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The Quad

Volume 114, Issue 8

April 16, 2018

The Student News Service of West Chester University

WCU Whistleblower Seeks Supreme Court News, 2

A Quiet Place, A&E 30-31

Prohibitive Minimum Wage, Op-Ed 26 Features, 11

On the go? Find more on wcuquad.com

Flyers Poised for Run, Sports 35


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News

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

WCU WHISTLEBLOWER SEEKS SUPREME COURT: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW HALLE NELSON NEWS EDITOR

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olleen Bradley began working for West Chester University in 2011. In that time, she alleges that WCU hid millions of dollars from the state, the public and from faculty by claiming a deficit rather than a surplus. In an April 2018 interview with Raging Chicken Press, Bradley gives more details about her time at WCU. For example, Bradley says she brought up this alleged manipulation of numbers to her boss Mark Mixner, current university president Christopher Fiorentino (whom she alleges silently supported her) and the Administrative Budget Committee. She claims that her speaking about this publicly angered Mixner. Bradley then went on to say that Mixner went to the university president, who at the time was Greg Weisenstein, to discuss the situation, who then said to him that they needed to report a deficit. It was agreed upon, she said, that she would fill out the rest of the budget report and Mixner would change the transfer line. He did it, but he did so in Bradley’s name. Bradley says she tried to clear her name to the Administrative Budget Committee by writing up a memorandum distancing herself from the “outright plug of a number” in the budget report. She then reached out to budget managers from other PASSHE institutions, all of whom allegedly claimed the budget report was a “political document” she need not stress over. 2014 arrives, and Bradley says she was told “in order to rebuild [her] credibility” she needed to present the three-year budget projection requested by WCU faculty. She calls the budget they wanted her to present “the sky is falling budget.” She wanted to present a “realistic” budget. Her boss

allegedly told her to prepare both, then rescinded the offer and told her to present their budget. Despite direct orders, she brought both budgets to present and then distributed her budget to a meeting of presidents and vice presidents. Mixner was “not happy,” according to Bradley. After these events transpired, Bradley learned that her contract was not going to be renewed due to her “not being the problem solver they thought [she] would be.” After Bradley was terminated, she

than simply trying to increase the university’s funding. The complaint also alleges that the budget deception was designed to best position the university to become a state-related university if the 2014 PASSHE Secession Bill had passed; to increase WCU and PASSHE’s leverage in negotiations with the faculty union, APSCUF and other unions on PASSHE campuses; and, to personally benefit the defendants with ‘significant personal financial gains’ if West Chester were successful in breaking away from the 14 university state-

“The university ... vigorously denies Ms. Bradley’s allegations and believes her legal claims to be without merit.” decided to sue the university for breaking Pennsylvania whistleblower law. FindLaw defines a whistleblower as, “An employee who reports a violation of the law by his or her employer.” The Philly Inquirer reporter Susan Snyder says the lawsuit, filed in 2015, is a 62-page complaint that says, “the university claimed break-even or deficit budgets, it actually increased its assets by $56.6 million over three years, the lawsuit alleges. Concealing the surpluses allegedly allowed the university to reap more than $146 million in state funding. The university hid the funds in an account for facility maintenance.” WCU spokesperson Pamela Sheridan said: “The university . . . vigorously denies Ms. Bradley’s allegations and believes her legal claims to be without merit,” according to philly. com. In a May 2015 Raging Chicken Press article, Kutztown University professor Kevin Mahoney wrote the following: “Bradley’s lawyers argue that there was even more at stake

owned university system.” In 2017, The Daily Local reported District Judge Michael Baylson threw out the lawsuit because, “while Bradley’s speech was protected, she failed to prove it was a factor in the university’s decision not to renew her contract.” One of her lawyers, Dan Kearney, said the following in a Raging Chicken Press interview: “We thought that the case was really unusual in the sense that Colleen had done a very good job of documenting what had transpired here. So, in assessing the case we had a very optimistic view of how the courts would view her case primarily because we weren’t dealing with a ‘he-said, she-said’ sort of situation. We had a black and white paper trail of emails other correspondence, in memorandums, which really set forth in a very clear way factually what had happened here.” This case was appealed to the Third Circuit Court, which is the court just before the Supreme Court and covers the District of Delaware, the District of New Jersey and the Eastern District

of Pennsylvania. On Nov. 8, 2017, the court concluded in an official document that their judgment was “in favor of Ms. Bradley’s supervisor, Mark Mixner, holding that, although Ms. Bradley’s speech was constitutionally protected, Mr. Mixner was entitled to qualified immunity.” According to FindLaw, Qualified Immunity, “shields public officials from damages for civil liability so long as they did not violate an individual’s ‘clearly established’ statutory or constitutional rights.” The Third Circuit Court then cited Supreme Court Case Garcetti v. Ceballos with the following: “‘When public employees make statements pursuant to their official duties, the employees are not speaking as citizens for First Amendment purposes’ and that, therefore, ‘the Constitution does not insulate their communications from employer discipline.’” However, Kearney argues that from a Garcetti perspective, they were in the clear, because “this is the counterpoint to Garcetti in the sense that not only was Colleen not asked to speak out on the issue that she spoke about, she was directed not to speak out against it. Almost to the point where her supervisor might say she was insubordinate in speaking out and exposing these misrepresentations and this fraud.” In messages exchanged with Professor Kevin Mahoney of Raging Chicken Press and Kutztown University, he said the following: “The key thing here is that no one has been held accountable and the practices of misrepresenting budgets continue. A group of faculty at Kutztown commissioned an independent audit of the university’s financial situation last

“Whistleblower” continued on pg. 9


April 16, 2018

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FAMILY MEMBERS OF BARCLAY FIRE VICTIMS FILE LAWSUIT By Jessica Ferguson Special to the Quad

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n the night of Nov. 16, 2017 at approximately 11 p.m., a fire quickly spread throughout the Barclay Friends Senior Living Community while residents were sleeping. Of the 160 residents and staff at the location of the incident, four residents lost their lives due to the blaze. Twenty-seven others were injured and taken to a nearby hospital. West Chester University became a short-term shelter for some of the displaced residents, while other residents were taken in by their families. It was later discovered that the fire started in a rear patio in the personal care section of the Barclay Friends complex. The exact cause of the fire is still unknown, but is actively being

investigated by the ATF, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Foul play and arson are not suspected. An engineer hired by Barclay Friends informed surviving victims, their families, families of the deceased and attorneys that water to the sprinkler system was turned off the night of the fire. According to lawyers of the families, the sprinkler’s warning system gave incorrect readings that the water was turned on when it was actually turned off. This information was discovered during a December 2017 debriefing held by Dan Arnold, an engineer with Seneca Fire Engineering. Seneca Fire Engineering is a firm based in Atlanta that works for the Barclay Friends complex. During the debriefing, the lawyers of the families were told by Arnold that the large

wheel used to control the sprinkler was in an off position following the fire. Seneca Fire Engineering could not be reached for comment. According to Ian Bryson, an attorney with McEldrew Young, and Samuel Dordick, an attorney with the Mongeluzzi firm, this large wheel was locked inside a mechanical room within Barclay Friends. The mechanical room was left untouched by the fatal fire and was only unlocked after the fire was put out. This rules out the possibility of firefighters turning the water off while putting the fire out in order to secure better water pressure for their hoses. The firm that Bryson works for represents the Parker family. The Parkers lost Thomas Parker and his wife, Delores, as a result of the fire. The firm of McEldrew Young did not return messages seeking comment on this matter.

