C6W7@@EƎCDEƏ@@CO3FEE96

Kuo and lamps by Cedric Hartman from the 1960s. A custom Moroccan rug covers the floor. A pair of refinished midcentury Danish chairs sit beside a Hans Wegner chest.

There are two outdoor showers. The upstairs one (above) is an extension off the master bath, with shades for privacy. The fixtures are by Sonoma Forge.

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backstory

Earning Its Sea Legs Raised to avoid floodwaters, Michael Silber’s beach house begins a resilient new chapter.

1938

The Great New England Hurricane slams the East Coast, destroying scores of homes and businesses on Fire Island. 1939

Carpenter Mike Coffey starts rebuilding the village of Saltaire with shingle cottages. 2 0 11

Michael Silber buys a Coffey house 50 yards from the beach, with plans to renovate. 2 0 11–2 01 2

A zoning dispute delays construction. 2 0 12

Hurricane Sandy washes away at least a dozen Fire Island homes and damages hundreds more. Silber’s cottage is spared. 2 0 13

The renovation, which includes FEMAcompliant upgrades, begins. 2 0 15

Construction ends. The new house is now elevated eight feet above the ground.

A Bend Sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia commands one corner of the second floor; joining it is a Maria Preciosa coffee table by Etel Carmona (top). A vintage red Italian pendant hangs overhead.

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The painting at the top of the stairs is by Barbara Johnson (above). “Having paintings in the house gives a wonderful sense of fantasy,” says Michael. “They enrich the house without competing with the beach.”

second-story addition, which roughly doubles the space, took a dramatically different direction. “I wanted a loft-like feel,” he says. The large room includes an expansive seating area where company can enjoy drinks and the view. There’s also a sepaC2E6?@@<96FD6D2D2?@7Ǝ46OH:E924@F49 that folds out as a bed for guests. To top it off, Schiller created a ceiling of varying heights: The low points reduce the scale, while the high points make it soar and give the structure more strength against storm winds. No section of the ceiling is more than 16 feet wide. “It feels like origami,” the architect observes. Michael admits it would have been cheaper to demolish the house and start from scratch. But, he says, “I wanted to keep the quality at any cost.”

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big idea

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

Elana Castle Murray Fredericks

Room to Grow Is it possible to produce much of your own food and energy while living near the heart of the city ? The gate leading to Geoff Carroll and Julie Young’s rebuilt terrace house in an inner suburb of Sydney, Australia, holds an array of succulents, signaling what lies within: a greenery-filled home that includes

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a central courtyard, vertical gardens, aquaponics and rain filter systems, and even a chicken coop. Architect Clinton Cole of CplusC Architectural Workshop led a team of collaborators in revamping the property.

ŧ+RPHRZQHUVRIWHQTXLWDWWKHƣUVW sign of complexity or budget escalation when building a self-sustaining home,” says Clinton Cole, principal of CplusC Architectural Workshop, a design-build ƎC>32D65:?*J5?6JOFDEC2=:2NFE6@77 2CC@==2?5!F=:60@F?82C65:776C6?EN+@ them, growing vegetables or tracking daily energy consumption aren’t chores to be @FED@FC465N+96JkC6A2CE@7=:G:?82?6?G:C@?>6?E2==JC6DA@?D:3=6=:76DEJ=6N@E9 have senior positions at an Australian

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data analytics software company that helps clients confront the challenges of 9JA6CWFC32?:K2E:@?2?54=:>2E6492?86N With Cole as their architect, they wanted E@4C62E629@>6E92EC6Ć?64EDE96:C H@C<:?DFDE2:?23:=:EJN FEE96:C3F:=5:?8O2 DE6CC2469@FD6 in the inner suburb of Alexandria, suffered from poor thermal performance and a 5:DE:?4E=24<@7@FE5@@CDA246N@=6kDĆ&#x17D;CDE C64@>>6?52E:@?E@6@772?5!F=:6H2DE@ E62C:E5@H?2?5DE2CE7C6D9N&?4656>@=:tion was done, he suggested a few critical ideas, including reducing the number of bedrooms from four to two, carving out an internal courtyard, putting the staircase at the front of the building rather than in its former location at the back, and converting the carport at the rear of the prop6CEJ:?E@2A6C>24F=EFC682C56?N +96?6H8C66?DA246DD6CG63@E926DE96E:42?5AC24E:42=AFCA@D6DN+9682C56?

