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W W W. W C U Q UA D. CO M MONDAY, APRIL 22, 2013

VOLUME 104, ISSUE 9

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Greek Week 2013

Ilana Berger/ Asst. Photography Editor


PAGE 2

News

THE QUAD NEWS

APRIL 22, 2013

Explosions rock Boston Marathon

the streets. Photo by fastcompany.com The scene of pulling together amidst the CNN. chaos and By Nicholas Devoe “All the time she c o n f u s i o n Staff Writer smiled…She made me of the event Last Monday afternoon happy, I used to look for- is a great two homemade explosives ward to her coming over to demonstrawent off near the finish see me… She loved life… tion of the line of the Boston Mara- Her disposition, her atti- selfless comthon. Exploding within tude, her bubbliness! She passion the seconds of each other, the was bubbly all the time, Boston citidamage to people gathered and laughing,” Campbell zens have for the world-renowned commented. for their felrace was tremendous. The The third victim to lose low countrybombs killed three people their life from this bomb- men in that and injured 176, most of ing was identified as a Chi- situation. whom sustained devastat- nese national in her 20’s The Seing damage from shrapnel. by China’s consulate in cret Service Authorities said nails New York. The Shenyang reacted acand ball bearings were native, Lingzi Lu, was a cordingly to stuffed into the explosives graduate student at Bos- a domestic by their makers to widen ton University. She stud- b o m b i n g the footprint of bodily ied mathematics and sta- protocol, by harm to the spectators of tistics, and anticipated to e x p a n d i n g this event. graduate with a master’s the perimSadly, among the dead degree in 2014. eter of secuTwo homemade bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. from this dreadful tragRunners united to try to rity around edy is eight-year-old Mar- make what progress they the White On Tuesday, April 16th what took place, the FBI The remains also aided detin Richard of Dorchester, could in saving the lives of House. Speaking in terms President Obama made a is investigating it as an termining that the bombs Massachusetts. Another those injured. Some ran di- of the sheer magnitude of statement regarding the act of terrorism. Any time were probably on timed was identified as 29-year- rectly to the nearest hospi- the explosions, this act did explosions at the Boston bombs are used to target detonators as opposed to old Krystle Campbell of tal to give blood, knowing not reflect that of tradi- Marathon. He touched innocent civilians it is an using remote detonation. Arlington, Massachusetts. it would be greatly needed. tional terrorist attacks on down on how this act is act of terror.” FBI Special Authorities have idenHer grandmother, Lillian Others literally ripped off our soil such as the trade being treated by the FBI, Agent Rick Deslauriers tified the perpetrators as Campbell, chose to speak their own clothes creating center bombings in the and expanded on what au- commented that from the Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, about the late Krystle in a tourniquets for the wounds 90’s or the 9/11 attacks in thorities plan to do. remains it can be suggest- and his younger brother, one-on-one interview with of the dozens injured in 2001. “This was a heinous and ed the contents of the ex- Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19. cowardly act. And given plosives were in a pressure See BOSTON BOMBING In a matter of minutes, the area around the Boston Marathon finish line was what we now know about cooker inside a nylon bag. page 3 deserted as people ran for their lives away from the scene of the explosions.

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Photo by bigthink.com

WCU will be showing its support of the Boston community by having the

Mile of Silence for Boston The walk begins at 7:30 p.m. on April 23 in front of Wayne Hall, to be followed by a candlelight vigil on the steps of the Sykes Student Union.


APRIL 22, 2013 BOSTON BOMBING continued from page 2

The 26-year-old was killed in a gunfight with police early Friday morning, after citizens reported the pair for robbing a 7-Eleven. The younger Tsarnaev escaped the gunfight, and hid from police until late Friday evening, when he was found in a tarp-covered boat in a Watertown backyard. Tsarnaev’s body heat was detected by airborne thermal imaging, which is what led to his capture. Tsarnaev is being held in critical condition until he has recovered enough to respond to police questions. Boston authorities are eagerly awaiting Tsarnaev’s recovery, so they can interrogate him. “We have a million questions, and those questions need to be answered,” says Boston Gov. Deval Patrick. Tsarnaev’s family denies that the 19-yearold was a critical player o aided de- in the bombing. Ruslan the bombs Tsarni, Tsarnaev’s uncle, on timed pposed to onation. ave identrators as naev, 26, r brother, Clare Haggerty naev, 19. News Editor

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n April 14, communication studies professor Jesse Piersol premiered her short film, entitled “Clean Getaway,” at The Note in West Chester. The movie was filmed in Downingtown over the course of three days during Winter Break with a collection of West Chester students and Professor Piersol’s friends and family. The premiere began with a reception before the movie. The reception started at 6 p.m., and there was a $10 admission price. The proceeds from the admission price were going to benefit the family of the late Captain Chris Good, a firefighter who had lost

THE QUAD NEWS said that Tsarnaev was “used” by his older brother to carry out the attack. Tsarni also says that his nephew, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, recently became associated with Islamic extremism. He began to use words like “jihad” without understanding their true meaning, says Tsarni. This past week is not the first time the U.S. government has dealt with Tamerian Tsarnaev. In 2011, at the request of the Russian government, the FBI questioned and later released Tsarnaev. The 26-year-old had just returned to the U.S. after spending a year in Russia prior to the bombing. After Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s capture on Friday evening, Boston citizens gathered in the streets to celebrate. Public transportation, offices, and stores were set to reopen, following Tsarnaev’s capture. Nicholas Devoe is a fifth-year student majoring in English. He can be reached at ND626335@wcupa.edu.

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Photo by John Wilcox/Boston Herald/MCT

Residents celebrate in Watertown, Massachussetts, after the arrest of a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings on Friday, April 19, 2013.

WCU professor premieres short film his life in the line of duty in November. The guests were dressed in “loosely interpreted black tie,” which meant that there were people in gowns and there were people in jeans, but the atmosphere of the evening was very upbeat and positive. There was an array of light refreshments that were donated from area businesses, such as the Sweet Beginnings bakery in Thorndale, and the Blue Café in Downingtown. The refreshment table offered such treats as bite-sized cupcakes, pizza, hoagies, and even cookies baked by Professor Piersol’s mother, who also had a role in the film. Between 6 and 7 p.m., the noise level steadily increased as more people came, all of whom were anxious for the film to start. “I had the fantasy of sell-

ing out The Note, which would have been 385 people. We didn’t get near that, but I’m incredibly pleased with the turnout,” Professor Piersol said. “We cleared the expenses for The Note, and everything else was donated, so there should be a nice-sized contribution for Jessica Good and her family, and that makes me feel really good.” Promptly at 7 p.m., Professor Pierol took the stage to thank the sponsors of the evening who had donated food, as well as The Note for hosting the event. She also gave a brief statement about Captain Good and his family and profusely thanked emergency responders for putting their lives on the line on a regular basis, several of whom were in attendance. Professor Piersol continued on to talk about

the film and the process of filming and promoting, and finally premiering. Professor Piersol was one of the screenwriters, the producer, director, and even wrote and performed the title song from the film. “During filming, I realized how expensive it is to use music in a movie, so I figured I’d better write one myself,” she explained. “I woke up one morning during filming and wrote the first half. Then, I worked on it over the next couple of weeks, and there it was.” Once Professor Piersol finished speaking, the time had finally arrived to watch the movie. The audience scarcely stopped laughing throughout the entire film, which lasted around 40 minutes. The movie featured several WCU students, including Jake Markie-

wicz, Dan Hinderliter, Alane Presswood, and Daquann Chung, among others. The film was about three friends (Markiewicz, Hinderliter, and Chung) who appear to have nothing better to do than hang around a laundromat all day. They come up with the get-rich-quick scheme to start selling soap balls, made by one of the boy’s grandmothers (played by Professor Piersol’s mother), to the other laundromat patrons, including Extra Rinse Girl (played by Presswood) – and that, of course, is when everything goes horribly and hilariously wrong. “Being a part of ‘Clean Getaway’ has been a great experience,” screenwriter Daquann Chung said. “I really enjoyed having the opportunity to do something that I’ve always

wanted to do and getting the chance to see what the process was like for creating a short film from the ground up. I hope that in the future, I can continue to screenwrite and build upon the skills that I learned from being a part of ‘Clean Getaway.’” Following the movie, there was an after party to celebrate with more refreshments and dancing to music provided by a DJ from WCUR. The night could be considered nothing but a success. “It was amazing,” Professor Pierol said. “I promised attendees a fun, cheap, memorable evening for a great cause, and I feel like we delivered on that promise.” Clare Haggerty is a second-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD NEWS

Slackliners hope to cast away negative perceptions

Kenny Ayres Editor-in-Chief

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hen the weather gets warm, students on campus engage in many outdoor activities such as Frisbee, jogging, or tossing a baseball around in the academic quad without so much as a glance their way. But one group of students on campus has been searching for some “slack” from naysayers of their outdoor activity of choice: slacklining. Slacklining is similar to tight-rope walking, with a flat nylon rope suspended between two anchor points fairly low to the ground. A group of dedicated slackliners can be seen most often in the academic quad between two trees just in front of Recitation Hall. Harmless enough, right? Not according to public safety.

According to Kurt van Mol, founder of the Slackline Society on campus, almost every evening, public safety officials raise concerns with students who are using slacklines in the quad. “At 5 o’clock when they start their rounds, they start yelling at us and saying we are irresponsible,” van Mol said. Van Mol stated that public safety is concerned with two different things: the harming of the environment due to the slacklines being tied to trees, and the potential safety issue of students getting injured while slacklining. The problem is, neither of these concerns have basis in truth. Yes, slacklines can damage trees. However van Mol was quick to point out that all slacklines are fixed to trees with a protective surface between the rope and the tree, such as a padded yoga mat or tow-

els, so as to not scrape of the bark and cut into the tree. With the proper measures in place to protect them, it does not hurt any trees one bit. It is so harmless, in fact, that national parks across the country, such as the famous Yosemite National park, allow slacklining provided that the lines are attached with regards to the health of the tree, such as by attaching pillows, towels, or other forms of pads between the line and tree. Many universities across the country have also accepted the up-andcoming practice of slacklining. Van Mol and other slackliners take exception to allegations of being irresponsible and damaging to nature. Slacklining is a peaceful activity that people engage in to be closer with nature, not harm it. “A lot of what slacklining is about is being able to find tranquility, relax-

WCU football team to host bone marrow drive Clare Haggerty News Editor

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APRIL 22, 2013

n Friday, April 26, the WCU football team will be hosting a bone marrow drive from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Sturzbecker Gym. The process involves filling out paperwork and having DNA samples extracted from the donor’s mouth with cotton swabs, a process which takes about 10 minutes. The donor’s cotton swab will then be submitted to be checked against potential recipients for a match. The football team’s bone marrow drive donors will not be the only WCU students who have donated. According to Amy Farnum of the NCAA, the chances of a match occurring are rare. There are

approximately 20 million people worldwide registered as potential marrow donors, but there are only about 250 matches found each year, making it a 1-in-80,000 chance that a registered donor will be a match. But Tori Dugan, WCU women’s lacrosse player, ended up being one in 80,000. Dugan underwent the operation in November of 2011 after she was matched to a 50 year old man with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. A month after her donation, the unnamed recipient was out of the hospital and doing much better. “I think everybody should at least be on the registry, and if you are matched up, you still have a choice to be a donor,” Dugan said. “It was awesome.” Another WCU athlete,

Jared Bonacquisti of the football team, donated bone marrow in 2011, as well, after a week of injections to stimulate stem cell reproduction. “It’s really exciting knowing that I’m a match to somebody, and I can actually potentially help this person and continue their life,” said Bonacquisti, according to CBS Philly. The WCU football team hopes to be as successful in their bone marrow drive. Any interested students and faculty should stop by the gym in the Sturzbecker Health Science Center. Even if their cotton swab is a match with a recipient, the person still has the option to say no. But saying yes could save a life. Clare Haggerty is a second-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@wcupa.edu.

Photo by Kurt Van Mol

ing, forming a community, and making new friends,” van Mol said. “People are claiming we are hurting the environment which is exactly what we are not doing and do not want to do.” There has also been worry that slacklining can cause injury, but members of the slackline society were quick to point out how safe it really is. The line is tied just a few feet off the ground, eliminating any risk of injury from a high fall. It is no higher than some people are able to jump on skateboards or bikes. Also, all newcomers are prohibited from walking the line on their own without assistance. A member of the society holds onto beginners to stabilize them and eliminate the risk of falling. “Kids running around in the quad playing Frisbee or climbing trees are more likely to get hurt,” van Moll said. But despite the precautions taken by the slackliners, they are still being told to pack it up. Van Mol’s solution? Make it an official West Chester University club. “We want to have it passed so we can spread the word and have people realize that we are being respon-

sible and respectful to the environment,” van Mol said. Having the Slackline Society become an official club would do numerous things. If passed, it would allow students to slackline unbothered as long as they met the safety requirements. It would also encourage students who might want to try that slacklining is indeed safe, because it is recognized by the school. “It’s hard because it’s a sport nobody knows about, it’s a weird activity,” van Mol said. “We want to make it so it is something that has a good reputation on campus, not a bad one. Also, other people are setting up slacklines on campus, and I want to make sure they are being safe and doing things properly.” The idea has taken off. Van Mol and his fellow slackliners have already begun the long process to being recognized as an official organization. They have bylaws, an OrgSync account, a faculty advisor (John Helion), a recruitment list, a roster, and they have already had an introductory meeting. They also have a president (van Mol), vice president, and treasurer, in addition to 42 “official” members of

their currently unofficial group. But the next step will be the hardest. “Meeting with the grounds crew and public safety,” van Mol said with a wry smile. They are hoping that their preaching of safety and care of the environment along with the recent support from students and other organizations will help make public safety understand that it is a responsible and tranquil activity. If approved, the Slackline Society wants to do more than just allowing their favorite activity to remain on campus, they want to do what van Mol mentioned before: building community and making friends. “I would really like to incorporate freshmen who come by and maybe do not have a place. It’s a really friendly, welcoming, and open society. Anyone can do it, just come on over.” To find out more about the Slackline Society, “like” WCU Slackline Society on Facebook, visit their Earth Day table on April 22, or email president Kurt van Mol at KV746822@wcupa.edu. Kenny Ayres is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.


APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD NEWS

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English department hosts English major career panel By Julia Zakrzewski Practicum Writer

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n Monday, April

the Slack11, West Chester nts to do University hosted allowingan English majors career activity to panel titled “What Can pus, they You Do With an Engt van Mol e: buildinglish Degree?” in Philips d makingAutograph Library from

3:30 to 5:30 pm.

ly like to The career panel was hmen whohosted by Dr. Eleanor an English ybe do notShevlin, s a reallyprofessor at WCU, and ming, andfeatured three guest nyone canspeakers who graduated n over.” from WCU with English more aboutdegrees. “You can do just Society,about anything you want ckline So-to do with English as a ook, visitmajor,” said Dr. Shevlin. y table on Erica Nagurney, who mail presi-works at transit advern Mol attising company Titan pa.edu. 360 as a sales coordina-

d-year studenttor/assistant, spoke first cation studies.about both her experit KA739433@ence at WCU as an Eng-

lish major/art history minor and her job hunt after graduating. “Being an English major puts you ahead of the game in writing [and] building a good resume even if you don’t have a lot of experience,” she said. She also cited LinkedIn, Career Builder, and Monster as social networking sites that helped her to acquire interviews. Nagurney named the three most important skills she learned from WCU’s English program as research, communication, and team interaction. “Having an English background is beneficial,” she said, explaining that analyzing texts, researching, and communicating verbally are three abilities vital to her career. “Writing skills give you the first skill in the business

world,” said Nagurney. Carl Gersbach, managing director at CB Richard Ellis, Inc., encouraged career-seeking students and graduates to be persistent. “You have to be willing to network,” he said. Gersbach explained that his company, CBRE, does not look for a specific degree, but, like Nagurney, said that writing skills are “tremendously important” and that his job involves writing proposals, letters, e-mails, and brochures, among other texts. Gersbach cited positions in research and advertising as the best fit for English majors pursuing careers at CBRE. Like many other college students, both Gersbach and the last speaker of the afternoon, Joan-Marie Stiglich,

started out with different majors before settling on one. Gersbach switched from health sciences to English, and Stiglich, who graduated from WCU in 1994, decided to become an English major in the middle of an organic chemistry test. “I loved putting words in the right order, loved telling stories,” she said. Stiglich, who wanted to use her English degree to get into journalism, works as the senior vice president for SLACK Inc, a healthcare publishing company. “Philadelphia is the main hub for medical publishing in the world,” she said. While at WCU, Stiglich worked for the Quad, and after graduating wrote for various newspapers, including the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Stiglich’s advice to aspiring journalists is to “write clean, write fast, and be very humble.” She also advised students to “clean up your social media. If you’re going to be online, write a blog.” She cited being able to provide examples of writing as important when pursuing a career in journalism. The speakers named a multitude of WCU classes they deemed most beneficial to their careers. Among these classes are Power, Politics, and Propaganda, various ENG400 classes, and journalism classes. Dr. Shevlin mentioned ENG296, saying that reading literary theorists in that class enables students to see theories and motives in texts. When asked about

what employers look for on a resume, Gersbach said that the most important areas are leadership skills, GPA, and the academic fields the applicant has studied. He also cited showing competiveness, such as playing a sport, as an important aspect of a resume. Before the presentation ended, the speakers advised to always “do your homework on the company you are pursuing.” Dr. Shevlin noted the importance of followup e-mails after a job interview. The career panel concluded with speed networking, where students got the chance to speak with each of the WCU graduate speakers for two minutes. Julia Zakrzewski is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at JZ727170@wcupa. edu.


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THE QUAD NEWS

APRIL 22, 2013

Borough Council meets to discuss parking agenda

Two council members, that we have a very small Cassandra L Jones and sample,” said Jones. Jordan C. Norley, conJones was not the only est Chester bor- ducted a survey of bor- one who was concerned. ough council ough residents. “[Our] Sue Bayn, West Chesmembers and survey did come back ter resident and former residents discussed an overwhelmingly in favor borough council memordinance that would ex- of having the [parking] ber for eight years, said, tend enforcement of Area ordinance enforced on “Council has a permit A residential parking Saturday,” said Jones. process which requires a In fact, 63 percent of re- petition to be signed by permits to Saturdays. The motion to extend spondents were in favor of a certain number of resienforcement in Area A residential permit exten- dents before a proposal was discussed at a bor- sion. “The only problem is put into place… before ough council work ses- I see with [our survey],” you go racking up bills, sion on Tuesday, April Jones continued, “is that and creating ordinances, 16. The idea came after we didn’t have time to go you need a percentage of council members received door to door and ask ev- residents to say, ‘yes, we want this.’” Bayn said a several complaints from eryone individually.” Survey participants more representative surresidents who find Saturday parking to be espe- were selected from the vey or petition could be cially difficult because of combined email accounts conducted in less than two weeks – even before visitors from out of town of Jones and Norley, and further discussion on parking in Area A. Area contacted via email. Out the proposal takes place. A refers to the southeast of 70 emails sent by Nor“There’s no reason to side of West Chester, ley, 41 residents respondrailroad this thing,” said from Rosedale Street ed, and out of 15 sent by Jones, 12 residents retoQuarter Miner, and Franklin Page Square MC3 Summer Ad_Layout 1 1/12/13 2:39 PMBayn. Page 1“You are about to sponded. “My concern is propose something that Street to High.

By Kellyn McNamara Managing Editor

W

most people have not weighed in on.” Other residents asserted that extending enforcement would affect other permit areas. West Chester resident Joe Norley Sr., who lives in the southwest area of town, said, “There is concern in the southwest quadrant that [permits will be enforced on Saturdays] in the southeast.” Norley continued that residents of the southeast quadrant are mostly college students. Many students invite guests to stay over the weekends. If these guests will be ticketed for parking in Area A, the concern is that they will park in other areas of town, such as Area B. “I don’t want this problem to get worse,” says borough resident Diane Horvath, a resident of parking Area B. “We al-

ready have a shuttle system on one side of town,” she says. According to Horvath, many students park in Area B, then are shuttled other areas of town to attend parties. Council is working to appease all residents. According to councilman Norley, there are special permits that can be obtained prior to guest visits. With a bit of planning, residents will still be able to obtain special event and guest passes to accommodate visitors from out of town. “[The proposed ordinance] would just take care of the spontaneous, ‘I’m gonna have 20 people over at my house’ parties,” said Norley. Borough council President Holly V. Brown thinks parking overflow is inevitable. West Chester University is accept-

ing increasingly larger numbers of students, but the town cannot hold them. “In a town where our streets have not expanded since the 18th century – where people used to ride horses and buggies – we are now trying to fit all these cars into a space that just does not expand,” said Brown. Councilman Stephan A. Shinn said that what West Chester needed to really fix the parking problem is a boroughwide parking study, a measure which Shinn says could cost over $100,000. “This structure wasn’t build to handle the density that’s here,” says Shinn. “There’s really no good solution.” Kellyn McNamarais a fourth-year student majoring in nutrition & dietetics. She can be reached at KM654122@wcupa.edu.

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E

rica Freeman’s stalker was finally caught. Dwane Cook, 45, repeatedly showed up uninvited at the 25-year-old’s home. She once woke up to him massaging her feet in the middle of the night, but he was never caught - until now. Freeman and her husband walked into their house to see Cook with his pants around his ankles. Freeman’s husband punched him in the face, and he fled out the window. Authorities finally managed to catch him a short time later as he was breaking into someone else’s home. uthorities say an 85-year-old New Mexico man led Grant County sheriff’s deputies on a high-speed chase and was caught only after lighting a cigarette and losing control of his car. The man was arrested on Wednesday following reports that he was driving erratically in the Grant County Detention Center parking lot. He took off from the parking lot, fled from deputies and drove up 120 miles per hour, waving to other drives as he passed. ozens of snakes are in good condition after a home in Colorado caught fire. Two adults and five children escaped safely, but now the snakes are trapped in the debris of the ruined home. Firefighters are working with the homeowner to get the hundreds of exotic snakes into a new home.

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APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD NEWS

WCU to host first queer and feminist film festival

y larger students, nnot hold wn where By Victoria Holt e not exStaff Writer the 18th re people est Chester orses and University stue now trydents will preshese cars ent short films at the t just does d Brown. University’s first stuStephan dent produced feminist hat what and queer film festival, needed to titled LoOSenING Our parking Minds, this upcoming borough- Saturday, April 27 from study, a 1 to 6 p.m. at Sykes Stuh Shinn dent Union Theatre. ost over Our structure LoOSenING Minds is “an opportuandle the ere,” says nity for students to exreally no press and use their voic-

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es to convey their queer a fourth-year experience.” Queer does nutrition & not necessarily mean reached at “gay,” but instead, a u. lifestyle away from the norm. Students have created short, 10-15 minute films about numerous topics that affect students. Films either send a message, tell a story,or portray what is happening to alienated students. Each film will be followed by a Q&A session with the student filmmakers to provide further dialogue on their topic. LoOSenING Our Minds is free and open to the public and refreshments will be provided. Dr. Lisa Ruchti, an associate professor of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies, and event organizer, said, “The film festival was open to any student film maker, no matter the level of experience,” and emphasized the opportunity for students to express themselves and their queer experience.

One of the films to be featured at LoOSenING Our Minds is titled “Through My Eyes: Perspectives on Domestic Violence.” A group of students from HON451: Documentary Video and Social Justice will present a series of interviews with West Chester-related individuals about their various experiences with domestic violence. At 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 27, the feature film of LoOSenING Our Minds, “Criminal Queers” will be shown. “Criminal Queers,” directed by Eric A. Stanley and Chris Vargas, tells a fictional story with the reality of violence against the queer and transgender communities by different states and the prison industrial complex. “‘Criminal Queers’ is a mixture of satire and political critique, wrapped up in a classic prison-break narrative. The presence of the most famous prison abolitionist of our time, Angela Davis, lends weight to the film’s rumination on the prison-industrial complex,” said Bitch Magazine. There will be a Q&A session to follow. While all of the films in LoOSenING Our Minds focus on social justice issues, not all of the films are dark, or serious. Some of the films are comedies, including the main feature “Criminal Queers.” LoOSenING Our Minds is sponsored by Association for Wom-

PAGE 7

Session

en’s Empowerment, the College of Arts and Sciences, Departments of English and Philosophy, the University’s Digital Media Center, the Growing Community Project, LGBTQA Club, LGBTQA Service, Sisters United, the Student Activities Council, the Women’s Center, Women’s and Gender Studies Program, and the University Forum. For more information on the event, please contact Dr. Lisa Ruchti at LRuchti@wcupa.edu or Dr. Simon Ruchti at ERuchti@wcupa.edu.

Starts May 13th, June 10th & July 8th

RegisteR tODAY! Stay on course this summer! Online | Blended | Classroom

Semester Starts May 13

Victoria Holt is a second-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at VH758202@ wcupa.edu.

Mod 5 | Mod A Starts May 13

Mod B Starts June 10

Mod 6 Starts July 8

Register online at www.alvernia.edu/Summer All courses are accredited. Schedule is subject to change.

West Chester University Weather Center

TUE APRIL 23

WED APRIL 24

THU APRIL 25

Weather

Upcoming Weekend Weather Trends:

FRI

Temp Precip Pleasantly mild with lots of sunshine

Period of showers; mild temperatures

HIGH

HIGH

62-66

63-68

Sun with clouds; tad chillier

HIGH

54- 60

Discussion: The week will begin with plenty of sunshine with a mix of clouds. Temperatures will remain mild until the middle of the week. On Wednesday, a cold front moves into our area bringing showers during the day and a drop in temperatures later in the day due to winds coming from the northwest. Temperatures on Wednesday will start out mild and are expected to be consistent with the historic high temperature of 65. Thursday’s highs will struggle to reach 60. Over the weekend, temperatures will remain near normal until Sunday when it becomes chillier. Showers with a few peeks of sunshine are expected throughout the weekend into early next week.

SAT

SUN

NEAR NORMAL

NEAR NORMAL

BELOW NORMAL

SHOWERS?

LATE SHOWER

SHOWERS

Historical high temp this week: 65°F Weather Focus:

Observed Snowfall at Philadelphia Last 5 Winters Season

Snowfall

2012-2013

8”

2011-2012

4”

2010-2011

44”

2009-2010

78”

** Average snowfall is 22”. Department  of  Geology  &  Astronomy  student  forecasters:     Nora  Pearse,  advised  by  Dr.  Joby  Hilliker  


PAGE 8

THE QUAD NEWS

Greek Week begins with a bang

APRIL 22, 2013

Fraternities and sororities perform skits and lip-sync to begin the week of festivities By Skylar Rack Special to The Quad

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reek Week has finally happened, and the battle for the title of Greek Week Champions was very heated. Fraternities and sororities competed against each other in events beginning on April 14 in hopes to win the gold and to also unify Greek life. An opening ceremony was held at 6:00 p.m. on Monday night in Asplundh Concert Hall, followed directly by Lip Sync. For the opening ceremony, each organization had two members come on stage to share their public motto or creed and explain why their association is special to them. Lip Sync then started at 6:30 p.m. where each Greek team performed a short, but amusing skit that incorporated dancing and lip-syncing. Fraternities performed first. The order was: Delta Chi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Phi Epsilon, and Sigma Pi. Each fraternity had a small group of men perform their skit. Delta Chi had an entertaining Space Jam theme, while Sigma Alpha Epsilon chose to use the timeline of Justin Timberlake’s music career as their focus. Sigma Phi Photo by Ilana Berger

Epsilon performed a Scooby Doo-themed skit, and Sigma Pi used many different songs and had one special guy come forward

as their topic. Phi Mu took the famous TV show The Fresh Prince of BelAir and gave it a twist for their performance, as did

Photo by Ilana Berger

to lip sync the lyrics and serenade the ladies. The sororities followed: Alpha Phi, Zeta Tau Alpha, Delta Phi Epsilon, Alpha Xi Delta, Phi Mu, Alpha Sigma Tau, Phi Sigma Sigma, and Delta Zeta. The women of Alpha Phi chose to base their skit on the negative stereotypes of Greek life versus how wonderful it really is, while Zeta Tau Alpha went with the clever theme of Around the World in 80 Days. Delta Phi Epsilon performed a comical Finding Nemo skit, and Alpha Xi Delta used an old classic, The Breakfast Club,

Alpha Sigma Tau with their presentation theme of Grease. Next was Phi Sigma Sigma taking on Jumanji, followed lastly by Delta Zeta, who chose a more modern movie theme of Bridesmaids. After all of the performances, the judges, who were members of the West Chester University community, took an intermission to choose the winners. Each group was judged on appearance, music, dance, skit, presentation, Greek unity, and knowledge of material. First place received 35 points toward the Greek Week total,

second place took home 25 points, and third place won 15 points. For fraternities, Delta Chi won the gold, while Sigma Phi Epsilon followed in second place. Sigma Pi won third place.