Andrew Duffy, who works for the Mongeluzzi firm, filed the lawsuit in support of the family of Theresa Malloy. The Malloy family lost Theresa Malloy as a result of smoke inhalation from the fire. The Mongeluzzi firm filed the suit because the sprinklers were not working that night and the valve for the water was off, which would have helped put the fire out. The firm stated that Barclay Friends had failed in its responsibility to keep its residents safe with the fault in their sprinkler system. The Mongeluzzi firm did not return messages seeking comment on this statement. The family of Theresa Malloy also could not be reached for comment about the lawsuit.

Jessica Ferguson is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. JF830568@wcupa.edu.

CHESTER COUNTY RESIDENTS PREPARE FOR 2018 PRIMARY ELECTION By Ryan Kutzler Pr acticum Writer

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he 2018 Primary Election is approaching, and the results of this election will help determine local and state governmental representation. Voters will read candidate proposals and conclude which candidates they feel is best fit to represent them. The leaders chosen by the people can have a real impact on the daily lives of their constituents; thus, constituents should be made aware of the voting process. There are several key dates in the election process. April 14, 2018 was the last day to register to vote. If you missed the deadline, you can still register and be admitted to vote in the next election. Legally, it’s completely up to you whether you would like to register in West Chester, Pa. or at your own residence, though you cannot be

registered in two different locations. May 8, 2018 is also an important date: It’s the last day to apply for an absentee ballot. Many college students who reside in West Chester during the academic year utilize this option. Applications for an absentee ballot are due by 5 p.m. on May 8. If you have an absentee ballot, the last day to return those is May 11 by 5 p.m. Other than that, if you’re going out to your polling place to vote on Election Day, that’ll be on Tuesday, May 15. On that day, you have the opportunity to vote any time between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. As long as you get in line before 8 p.m., you’re entitled to cast your vote. According to Hans van Mol, WCU alum and current president of the Chester County Young Democrats, “This year’s primary is extra important because 2018 is the year that Democrats will also be choosing representa-

tives (known as “Committee People” or “CPs”) to both the Chester County Democratic Committee (CCDC) and the State Democratic Party. Each of the 200+ precincts in Chester County elects two Democrats to represent their area in the CCDC, and these CPs are empowered with choosing which candidates the party endorses, who the officers of CCDC will be and what the overall direction and platform of the party will be.” In the same way, if you’re Republican, you also have the opportunity to vote for who will serve you in your local state committee. Ultimately, as Mol described, these Committee People can end up having a huge impact on your respective party’s platform and will serve directly as your local representative. Along with voting for Committee People, on this ballot you will also be voting for U.S. Senate positions,

Governor, Lieutenant Governor, State House of Representatives positions and State Senate positions (in some areas). All of these positions are extremely important, as these people all have a say in making decisions and creating reforms that will impact our lives. Mol wanted to emphasize that “2018 is the first time we millennials have the largest say on how we want our community to look and what we want it to stand for. However, we only can have our say if we get out and vote. As we’ve seen time and time again over the last 2 years, your vote matters.” Thomas Donohue, Executive Director of the Republican Committee of Chester County, explains, “In the 2016 election only 18 percent of 18-29 year olds exercised their rights to vote.

“Primary Election” continued on pg. 9


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TRUMP ORDERS AIRSTRIKE ON SYRIAN GOVERNMENT By Samantha Walsh Staff Writer

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ollowing Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s alleged chemical attack on Syrian civilians, President Donald Trump ordered an airstrike on Damascus, the capital of Syria, early Saturday morning. According to evidence gathered by officials in France, the United Kingdom and the United States, over 40 civilians were killed in the gas attack early in the month. According to CNN, Syrian armed forces confirmed a total of 110 missiles, most of which were intercepted by the Syrian military. The missiles struck a research base in Damascus responsible for creating chemical weaponry. None were confirmed to have hit any Syrian military bases. The strikes were coordinated with military forces from France and the United Kingdom. Eyewitness accounts reported the use of barrel chemical bombs dropped

from helicopters over Douma, where the attack was staged, according to the Telegraph news. Photographs of the barrels match those of barrel bombs used by the Syrian regime in the past. Government helicopters were also spotted over Douma, which had reportedly taken off from a nearby airfield belonging to the Syrian regime. The regime refuted all claims of the attack, with Russia stating that the incident was “staged” in corroboration with the United Kingdom. The Violations Documentation Center reported a strong smell of chlorine, one of the alleged gases used in the attack. Trump described Assad’s alleged attack as “a significant attack against his own people” in justifying his own attack over the war-ravaged country. He later declared it a “mission accomplished” over Twitter following the attack. Joe Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, stated, “The United States had interest in reverting a worsening catastrophe in Syria, spe-

cifically deterring the use and proliferation of chemical weapons.” He later stated that “important infrastructure was destroyed which will result in a setback for the Syrian regime. They will lose years of research and development, storage and equipment.” Dunfort also claimed that the United States had “specially identified targets” to prevent Russian retaliation of military forces. Russia has voiced its support for the Syrian regime in the past. Rachel Lockley, a junior special education and early grades major at West Chester University, stated she has “mixed feelings about the U.S. intervening” and “coming in to save the day” in situations like Syria. “That causes a lot of problems,” she said. “I do think that we need to help people in need in terms of when a leader turns against his own country. But … airstriking is not the way to do it.” She is unsure as to whether we should intervene at all, but believes it is the responsibility of the United Nations and other global

organizations to help with crises such as the gas attack in Syria. The Russian Foreign Ministry criticized the United States’ attack on Syria, saying that Trump ordered the strike when the country “finally had a chance for peace,” according to CNN. Russian officials felt threatened by the States’ attack on Syria, claiming that they had previously warned that the States’ actions would not be met without consequences. Trump has formerly criticized Russia’s support of the Syrian regime, denouncing their failure to eliminate Syria’s chemical weapons. As the story unravels, students are encouraged to turn to reputable news sources for up-to-date information about the United States’ involvement in the airstrike. Samantha Walsh is a third-year student majoring in special education and English with a minor in autism studies. SW850037@wcupa.edu