at the base of the half-cylinder glass and timber-battened staircase introduces A=2?ED:?E@E96H2C>E@?6D@7E96:?E6C:@CN #:<6H:D6OD2JD@=6Oj+96:?D6CE:@?@7E96 courtyard meant we could pull apart the

solid mass of the traditional terrace house, D@E92E=:89E2?52:C2C623=6E@4:C4F=2E6Nl +964@FCEJ2C5kD7F==W96:89EOG6CE:42==J retractable doors operate via a rack-andpinion crank that is designed to support

Aquas Perma Solar Firma ARCHITECT LOCATION

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CplusC Architectural Workshop Sydney, Australia

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A cylindrical glass staircase with Western red cedar and painted steel mullions dominates the front of the house (top). The stair treads, along with the floor, are made of recycled spotted gum. In the kitchen (above), an island on casters hides a trio of tables that can be configured in multiple ways both indoors and out. A counterweight pulley system makes easy work of lifting the large glazed walls flanking the courtyard (right).

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Front Garden Living Area Courtyard Bathroom Laundry Kitchen/Dining Area Outdoor Living Area Aquaponics System Wicking Bed Vertical Garden Pond Carport Mechanicals Storage Chicken Coop Guest Room Breezeway/Study Master Bedroom

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R


AUTHENTICALLY SPARK! Fires designed and engineered to be extraordinary. See our photo gallery at www.sparkfires.com 203.791.2725 Where family and friends gather.

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Palos Verdes Estates Architect: R.Barto, AIA Designer & Photographer: DLFstudio


big idea

Cole worked with two landscape companies, Sydney Organic Gardens and Pepo Botanic Design, to create the plant and vegetable gardens and other permaculture

features (above and below left). Upstairs, a breezeway is used as a workspace (above left). Metal and glass louvers by Maxim bring light and air into the master bathroom.

“We spend about ten minutes each morning with the chickens and ñƆĔļÇ ŇƩƙļĔŇƩſǘÓÓĪĚļƙĔÓ garden, mostly harvesting produce.” GEOFF CARROLL, RESIDENT

>@C6E92?OA@F?5DH:E9E962DD:Dtance of a dangling concrete counterH6:89ENC2:?492:?A2DD:?8E9C@F89E96 concrete weight channels rainfall into an underground tank, where it is stored for FD6:?E96=2F?5CJOE@:=6EO2?582C56?N +96C62C82C56?762EFC6D2?2BF2A@?:4D DJDE6>7@CƎD992CG6DE:?8O2H:4<:?8365 to help with drought resistance, a compost system, a vegetable garden, and chicken 4@@ADNj EkD2G6CJ:?E6?D:G66?G:C@?>6?EO

Natural Connections

inspired by our interest in permaculture,” D2JD6@77Nj&FC82C56?7665DFDOH67665 the chickens our scraps, and they give us 688DA=FD76CE:=:K6C7@CE9682C56?N ?2 D:>:=2CH2JOE96ƎD956A@D:E?:EC@86?:? our pond, which feeds the bacteria on the clay beads in our vertical garden, which 7665E96A=2?EDE92EƎ=E6CE96H2E6C:?2 4@?E:?F@FD4J4=6Nl +969@>6:D2=D@C6>2C<23=J6?6C8J67Ǝ4:6?EN,D:?82?6G24F2E658=2DDEF36D@=2C

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DJDE6>7@C9@EH2E6C2?52N "HA9@E@W voltaic array for electricity, it produces, on 2G6C286O>@C6A@H6CE92?:E4@?DF>6DN While the home is hooked up to the city sewer and water and electricity mains, !F=:62?56@7756A6?5=:EE=6@?@FED:56 D@FC46D7@C?646DD:E:6DNFE@?6H@?56CDP How hard is their household to maintain? “A well-designed system largely looks 27E6C:ED6=7Ol6@77C6A=:6DNj+96DFDE2:?23:=ity systems saveFDE:>62?5677@CENl

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A circuit that renews itself. Humans feed the fish. Fish produce nitrogen. Nitrogen feeds the garden. Garden yields produce. Humans eat the produce. Eating leaves scraps. Scraps feed the chickens. Chickens produce eggs and fertilizer.