Delta Phi Epsilon placed first for sororities followed by Phi Sigma Sigma in second and Zeta Tau Alpha in third. The events for the rest of the week were open to all members of the WCU

community, and everyone was encouraged to attend to finish off Greek Week 2013 strong. Skylar Rack is a second-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at SR758781@wcupa. edu.


APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD FEATURES

PAGE 9

LogicPad’ s new Features textbook application AIDS Benefit at WCU to help students Buying and selling textbooks is rasied over $13,000 now easier for students QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Funds benefit HIV/AIDS victims and those suffering from hunger

By Julie Singer nected to each other, lo- nization raised over Staff Writer cally and globally,” said $14,000 from the fundraiser and this year n Sunday, April Mills. The funds raised each raised over $13,000, 7, West Chester University hosted year goes to four ben- with the help of over 105 a fundraiser on campus eficiaries: H.E.L.P. Min- volunteers. The event took place istries Soup Kitchen, for Aid to South Africa. Aid to South Africa serving 6,000 bowls of in the Hollinger Field is an organization that soup daily to nine pri- House from 12-4 p.m. raises money for men, mary schools, Sparrow The WCUR DJed outwomen, and children Village, the first AIDS side of the field house suffering from HIV/ village in the world, with a kids area, includAIDS and hunger. Pro- Nkosi’s Haven, a family ing a moon bounce, a moting awareness of refuge for AIDS orphans pedestal joust, tye-dye these issues within as well as infected chil- and more. Children’s WCU and the local com- dren with their mothers, choirs, local bands, and munity is main part of and Mosaic, a self-sus- dance companies also their mission. To raise tainable orphan-care fa- performed. There was also a funds, the organization cility, according to Nichwalking relay and sochosts an annual commu- olle Mills. Helping others means cer tournament that ocnity fair, and 2013 was a lot to this organiza- curred throughout the the 8th annual fair. day. Some According to “Helping others means giving a of the walkNicholle Mills, ing teams the public relapiece of yourself - your time, included tions chair for The Miss ASA, the oryour money, your talents.” West Chesganization encouraged West Ches- tion, especially Mills. ter University Team, Prodter students and local “For me, helping others Pharmaceutical community members to means giving a piece of uct Development Club attend and help raise yourself - your time, your Team, Glass Family funds for this cause. money, your talents-in Team, Miriello Family “Seeing local kids and order to make the life of Team, WC Sunrise Roparents, side by side someone else better than tary Team, Stinson with university stu- it was before. By doing Family Team, Hopewell Methodist dents, supporting South this, we are able to grow United Africa was amazing. The in ways that would be Church Team, and the ASA fair does/did a fan- impossible otherwise,” Schwabenland Family Team. The soccer teams tastic job of reminding said Mills. Last year, the orgaus that we are all conSee BENEFIT page 11

www.logicpad.com

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S

ince LogicPad’s debut in Fall of 2012, Kehinde Roberts the co-founder of LogicPad and his team, have been working on their innovative textbook application. Their new textbook application hopes to solve two problems: finding students who have taken your course, with textbooks to sell, and helping students sell textbooks at a competitive price, according to Roberts. “Our textbook application will give students the option to make more money back on their original investment, by connecting them directly to other student buyers who are going to take that course in the near fu-

ture,” said Roberts. Roberts explained how these days, students spend so much money on expensive textbooks, and only get back 10-20 percent of the true market value, when it’s time to sell their books back. It is also economically inefficient since third party buyback systems only increase the cost of used books to students, according to Roberts. The problem, according to LogicPad, is that there is inefficiency in selling books back for cash, since students are not getting a fair market value. So, their answer is a student buyback: making costs lower for buyers, earning more cash from sell-

ing books, and being able to trade with other students. Using LogicPad’s integrated Textbook application, students can compare textbook prices to those on Amazon and other students, and in addition create “Craigslist type” listings for popular books while managing their textbooks in one place. “LogicPad’s aim is to help students by providing a simple and easy listing that’s connected to the course code, number, semester and professor, so other students can purchase the book on campus,” he said.

See LOGICPAD page 11


PAGE 10

THE QUAD FEATURES

APRIL 22, 2013

Internship experience provides future opportunities

LogicPad from page 9

Proof of why students should gain experience, regardless of major

By Julia Zakrzewski Practicum Writer

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or many students, an internship is part of the college experience. In fact, some universities even require each and every student to participate in an internship before he or she graduates. According to a survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, over 55 percent of 2012 college graduates “took part in an internship or co-op at some point during their college career,” up from 52 percent of the class of 2011. NACE surveyed approximately 48,000 college students graduating in 2012 from across the U.S.

NACE also found that the majority of students – 62 percent – would accept an offer of paid employment from their internship employers. In order to compete with other applicants, having experience as an intern is considered highly important. “It is extremely important that students of all majors complete an internship to be competitive in a global economy,” says Amy Thul, assistant director of alumni career services at Penn State University. Gabrielle Dallazia, a fourth year English education major at West Chester University who recently attended an interview for an internship with West Chester based

magazine The WC Press, raises a great point. “As a BSED major, the internship will open doors for me after I graduate and not limit my career opportunities,” she says. “It would provide me with real-life experience in the publishing field.” Some internship expe-

were unpaid; and “nearly one-third of internships in the for-profit sector were unpaid.” In order for unpaid internships to be considered legal, there are various factors that must be met. According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour

“Students of all majors [should] complete an internship to be competitive in a global economy.” riences offer students college credit; however, that is the most compensation that some students will receive. In the same survey of 2012 college graduates, NACE found that 47 percent of students’ internship experiences

Division (WHD), the criteria includes the stipulation that interns “do not displace regular employees, but work under their close observation.” Other factors that the WHD mentions include: training must resem-

ble that of a vocational school or academic instruction, training must be “for the benefit of the trainee,” the intern must not provide the employer with an “immediate advantage” from his or her activities, trainees are not entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship, and all parties must understand that the intern is not entitled to monetary compensation. Students’ biggest concern about working for free as an intern is obvious: How are you supposed to pay for rent, bills, and groceries? This is especially a challenge when accepting an internship miles away, perhaps even across state borders. On top of

putting in hours at their internship, many students need to hunt for a job that provides income as well. However, as Dallazia pointed out, internships can provide students with opportunities they previously may not have had. Students who feel limited by their degrees may find other “doors opening” to them because of their internships. “Employers are looking for students that have field work experience and can transfer the skills learned during internships into their future company or organization,” says Thul. Julia Zakrzewski is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at JZ727170@wcupa.edu.

Online Summer Classes Choose from the following options:

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To RegisTeR: Visit dccc.edu/summer or call 1-877-912-DCCC (1-877-912-3222)


APRIL 22, 2013 LogicPad from page 9

s at their any stuhunt for a es income

Dallazia ternships LogicPad’s company logo. students ties they Providing some testinot havemony from a studentwho feelperspective, two West r degreesChester University er “doorsstudents, Laura Succa m becauseand Liz Saldan, share hips. their personal experiare look-ences using LogicPad’s nts thattextbook application. k experi- “The first semester transfer I used the textbook ed during app, I spent at least o their fuor organi-75 percent less on textbooks than I would hul.

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wcupa.edu.

THE QUAD FEATURES took me three minutes to find and pay for all my textbooks. At the end of the semester I simply re-listed my books on the platform and rather than get two dollars back from the bookstore, I made more money by selling my books to students taking the class this summer,” says Laura Succa, a Communication Studies senior at WCU. “I have never had a problem finding cheap textbooks while using LogicPad’s database. Everything you need is all in one place, and offers the best prices for expensive textbooks you know you are going to have to buy,” says Liz Saldan, also a Communication Studies senior at WCU.

This application is just one of many improvements LogicPad has made to the current system. The creators are now taking the feedback they received, and are developing LogicPad into a fully functional Global Learning Management System that will cater to the latest learning products and services today. Dedicated to using some of the most advanced web technologies, LogicPad hopes to enhance online learning tools for faculty and students at WCU, as well as other institutions in the near future, according to Roberts. Julie Singer is a first year student majoring in special education and middle grades preparation with a minor in reading. She can be reached at JS781397@wcupa.edu.

Benefit from page 9 included the Unicorns, Misfits, Extreme Dynamo, Jefferies, Aftershock, Yolo (winners), and the Black Hippies. “The event was a great success. We surpassed our goal by over $1,000. We added more vendors this year, many of whom sold out of their products. We also added more children’s entertainment, which increased the number of families coming to ASA. The leadership team, volunteers, and attendees all had a wonderful time enjoying the beautiful April weather, while supporting an even greater cause,” said Mills. Julie Singer is a first year student majoring in special education and middle grades preparation with a minor in reading. She can be reached at JS781397@wcupa.edu.

PAGE 11

pus Cooking m a C with Molly & Jenna Caesar Salad Dressing Preparation Time: 5 minutes Serving Size: For 1 large salad Ingredients: 1/2 cup vegetable oil 1/4 cup olive oil 3 T. lemon juice 1 1/2 T. red wine vinegar 1/2 tsp. Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic, minced 1/2 cup parmesan cheese Cracked black pepper (to taste) Instructions: 1. Toss all ingredients with romaine lettuce. 2. Top with your favorite toppings, such as croutons, black olives, anchovies, roasted red peppers, grilled chicken, etc. This recipe is certainly a favorite in my house. We never have people over for dinner without making Caesar salad with this dressing. Enjoy!

For the latest campus news, sports, and event coverage, Check out this week’s edition of WCU Weekly! Available now on www.wcupa.edu! Find WCU Weekly on Facebook! www.facebook.com/wcuweeklynews


PAGE 12

THE QUAD FEATURES

APRIL 22, 2013

Musician discovered by devout fan and journalist “Searching for Sugarman” documentary wins Academy Award

By Colleen Cummings Staff Writer

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he greatest musician of the 70s in the U.S. remained undiscovered until a devout fan and journalist brought him into the light. In the 1990’s these two men Stephen “Sugar” Segerman, a record store owner, and Craig Bartholomew Strydom, a music journalist, went out to discover the legend of Rodriguez and created a documentary titled “Searching for Sugarman” that won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature this year. Segerman and Strydom were from South Africa, where Rodriguez had become an icon but not much else was known about the artist. “We didn’t have any information besides the record cover and the lyrics,” stated Segerman. But the album spoke to the citizens in South Africa who were experiencing apartheid, racial segregation between whites and blacks, similar to the U.S. racism at the time. The album “Cold Fact” started its own movement which other musicians began basing their

purpose on. “It’s like a voice told our musicians: there is a way out of [racism],” said Segerman. The government of South Africa realized the influence “Cold Fact” had on the citizens. At the time period, the news was monitored by the government and there was no freedom of speech. “Cold Fact” implored the audience to stand up for what was right, and consequently the government began seizing records and scratching off particular songs before releasing the albums to the public. In the 90s, Segerman released a CD version of “Cold Fact” in his record store. In the cover, he asked his audience if anyone had ever heard of Rodriguez and if they could help him locate the mysterious musician. That is when Strydom contacted Segerman, and the two decided to find Rodriguez. In South Africa, it was rumoured that he committed suicide on stage, and the two men set out to find whether the rumor was true or not. They began their search with Clarence Avant, the owner of Suffix Records in the U.S.

who produced “Cold Fact.” Avant had seen no money come in for the record sales in South Africa nor in America. “This is my man!” exclaimed Avant upon looking at the record, “I’ve never heard anything like it. Bob Dylan was mild compared to this guy. But Latin music wasn’t happening. We sold maybe six records in the U.S.” The two men began reaching out in anyway that they could, including placing Rodriguez’s face on milk cartons. Eventually his daughter, Eva Rodriguez, saw a milk carton and called in. Immediately Strydom began asking questions “How did he die? Suicide?” Eva laughed and said “He’s alive, living in Detroit,” and warned the men that the fantasy might be better than the reality. Segerman and Strydom flew into Detroit and met with the Rodriguez family. They found that Rodriguez was working as a construction worker, and living with his three daughters. “I would like to of kept making music, but nothing beats reality. I went back to work,” Rodriguez told Segerman and Strydom.

Rodriguez had no idea what influence he had on South America. He had been raising his three daughters and working an honest, bluecollar job. “He never said anything about being this poet. He spoke for the working class in the community, though,” said his youngest daughter, Regan Rodriguez, “My father always took me to ‘elite’ places. He took me to the top of buildings and said ‘look you’re just as big as everyone else.’” On March 2, 1998 Segerman and Strydom took the Rodriguez family to South Africa to play

a concert on March 6. His eldest daughter, Eva, stated “He went from a being an outcast to who he really was. I thought he would be bewildered [by the sudden fame], but there was only complete tranquility.” Rodriguez stayed and played six sold-out shows in 1998. “South Africa made me feel more than a prince,” said Rodriguez. The family returned to Detroit, and continued their lives. “My dad says he has two lives. The carriage turned back into a carriage-bus or something,” laughed Eva. The youngest daughter, Regan, stated “He lives a

very, very, very modest life. There is no excess. He still works hard to make ends meet. He’s rich in a lot of things, but not in material things.” The majority of the money that Rodriguez has made from his newly discovered fame he has given to his family. He has lived in the same house in Detroit for 40 years. Rodriguez remained humble, and his daughters were not surprised. Colleen Cummings is a secondyear student majoring in English with minors in graphic design and journalism. She can be reached at CC763510@wcupa.edu.