FEMINIST SLAM POET OLIVIA GATWOOD PERFORMS AT WCU

By Domenica Castro Staff Writer

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n Thursday, April 12, slam poet, author and Title IX educator Olivia Gatwood performed several of her original works at 7:30 p.m. in Sykes Student Union at West Chester University. Prior to her performance, Gatwood held an hour-long workshop covering the topics of gender equality and sexual consent, as she has done at approximately 70 colleges and 30 high schools nationwide. Gatwood remained afterwards to take pictures with attendees, sign autographs and sell her merchandise including tshirts and her latest publication of poems, “New American Best Friend.” Originally from New Mexico, 26-year-old Gatwood says she has always loved writing poetry, but she

started performing her poems at 16 years old, with some of those performances now available to view on YouTube. While reflecting on the impact of her popular videos, Gatwood commented, “Obviously, my identity is more complex than what you see on YouTube, so I really like when people come to shows in person.” However, she added that she appreciates her fans who have connected with her internet-famous poems such as “Ode to the Women on Long Island,” “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” and “When I Say That We Are All Teenage Girls.” She performed all three of the poems over the course of the night’s festivities. When The Quad Features Editor Max James asked what a writer should do when searching for inspiration, Gatwood recommended reading other artists’ works. In her words, “Read

more than you write and listen more than you speak,” emphasizing the fact that art is hard work and requires intensive study. When reflecting on her own growth as an artist, Gatwood said, “When I started reading poetry … my writing drastically changed, in a better way, because I was studying it.” In addition to loving the written word, Gatwood mentioned that she scours for words that feel good when she verbalizes them. When James asked her how she finds the perfect words for a poem in progress, Gatwood said, “The thesaurus is my friend.” She also added that she hunts for words “that are [not] related to the theme.” Gatwood continued to say, “It’s a matter of saying things out loud. I talk to myself a lot,” mentioning how musical elements, such as rhythm, play an important part in her creative process.

She said the creation of her poems is “almost like scatting, like jazz singers do, and then filling in the blanks with words.” Gatwood recommended that writers and poets who wish to become published should submit their works to poetry contests, such as Submittable. Submittable is a website (poetry.submittable.com) where different deadlines for various poetry and prose contests are advertised on the homepage with rolling deadlines. If no luck is had with that, Gatwood affirmed that self-publication is always an option. When asked about how she comes to terms with her success, Gatwood replied, “Where I am now is never where I dreamed to be as a young person.” Domenica Castro is a third-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in Spanish. DC874612@wcupa.edu


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FREDERICK DOUGLASS INSTITUTE HOLDS EVENTS IN HONOR OF HIS HISTORIC VISIT By Jennifer Odiatu Staff Writer

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he Frederick Douglass Institute of West Chester University held a series of events over the span of two weeks. All of the events sought to enlighten students and faculty members from WCU as well as individuals from other colleges about Douglass’s February 1, 1895 appearance at West Chester University’s campus—just 19 days before his death. Many faculty members from various colleges collaborated to help educate students about Frederick Douglass and race in the United States today. From April 5-6, the institute collaborative held two specific events: a debate tournament and multiple concurrent informative sessions. The debate tournament topic discussed confederate monuments and whether or not they should be removed from public properties in the United States. The debate tournament consisted of three rounds. Each round was held in a separate room in Sykes Student Union. After the rounds were completed, student debaters, coaches and others ate lunch, took a photo in front of the Douglass statue and listened to a presentation. The keynote presentation was led by David Blight, an acclaimed professor of American History at Yale University, shortly after the awards ceremony to the debaters. There were several sessions that discussed topics pertaining to Douglass on Friday, April 6. Some of which were the “Pedagogical Challenges and Opportunities, Race, Social Justice, and Literacy, Rereading Douglass: Paths to Freedom and Wisdom” and several others. During the intermission of the program, one of the keynote speakers, Veronica Watson, presented a

speech paying homage to Blight. Specifically, she noted his measures in 10 years of service while establishing the institute collaborative by informing hundreds of individuals of Douglass’s

to come to WCU, he has had several interactions with the police. After being stopped over 50 times from the ages of 12-18, he started becoming used to it, but despite his negative en-

“‘In life you are one of two things: You’re either a thermometer or thermostat. A thermometer is easily changed by the atmosphere while the thermostat changes the atmosphere. You are either one that is changed by your environment or you are one to change your environment.’” life and work. The second set of events that took place was the Frederick Douglass Institute Lunch Encounters Panel Discussion on Wednesday, April 11. This event was facilitated by Dr. Anita Foeman of the Communication Studies Department and Dr. Eleanor Shevlin of the English Department; they have been running this program for the past two years. The panel discussion was held to inform the students and faculty members at WCU and other colleges about the negative connotations concerning police and race. The three panelists were Regena Clay, Elliot Mason and Detective Laura McGill. All panelists gave insight about their own personal experiences with police contact. Clay, the president of WCU Gospel Ministries, began to describe her encounter with police officers. She mentioned to the audience that she hadn’t had much interaction with them, except for the 2016 Trump rally at WCU. “They were telling people that they will be arrested if they were on the streets, so I made sure my friends were far away from the streets. We wanted it to be a peaceful protest.” Mason, a pre-physical therapy major, mentioned that he doesn’t necessarily put his full trust in the police. From his adolescence up until leaving

counters with them, he knows how to critique each police officer differently. Mason stated after his introduction that when African Americans encounter the police, they are already in a defensive mode. The last individual to introduce themselves was McGill. Despite some negative experiences with the police, that didn’t stop McGill from pursuing her goals of joining the police academy and later becoming a police officer. McGill is the only African-American female detective in Chester County, Pa. Over the course of graduating the police academy in 2009 and later having hands-on experience with the community, she learned how to deal with people who hold varying opinions, whether they like her as a person or if they cannot converse with her due to her occupation. As the panelists continued to express their thoughts on police and race, they allowed the audience to ask them a few questions. One man in the audience made a specific observation when saying that he believes that bias fuels bias, ignorance and a lot more. He went on to say that the Frankford area in Philadelphia is filled with more meth, drugs and crime than other neighborhoods or districts that are also heavily dominated by African Americans, but those areas are not

held accountable on the same scale. Following the response, Mason said that we, the people, need to figure out why these situations occur. He went on to say the solution is going down to the root of what the police force should do in those scenarios. McGill used a quote from her grandmother: “In life you are one of two things: You’re either a thermometer or thermostat. A thermometer is easily changed by the atmosphere while the thermostat changes the atmosphere. You are either one that is changed by your environment or you are one to change your environment.” She went on to say that she had to personally think of what she would want to be in regard to a thermometer or thermostat, and once she figured it out, she realized that is when you start to grow and learn a little bit more about yourself. As an official in law enforcement, McGill wants the community to see her first as Laura, a regular human being just as everyone else, and then as a detective. By looking beyond occupations, she says, people are more willing to come and engage in conversations that don’t necessarily have to be about police, but can be about school, jobs or more. McGill realized that police officers receive the book knowledge to excel in the police academy, but many do not have the hands-on experience to deal with people in many situations. “Before you see the badge, we are human beings too,” she said. McGill concluded the discussion by giving the audience members guidance when coming in contact with the police: “Always follow directions. No matter if the police officers come off differently, still, follow directions.” Jennifer Odiatu is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. JO820471@wcupa.edu