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ILLUSTRATION: GIACOMO GAMBINERI

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The new Madrona Modern stove offers the comfort of radiant gas warmth in a modern, Scandinavian inspired style. An original Valor design, Valor fireplaces are made in North America.

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MODERN MARKET The product-packed Modern Market section of Dwell just got even better with a fresh look and an innovative crop of new modern designs. In this highly shoppable section, you are guaranteed to discover that one unique item or special gift that makes you feel at home in the modern world! For more products and services, visit us online at dwell.com!

ThinkGlass Design, Quality, Functionality, Sustainability Thermoformed glass, an essential material for your interior decor! ThinkGlass offers impressive and unique glass applications that offer a wide range of exclusive design options as well as the ability to create unique and custom effects. Style : Industrial | Color : Crystal | Texture : Granula Toll-free 877-410-4527 thinkglass.com

Cubic Wood Stoves Design “Inside” the box The Cubic series are a new generation of wood burning fire. Six floor and wall models range from 7’ to 3½’ high are available including the Cubic 166 shown. Minimal, sophisticated, and contemporary, designed by the Danish architect Anders Nørgaard.

Dino Sphere Bring the beauty of the ocean into your home. The Dino Sphere creates a spectacular bioluminescent light show when swirled at night. Enjoy 20% off with code: DWELL2018 biopop.com

Higher fuel efficiency, higher combustion temperatures, and lower emissions make burning wood a “green” thing and environmentally responsible. Tel. 914-764-5679 wittus.com


modern market

GelPro Elite Comfort Mat Indulge in the luxurious feel and deep-cushioned support of the world’s most comfortable floor mat. GelPro Elite’s exclusive Dual Comfort Core of patented gel and energy-return foam provides maximum support and ultraplush comfort so you can stand for extended periods of time without experiencing discomfort and fatigue. The stain-resistant top surface is a breeze to clean and available in hundreds of designer patterns and colors. Phthalatefree and non-toxic. Made in the USA with imported fabric. 5-year warranty. Toll-free 866-435-6287 gelpro.com

Nik Desk Re-Imagining the Simple Desk The minimal design complements a range of environments making Nik the perfect desk. Two adjustable shelves attach to the glass privacy panel, ideal for viewing charging devices, or to place as bookends. Easy access to power with the hinged cable tray that conceals wires from view. Optional drawer plus standup worksurface are also available. Available in 48" and 60" widths and in a range of finishes. nikdesk.com

Bartels Doors & Hardware This stylish custom ladder by MWE is the designer feature that will bring your design together. Ladders are provided with everything you need to create-the-art look. Suitable for loft spaces, kitchens, wine cellars, closets, and so much more. All of Bartels ladder hardware is made of quality stainless steel available in satin, polished, carbon black, copper, or bronze finishes to compliment your home’s distinct style. Ordering your custom ladder is simple, contact Bartels to learn more or hear about our many other hardware solutions. Bartels Doors and Hardware is the choice of educated consumers, offering luxury interior doors, exclusive door accessories, designer MWE library ladders, and up-scale barn door hardware. Toll-free 866-529-5679 bartelsdoors.com/dwell

Smart Homes For Smart People evoDOMUS builds custom designed, ultra energyefficient, healthy prefab homes throughout the U.S. We love modern design and take pride in our unique all-inclusive approach. Our standard R-33 walls, triple-glazed German windows and passive solar design principles are just a few of the benefits we have to offer. With evoDOMUS you can rely on our team to create a beautiful, sustainable, custom dream home. Tel. 216-772-2603 evodomus.com

modern market For more information on affordable ways to reach Dwell Design Seekers or to be a part of Modern Market, please email us: modernmarket@dwell.com


Contemporary, Intelligent, Dramatic Stillwater Dwellings

Sinuous Brazilian design meets easy comfort in modern armchair by Aristeu Pires. Select finishes delivered within two weeks. Hand finished of solid wood with faux leather.