APRIL 22, 2013

Op-Ed

THE QUAD OP-ED

QUADOPED@WCUPA.EDU

Goodbye and farewell

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PAGE 13

The Quad The Student Newspaper of West Chester University 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 610.436.2375 | quad@wcupa.edu | www.wcuquad.com

Kenny Ayres

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Clare Haggerty News Editor Jack Barnett Op-Ed Editor Samantha Schaule Features Editor Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor Joey Samuel Sports Editor Jessica C. Guzzardo Photography Editor

EDITORIAL STAFF Ilana Berger Asst. Photography Editor Riley Wallace Asst. Sports Editor

his is my last issue as op-ed editor of The Quad. It has been a great COPY EDITORS year. It was a great honor to be able to voice my opinion and others’ Colleen Cummings Stephanie Loeh sometimes different opinions in every issue. It was a joy to be part of Laura Wayne such a great organization. I would suggest to everyone to get involved in The Jeffrey Holmes Quad, which is staffed by great, competent people. Everyone does a great DISTRIBUTION job here. I would like to thank our editor Kenny Ayres who happily will be Riley Wallace returning next year. I would also like to thank our faculty adviser Dr. Philip ONLINE EDITION A. Thompsen who helps us when we need it, but gives us a great deal of BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Patrick Thomas Erica Brooks autonomy - yet another reason why I love this organization. The Quad is Manager truly student run. West Chester students make the decisions and do the Business FACULTY ADVISOR Kellyn McNamara work. Many responsibilities come with this independence, but we rise to the Managing Editor Dr. Philip A. Thompsen challenge. If I have to make any apologies it is to the copy editors who had to suffer through my numerous typos and misspellings. My tenure at The Quad has certainly been worthwhile; I just hope my readership feels the Submissions Policy and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the same way. If you are reading this, then I would just like to extend a “thank Guest academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union you.” The readership moves The Quad forward. All year long, you all read Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be my liberal, progressive spiels and rants. I just hope you enjoyed my writ- 253 sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and ings. In the end, you are the people I want to thank the most. phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, This would be a more solemn occasion if I did not know The Quad was being passed to capable hands. My successor, Joy Wilson, is sure to be a great addition. If you have read the section this year, then you probably have read an article by Joy. It was amazing how I could always count on an article from her, proof of what a dedicated hard-worker she is. We have similar ideals, but a very different way of executing our work. In my writing, I am more rigid, focusing on a barrage of facts, while Joy is much less rigid, focusing on ideas. She has a great flair for writing and it shows. The Quad is due for a great change next year. I, for one, could not be happier. In conclusion, I would just like to say good-bye. My time at The Quad has been great. I would never trade this opportunity for anything else. I have learned and grown with this job. It has been great writing for this newspaper. I hope you have enjoyed my section and will enjoy the section in the future. ~Jack Barnett Op-Ed Editor The Quad

class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumni. We do not accept submissions from members of the community who are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,000 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers Copyright ©2013 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the editor-in-chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, studentrun newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and, although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our website at www.wcuquad.com. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our website at www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


PAGE 14

THE QUAD OP-ED

Learning many lessons from Boston Embracing technology responsibly

By Kyle Neubeck Special to The Quad

take the time to help those who need it, and rememinutes after Monber that each day we still day’s bombing in breathe oxygen is a gift. Boston, phones lit I do not mean to preach; up across America. TwitI am not asking for the ter blazed with distress students of West Chester and shock. News outlets to save the rainforest or scrambled for relevant end slave trading. Howinformation. Texts from ever, we need to realize friends and family spread that the world is at our finthe word. The gravity of gertips, unlike any other the moment was hard to time in human history. escape. With social networks We live in a giving us a voice, we plugged-in socithink shouting at ety, for better or each other on Facefor worse. When book means we are politicians fumble contributing to a soover their words, a lution. YouTube video is I am as guilty as posted within the anyone of being a hour. If an athprisoner of the molete has an unflatment, but even in tering interaction the moment we with a heckler, should remember they are raked over the lessons that the Sports Center make causes imporcoals to the point tant to begin with. of exhaustion, and Though we cheer when something for the brave souls tragic happens, we who rescued the inwill all bear witjured post-bombing, ness, in the flesh or Runners receive aid after marathon tragedy. for the firefighters on the web. who rushed to emiPhoto By Nancy Lane I struggle to deal nent death on 9/11, with the responsiand for the soldiers bility that the internet re- fact we should never for- that fight and die for our quires. On the one hand, get. rights overseas, somehow, it provides a powerful tool But we do forget, be- we still let these people go that I can no longer live cause our culture of now underappreciated and unwithout. The vast major- demands it. We chase derpaid for 300 plus days ity of my research, read- Twitter trends and try of the year, until extraoring, and television-viewing to discover “the next big dinary events illuminate take place on a computer. thing” before other people the American heroes in I now possess the great show up and ruin it (Re- our daily lives. ability to share pieces of member MySpace?). We Today we should emmy life with friends and gesture rudely to drivers brace technology for more family around the country who will not let us into than following fleeting and the globe. I can settle their lane, cursing people trends. We should use this disputes in a bar with a we do not know over a mi- responsibility to stay well quick Google search, and nor inconvenience. Life informed and connected prepare writing on the go. goes on whether we learn so that we can thank Having access to the inter- from these terrible events those men and women, net gives me no excuse to or not. our teachers, our doctors, be ignorant to the world We should not dwell on our firefighters, who imaround me, a challenge I the gruesome nature of pact our lives every day. embrace as fully as pos- events like those in Boston, It should not take tragedy sible. but we should not let them for us to realize the majesFollowing the story in fade from consciousness ei- ty of the American mosaic. Boston and subsequent ther. This country is only Kyle is an English Writing major reactions these past few as good as we choose for it with a focus on Journalism. He days, I was as proud as to be. We should choose to can be reached at KN669234@ wcupa.edu. usual of the citizens of hold a door for a stranger,

M

America. These times of sadness tend to rally people of all colors and creeds, as we remember what really matters. We not only celebrate the lives of those important to us, but in a rare display of empathy, we celebrate the lives of people we will never meet. Faced with our own mortality, we remember how precious our lives are - a

APRIL 22, 2013

Mayweather missing cash fights

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By Evan Smith Staff Writer

loyd Mayweather is the highest regarded name in the sport of boxing right now. He undoubtedly has a track record of winning big fights. In fact, he has a track record of never losing. On May 4, he is scheduled to take on relatively unknown 147-pound welterweight champion Robert Guerro. Guerro, 30, has compiled a 31-1-1 record, against mainly low key fighters. Guerro’s last fight came as a big win for him, as he outlasted Andre Berto. Mayweather has taken on the winner of an Andre Berto fight before, as he fought and won on a controversial knockout against Victor Ortiz last year. But for true boxing fans, these fights are nothing but a waste of time. For those who follow boxing, there are many bigger names. Guerro, a natural lightweight, has been begging for the fight for quiete sometime, and he finally received his demands. However, Guerro recently had a shoulder surgery, and he has not had a knockout in his last five fights - key indicators that he will have a tough time with Mayweather. Though he is a gritty fighter, he will likely be no match for Mayweather’s superior technical boxing skills. In order to make the fight look more appealing, Mayweather bluffed on Twitter that he was going

By Ad potty mouth trash talkS ing, providing the appearance that his inferior s I opponent has a “fighting” one chance. of i Other potential fights tion know for Mayweather this Boston M spring could have in- has been volved either Saul “Cane- the other lo” Alvarez or Sergio Mar- older bro tinez, two men who box Tsarnaev, at 154 pounds. Alvarez fight with was initially scheduled to near Bost fight on the undercard of er broth Mayweather versus Guer- Tsarnaev ro, but decided to wounded, fight on a separate alive and date because May- ing treate weather would not The b guarantee him a been desc fight in September. terror; an While Mayweather nocent c is going back to not have t 147 pounds for this everyday fight, he fought that this his last fight at their last 154 pounds, tak- that we, a ing Miguel Cotto’s as a peo belt in the junior these bo middleweight divi- our every sion. Thus, there is activities. no excuse for why terrorism he did not fight the thermore, bigger name fight- point out ers, other than the in this e fact that they were Anyone potentially more replay foo dangerous for his tacks saw unblemished re- and effic cord - something sponders Floyd Mayweather he shows immense and how Photo By Jacob Langston pride for. were und While “Money” response of all time. Mayweather Mayweather will is a testa already holds this crown make millions of dol- can resili from when he squared lars regardless, he is not the mara against the Golden Boy capitalizing on the big- even after himself, Oscar Dela Hoya. ger cash payouts, which 26.2 miles Mayweather made a would have involved Pac- an additio monumental decision to qauio, Alvarez, or Mar- the local h switch his Pay Per View tinez. Unfortunately, to donate stations from HBO to the sport of boxing has Now m Showtime, a move that been consumed with the cans, I do will drastically change promotion aspect rather for all of the dynamic of the PPV than the fighting, which not let hi boxing. Ironically enough, has been detrimental to self. By t it was Mayweather who the sport. Promoters are must not g ridiculed Pacquaio for now allowed to hand pick reotypes t fighting on Showtime fights, thus never fulfill- selves so r when he took on “Sugar” ing our desires of seeing after this Shane Mosley, alluding to the dream fights we hope suspects the notion that HBO was for. reported his family and he would Evan Smith is a third year student of Islam, never leave them. May- majoring in political science with a the stere weather, to his credit, minor in communication studies. Muslims hypes fights up with his He can be reached at ES777403@ the charts to take on Devon Alexander, yet another unfamiliar boxer to many. Albeit, the Manny Pacquaio fight has lost the luster it once had, but it would still be a much better fight than the alternatives. Constant failed negotiations between two of boxing’s biggest promotion companies, Top Rank and Golden Boy, doomed what surely would have been the highest grossing fight

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wcupa.edu.


APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD OP-ED

Terror strikes Boston By Adam Farence Staff Writer

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s I am sure everyone with some sort of internet connection knows, one alleged Boston Marathon bomber has been captured and the other killed. The older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, died in a gunfight with police officers near Boston. His younger brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was seriously wounded, but captured alive and is currently being treated at a hospital. The bombings have been described as acts of terror; and rightly so. Innocent civilians should not have to go about their everyday lives worrying that this day might be their last. It is my wish that we, as a nation and as a people, do not let these bombings affect our everyday lives and activities. If we do, then terrorism wins. Furthermore, I would like to point out that we are not in this endeavor alone. Anyone who watched replay footage of the attacks saw how quickly and efficiently first responders got to the scene and how quickly things were under control. Our response to this disaster is a testament to American resilience. Some of the marathon runners, even after completing the 26.2 miles, decided to run an additional two miles to the local hospital in order to donate blood. Now my fellow Americans, I do have a warning for all of you: We must not let history repeat itself. By that, I mean we must not give into the stereotypes that make themselves so readily available after this attack. Both suspects have allegedly reported to be followers of Islam, and since 9/11, the stereotypes against Muslims have been off the charts. I believe that

we often forget how many Muslims do live in peace around the world, as we focus on a violent minority that does not represent the true religion of Islam or the people who follow it with true courage. As Americans, we should never deny justice to those who deserve it. If we descend into “Islamaphobia” like we did after the 9/11 attacks, we do ourselves an injustice. We blind ourselves and readily assume ill-will to all followers of Islam, devaluing the basic tenants of American prosperity. We must remember that we allow freedom of religion, and freedom to practice religion in any way a person wishes, as long as those practices do not conflict with the law. I do want to make it clear, however, that we have a right to deal swift justice to those who attempt to harm us. We do have a right to protect ourselves from attack. I only worry about blind rage. People have a tendency to give into impulses after an attack like this one, and while understandable, we must prove that we are not a nation that can be easily terrorized. We must not be guided by terrorism. We can use this tragic event as an opportunity to show the world that Americans do not give into evil and fear. What I truly hope to convey to whoever reads this is that we must not place undue attention on the villains and waste time making assumptions. We must praise the first responders who readily entered the disaster site, and mourn those lost and injured. We cannot let our response to this tragedy be one of hate and fear, but rather one of love and kindness. Adam Farence is a second-year student majoring in history and minoring in French. He can be reached at AF764146@wcupa.edu.