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CECE MCDONALD TALKS R ACE, TR ANSPHOBIA AND POLICE By Casey Tobias Staff Writer

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ultiple departments came together to co-sponsor a film screening of the documentary “Free CeCe!” on Wednesday, April 11 in Sykes Theater. The event ran from 4:30 to 8 p.m. A panel discussion was held after the documentary ended. The Sexuality and Gender Alliance, Shades of the Rainbow, Center for Women and Gender Equity, Office of Wellness Promotion, LGBTQA Services, Lawrence A. Dowdy Multicultural Center and the Women’s and Gender Studies Department co-sponsored the event. Liam Lair, assistant professor of women’s and gender studies, held a panel discussion following the screening with the filmmaker Jac Gares as well as the film’s subject, CeCe McDonald. New York City filmmaker Gares directed “Free CeCe!,” while “Orange is the New Black” actress Laverne Cox served as executive producer. The documentary centers on McDonald, a black transgender woman who was incarcerated after accepting a plea bargain of 41 months for second-degree manslaughter of Dean Schmitz. In 2011, McDonald and her friends were walking outside a bar in Minneapolis when Schmitz’s group shouted racist and transphobic slurs at them. A physical fight broke out once one of the members of Schmitz’ party, Molly Flaherty, smashed a glass of alcohol against McDonald’s face. This resulted in McDonald needing 11 stitches. One witness described Schmitz separating McDonald from Flaherty. As McDonald described in the film, she was ultimately defending herself when she pulled out and used a pair of scissors. Schmitz died from the stab wound, and McDonald was subsequently arrested. Hennepin County Attorney Michael Freeman initially charged McDonald with two counts of second-degree

murder. In May 2012, McDonald took a plea deal that reduced the charge to second-degree manslaughter rather than going to trial and risking a 20year sentence. McDonald was forced to serve time in a men’s prison, and she was released in January of 2014 after 19 months. The documentary highlighted McDonald’s case which received international attention. It showed people

the coalition, 72 percent of victims of hate violence homicides in 2013 were transgender women, while 67 percent were transgender women of color. The coalition also found that transgender people of color were six times more likely to experience police violence. While she was incarcerated, McDonald read works by political activists including Angela Davis and

“‘The most violent offenders in our society are cops. They don’t go to jail at all. They get a severance pay, and they get to go relax.’” protesting around the country and the world, accusing the handling of the case as racist and transphobic. One person protesting for McDonald’s cause noted that transgender women, especially transgender women of color, are at an increased risk of violence and often wind up dead. In their words, McDonald’s “gift for survival was a prison sentence.” The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs published a fact sheet that supports this claim. According to

Mumia Abu-Jamal, which led to her present-day position of advocating for prison abolition. She expanded on this belief during the Q&A portion of the panel discussion when one student asked about how to deal with violent criminals in a post-prison society. “The most violent offenders in our society are cops. They don’t go to jail at all. They get a severance pay, and they get to go relax. They go from one place to the other,” said McDonald, referring to cases of police brutality.

McDonald went on to say, “There is no hope in reframing or restyling of our prison system. So a lot of people ask, ‘Where do these specific people go if prisons are abolished?’ There is a small [percentage] of people who are in prison for violent crimes. The majority of people who are in prison are in for drug cases.” McDonald believes the rate of violent crime would be drastically lowered if more resources were dedicated to mental health, as they would then be easier to prevent. “The reason there are so many violent offenders is because there isn’t a space for healing, and there isn’t a space to talk about mental health,” she said. She also noted, “A lot of these people who do heinous crimes are men, and they do them out of toxic masculinity. They do it because of rejection.” McDonald brought up last month’s school shooting in Maryland, where 17-year-old Austin Rollins fatally shot his ex-girlfriend and injured another student before killing himself. “That says a lot about who’s really violent, and why they’re violent,” she said. Overall, McDonald explained that she continues to “do this work because [she is] affected by it.” She stressed the difference between performative allyship and genuine solidarity, as well as the importance of tackling the colonialism and imperialism embedded in our society and the importance of understanding personal healing needs. When Lair asked McDonald and Gares what they found hope in, Gares said, “I found hope in CeCe.” The event came to an end with the crowd giving McDonald and Gares a round of applause, and McDonald stayed for a bit longer to pose for pictures with audience members. Casey Tobias is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies and women’s and gender studies with a minor in journalism. CT822683@wcupa.edu. @Casey_Tobias.


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WCU FOUNDATION HOSTS PRESIDENTIAL GALA By Amanda Saleh Staff Writer

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n Saturday, April 7, The WCU Foundation celebrated the 35th annual Presidential Scholarship Community Gala in Hollinger Fieldhouse. This event awarded meritbased scholarships to three freshmen and served as a celebration and display of appreciation to all of the donors. “Emerald Gardens: Growing a Sustainable Future” was the theme of the evening. Valet parking was available and golden gates served as the entrance. Plants and flowers filled the room and one of the walls was adorned with succulents. The attendees were a mix of donors, faculty and students, including those from the Friars’ Soci-

ety and SGA. President Christopher Fiorentino kicked off the black-tie event and shared that all of the plants that were not up for auction would be for university use. In the coming weeks, the plants will be planted all over campus. This event is considered the premiere black-tie affair of Chester County. Slow jazz music played in the background before live entertainment was provided by The High Street Harmonics and Legacy Entertainment. Cocktail hour started the evening with top-shelf liquor while servers came and passed out hors d’oeuvres such as small pastries filled with salmon mousse, pea chantilly and rabbit rillettes. Attendees crowded around a cheese board and bid on items such

as electronics, vacations and home decor. On the other side of the room, people dined on shrimp, oysters, crab and caviar. The main meal included plant-based options and local ingredients such as Kennett Square mushrooms. Kaplan’s Jewelry began the evening with a Champagne & Diamond raffle which auctioned off a pair of diamond earrings. ARAMARK and MacElree Harvey, Ltd were diamond sponsors. Representatives from each of these organizations had the chance to share their remarks at the beginning of the evening. This year, the scholarship was given to three freshmen in the honors college who just so happen to be friends. This year’s academic scholars are