Rooted in a contemporary Pacific Northwest aesthetic, Stillwater Dwellings’ homes are built using a systems-based sustainable construction method that provides design flexibility and cost predictability. The Stillwater team is comprised of highly experienced architects and project managers to guide you through the entire home design and building process— from determining site feasibility to hand-selecting finish options. Start with one of 23 floor plans and three finish packages upon which to shape your vision, or have us design a completely custom home just for you.

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Angela Armchair

LACAVA For a Sophisticated, Unique Lifestyle The Linea vanity, in horizon blue finish and brushed brass frame, is shown with Eleganza faucet, Cube sink, and complementary Linea mirror. Our 2018 collections have been designed for detail and feature various wood finishes along with trendy metal options in polished and brushed stainless steel, brushed brass, and matte black. LACAVA provides a complete bathroom experience from vanities, sinks, tubs, and toilets, to faucets, and accessories. Toll-free 888-522-2823 lacava.com

Charles P. Rogers & Co. Beds Stylish, functional, under bed storage solutions from $359. Handcrafted in solid mahogany. Free delivery to most U.S. addresses. Toll-free 866-818-6702 charlesprogers.com

Kül Grilles Modern Grilles for the Modern Home Your design is a reflection of your personality and style. We want our floor and wall grilles to be one of the many inspiring details that complete your modern home. See our gallery and finish options online! Discount code: dwell0118

Veldt Marfa Conceived by an artist and an industrial designer. Veldt Jewelry is made with love in Marfa, TX. Wear your art. Titanium Pillar on sterling box chain: $125 veldtmarfa.com

tw: @kulgrilles kulgrilles.com


modern market

Method Homes Down to Earth Prefab Method Homes builds healthy, beautiful, high-performance prefab that is unmatched in quality. Whether you are looking for an efficient cabin retreat, a modern family home, or a fully custom option, Method can deliver. Visit our website to explore all eight series of architectdesigned homes and limitless custom options. Tel. 206-789-5553 info@methodhomes.net methodhomes.net

Modern-Shed Not only the originator of the backyard modern shed craze, but innovators of style and simplicity. How will you use your new space? Art Studio Home Office Man Cave She Shed Guest Suite

Rabbit Air Find comfort and ease in our MinusA2 SPA-780N air purifier with WiFi. Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on the couch, at the office, or on vacation, you can keep an eye on the air quality in your home and adjust your air purifier accordingly for an optimal indoor environment. Our mobile app means personalized, no-fuss communication with your Rabbit Air. Toll-free 888-866-8862 rabbitair.com

Download our brand new catalog. Toll-free 800-261-7282 info@modern-shed.com modern-shed.com

Raydoor The Art of Division At Raydoor we like to think of art and functionality as one. Not only can our systems add to the look and feel of your space, but also create new areas of function and purpose. Raydoors do not require a floor track, allowing you to divide space intelligently without creating passive barriers. Opening the existing space as is or allowing it to transform into a completely new space. Tel. 212-421-0641 raydoor.com

modern market For more information on affordable ways to reach Dwell Design Seekers or to be a part of Modern Market, please email us: modernmarket@dwell.com


Lindal Cedar Homes Elements for the Modern World Lindal Elements homes are a fully-developed system of parts that can be used to create an infinite array of individualized home designs. Select from existing plans, personalize a Lindal plan or design a custom Elements home. Efficient and predictable, relaxed healthy environments, and caring local service combine with the industry’s only lifetime structural warranty. Easily shipped worldwide. View free planning books online.

Modern Shelving Keep your books safe and on display. Modern Shelving for your life: Aluminum or wood shelves, poles, and cabinets. Order online or consult with our designer.

Toll-free 888-4LINDAL lindal.com/ebooks

Toll-free 877-477-5487 modernshelving.com

Liza Phillips Design ALTO Steps: handmade, modular rugs for your stairs. Available in different colors and patterns. Mix them up. Arrange them in any sequence. GoodWeave certified. Tel. 845-252-9955 lizaphillipsdesign.com

The Jackson Lounge by Monte The Perfect Chair to Relax In Handcrafted in Canada, Monte’s premium furniture line is sustainably made and built to last.