PAGE 15

Liquor privatization will change Pennsylvania Jack Barnett Op-Ed Editor

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n March 2013, The Pennsylvania General Assembly passed House Bill 790. If the bill is voted into law, the liquor industry will be privatized. Mike Turzai, Pennsylvania House Majority Leader of the 28th legislative district, introduced the bill, and it quickly gained support from many Republicans including Pennsylvania Governor, Tom Corbett. Supporters claim privatization will bring prosperity to the Commonwealth by instilling competition. If passed, the bill’s plan to slowly phase out state-run liquor stores will bring an end to a unique history of the Pennsylvania commonwealth selling liquor. Unfortunately, many people will be hurt by this bill. The Pennsylvania Wine and Spirit Stores employ many Pennsylvania residents. Wendell Young IV, President of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1776, currently leads the union in fighting against liquor privatization. He represents 3,500 of the 5,000 Wine and Spirits store employees. These employees are not guaranteed their jobs if the switch is made to privatization. This is the main reason that the unions oppose this bill. However, the bill would have other consequences as well, such as hardships on beer breweries. According to the bill, the 600 state-owned liquor stores will be phased out by selling private licenses to potential suppliers, ending the monopoly that the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board has on wine and spirits. Licenses will be sold to a variety of businesses, including beer distributors, grocery

Governor Tom Corbett Photo By Nabil K. Mark

stores, big box stores, and other potential suppliers. These suppliers will choose to purchase one of two types of licenses. The grocery store license will enable stores to sell an unlimited amount of wine, but no beer. The restaurant license will allow businesses to sell both wine and beer as long as the business maintains a restaurant in the building. In other words, grocery stores will be able to have the restaurant licenses as long as the stores have a separate restaurant area. Representative Mike Turzai has stated that when the transition is complete, “competition will take effect” and benefit Pennsylvanians. Despite his claim that the bill will help the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with increased competition, in fact, many of the bill’s provisions will hurt Pennsylvania’s beer breweries. Pennsylvania is home to many important breweries. The three most prominent are Yuengling, Troegs, and Victory. These businesses and others are worried that privatization will hurt their respective industries by giving an unfair advantage to the liquor and wine industries. An open letter to Pennsylvania lawmakers from Anheuser Busch, MillerCoors, The Pennsylvania Beer Association, and Brewers of Pennsylvania ad-

dressed these concerns. In the letter, the brewers call the bill “detrimental to the beer industry.” Since House Bill 790 would allow beer distributors to sell new products, they would have to accommodate to make new space for the new products. Beer products would likely lose half of their space to wine and spirits. The first 1,050 of 1,600 total licenses to sell wine and liquor would go to beer distributors, ensuring less demand for beer brewers’ products. The letter also claims that the current version of the bill would result in an “uneven playing field in the grocery store segment,” because grocery stores would be able to sell wine, but not beer. Even for grocery stores with restaurant licenses, beer would only be sold in the restaurant section in limited quantities, while wine, on the other hand, would be sold anywhere in the store. These provisions would discourage grocery stores from selling beer because they would have to spend time and money on the expensive upkeep and management of a restaurant. Governor Corbett’s original plan for the bill was for beer to be sold in grocery stores as well, but it was altered in part by Liquor Control Committee Chairman John Taylor. Representative Turzai claims that the purpose of the bill is to create competition where

the consumer wins. Yet the current version of the bill drastically expands wine and spirit sales, while barely increasing the beer industry. This plan could severely hobble beer brewers in the state. The current bill is not best for the people of Pennsylvania. An acceptable bill would allow beer to compete with wine and spirits. The actions taken by the Pennsylvania GOP are simply too rash. More moderate measures could be taken. Although Pennsylvania is only one of two states with solely publically owned stores, other states have found a compromise. Many states blend public and private stores, ensuring that everyone has access to a variety of choices. Wine and Spirits stores are in all of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties. Businesses in the middle of Pennsylvania may not find it profitable to sell liquor. The only places that would be likely to sell liquor in these areas are big-box stores and grocery stores, ensuring a poor selection for central Pennsylvania. These big businesses would inevitably push out smaller businesses that cannot compete with the low prices of the larger companies. Workers who deal with alcohol may currently receive livable wages, but wages will most likely decrease with the proliferation of big-box stores and grocery stores involved in the beer and liquor business. Governor Corbett and the GOP are rushing to get privatization passed. In this rush, they forget they could choose a middle-road. A wise bill would take a moderate approach, mixing private and public interests. Jack Barnett is a fourth-year student majoring in history and political science. He can be reached at JB723722@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 16

THE QUAD

APRIL 22, 2013

Greek Week Pictures

Photo by Jose Mestre

Photo by Jose Mestre

Photo by Brooke Hillman

Outstanding Faculty Reception

was hosted by the Honors Student Association for professors that were nominated by students for excellence on campus. Photo by Brooke Hillman

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DON’T GET CAUGHT IN APRIL SHOWERS Enroll in Direct Deposit of your student refund From WCU to Your Bank to YOU! No lines ~ No paper checks Why wait for a rainy day? ENROLL NOW via the new link your myWCU account!

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PAGE 18

The Quad Crossword

THE QUAD

APRIL 22, 2013

Classifieds

VISIT WCUQUAD.COM TO SEE YOUR AD HERE

How to Place Classified Advertising in the Quad

Apts/Lofts/Rooms

To place a classified ad in The Quad, visit www. wcuquad.com, and click “classifieds.” Then enter your ad exactly as you wish it to appear, select a category, choose dates of publication, and pay for your ad with any major credit card on our secure 1 BR APT $1000 server. The rate for classified advertising is 30 cents per word, with a minimum of 20 words ($6 mini- 5 MI FROM WCU NEW! mum charge). Deadline for placing classified advertisements in The Quad is 11 a.m. on the Sunday 500 Sq/ft, Lrg Bed, Lrg kitch, Off str. before publication. prkg, No Pets/SmokRead The Quad online at wcuquad.com ing, 570-807-1899

Across 1 Medical amts. 4 Be accountable (for) 10 Remove, as coupons 14 Ernst collaborator 15 Electronic music genre 16 Spherical opening? 17 Titanic compartment on the lowest level 19 “All __”: 1931 tune 20 Height: Pref. 21 Lord’s Prayer opener 22 Arterial trunk 24 __ León: Monterrey’s state 26 Setup of a sort 29 Okay 31 Okay 32 Project, with “out” 33 Mediterranean capital 36 Farm female 37 Drive-in offering, and what 17-, 26-, 50- or 60-Across has, in more ways than one 41 1% of a cool mil 42 Lethargic 43 Stein filler 44 Poet’s contraction 46 Discography entries 50 Country kitchen design option

54 Wash softly against 55 Words after “What a coincidence!” 56 Muppet friend of Elmo 58 Poet’s preposition 59 Italian carmaker 60 Verify 63 “Poppycock!” 64 Find, as a frequency 65 Whopper, e.g. 66 Very dark 67 It has its ups and downs 68 Family guy Down 1 Poolside structure 2 Springtime bloomer 3 Tapering tops 4 Wore (away) 5 Fiery emperor? 6 Clean with effort 7 Fingerprint ridge 8 Ambient music pioneer Brian 9 Parmesan alternative 10 A minor, for one 11 Didn’t quite close 12 Childish 13 Slapstick prop 18 Film Volkswagen with “53”

painted on it 23 Singular 25 Mark on an otherwise perfect record? 27 Place in the earth 28 Hot time in France 30 Dawn-dusk link 34 Like the ‘80s look, now 35 Tabloid subj. 36 Spa treatment 37 Aspect of paranoia 38 Person in the know 39 Therapists’ org. 40 Cultivate 41 Smidge 44 Unit of resistance 45 Official orders 47 Defended, as family honor 48 Brady Bunch girl 49 Fed the fire 51 Cartoonist Guisewite or her title character 52 Depleted layer 53 Blooms for lovers 57 “¿Cómo __?” 59 Justice Dept. division 61 Wish one hadn’t 62 Udder woman? Solution on page 19

THANK YOU WCU STUDENTS You emailed, wrote letters, & sent postcards to The Chancellor of the State System of Higher Education, Your local legislators, & The Governor To support public education funding and A fair faculty/coach contract.

Please continue to support public higher education! www.facebook.com/apscuf


APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD

PAGE 19

The Quad SuDoKu

Fill in the grid so that each of the numbers 1 - 9 appears once and only once in each row, each column, and each 3x3 square.

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THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Entertainment QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

APRIL 22, 2013

Follow the Quad on Twitter! @TheQuadWCU

Box-office hit preserves Jackie Robinson’s legacy Rob Gabe Special to The Quad

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ounding third and heading for home, the new Jackie Robinson biopic, “42,” hit it out of the park, making a whopping $27 million at the box-office in its first weekend. The film put a damper on the fifth installment of the tired and unimaginative “Scary Movie” franchise, which did not click with audiences and fell to second place. The week belonged to “42” both on the field, and at the box office. This Monday, April 15, marked the annual celebration of Robinson and his lasting mark on the MLB. Every member of the Brooklyn Dodgers sports Robinson’s legendary number on their uniforms as part of the tribute. The timing of the film’s release was on point, gathering baseball fanatics to celebrate the icon’s towering legacy. Did the film live up to the man? Mostly.

“42” only adequately portrays the story of Robinson; it never quite claims the status of “Best Baseball Biopic,” though you can tell it is trying. Ultimately, it plays out too much like a made-fortelevision film. However, it does get a lot right in the process. The film boasts an extremely pleasing and dedicated performance by newcomer Chadwick Boseman. Boseman has, up until recently, only starred in television shows like Fox’s “Fringe” and FX’s “Justified.” As the most welcoming addition to the cast, Boseman exhibits a performance worthy of accolades and praise that, in turn, lives up to Robinson’s name. His charm and on-screen charisma help pull the film through its wandering moments. “42” displays some of the struggles Robinson had to withstand while pursuing the pennant alongside The Dodgers. In more than one sce-

nario, we see Robinson being taunted by racists’ opinions. In these scenes, Boseman deeply channels Robinson’s conflicted restraint while having to tolerate an earful of racial slurs. At this point, the audience has become enamored with Jackie as an individual and his struggles become agonizingly difficult to process. Robinson is even subjected to hearing harsh racial language thrown at him during a game against our own Phillies! Philadelphia manager, Ben Chapman, played by Alan Tudyk, becomes harrowing to endure. Like Robinson, the audience will feel restless after being exposed to Chapman’s consistently crude behavior. Luckily, this leads to a muchjustified situation where Chapman is referred to as a “Redneck piece of…” The script, produced by writer and director Brian Helgeland, is nearly flawless. In the past, Helgeland penned some

of the silver screen’s most acclaimed films. Both “L.A Confidential” and “Mystic River” stand as two of his most renowned scripts. His work with “42” is no different. Any dispute over the quality of the film can hardly be applied to the writing. Aside from the journalist, Wendell Smith, who disappears from a leading role to a secondary character halfway through the picture, the plot is all top-notch. Smith’s opening narration bestowed a weighty presence before disappearing for the the remaining runtime. Another strong attribute is the film’s impressive replication of the time period—particularly the faithfully rendered Ebbets Field. All the set pieces look accurate and are likely to evoke nostalgic bliss for anyone who remembers the location. Watching Robinson steal bases, aggravate pitchers, and slide onto plates is exhilarating,

as well as comical to watch. More comic relief comes from the relationship Jackie has with his teammates, specifically regarding team showers. While there is plenty to enjoy about “42,” it also suffers from problematic constraints that keep it from truly reaching its potential. To reiterate, the film at times gives the impression of a cable TV movie. The indoor sets are cheap; they look too clean for the time period. Most distinctively, “42” meanders through its predictable plot without having to do much. If you have seen any type of sports film before, it will not be hard to figure out where this one is going. There is an overuse of Mark Isham’s score to an almost corny effect. The violins swirl and horns ascend during the tender moments making an emotional experience feel manipulative and tacky. Harrison Ford gives an unusually hammy per-

formance as Robinson’s manager Branch Rickey. In short, “42” has the feeling of a Disney movie at times. It was said at one point that Spike Lee had acquired the rights to adapt a Robinson biopic. It is interesting to think about how that film may have turned out. In any case, there is no reason a baseball aficionado will not mildly enjoy “42” as a film. Its most valuable aspect is that it carries heart and serves as a competent tribute to one of America’s most idolized sports figures. Expectations should be lowered, however, as it is not the end-all, be-all of baseball flicks. At any cost, “42” does not diminish Robinson’s legendary status as one of sport’s greatest icons, and it should be a welcome addition to the genre. Robert Gabe is a second-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RG770214@wcupa.edu.

Dress for Success Fashion Show is a big hit T

Catia Rembert Special to The Quad

alking about professionalism can often be repetitive and boring. You always hear the same information about preparing your resume, being able to network, and dressing appropriately for the

workplace; but the Career Development Center and the Office of Multicultural Affairs have found a way to make things more interesting. On Thursday, April 18, the CDC and the OMA partnered with Sisters United, Precise, Black Student Union, and

the Black Latino Greek Council to present the Dress for Success Fashion Show. The main goal of the show was to let everyone know that it is possible to incorporate your personality and style into your workplace wardrobe. The best part about the

showcase was that the students controlled everything and made it as relatable as possible. It was refreshing to be at an informational event for the students that were given by the students. Not only did we hear that your wardrobe is important from the day that you

interview to the day that you leave your job, but we saw its importance as well. Everything kicked off with mock interviews that informed everyone of interview tips such as these: show up with your resume in hand, be able to speak about all of your work experience, be able

to name your strengths and weakness, and lastly, dress to impress! The next portion focused on getting an outfit together that was both professional and personal. Janet Sackey, who also styled sev-

See FASHION SHOW page 21


APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Celebrities born this month month: Troy Polamalu

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FASHION SHOWcontinued from page20

eral of the outfits in the show, explained how color choice can help with both. Remember to do the following: 1) Steer away from wearing bright colors because they can be inappropriate and too loud in the workplace environment. 2) Since bright colors are a no-go, try to remain neutral. Brenden Sams from Precise said that light blues, greys, white, beige, black, and brown are good ways to do this. 3) If you want to spice up your otherwise dull ON SHOWwork clothes, statement accessories can always

page 21

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make a big difference. For men, the tie, belt, or watch can spice things up, while women can rely on a statement necklace, ring, or bracelet. Another significant point that was made was to dress according to the culture of a particular job. This point was best made by the models dressed from different professions. There was the IT employee in his relaxed khaki pants, collared shirt, and comfortable shos. Then it was fashionista’s turn.She wore a sleeveless burgundy halter dress with jewels on the neck. Members in the audience also had a chance to dress models themselves and talk

about their personal style choices. The most important lesson of the entire show was to be able to express who you are as a person wherever you go. If people cannot access who you are as an individual, then they will not be able to gather how you can help them, or the rest of their team. First impressions are often the most important and your clothes are a major part of that expression. So before you think about what you will say about yourself, think about what your clothes are saying for you. Catia Rembert is a second-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at CR 776429@wcupa.edu.