Jennifer Knerr, Madison James and Cameron Ducey. Knerr, a special education and early grades prep major from Slatedale, Pa. said that this award was a dream come true. “I have been so blessed with my scholarships. I really don’t know if I would have been able to attend college had it not been for this scholarship money. I knew that I would have to work really hard in high school so that it would pay off,” she said. James, a biology pre-med major from York, Pa. and member of the track team was so honored to receive the

“Presidential Gala” continued on pg. 10


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RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES UNITE AT INTERFAITH BANQUET By Amanda Mills Staff Writer

vanced recognition of spiritual life on campus, and therefore is investing in this community of various beliefs. A

a “journey with your senses,” where a song in Hebrew is sung in worship while a lit candle is dipped in grape

coalition is currently forming for the fall 2018 semester to include all leaders of faith-based organizations through the office of Student Affairs. After the initial introductions, each religion shared a prayer. David Coup, a sophomore communication studies major and leader and member of Cru, read the Lord’s prayer and explained how in the Christian faith, they pray through admiration of God, confession of sin and supplication or requests and statement of needs. Lisa Patrick and Ellie Sullum of Hillel performed a part of the Shabbat, which is practiced each week during the Sabbath of Friday sundown to Saturday at sundown. Patrick explained it to be

juice or wine. Patrick explained if there is a sizzle, that may signify a good week to come. She dipped the candle in the grape juice. “That was a good sizzle,” added Sullum. Pennsylvania Senator Andy Dinniman stopped by to share a word of encouragement. “All of our faiths’ traditions share more than we are different,” explained Dinniman. He explained how he is eager to see diversity grow in our area, as the first Hindu temple is currently being built in Chester County. “Sometimes politicians have tried to divide us through faith, but you are all young, and tonight is an affirmation

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n Saturday, April 14, six faith-based organizations met under an initiative out of the Student Affairs office to attend an annual interfaith banquet to celebrate culture, community and the importance of religion in the lives of many Golden Rams. Cru (Christian organization), Muslim Student Association, Hillel (Jewish organization), Lutheran Student Association, the Catholic Newman Center and Impact (Christian organization geared toward African Americans and minorities) were in attendance. The night consisted of socializing, prayer recited by all faith groups in attendance, dinner, a presentation and update from each organization as well as entertainment by the Newman Center Choir. The theme for this year’s banquet was CommUNITY. Taylor McCahan, one of the main organizers of the event and member of Cru, emphasized how important she feels it is to come together and celebrate faiths and their similarities to one another. “I think it is so cool that our university supports this initiative. It is so awesome that we have such a high attendance and interest,” said McCahan, a senior communication studies major. “It’s an amazing opportunity for students of different faiths to come together to find common ideals that we all strive to uphold,” said Richie Fontanet, a senior history major and member of the Catholic Newman Center. Additionally, the university has seen interest amongst some students for ad-

that that is no longer so,” stated Senator Dinniman. After dinner (Kosher/Halal friendly), each organization stated their mission Photo courtesy of and what they do Amanda Mills each academic year. Jeffrey Camp of Impact stated that at Impact, “We love community.” He shared how his Bible study helps him develop his relationship with Jesus and simply helped him discover “what it means to be a man.” Impact meets Mondays at 6 p.m. in Sykes 252. Maddy Wyshinski, president of Cru, said Cru “is a caring community passionate about connecting people to Jesus Christ. We believe we are saved by believing in Jesus where we are saved by grace through faith.” Cru hosts fun events like dances and cookouts throughout the semester, retreats and Bible studies. Cru meets every Wednesday at 8 p.m. in Main 168. Lisa Patrick explained that Hillel and “in Judaism, we are a very community-oriented people. We are an ethically-based religion and are all created in God’s image” and stressed the importance of inclusion. She showed the group a Venn diagram, dichotomized between community and Tanakh. She cited the strong history of activism in the Jewish faith and shared her own story of how Judaism has changed

“Interfaith Banquet” continued on page 10


rrApril 16, 2018

Page 9

NELSON GR ABURN SPEAKS AT WCU ABOUT TOURISM AND JAPAN By A aron Gallant Staff Writer

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n Tuesday, April 3, professor emeritus of sociocultural anthropology at UC Berkeley, Nelson Graburn, gave the talk “Kokunai Kokusaika … Japan’s Domestic Heritage of Foreignness,” based on his travels and research in Japan’s Gaikoku Mura or foreign villages. Graburn played a foundational role in the anthropology of tourism. His chapter “Tourism: the Sacred Journey” in “Hosts and Guests: The Anthropology of Tourism” argued that in modern society, people’s lives are, in part, defined by a “profane, ordinary” life. Life, he says, is punctuated and given meaning by “sacred” periods in which they travel to places and/or have experiences which are different enough from their “workaday lives.” Graburn began his talk, which took place in the Business and Public Management building, by recounting the history of Japan. First, he discussed the Tokugawa period during which the Japanese shogunate held to a strict policy known as Sakoku or “closed country.” This banned travel out of and into the country and restricted foreign trade to a single port controlled by the Dutch in Nagasaki. He also said, “The Japanese used

“Whistleblower” continued fall and found the same practices continue.” He continued, “Programs are being eliminated, student fees are being imposed, faculty are losing their jobs, tuition is increasing all on the grounds that there is a budget crisis in PASSHE. The truth is closer to the fact that the ranks of admin are growing and they are seeking unchecked authority to spend money the way they want without public scrutiny. These deceptive budgeting practices feed into the hands of those anti-public education zealots in Harrisburg, who want to gut funding for PASSHE.”