LéAna Clifton Cloud Train, Series I This body of work was photographed in Marfa, TX in 2017. Abstract images of speeding trains and sky-scapes. Archival prints available in various sizes. Work with the artist to create your own unique series leanaclifton.com

Order free fabric swatches online today. Toll-free 866-604-6755 montedesign.com


Contact Our Advertisers Wetstyle The Déco Collection Designed by Joël Dupras, Pierre Bélanger, and WETSTYLE Design Lab, the Déco collection reinvents Art Déco style with a modern twist, bringing softness, and simplicity to the bathroom. Smooth textures combined with the warmth of wood accents take relaxation to a new level, immersing you in a world of elegance in the bath. Handcrafted in Montreal, Canada. Toll-free 888-536-9001 wetstyle.com

When contacting our advertisers, please be sure to mention that you saw their ads in Dwell. Alden B abdow.org

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Modern Digital Canvas Transform your space today with one of our super-cool jumbo canvas prints just $499. A modern digital canvas is the affordable, strong, art solution for any interior. With over 2,000 exclusive images created in our Hamptons design studio, we use latex inks printed on rich archival canvas. Everything arrives fully and stretched and ready to hang and ships in just three days. Jumbo $499, large $399, small $249, sized 3' to 5'. Get a solid wood floating frame for just $59 on any size! Let an "m-dc" canvas occupy an important space in your modern life. Celebrating 16 years of happy customers. Shop 24/7 on our secure website. Toll-free 888-345-0870 md-canvas.com


sourcing

for Mjolk mjolk.ca; Glo-Ball pendants by Jasper Morrison for Flos flos.com; Drop 1 pendants by Peter Bowles for Original BTC originabtc.com 64 Loft in Transition

22 Drop the Top Architecture by ORG Permanent Modernity orgpermod.com Roof fabrication by Atelier Melens Dejardin melensdejardin.be Structural engineering by UTIL util.be Windows by Allivan allivan.be Frames by Reynaers Aluminum reynaers.com 22 Hopper picnic table by Extremis extremis .com; Highlands Sofa by Patricia Urquiola for Moroso moroso.it; Fix pendants from Lucide lucide.be 23 Tulip dining table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll knoll.com; fireplace by Kalfire kalfire.com; Oslo sofa from Xooon xooon.be;

Daphine Terra floor lamp by Tommaso Cimini for Lumina lumina.it 52 Better Half Architecture by A Small Studio asmallstudio.co.uk VA Build vabuild.co.uk Blue Engineering blueengineering.co.uk Lighting by Haus London hauslondon.com 54 Lastra cabinets by Crown crown-imperial .co.uk; espresso machine from Gaggia gaggia.com; Anglepoise pendant anglepoise.com; table by Ebbe Gehl for John Lewis johnlewis.com; understair storage by A Small Studio asmallstudio.co.uk

Dwell® (ISSN 1530-5309), Volume XVIII Issue 2, publishes six double issues annually, by Dwell Life, Inc., 901 Battery Street, Suite 401, San Francisco, CA 94111, USA. Occasional extra issues may also be published. Copyright ©2018. All rights reserved. In the US, Dwell® is a registered trademark of Dwell Life, Inc. Publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts, art, or other materials. Subscription price for US residents: $28.00 for 10 issues. Canadian subscription rate: $39.95 (GST included) for 10 issues. All other countries: $49.95 for 10 issues. To order a

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56 Illustrate tiles from Solus Ceramics solusceramics.com; Anglepoise wall light anglepoise.com; appliances by Neff neff-home.com; 58 Here and There SvN Architects svn-ap.com General contracting by Portico Timber Frame porticotimberframes .com Cabinetry by TJM Custom Interiors Inc. 416-918-6679 Solar PV system by Muskoka Renewable Energy muskoka renewableenergy.ca 58 Wood stove by Rais us.rais.com 60 Hiroshima Woodseat armchairs by Naoto Fukusawa