Joshua Shapiro Staff Writer

ong after the fall of the steel curtain, Troy Polamalu continues to instill fear in the hearts of opposing offenses week in and week out. The ruthlessly strong safety has been a perfect fit on a Pittsburgh football team that features a long-standing history of ranking among the league leaders on defense. For the Steelers, the old adage “defense wins championships” could not be more true, and Polamalu has been the anchor for a Steeler defense that has gone on to win two championships in the past 10 years. Born on April 19, 1981 in Garden Grove, California, Troy Polamalu, born Troy Aumua, is the youngest of Suila Polamalu’s five children. Divorced shortly after Troy’s birth, Suila was tasked with raising all five children on her own. The role of a single parent soon became overwhelming and her older children began to get in trouble with the law. Fearing Troy would also head down the wrong path, Suila agreed to allow him to live with his Uncle in Tenmile, Oregon. While in Oregon, Polamalu attended Douglas High School where he played basketball, football, and baseball. There was no doubt, even as early as age 14, he possessed a level of athleticism which far exceeded most

of his teammates. His talent did not go unnoticed, and in 1999, Polamalu received a full athletic scholarship to play for the Trojans at the University of Southern California. After spending almost four years with the Trojans and receiving numerous awards for his play at USC, he was selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the first round of the 2003 NFL draft.

Bowl. However, despite being one of the most tenacious players on the field, outside of football, Polamalu is as gentle as they come. Polamalu enjoys a quiet life and strives to distance himself from the glamorous lifestyle which often accompanies being a professional athlete. He realizes there is a life outside of football, stating, “I take pride in my life—my wife, www.leanblitz.net

To say it did not take long for the young safety to make an impact would be a vast understatement. Only a year after being drafted, Polamalu was voted into his first Pro Bowl. Two years after that, he hoisted the Vince Lombardi trophy into the air, an achievement many great players are never able to obtain. Now a seasoned veteran, Polamalu is being compared to some of the greatest safeties to have ever played the game. This is not surprising when considering his resume features two league championships, five all-pro selections, and seven trips to the Pro

my family. I try my best not to have football define the person that I am.” Joshua Shapiro is a second-year student majoring in English and education. He can be reached at JS762110@wcupa.edu.

Find out how much Polamalu’s hair is worth by scanning this QR code:


PAGE 22

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

APRIL 22, 2013

Gosling’s latest may become a modern classic Rob Gabe Special to The Quad

If you choose to see Ryan Gosling’s new drama, “The Place Beyond the Pines,” this week, you might be getting three films for the price of one. That is how wide in scope director Derek Cianfrance’s second feature film is. Spanning over numerous decades and generations of fathers and sons, it is a gripping crime thriller that is completely fearless in its ambition. The story is told in an awe-inspiring fashion, but to reveal how it does this would be a disservice to the experience. In an effort to get the most out of the film, it is best to go in without knowing much. That said, it is still feasible to discuss the extraordinary strengths of the film without getting into spoiler territory. First thing’s first: Cianfrance’s debut film, “Blue Valentine,” would not be a bad starting point before approaching “The Place Beyond the Pines.” In “Blue Valentine,” Cianfrance shows his talents for showcasing raw human drama. He has done the same with “Pines,” and in the process has incorporated elements of the heist film. What makes Cianfrance’s works so powerful is their documentary-like feel, which gives the impression we are watching real people. The camera follows the characters as if we are witnessing their lives, and not watching a glossed-up Hollywood picture. The entire experience feels naturalistic, and most importantly genuine. It is challenging to come to the realization you are not watching the corrosion of a person’s life. That is how convincing the picture feels at times. If you are enthusiastic about

the technicalities of film, pay attention to the masterfully crafted opening tracking shot. It is quite a marvel how they managed to pull it off. Gosling is the clear-cut shining star of the film, and you will not be able to take your eyes off him. In one of his most outstanding roles yet, his character evokes sympathy while at the same time puts fear into the hearts of the audience. He plays a tough-as-nails, though still vulnerable, tattooed stunt-rider with an almost troubling fatherly perseverance. Bradley Cooper also soars as a morally troubled rookie cop, who happens to get tangled into the intricacy of Gosling’s scheme. Eva Mendes crafts a notably impressive performance as the mother to Gosling’s child. A heavy amount of the film’s emotional weight is achieved from her character. Lastly, we have both Dane DeHaan and Ben Mendelsohn who verify themselves as two rising Hollywood stars to look out for. Ray Liotta also makes an appearance because what is a proper crime film without him? Moral ambiguity lingers over every frame of the film. Ethical boundaries are explored without judgment. There are no pronounced “good guys” or “bad guys.” Characters give you a reason to both admire and detest them. At one moment, a character’s motivation may foment bitter criticism. However, the viewers may find themselves exchanging those accusations for empathetic pity as the film advances. Gosling’s character, in particular, stands as the film’s gleaming anti-hero, and what a memorable anti-hero he is! His performance is sometimes remi-

niscent of the role he was given in Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Drive” in 2011, but still stands on its own as a separate experience. The film frequently analyzes the bond between father and son to a poetic caliber. Multiple, subtle parallels are constant throughout the film, and discovering these moments of subdued beauty is chillinducing. The dauntingly grand mythology could be the only setback keeping audiences from embracing it entirely. “Pines” is a monster of a film and its length will no doubt have viewers asking where it is headed and when it will wrap up. Various times, I mistakenly thought it was coming to a close, only for the film to keep progressing further. Cianfrance was seeking to paint a portrait of a colossal saga. All scenes serve an applicable purpose and cutting the film 20-something minutes shorter, which most likely could have been done, would only be detrimental to the overall product. Regardless, viewers are going to feel the runtime. For some, this may have them itching towards the exit doors and “Pines” may feel like an exhausting experience. For others, the sentimental toll of the story will take them by storm and leave them emotionally drained. Dealing with issues of family, parenthood and consequences, “The Place Beyond the Pines” is a monumental achievement and one of the most ambitious epics in recent memory. Recurring allegorical themes come full circle and attest to a clear narrative direction. Cianfrance has this story mapped out from the beginning. It is so jampacked that it could have been a trilogy or a mini-

series. Cianfrance does not falter for a second or let the harsh undertaking delude his grand vision. He aspires for greatness and executes it flawlessly. Some may dispute that

the film’s final acts never reach the strength of the first half of the film, but no one can say they do not put in the effort. By all means, “The Place Beyond the Pines” is the first truly

spectacular film of 2013 and a new modern classic. It is hard to stop thinking about it. Robert Gabe is a second-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RG770214@ wcupa.edu.

www.digitalspy.com

Gosling racks up another incredibly real performance in “The Place Beyond the Pines,” along with his talented co-star, Eva Mendes.

Interested in writing for the Quad Entertainment section? E-mail quadentertainment @wcupa.edu


m of 2013 rn classic. p thinking

d-year student cation studies. RG770214@

Alumni Weekend is a great opportunity for Students to network with WCU Alumni, meet new people, and these are all Free events!

Business & Public Affairs Alumni Reunion Time: April 27th, 4 - 6 p.m. Location: Behind Ruby Jones Hall, Academic Quad Carnival & BBQ for Alumni and Students Time: April 28th, 12 - 3 p.m. Location: Residential Quad (in-between Sykes and Lawrence) Maggie Tripp Annual Day of Service Time: April 28th, 3 - 5 p.m. Location: Ehringer Gym Details: Students and alumni will join forces and complete service projects together for the campus and community!

Spring Football Game Time: April 27th, 12 p.m. Location: Farrell Stadium

Outdoor Classroom & Garden Tours Time: April 27th, 12 - 4 p.m. Location: Schmucker Science Center Planetarium Shows Time: April 27th, 1 p.m. & 2:30 p.m. Location: Schmucker Science Center Nursing Alumni Reunion Time: April 27th, 2 - 4 p.m. Location: Alumni House Recitation Hall’s 120th Birthday Party Time: April 27th, 2 - 4 p.m. Location: Room 301 Recitation Hall

For more information visit us on FACEBOOK, TWITTER or our website www.wcualumni.org


PAGE 24

Lauren Grow Special to The Quad

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n May 4, the College of Performing Arts will be hosting its first Arts Festival at West Chester University from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the E.O. Bull Center and Swope Music Building. The Arts Festival is a result of a collaboration between students’ capstone projects and faculty leaders’ own projects. The event has grown into a huge project with over 200 artists working together to make this event a success. The Arts Festival incorporates all forms of art, including music, dance, creative writing, visual art, and theater. The festival will have food for visitors and opportunities for visitors to make art of their own.

THE QUAD

College of Performing Arts gears up to premier its first Arts Festival The Arts Festival will where anyone can help feature over 30 individ- him create a beautiful ual student art projects paint canvas from April and faculty-led projects. 22-May 4, so keep an eye Nick Burns, a sophomore out. Also, Burns will be Graphic participating in D e s i g n Photo by Lauren Grow the “Meet the major, Artists” porw i l l tion of the Arts have his Festival on May paint4, so stop by to ings feameet the artist tured at behind the colthe Arts orful canvas. Festival. Interested in Burns a live narrative enjoys performance? splatterFreshmen Ana painting Amand, Joshua a n d Fetzer, and views it Erin Yentz, all as a way Nick Burns’ “Organic Chemistry” majoring in to ex- will be featured at the festival. Studio Art and press his Education, will emotions and take a break be performing together at from stress. Burns will be this year’s Arts Festival. doing a “Splatter Paint- The three artists will be ing in the Quad” activity presenting a narrative-

performance called “The Fire in the Phoenix.” This piece tells the story of the Russian fairytale, “The Firebird,” a tale of love’s betrayal and eventual success. The performance will include a mix of fine art scenery, costume, and a dance-based plot line. The Arts Festival also welcomes caricature artist, Kat Stahl. The senior is a Music Education and French Horn Performance double major at WCU and has extreme skill in caricature drawing. Stahl draws caricatures at Dorney Park during her summers. She will be at the

Arts Festival May 4 from 10:15 -11:00 a.m. drawing caricatures for audience members. Some highlyanticipated acts include t h e W C U Gracenotes, an allfemale a c a pella group, the senior art show, and the unveiling of a new art mural on the side of the E.O. Bull Center. At the Festival, there will also be Latin Jazz, comedic improv, open mics, and more. The Arts Festival will

APRIL 22, 2013

become a yearly event and its goal is to promote the arts on campus and to show that “The Arts are Alive.” Begin paying attention around campus to artists popping up in some unlikely places to promote the Arts Festival and the importance of art in our lives. Make sure to stop by the Arts Festival here at West Chester on May 4 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at E.O. Bull and the Swope building. For more information, “Like” the “West Chester University Arts Fest” page on Facebook and visit wcuart.tumblr.com for pictures and profiles on the artists of WCU. Lauren Grow is a first-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at LG781107@ wcupa.edu.

Chi Cheng, Deftones bassist, dies at 42 Jeffrey Holmes Special to The Quad

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car crash in 2008 had forced Chi Cheng, the bassist from alternative metal veterans the Deftones, into a coma for the past five years. On April 13, 2013, his heart finally gave out. His fans, bandmates, and his family have all expressed a sadness over a great loss in the music world. His mother said this to his fans on his passing, “I know that you will always remember him as a giant of a man on stage with a heart for every one of you.” Cheng had served as the band’s bass player from 1995’s Adrenaline to 2006’s Saturday Night Wrist. His playing can be heard on some of

the band’s most famous tunes, such as “Change (in the House of Flies),” “Minerva,” and “Hole in the Earth.” In addition to being a respected bassist, Cheng was a poet. The year 2006 also brought out The Bamboo Parachute, a collection of spoken word poetry by Cheng, available on CD format. Perhaps he will best be remembered for his performance and songwriting contributions on the Deftones’s 2000 album White Pony, which remains the band’s most highly-acclaimed album to date. The Deftones were founded in 1988 and they are no strangers to the music scene. Often credited for helping to pioneer the genre of nu-metal, alongside acts like Korn,

Staind, and Coal Chamber, the Deftones drew influences from a variety of musicians. The band

Bloody Valentine, and layering them with the thick churn of distorted seven and eight string guitars.

www.oneloveforchi.com

Chi Cheng died last week after spending five years in a coma. is best known for creating ethereal synthesizer textures, reminiscent of shoegaze groups like My

As the band’s career progressed, they garnered critical acclaim for songwriting and musicianship.

The group has released several successful singles that have earned airtime on radio, such as “My Own Summer (Shove It)” and “Hole in the Earth.” The band’s career was looking best in the year 2000, which brought the group a Grammy award for their single “Elite” from the band’s highly-acclaimed and experimental White Pony. Critics praised the record for singer Chino Moreno’s vocal talents, as well as the band’s experimentation with layers, dissonance, and polyrhythms, oftentimes utilizing special effects with guitars and synthesizers to produce lush, dream-like sounds. After achieving status as innovators in the music industry with their

Grammy win, a myriad of tours, late night show appearances, and albums ensued, further cementing the band’s legacy. The group’s path hit an uncertainty in 2008 when Chi Cheng got into the car accident that finally claimed his life this year. Currently, former Quicksand bassist Sergio Vega has taken Cheng’s place on electric bass and backing vocals for the Deftones. The band will continue on, but its members will not forget the impact Chi Cheng had on their careers and their lives, helping to craft the sound that created a legend in the music industry. Jeffrey Holmes is a first-year student majoring in Secondary Education for English. He can be reached at JH791223@wcupa.edu.


APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 25

Wendle’s promising career brings him through Wilmington By Ariel Senko Special to The Quad

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ast week, Joe Wendle, alum of the Golden Rams’ 2012 Division II Champion baseball team, was in town to play second base for the Carolina Mudcats (a Cleveland Indians minor league affiliate) as they took on the Wilmington Blue Rocks. The Quad caught Joe on the phone to hear about his experiences since signing with the Cleveland Indians last summer. Q: Since when have you been with the Mudcats? A: The last day of March. I’ve been playing with them for about two weeks now. Q: Has the learning curve been pretty steep over the last threefourths of the year, or has it been not so bad? A: A little bit of both. As far as the lifestyle goes—playing seven days a week, being on the road, being away from your family, learning how to

get yourself ready for a game every single day— that’s a steep learning curve. And playing is also, but I think playing for the summer leagues that I did in college did a really good job of preparing me—swinging a wood bat in those leagues was very helpful. So, yeah, there’s a very steep learning curve, but a lot of people are going through it at the same time, so it makes it easier. Q: Playing so close to West Chester, you had a lot of friends and fans in the audience. How was that? A: It was a lot of fun. I wish we would have been able to win a couple games for them. I saw people I hadn’t seen in years—people from my high school, people from my hometown, people from college, people from all over—and it was really good just to say “hi” to them and to see them, even if it’s just for a couple seconds. It’s awesome to have such a support system, to have so many people who are following you and care what

you’re doing. It’s meant a lot for me to see that, to see all those people there. Q: Is there any way in particular that your game has improved since last spring? A: I really focused on my arm strength, throwingwise, and also my speed. I thought those were two areas that I needed to focus on in the off-season. So, I like to think that I improved in both of those. Q: Are there any cool perks to playing in the minor leagues that you’ve come across? A: Cool perks…let me think. Well, I like the fact that you can get your bats for free. That’s one thing. I enjoy just playing, the fact that you get to play every day. Sometimes, baseball people talk about it being a grind or something like that, but any time you get to come out and play a game every day of your life is really not a grind. I’m just thankful for every opportunity that I get and I look forward to doing what I do every day. Q: Do you really play milb.com

While pictured here with the Mahoning Valley Scrappers, Wendle has since moved up to the Carolina Mudcats team. In three games against the Blue Rocks this week he drew four walks and had two RBI.

The Daily News

Joe Wendle defends second base against a potential base stealer. This past week, Wendle’s team played two games in Wilmington against the Blue Rocks. He had two hits, including a double, this past week. seven days a week? A: Yeah, we play seven days a week. We play a 140-game schedule in about 150 days, so we get about 10 off days throughout the course of the season. Right now, we’re in the middle of a 24-game stretch without an off day, so we do get off days, but maybe once every other week or so. Q: Wow. I’m guessing that you would get tired physically, but I guess maybe if you’re not playing the same amount every game… A: Well, the thing is, it’s baseball, so not to say that it’s not physically taxing on you…but if it was a game like football, obviously we wouldn’t be able to do it every day. It’s very important to take care of your body, make sure you’re keeping up with your lifts, make sure you’re eating well, staying hydrated, make sure you’re stretching properly, and just doing all the little things to make sure that you’re ready for that game.

Q: What are your teammates like? A: My team is fun. We all have a good time together. As much as we see each other on the field, we also hang out together off the field. I like to go fishing, so me and a couple guys will go fishing sometimes in the morning if we have an off day. Everyone’s got their own personality. Q: So, they let you take your fishing stuff with you, or do you fish just when you’re in North Carolina? A: Actually, I’m driving my truck back down today, or tomorrow morning, probably, and I’ll bring all my fishing stuff there so I can go out with the other guys. Q: How much can you expect to earn in your first year? A: We make about $1,500 a month. As you move up, you make more. Q: I’m sure that your brothers are two of your biggest fans…did you guys play baseball a lot together growing

up? A: Yeah, I was always playing with my brothers when I was growing up. I’m actually in my front yard right now—this is where we used to play stick ball every day. I would always go to their games. They were always playing with me and were always teaching me things…how to hit…how to throw…how to field— and both our parents, too. My mom used to throw the ground balls, and my dad was my coach all through Little League, and they’ve all been my biggest supporters throughout my college career, pro career, and even when I was six years old. I was always playing baseball, every day that I could. Q: So that was the sport for you guys? A: That was the sport. I played soccer in high school, and I wrestled, too, but we were always a baseball family. It’s just the way we were raised. Never turned back since. Ariel Senko can be reached at AS789406@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 26

THE QUAD SPORTS

APRIL 22, 2013

Late-game heroics help WCU earn split vs. Shippensburg Riley Wallace

Asst. Sports Editor

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irst baseman Chris Pula capped off the comeback in the second game of a doubleheader against Shippensburg Saturday with a walk-off double in the seventh to give the Rams the 9-8 victory. Game 1 between West Chester (18-14-1) and Shippensburg (20-17) also featured late inning fireworks, this time seeing the Raiders come through in their final at-bat. Second baseman Justin Lamborn got things started in the first with a triple to right center, scoring right fielder Jack Provine and giving the Rams the early 1-0 lead. The bats went quiet for the next four innings until Shippensburg pushed one across in the sixth to tie it up at one. The Rams answered right back with one of their own with Provine scoring again, this time on Pula single to center. In the seventh, the Raiders got to pitcher Joe Gunkel as they scored

four runs on four hits to take a 5-2 lead. In the bottom half, West Chester managed one but that was all as they dropped game 1 5-3. Gunkel (5-3) picked up the loss in a complete game effort. He allowed five runs, four earned, off nine hits while sending down six Raiders on strikes. The offense managed just five hits with no Rams batter registering more than one. Provine scored two of West Chester’s three runs despite not recording a hit as he was hit by pitches twice. For the second game in a row, West Chester struck in the first with Lamborn once again doing the damage. His triple to right center plated both Provine and center fielder Mike Raimo. Lamborn stretched the lead to 3-0 when he scored on a passed ball in the next at-bat. Shippensburg retaliated in the second with four runs to take the lead but it would be short lived. In West Chester’s half of the second a throwing error and a Lamborn double allowed three more runs to score with Provine and

Raimo once again benefiting from a Lamborn extra base hit. A four-run top of the fourth gave Shippensburg the lead back 8-6. In the sixth the Golden Rams pulled within one when Provine scored on Pula’s double down the right field line. The Rams tied it up in the seventh with Provine’s two-out single through the right side, scoring pinch runner Ben Spezialetti. Provine advanced to second when Lamborn was hit by a pitch bringing Pula to the plate with a chance to win it. Pula’s double down the right field line sealed the deal as Provine scored easily from second to give West Chester the 9-8 victory. With the win, West Chester improves to 12-1 in games decided by one run. Kyle Weary (3-0) pushed his ERA to a remarkable 0.39 with a solid seventh inning in relief of Fred Breidenbach. Breidenbach gave up eight runs over six innings off nine hits while walking one and striking out three. The Raiders couldn’t find a way to keep Provine and Lamborn off the base paths as the two

Photo by Jose Mestre

combined to go eight for nine with five runs scored and five runs batted in. After traveling to Shippensburg Sunday for a doubleheader, the Rams will stay on the road when they face Wilmington University (30-12) in rematch of the Bill Giles Tournament where the Wildcats defeated West Chester 165. The Golden Rams will wrapped the week up with four games versus first place Millersville (28-11). Sitting two games back of the first-place Marauders presents the opportunity for the Rams to overtake Millersville during the two home games on Friday and the two road games on Saturday.

Photo by Jose Mestre

Riley Wallace is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at RW718681@ wcupa.edu.

The Golden Rams huddle up before a game against Ship. The team is two games back from rivals Millersville in the standings but will play a home-and-home doubleheader against them this week.

Want to get ahead this summer?

Take online classes or enroll in an online program at Clarion University Choose from three associate’s and seven bachelor’s degrees at www.clarion.edu/online Get a class list at www.clarion.edu/summer For more information:

Junior outfielder Mike Raimo hits the ball against Shippensburg. Raimo had two hits, including a double, in the two games against the Raiders. He added an RBI and two runs scored as well.

Call 800-672-7171 or e-mail admissions@clarion.edu Clarion University is an affirmative action equal opportrunity employer.


APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 27

Hughes takes javelin to headline dominant performance in track & field By Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Special to The Quad

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he West Chester Golden Rams men’s and women’s track and field teams did phenomenal this past week, producing multiple winners at West Chester’s Invitational inside John A. Farrell Stadium. The Golden Rams men’s team had a big winner in Nick Drozd, winning two events for West Chester University. Drozd, a junior, placed first in the 400m dash at the invitational, clocking in at 49.17 seconds. Drozd also won the 400m hurdles at the event, finishing them in 55.48 seconds. Alex Foulke, a sophomore, came in second place in the 400m dash, clock-

ing in at 50.21 seconds, while Domonik Brown, a senior, came in eighth in the competition, finishing in 52.09 seconds. Ryan Karli, a senior, and Mark van Teyens, a freshman, finished in second and fifth place for the hurdles, respectively. Karli finished in 56.21, while Teyens finished in 56.92. The men’s team also had other first place winners, including the 4x400 relay team. The team finished their relay in three minutes and 22.02 seconds to take home first place. Elsewhere in the field events, Joe DeCecco, a freshman, won the high jump for the Golden Rams, reaching 6 feet, 2 ¾ inches to come in first. Tyler Espey, a sophomore, won the javelin by a throw of 172-09.

Eric Hunter, a sophomore, also had a good day, placing third in the high jump by clearing 6 ¾ feet. To add to that, Hunter also received second place in the pole vault competition, clearing 14-7 ¾ feet. Sean Sebeck, a senior, won the 10,000m run for the distance events, clearing the distance in 33:40.87. Behind him was the Golden Rams’ own Chris Bucci, who came in second place with a time of 34:10.84. The women’s track and field team for West Chester more than held their own as well, with the 4x100m and 4x400m relay teams winning their respective events. Randi Boothe, a junior, dominated the competition, winning both the 100m and 200m races in 12.03

second and 25.22 seconds. Nicole Smith, a senior, won the 800m race in two minutes, 15.67 seconds. Amanda Hughes, a sophomore, won the javelin for the women’s squad, winning with a throw of 118-11. Hughes also participated in the discus, coming in third with a 118-9. Also placing in the javelin competition was Lauren Farrisi, who came in sixth place with a throw of 101-10. Both the men’s and women’s track and field teams go on to East Stroudsburg University for their next competition. Oliver Suskin-Santarelli is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at OS753461@wcupa. edu. Photo by Scott Rowan

Men eighth, Gabby Couture second to lead golf teams By Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Special to The Quad

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he West Chester University Golden Rams men’s golf team placed eighth at the 50th Annual Cecil C. Spadafora Invitational hosted by Indiana University of Pensylvania on Monday, April 15. The men’s team shot a 315 of the second day of the invitational, bringing their total to 615. Connor Lefever, a junior at West Chester, finished the tournament with a final score of 153, shooting a 76 on day two of the invitational. Lefever’s 76 on day two was the lowest score on the Golden Rams squad. Griffith Basehore, a senior, scored a 77 on Monday, bringing his overall tally to 150 in the tournament, the lowest

total score for the Golden Rams. Eric Slawter, a sophomore, pulled together a score of 152. Slawter shot 79 on day two of the tournament. Between the three, Bashore finished 16th individually in the tournament, with Slawter and Lefever placing in at 18th and 21st, respectively. Other notable Golden Rams included Ryan Fogel, a sophomore, and Danny Walck, a senior, both scoring an 83 of day two of the tournament. Fogel had a final score of 160 for the tournament overall, while Walck had a final score of 166. The men’s team will head to the Challenge at Mystic Rock for their next tournament. The tournament will be held in Farmington, Pennsylvania. This will be the men’s last tournament

before NCAA Regionals begin, as well as NCAA Nationals. Meanwhile, for the West Chester University women’s golf team, sophomore Gabby Couture placed second overall in the Mike Bello Invitational, hosted by LeMoyne College in New York. It was one of Couture’s best performances, scoring an 82 on the second day of the event, and bringing her total to 166 for the invitational. Other Golden Rams who had solid outings at the tournament included junior Nicole Cavalcante, who shot a 92 on Sunday, bringing Cavalcante’s total to 172. Jenna Hopkins, a sophomore, managed to score a 94 on the second day of the tournament. Hopkins closed out the tournament with a final score of 183.

wcupagoldenrams.com

Sophomore Gabby Couture led West Chester’s women’s golf team, taking second in the Mike Bello Invitational. She shot a 166 over two days. West Chester University’s women’s golf team finishes up its season soon, with their last outing being a one-day event at East Stroudsburg at the East Stroudsburg

Invitational. With the weather clearing up and the sun starting to come out more often, in contrast to the snowy climate the Golden Rams had to face in New York, expect

the women’s team to finish their season on a solid note. Oliver Suskin-Santarelli is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at OS753461@wcupa. edu.