the Dutch as a conduit for knowledge of what was going on in the rest of the world, and learned of the many scientific advances over the 200 years that the country was closed. So they really knew what was going on through the Dutch, in fact they set up elite schools to teach ‘Dutch knowledge,’ while at the same time many Europeans infiltrated and kept abreast of what was happening in Japan.” Through information from the Dutch, the Japanese learned of European colonialism and there was one “manuscript written by a Japanese in 1832, which said ‘the Europeans are gobbling up the world and we’re going to have to catch up or get left behind in the dust.’” Graburn explained that the Sakoku policy was abandoned “after European and American incursion, which began in 1853. Japan was forced to open itself up under threat of gunfire from English, American and Russian navies. They just fired on the ports and said ‘Let us in, you’ve got to let us trade.’” Then during the Meiji era, “Japan took to rapid urbanization and modernization,” and later built “Meiji Mura, which means Meiji Village, where they put all the old railway engines and buildings from the Meiji era to keep them … which is near Nagoya, and it’s also near Little World Park, and most of my talk is about Little World Park.” Now Bradley’s team seek a hearing from the Supreme Court. This may be difficult, as the Supreme Court website states they only hear 100-150 of the roughly 7,000 cases directed to them annually. She will file her writ of certiorari within the next few weeks and, if accepted, this case could redefine First Amendment protections in the workplace. Finally, Mahoney said, “Until the scheme is exposed and people are held accountable, we are being set up to fail.” Halle Nelson is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with minors in deaf studies and English literature. HN824858@wcupa.edu. @Halle_N_Nelson

Graburn explained that after the second world war, “with increasing opportunities to travel abroad, the majority of Japanese felt great anxiety about their ignorance of foreign countries, foreign languages, foreign foods and so on. And about how they would be treated as former enemies of many countries so they got an influx of tourists coming in to see the bullet train to go to Kyoto and Tokyo, but very few Japanese had ever been abroad except the soldiers. But now they were a rich nation, as rich as western nations, they were expected to go abroad… and in 1964, the same year as the Summer Olympics [in Tokyo], the government lifted exchange controls, which meant … they could get as much foreign currency as they wanted and they could travel everywhere.” This growing expectation and desire of foreign travel combined with anxieties about foreign countries led to “a flurry of commercial building of foreign villages, foreign towns and foreign environments so the Japanese could familiarize themselves with life overseas, recognize famous places, learn to eat new foods with knives and forks, which 99 percent of the people had never tried before and to buy foreign products.” He said that although designed to promote foreign travel “for

“Primary Election” continued I think rather than sitting back and complaining, it’s critical that young people get engaged, learn about the issues and make educated choices in the ballot box.” Donohue also wanted to add that “political civility is sorely lacking in society today. The name calling, fearmongering and bullying that goes on in the political arena is foolish and doesn’t serve to advance the common good. I think younger voters really need to consider what type of country they want to inherent and begin to challenge this status quo. Statesmanship is coming together in spite of

many Japanese this was as foreign as they wanted to get, they spent their leisure time in these foreign theme parks and never actually went abroad.” Graburn then showed a number of photos of examples of these foreign theme parks on his PowerPoint presentation. For example, there was a recreation of the house of Anne of Green Gables “who is considered very romantic by many young Japanese men and women as the hero the Japanese could be: an independent, strong minded young woman … and people go [to the recreated house] to get married. It’s the most romantic thing they can think of.” There was also an English village, Russian town, Spanish park and “one of the biggest ones is made by Disney at Japanese invitation, called Disney World, which is a recreation of all the great port cities of Europe: Hamburg, Rome, Venice, etc. all built with incredible authenticity.” Parks like these are “where the Japanese go to experience foreignness, to experience being a Japanese in a foreign place, to take photographs of each other.” Aaron Gallant is a third-year student majoring in urban and environmental planning with minors in anthropology, Spanish and Latin American and Latino studies. AG851503@wcupa.edu

differences, finding common ground, and moving forward. A return to this I would argue would best serve our nation.” If you want to help change aspects of our country that are important to you, voting is a direct way to do that. In the past few years, state officials have won elections by just a handful of votes, including former Mayor of West Chester Carolyn Comitta, who is now serving in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. So, if you’re registered and have an informed opinion of the candidates running, you can get your absentee ballot filled out and submitted or get to the polls on May 15. Ryan Kutzler is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with minors in music and journalism. RK821378@wcupa.edu.


Page 10 rApril 16, 2018

“Interfaith Banquet” continued her life, especially while attending WCU. Blair Cunningham, President of the Lutheran Student Association stressed how her organization is a strong social group and how integral community is to her Lutheran faith. She spoke about how Lutheran church was founded after Martin Luther’s 95 theses and the Reformation 500 years ago. They meet at Calvary Lutheran Church across the street from Schmidt Hall on Mondays at 5 p.m. One of the banquet’s main organizers and president of the Muslim Student Association, Waneeza Mughees, broke down the tenets of Islam into three groups: equality, charity and compassion. She explained how we are all created equally and the importance of giving back, as well as serving the community. The Muslim Student Association is active in the West Chester community by serving at Safe Harbor and also promoting peace through Islam Awareness Week. Laura Reedy described the Newman Center as “her home away from home, where we celebrate the sacrifice of Jesus’ life.” She enthusiastically spoke to the group how joining the women’s group at the Catholic Newman Center (located on South New Street) was also life-changing for her, and she really enjoys the chance to “study the word with my friends.” Mass is held Monday-Thursday at 4:30 p.m., and on Sundays at 5:30 and 9 p.m. The Catholic Newman Center holds small group Bible studies, social events and serves the community. They also host an annual Thanksgiving food drive. Reedy urged everyone to “seek out your communities” and hold fast to your convictions, because “following your faith isn’t always easy on a college campus.” Finally, the Newman Choir finished out the night with “What a Beautiful Name” by Hillsong United. As the years go on, each organization hopes to continue with events like this for future students.

#Zuckhearing - Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified to Congress regarding the company’s failure to keep its users’ information secure. #Mancity - Manchester City claims the Premier League Champion title after Manchester United loss to West Brom. #PrayforSyria - The world prays for innocent Syrians caught up in the escalating conflict in the region.

“Presidential Gala” continued award. James says she is fortunate that she can relax now and doesn’t have to worry about how she is going to pay for her education. “My parents were so

happy and proud of me because now I don’t have to really work and now I can use my savings to pay for undergrad,” she said. Ducey, a nursing major from Eldersburg, Maryland, is relieved after receiving this award, and plans on using the money allotted for her undergrad to-

“‘I have been so blessed with my scholarships.’” Photo courtesy of Amanda Saleh

wards her graduate degree. She plans on becoming a nurse practitioner. The co-chairs of the event were Sally and Robert Smith, class of ‘72. The Smiths also established the Robert and Sally Smith Business Scholarship for outstanding business majors. Before serving as the co-chair, Mr. Smith was a member of the CBPM advisory board, WCU Alumni Association board of directors and a senior vice president at Dassault Falcon. The event could not have been done without the help of The Golden Rams Society, who served as hospitality staff. Catering was provided by New Street Catering. The Presidential Scholarship is one of the highest merit scholarships that West Chester University offers. This scholarship entitles recipients to $7,000 a year, which is redeemable for four years, contingent upon the recipient maintaining a 3.25 GPA. This scholarship has awarded an estimated $1.4 million to students since 1983. Over 130 Presidential Scholarships have been granted. Amanda Saleh is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with minors in Arabic and Journalism.