Design by New Affiliates new-affiliates.us Create NYC Contracting Inc. 914-830-0164 Millwork by Propylaea propylaea.com 64 Shelf hardware from Home Depot homedepot.com 66 Quartz countertop by Caesarstone caesarstoneus.com; appliances by Blomberg blombergappliances .com 67 Bed by Nathaniel Wojtalik nathanielwojtalik.com; metal mesh for loft railing from McNichols mcnichols.com; Triennal Atomic Orbiter floor lamp by Robert Sonneman sonnemanawayoflight .com 68 Coffee Fable Christopher Beer Architect Limited christopherbeer architect.com Langsford Construction Limited langsfordconstruction .co.nz DB Con Consulting Engineers Limited dbcon.co.nz 68 1997 Elektra espresso machine espressoninja.co.nz 70 NY chair by Takeshi Nii, vintage

subscription to Dwell or to inquire about an existing subscription, please write to: Dwell Magazine Customer Service, PO Box 5100, Harlan, IA 51593-0600, or call 877-939-3553. Periodicals Postage Paid at San Francisco, CA, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement #40612608. Canadian GST Registration No. 82247 2809 RT0001. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Bleuchip Intl, PO Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to Dwell, PO Box 5100, Harlan, IA 51593-0600.

72 Houdini sofa by King Living kingliving .co.nz; pendant from Lighting Direct lightingdirect.com; dining table and chairs, vintage 74 Rain shower heads by M&Z Rubinetterie mzspa.com; slate tiles from Cambridge Tiles cambridgetiles.co.nz; 76 Out on a Limb Alterstudio Architects alterstudio.net Structural engineering by Scott Williamson P.E. marleyatx@yahoo.com Perfect Lawns and Landworks perfectlawnsandland works.com Scallon Pools scallonpools.com 76 Cabrio chair by Loll lolldesigns.com 78 Glazing by Peacock Glass & Mirror 254-774-9400 79 Executive armchairs by Eero Saarinen for Knoll knoll.com; Platner dining table by Warren Platner for Knoll knoll.com; Chi

Chi rug by AVO supplyshowroom.com; Serge Mouille ThreeArm ceiling lamp gueridon.com 80-81 Form barstools from Normann Copenhagen normanncopenhagen.com; range and refrigerator by Wolf subzero-wolf .com; Colorado Gold marble countertop by Decorum Arch Stone decorumstone.com; wallpaper by Trove troveline.com 82 Drapes by Cush Cush Design cushcushdesign.com; Fulham bed by Rodolfo Dordoni for Molteni&C urbanspaceinteriors .com; tiles from Heath Ceramics heathceramics .com; Louis Ghost chair by Philippe Starck for Kartell shopkartell .com; Olympian Darby marble countertop by Decorum Arch Stone decorumstone.com; Indigo wallpaper by Eskayel eskayel.com 83 Village chairs by Kettal kettal.com

PHOTOS: FREDRIK BRODEN (TOP LEFT); MICHAEL LASSMAN (BOTTOM RIGHT)

The products, furniture, architects, designers, and builders featured in this issue.


84 Self-Restraining Order J_spy Architecture jspyarchitecture.com Hinkley Contracting 845-798-6216 Structural engineering by Robert Silman Associates silman.com 85 Maya modular seating from Room & Board roomandboard .com; Ball light by Smart and Green smartandgreen.eu 87 Retro Tillary 6-Piece sectional from West Elm westelm.com; San Vicente Blvd. chandelier by Avenue Lighting avenuelighting.com 88 Tiles from TileBar tilebar.com; countertop by Caesarstone caesarstoneus.com; cooktop by Bosch bosch-home.com; cabinets by IKEA ikea.com 89 Duratherm windows durathermwindow.com 102 Double Vision Red Architects red-arc.com Landscaping by Rosborough Partners rosboroughpartners .com Cabinetry by WPA Chicago wpachicago.com Facade by GFS Architectural Systems Inc. greenfacadesystems .com Window installation by Glass Works glassworks.net Concrete flooring by Accu Flow Floors accuflowfloors.com 104 Link suspension light from Lzf Lamps lzf-lamps.com; Gamma cabinets by Arclinea arclinea.com; Lagoon quartz countertop by Silestone silestoneusa .com