Hello, Treasurers! The 2013-2014 SGA Organization Budget Proposal is now available on OrgSync! You may access the document by going to the SGA OrgSync Portal, clicking on 'files' and about halfway down the list is the Excel Document entitled '2013-2014 Budget Proposal'. A hard copy of the proposal is listed below. Should you have a discrepancy with your allocation amount, there is an appeals process that will take place April 15th- April 29th. You may schedule a meeting with me to discuss your line item budget with reasoning as to why your organization received the proposed amount. You will then schedule an appeals hearing with the Finance Committee on one of the following dates: April 15, 2013 April 22, 2013 April 29, 2013 Thank you to all of you that you submitted your budgets this year. We wish your organization the best of luck for the upcoming academic year! Accounting Club Active Minds Adapted Phyical Activities AFRISA Alchemist American Inst. Graph Art American Marketing Assoc Animal Behavior Anime Club Anthropology Art Association Assoc for Women's Empow. Astronomy Club Athletic Training Best Buddies Black Latino Greek Council Black Men United Black Student Union CALYPSO Campus Covenant Fellow. Campus Crusade Chinese Club Circle K College Democrats College Republican Computer Science Criminal Justice Daedalus Dance Company Dance Team Darlington Bio Club Earth Group Econ/Finance Society English/Iconoclast Exercise Science Forensics French Gender Studies Geography

$637 $1,762 $1,180 $850 $665 $1,100 $2,256 $841 $400 $2,779 $1,185 $5,200 $950 $1,943 $507 $5,500 $4,500 $20,000 $532 $950 $3,500 $950 $4,465 $1,957 $2,060 $950 $1,900 $4,417 $6,412 $2,500 $1,201 $2,850 $1,425 $753 $1,710 $19,000 $750 $1,140 $475

German Club Gospel Choir Grace Notes Habitat for Humanity Health & Phys Ed Hillel History Homecoming Honors Student Assoc IFC IGC Indo American Instit of Magt Acct International Justice Mis. Invisible Children Italian Club LASO Leadership (LEAD) LGBTQA Lutheran Student Assoc Marching Band Panhellenic Council Major Entertainment Muslim Student Assoc NABA NCTE Philosophy Poesis Political Science Precise Pre-Med Club PRSSA Psychology QUAD Rec Services Relay for Life Rotaract Russian SAC

$783 $4,960 $926 $1,042 $330 $1,055 $320 $14,582 $8,470 $9,762 $18,100 $681 $700 $950 $1,900 $475 $7,000 $31,213 $9,660 $590 $60,000 $9,275 $46,000 $950 $1,800 $1,485 $1,025 $615 $500 $1,580 $973 $570 $210 $20,000 $57,000 $8,000 $918 $1,650 $108,000

School of Music: American Choral Dir. American String Teachers Brass Chamber Winds Collegium Mus Concert Band Concert Choir Crits Flute Guitar Masterworks MTNA MENC Opera Theatre Percussion Wind Trumpet Swope Ensemble Symphonic Band Men's Choir University Chorale/Cantari Statesmen Jazz Symphonic Orchestra Vocal Jazz Choir (Chamber) Women's Choir

$1,900 $187 $1,900 $3,040 $580 $2,888 $2,897 $4,275 $1,900 $541 $2,660 $475 $1,710 $3,325 $3,325 $4,000 $4,000 $3,572 $4,000 $712 $900 $950 $2,468 $250 $500

Serpentine Sigma Sisters United SNAP Social Work Society of Physics Sociology Spanish Club Sports Club Council Student Dietetic Assoc Student OutR to Urb Sch’s

$10,000 $860 $4,500 $2,280 $2,850 $950 $950 $1,425 $58,120 $3,100 $975

Student Vet's Group Students for Sensible Drug UAve Math Club Union Adv Board Univ Ambassadors Univ/ Theatre W/M in Communications WCAEYC WCTV WCUR Women in Science

$1,140 $1,500 $230 $11,000 $1,544 $50,000 $2,162 $2,345 $475 $29,000 $437

For more information or any further questions, please contact Kaitlin Kearney, SGA Treasurer, at KK716720@wcupa.edu She will be able to answer any questions about the financial committee appeals process.


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THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 29

No. 5 Rams fall to top-ranked LIU-Post, bounce back vs. No. 13 IUP careers at West Chester. All 10 seniors started to commemorate the special day, and senior Jacquie est Chester’s Burke shined, scoring four women’s lacrosse goals on the day. Lauren team had a tall Glassey also scored four order this past weekend, goals of her own and cohaving to travel to IUP captain Tori Dugan had and Lock Haven, the two quite the game, recording teams tied with West three goals and six assists. Chester for first place in 17 of the 21 goals were rethe PSAC. IUP is 8-0 in corded by the seniors, a the PSAC and 11-0 overseemingly perfect game all. for the girls, especially Last season, the Rams after being handed their took care of the Crimson first defeat of the season Hawks with a convincing the game before. 23-8 victory. Following the victory This season was no difagainst Slippery Rock, ferent as the Rams handed West Chester had to preIUP their first loss of the pare for the toughest season, with a convincing three-game stretch of the win 15-8, giving them sole season. All three games possession of first place on the road, the Rams for the time being. were set to travel to No. The game was tied 3-3 1 ranked LIU-Post, fol20 minutes into the game, lowed by matchups with but West Chester ripped first place IUP and Lock off four straight goals in Haven, the only other two five minutes to give them undefeated teams in the a 7-3 edge. PSAC. Theresa Giunta scored The game against her 16th goal of the season LIU-Post followed by marked a a goal by rematch of Caroline last year’s Kuchinnational s k y . champiGlassey onship, tacked on w h e r e two of her LIU handown before ed West IUP was Chester able to add a crushanother ing 17-16 one, makdefeat. ing it a The first Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor m a t c h u p 7-4 game. However, this seaD u g a n Senior attacker Tori Dugan looks to push the ball into the offensive zone. son proved s t o p p e d Dugan has been a key member of the offense for the Rams, scoring 28 the simigoals and registering 26 assists so far. IUP’s molar results mentum from the by scornational whelming 21-4 keeping ing with only 16 ticks re- them a perfect 7-0 in the championship, with LIU maining on the first half PSAC. It was an impor- defeating the Golden clock, giving the Rams an tant day for the program Rams 17-8. This was the 8-4 edge heading into the as 10 seniors were hon- Rams’ second loss of the locker room. ored on Senior Day for season, but one that will There was no turning their time and effort given certainly be turned into back at that point for the to the team during their motivation for the remain-

By Timothy Mulqueen Staff Writer

W

Rams, knowing the importance of this game, they kept the pressure on and scored the first four goals of the second half. Saraj Dennison scored two in a row to open up the half extending the lead to 10-4 and giving the Rams a firm grasp on the game. Tori Dugan assisted the next two goals, one scored by Jamie Dolan and the other by Nicole Pyle. The Crimson Hawks scored two quick goals in a row, but it was too little, too late as the Rams were in full control of the game. Dolan and Glassey converted in man-up situations, putting one last postmark on the game. The final score was 15-8, a convincing and vital victory for West Chester. The Rams outshot their opponents 23-20 and Jess Henderson made seven saves on the day. Earlier in the week, the Rams defeated visiting Slippery Rock an over-

Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor

Senior midfielder Lauren Glassey stands tall on defense. The Rams are holding their opponents to a shooting average of .410 while shooting .500 themselves. Glassey has 31 goals and 19 assists, starting all of the team’s 13 games on the year. der of the season. Following the Lock Haven game, West Chester will have three games remaining before the PSAC tournament. Kutztown

will be the last regular season on game of the season, followed by another road trip for the Rams’ first to Syracuse, NY to take on Le Moyne College,

and continued out to Edinboro for the final regular season of the game. Timothy Mulqueen is a third-year student majoring in marketing. He can be reached at TM734386@wcupa.edu.

Athlete of the Week: Jack Provine wcupagoldenrams.com

u

APRIL 22, 2013

Senior outfielder Jack Provine is our top athlete this week. After getting hit by two pitches in Game 1 vs. Ship, he went 5-for-5 in the Game 2, bringing his average to .342. He added five runs and an RBI.


PAGE 30

THE QUAD SPORTS

APRIL 22, 2013

Softball snaps five-game skid with split at No. 8 Cal Riley Wallace

Asst. Sports Editor

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he Lady Rams took the nightcap on the road against No. 8 California (Pa.) 4-1 Saturday, snapping a seasonworst five-game losing streak. On Monday, West Chester (27-16) welcomed in the visiting Devils of the University of the Sciences (20-12) for an afternoon doubleheader. In game one, the Rams fell behind in the third, but catcher Erin Quense’s homer in the fourth gave them what turned out to be a shortlived 2-1 lead. Quense’s home run was her third of the season, the most by a Lady Ram. The Devils responded in the top of the fifth with four runs to put them on top for good. Jessica Schuck’s RBI single in the fifth was not enough, as the Rams fell 5-3. Kate Skokowski (9-8) picked up the loss, pitching four and two-thirds innings before being relieved by Devon Utterback. Skokowski gave up the five runs, only one of which was earned, on seven hits with two walks and a strikeout. Utterback pitched a flawless two-plus innings striking out three and not allowing a hit. The offense mustered only four hits, but worked five walks out of the Devils’ pitchers. Game 2 showcased two aces facing off. Cassie Lapotsky (11-4) outdueled Utterback (14-7) as the Rams dropped a fourth straight game 1-0. For the second straight game the Lady Rams managed just four hits. Designated hitter Kim Murl led the way going one for three with a double, which is her teamleading ninth of the 2013 campaign. Second baseman Kim Begley drew two

walks in three plate appearances. Shortstop Jessica Norris’s error in the fourth marked the fifth straight game in which West Chester had committed at least one error. Utterback picked up the loss while pitching to her 16th complete game of the year going all seven, allowing just the one run off five hits while walking two and striking out three. Saturday, the Golden Rams went on the road to face nationally ranked and PSAC West foe California (Pa.) (26-2) for yet another doubleheader. In Game 1 it was all Vulcans who kicked things off with a solo shot in the first and added an insurance run in the fourth en route to the 2-0 victory. Utterback again received the loss allowing the two runs off five hits while striking out three Vulcans. Utterback struggled with her location as she walked seven Cal. batters, matching a season high. First baseman Jillian Murray went two for three to lead the bats which struggled to produce runs. The team is a remarkable 21-1 when they score at least four runs, but just 6-15 when they score fewer than four runs. The night cap was a different story for the Golden Rams. Norris got things started in the third with a single up the middle that scored rightfielder Kelly Anderson, giving West Chester a 1-0 lead. They were not done there though, as they tacked on three more in the fourth. With the bases loaded and two outs, centerfielder Ali Vavala came through with a single to right field, advancing the base runners and scoring Quense. Anderson followed that up with a single down the right field line, knocking in Megan Kelly and Laura Altenburger. The Vulcans

were finally able to get on the scoreboard in their final at-bat, but only managed one as West Chester came away with the victory 4-1. Kim Murl (4-1) picked up the win as she spread out eight Cal. hits over seven innings of work. She gave up just one run, struck out one, and walked zero in the winning effort. The lead-off and number nine hitters led the way for the Lady Rams with Anderson and Vavala registering two hits apiece. Anderson reached base a total of four times while scoring once and driving in two. Vavala went two for three with a run batted in. Entering the final week of the regular season, the Lady Rams are tied with East Stroudsburg for the third and final playoff spot in the PSAC East. The Golden Rams have three doubleheaders remaining on their schedule, all coming against PSAC East opponents. After traveling to first-place Shippensburg (25-6) on Sunday, West Chester will host ESU (18-14) on Tuesday in their final home games which will start at 2:30 p.m. The two teams split their previous meeting, so either team can own the tiebreaker over the other by winning both games on Tuesday. Saturday, the ladies will wrap up the 2013 regular season with two games at fifth place Millersville (26-16). While the Marauders sit in last place in the PSAC East, they are only one game back of West Chester and East Stroudsburg for the final playoff spot. Saturday’s doubleheader gets kicked off at 1 p.m. with game two starting at approximately 3 p.m. Riley Wallace is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at RW718681@ wcupa.edu.

Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor

Sophomore catcher Erin Quense looks to throw out a runner at first. Quense currently leads the team in home runs with three, and is batting .274 in 41 games played.

Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor

Sophomore outfielder Ali Vavala slides into second base. Vavala went 3-for-6 over the two games of a doubleheader vs. Cal on Saturday. She is currently batting .371 with a double and a triple.


APRIL 22, 2013

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 31

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Men’s tennis falls in PSAC semis to Edinboro, women in quarters to Millersville

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By Ryan Calpin Special to The Quad

he West Chester men’s tennis squad clinched its first ever regular season division title on Saturday April 13 with their win against Mercyhurst. With that win, they received the number one seed going into the PSAC Postseason Tournament. Since that win against Mercyhurst, they went 1-1 in their final two regular season games, beating Gloucester County College, but losing their first PSAC division game of the year to Edinboro, 5-4. This all set up for a semifinal matchup with that same Edinboro team on Friday. The women’s squad’s regular season has been over for quite some time and they were preparing for their Quarter Final

matchup against Millersville. The women’s team faced Millersville once during the regular season and won that matchup 5-4. West Chester was the No. 2 seed facing the No. 3 seed of Millersville. Millersville took the first two doubles matches 8-0, 8-5. West Chester then bounced back with a doubles win 8-6. West Chester then won the first three singles matches as Alex Santoro defeated Elizabeth Wagner 6-0, 6-0. Alison Fetter defeated Kelsey Waite 6-1, 6-2, and Nicole Nardi defeated Alexandra Heller 6-2, 6-3. Things were really starting to look good for West Chester as they had a 4-2 overall lead. But things went south quick, as they lost the final three singles matches, and lost their quarterfinal matchup to Millersville, 5-4.

It all came down to number four singles which pitted Nicole Daacke of Millersville against Jami Dumler of West Chester. Dumler took the first set 6-3, but then dropped the next two sets 2-6, 3-6. “I think overall, the women had a very good season and they played very hard. Yesterday (April 16) Millersville was just the better team,” coach Tina Tharp said. As the women’s season ended on Tuesday, the men’s squad still had a semifinal matchup against Edinboro on Friday. However, due to rain throughout the entire day Friday, the match was pushed back until Saturday. As Saturday’s match got underway, Edinboro took two of the three doubles matches to take a 2-1 lead going into singles play. David Goldenburg then defeated Brandon Romain of Edin-

boro 6-2, 6-3 to even it up at two apiece. West Chester then took a 3-2 lead when Patrick McGinely defeated James Cooper of Edinboro 6-3, 6-0. Unfortunately for West Chester, they dropped the next three matchups and lost their Semi-Final matchup 5-3. Their best chance at a win was at number two singles where Chaz Irwin of West Chester took the first set 7-5 over Kody Duncan of Edinboro. However, Duncan took the next two sets 6-1, 6-2, ending the men’s season. Although both squads’ seasons ended without winning a championship, both took big strides. The men clinched their first ever regular season PSAC conference title and first playoff appearance since 2003. Ryan Calpin can be reached at RC784188@wcupa.edu. Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor


PAGE 32 The 2013 NBA Playoffs are underway. On Saturday, the New York Knicks opened their first-round series against the Boston Celtics with an 85-78 win, marking the first time New York has had a 1-0 series lead since 2001. Carmelo Anthony, who earlier in the week clinched the season scoring title, led the way with 36 points, six rebounds, and four steals.

THE QUAD SPORTS

Sports

APRIL 22, 2013

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Clutch hitting has Rams third in PSAC East

Photo by Jose Mestre


Quad 104-09