Amanda Mills is a fourth-year student majoring in political science. AM836938@wcupa.edu.

AS821872@wcupa.edu


Features

April 16, 2018 rPage 11

By Emily Rodden

Photo courtesy of Emily Rodden.

Staff Writer

PART 3. ne night I was walking into the Borderlinks office and I overheard Derik Alvarez telling his story to a group of volunteers on his migration journey, walking through the desert and being detained in America. Derik is a member of the Garifuna Tribe in Honduras, which is a tribe of Africans that had escaped slavery in Spain on boats and arrived in Honduras. He was in the Honduran Military for four years of his life; being a part of the military in Honduras is very risky because the gangs will come for you. The gangs had threatened his life and so he fled Honduras in search of a more secure life. His journey through Mexico was a rough one because of the color of his skin. He was targeted by Mexican immigration as well as the police. He would hide in underpopulated areas and only come out when he needed food and to ask people for money. He rode the “Bestia” to go north. He was robbed on this train by gangs as well. To be taken into America, he had to smuggle drugs into the country because the gangs would kill him otherwise. You have to remember that if there was no market for illegal drugs in America, people like Derik wouldn’t be smuggling them across the border. We, as Americans, create the

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

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market for these drug smugglers. Anyway, he crossed the borders with these smugglers and managed to get away from them but had no idea which way to go. He got lost in the desert and he came across a lovely woman who put him in touch with a group called “No Más Muertes,” the humanitarian aid organization, basically saving his life. No Más Muertes gave him a place to stay and tended to his wounds. Shortly after he continued his journey through the desert, he was caught by the border patrol at one of their checkpoints. He was placed in a detention center. These detention centers are worse than the actual prison systems be-

cause the people in them aren’t American citizens. In this detention center he wasn’t allowed to make a single call for three months, and once he could finally call someone, he called one of the volunteers with “No Más Muertes” to see how they could help him. The volunteer he called worked on letters of sponsorship to send to Derik’s judge to be granted bond. To be detained in Arizona, you have to go through a process called Operation Streamline, which is the legal process all migrants go through to get their due process in court. Operation Streamline dehumanizes people and doesn’t take into consideration everyone’s personal experiences. Each per-

son is just another number and another paper to fill out for these judges. After six months in a detention center he was granted a bond set at $12,000. Derik was working in the detention center but only making $1 an hour. If he didn’t have help, it would have taken Derik 32 years to pay off his bond. When he was released he had to go through the only bond company in Arizona that allows migrants to get bonds and to be released from detention. Most people have to wait in prison until they can pay off their bonds. His bond compay granted him a bond but with high stipulations attached. The bond was originally $12,000, but each month he had to pay an additional $420 as a fee for the ankle monitor he was wearing. He now has to live with an ankle monitor, charging it for two hours a day, and basically still being in prison in his own house. But if this ankle bracelet is removed he will no longer have to pay the fee. He is undocumented; it is very hard for undocumented people in Arizona to find work. A recent community member just donated $4,600 to Derik’s cause so now all they need is $5,000 to remove his bracelet. Derik is currently asking for asylum as a political refugee in America. I honestly can’t do Derik’s story any justice; hearing it from his mouth was a privilege because he is such an animated, optimistic and funny guy. I think it’s important that his story is heard and if you want to help Derik in his journey, this is his gofundme page. Please go and donate to him and support him: https://www.youcaring.com/derikalvarez-1095889 Make a difference in combating the human rights crisis happening on American soil!

Emily Rodden is a second-year student majoring in anthropology.  ER861398@wcupa.edu.


Page 12 rApril 16, 2018

STUDENT CAMPAIGNS AGAINST VAPING

By Victoria Molumo

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Staff Writer

hile some people vape or smoke e-cigarettes to ease themselves off smoking tobacco, some people do it because it is perceived as cool and because they don’t want to miss out on trying a new trend. When we began our college journey, one of the things at the top of our lists was to assimilate and try new things. The wave of independence hits us, and we realized that it was our time to explore. Curiosity is a human trait that’s rather hard to erase. We bask in the glory of the new freedom and sometimes, we baptize ourselves in unhealthy behaviors like vaping or smoking. When Casey Stover, a graduate

student pursuing a major in public health, moved to WCU, she wanted to make an impact. Casey did thorough research on the issues on campus and she found out there is a high prevalence of e-cigarette use. About 25 percent of WCU students have vaped at least once, and vaping among WCU students is about 10 percent higher than the national average. Detecting the problem was just the beginning. As we all know, finding the root cause of the problem, and then creating and implementing solutions are the difficult parts. The higher percentage of vaping at WCU is said to be directly correlated with conforming to social norms. The more students think other students are vaping or smoking, the more like-

ly they are to vape themselves. In reality, as explained by Stover, seven out of ten first-year WCU students have never vaped, and four out of five students have never smoked. Although a majority of students have never participated in vaping, we still think it’s a lot more common than they are. Having realized what the issue was, Stover developed a seven-week smoking campaign that addresses the prevalence of smoking at WCU. The smoking campaign idea was brought to life with the help of Dr. Gopal Sankaran, Dr. Whitney Katoral, Mary Jane Rogan and Sherry Mendez. For the campaign, Stover hung posters and yard signs all around campus. The plan for the campaign is to share information on how many students

have never smoked. Stover said, “[By] adjusting the perception on use, in return we hope to see a lowering of the prevalence.” The first phase of the campaign is coming to an end, and the second phase is asking for support from WCU first-year students. Stover is urging first-year students to fill out the anonymous survey online, as participants will be entered to win one of ten $50 Amazon gift cards. Although college is a place to learn and grow, Stover’s smoking campaign definitely brings to mind that we should be aware that conforming to behaviors may not have a positive impact on our growth. Victoria Molumo is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in international business.  VM859943@wcupa.edu.