DWELL

105 Nut suspension light from Lzf Lamps lzf-lamps.com 106-107 Bend sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia bebitalia .com; artwork by Kenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ichiro Taniguchi ec-gallery.com; Maltino rug by Linie Design liniedesign .com; Yo-Yo coffee table by Emanuele Zenere for Cattelan Italia cattelanitalia .com; Random pendants by Bertjan Pot for Moooi moooi .com; cabinets by IKEA ikea.com; drapes by Basia Frossard Design basiafrossard .com; Admiration hardwood flooring by Mirage miragefloors .com 108 Minimikado suspension light from Lzf Lamps lzf-lamps .com 109 Tribeca desk from Jesper Office yliving .com; TemaHome Float bed teamahome.com; Mirror Ball pendant by Tom Dixon tomdixon .net; Tolomeo wall spot by Michele De Lucchi and Giancarlo Fassina for Artemide artemide .com; Terre Ruggine tiles by Iris Ceramica transceramica.com; IOS freestanding tub by Victoria + Albert vandabaths.com; Windows by Arcadia arcadiacustom.com 110 Heightened Security Eric Schiller Architect PC eric-schiller.com RJS Custom Carpentry 631-495-3425 Brian Kerr Landscaping Inc. 631-583-5714 Structural engineering by Michael J. Drake Jr. P.E.P.C. 631-893-9213 Tracey Garet/Aspara Interior Design apsarainteriordesign .com

MARCH / APRI L 2018

112-113 Wall mirror, T chairs by Katavolos, Kelly & Littell for Laverne International, Hans Wegner table, Landmark chairs by Ward Bennett, pendant by Poul Henningsen, and floor lamp, all vintage; stool by Nanna Ditzel nanna-ditzel-design .dk; understair storage by Eric Schilller eric-schiller.com 114 Fusion bed by Zeitraum zeitraummoebel.de; nightstands by Robert Kuo robertkuo.com; lamps by Cedric Hartman and Hans Wegner chest, both vintage; fixtures by Sonoma Forge sonomaforge.com 116 Bend sofa by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia bebitalia .com; Maria Preciosa bench by Etel Carmona espasso.com 118 Room to Grow CplusC Architectural Workshop cplusc.com.au Structural engineering by Partridge partridge.com.au Mechanical engineering by Event Engineering eventengineering .com.au Sydney Organic Gardens sydney organicgardens.com Pepo Botanic Design pepo.com.au Certifying by Peter Boyce & Associates boycecorp.com.au 120 Countertop from Corian corian.com; Plank light by Northern Lighting northern.no; Melamine cabinets by Polytec polytec.com.au 122 Louvers by Maxim maximlouvres.com.au

For contact information for our advertisers, please turn to page 133.

Thermostatic Shower Valve lmk-collection.com | (212) 696 0050 Made in England


one last thing PHOTO BY

Marcus Nilsson

At WXY’s office, principal Claire Weisz keeps a carving sample board (like a fabric sample chart for woodworkers) that belonged to master craftsman Lynn Ford.

On a trip to San Antonio to meet clients a few years ago, my partner, Mark Yoes, and I stopped by an art supply house to pick up a pair of scales. As we were browsing, we caught a glimpse of a backroom full of plaster models and other bric-a-brac. Intrigued, we struck up a conversation with the owner and found out we shared an appreciation for legendary local architect O’Neil Ford, who with his younger brother, Lynn Ford, a master builder, mixed vernacular roots and architectural modernism in Texas in the mid 20th century. At this point, the owner volunteered to show us something unusual. From the backroom, he produced a two-by-one-foot wood tablet, its face engraved with diagonal, chamfered, corrugated, and rounded carvings. He told us he bought it at Lynn Ford’s estate sale. It was his personal sample board—basically a 3D reference chart used by woodcarvers to create new patterns. It must have been at least 50 years old. The shop owner was willing to part with the board—for a cost of about $100—and we’ve had it in our office in New York ever since. Each pattern represents a different technique, showing how much you can do in less than an inch. Seeing a limited set of choices laid out, and knowing that repeating these designs made them into something new, is endlessly fascinating.

Architect Claire Weisz, who has retooled everything from parks to food-processing plants, shares the story behind an objet that inspires her.

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1981. A lawyer, a tax accountant and a financial advisor walk into a bar. Seriously. That was the start of a well-coordinated plan that’s still paying off in

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