rApril 16, 2018

Page 13

HOMETOWN HEROES: BAYARD RUSTIN (PART 2) By Celine Butler Staff Writer

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ast week, we took a look at Bayard Rustin’s youth and the ideologies and individuals that inspired his principles. This week, we get to see these principles in action, turning our attention to the boycotts and marches fathered by the noteworthy civil rights leader. In discussing these achievements, we can bring Rustin out of the shadows and celebrate the legacy of the man deemed by historian John D’Emilio as the “lost prophet” of the Civil Rights movement. In the previous installment of this series, I mentioned Rustin’s arrest in 1947. After protesting the segregated public transit system in North Carolina, he served 21 days on the road gang for violating Jim Crow laws. What I did not mention, however, is that Rustin was one of the organizers of the Freedom Ride predecessor. In addition to a man named George Houser, Rustin began a campaign called the Journey of Reconciliation. The two sent a mix of black and white riders to travel the upper south via bus and test segregation on public transit. Because of this decision to keep the Deep South out of the tour, the campaign was met with less resistance and garnered little media attention. Though the Freedom Rides of 1961 have a greater impact on civil rights history, the Journey of Reconciliation served as the foundation for the historical event. After his time spent in confinement, Rustin returned to the civil rights scene even more invigorated than before. In 1956, Rustin was encouraged by civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph to assist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the Montgomery bus boycott. The boycott, taking place from December 5, 1955 to December 20, 1956, is considered the first large-scale anti-segregation demonstration. During his time with King, Rustin shared his Gandhi-inspired

protest techniques, persuading King to adopt the non-violent methods that he is so often celebrated for. Rustin’s administrative efforts helped make Martin Luther King Jr. a prominent leader in the civil rights movement while also ensuring the success of the boycott now regarded as a pivotal event in United States history. In 1960, Rustin faced further adversi-

would celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, and the date, in addition to all other details, was carefully accounted for. However, the year would also mark a seismic shift in public attitudes as police brutality was televised in Birmingham, Alabama. The nation watched in May 1963 as police in Birmingham used clubs, fire hoses and

Photo Courtesy of the Library of Congress

ty because of his homosexuality. Black leader Rep. Adam Clayton Powell Jr. was angry that Rustin and King were planning a march outside of the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The Harlem Congressman felt threatened by the pair’s increasing amounts of power and influence and threatened to “reveal” that Rustin and King were having an affair. Though the “affair” was completely fictional, King, fearing for his reputation, canceled the demonstration and Rustin was forced to resign. Fortunately for the movement, Rustin did not let this development hinder him from making further contributions. While he spent two years relatively inactive, he quickly returned to the civil rights scene and made history as the organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Rustin was recruited in 1962 by A. Philip Randolph, who had a vision for the monumental event. The year 1963

dogs against African Americans participating in nonviolent anti-segregation protests. While the Birmingham Public Safety Commissioner Eugene “Bull” Connor had been using these tactics for years, previously isolated people from all across the country finally saw the harsh reality of racism in the United States. The situation in Birmingham forced the Kennedy administration to draft new civil rights legislation, and King had renewed interest in working with Rustin and Randolph in light of these events. Rustin and King reunited in Alabama and decided to expand the march’s focus to “jobs and freedom” instead of “freedom” alone. In an attempt to keep Rustin hidden, Rustin was appointed deputy to A. Philip Randolph who would serve as director of the march. But opponents of the civil rights movement still targeted Rustin relentlessly, despite his carefully calculated behind-the-scenes position. Director of

the FBI J. Edgar Hoover passed Rustin’s arrest record to segregationist Senator Strom Thurmond from South Carolina. Thurmond spoke to the Senate shortly after receiving this information to declare that the march was being coordinated by a “pervert.” Luckily, his words carried little weight with movement leaders, as the attack came from a racist Southern politician. Unlike the last time his sexual orientation was brought under fire, movement leaders stood by him and continued to plan for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. On August 28, 1963, 250,000 people marched through Washington, D.C. It was on that day that Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his infamous “I Have a Dream” speech, one of the most potent social and political statements of the 20th century. A year later, thanks to the efforts of individuals like Bayard Rustin, Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. While the United States still has a long way to go in ensuring equality for all, the bill was a monumental step in the right direction. Before his death on August 24, 1987, Rustin continued to preach for social equality. In the 1980s, Rustin became increasingly vocal about gay rights and the oppression of the gay community. Though Rustin’s status as a gay black man made him a target for subjugation in American society, Rustin armed himself with courage, fortitude and unwavering principles in the fight to make the world a better place. So while he does not have a day named after him or his face plastered on t-shirts and posters, we can still celebrate the man who permanently changed our country for the better. Though he has since passed, shining light on Bayard Rustin’s accomplishments and adopting his teachings means that we are one step closer to making the dream of equality for all a reality. Celine Butler is a second-year student majoring in psychology with a minor in French.  CB869017@wcupa.edu


Page 14 rApril 16, 2018

SPRING FEVER By Marie Br ay

Pr acticum Writer

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hat time of year is approaching! The snow is melting, the temperature is rising and people are slowly coming out of their coopedup houses. The flowers and trees are blooming, creating the aroma of light scents and fresh air. Kids are starting to run off the buses in order to catch the last few hours of sunlight of the day. You guessed it, spring is here! Which means spring fever is starting to take over the minds and bodies of the cold and restless humans who were itching for the winter season to be over. No, you will not be bedridden; however, you may respond to allergies due to the rising pollen count. To start off, spring fever used to be bad news. Centuries ago, spring fever, or spring disease, was called scurvy. Scurvy is the lack of vitamin C, and in the 15th to 18th centuries, it was a major threat to life. This mainly affected poorly nourished sailors, but it caused the person’s gums to bleed, gradual teeth loss and opened up previously healed wounds. The name spring fever came about because it occurred during that season and lasted up until the 18th century when it turned into the behavioral and mental change of a human due to weather climate. Of course people’s bodies can still lack in vitamin C, but spring fever is starting to take on a more positive light in today’s society. As time went by, scientists started measuring spring fever and signs people would show when they’re experiencing it. According to Michael Terman, director of the Center for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms at Columbia University, “I would say it begins as a rapid and yet unpredictable fluctuating mood and energy state that contrasts with the relative low [of the] winter months that precede it.” For example, if you have the sudden urge for walking or running outside, craving healthier foods, sleeping less, smiling very often or cleaning, they are some signs you are ready to get rid of this cold weather. According to Jordan Brown, who is a junior at West Chester Uni-

versity, “I typically get spring fever around this time of the year when I am over the cold and snow. I want the warmth, sun, and spring apparel to make an appearance. This can affect me because if I have spring fever and just hope that the temperature will begin to rise and the flowers start

crease in serotonin and decrease in melatonin. Serotonin has a wide variety of functions in the body, but its primary nickname is the “happy chemical,” because it contributes to overall wellbeing and happiness. Since there is more sunlight, that creates more energy in the body which also leads to

Photo via Flickr.

to bloom. When this doesn’t begin to happen I get moody when it comes to the weather everyday.” Once the abominable and horrific darkness of the winter solstice comes to an end on March 21, the seemingly ever-elusive spring birds begin chirping again and fill those of us who are working with a sense of purpose to make the most of the newly lengthened day. Daylight saving time is the start of spring fever, especially for people working full-time jobs, because they are not walking out at the end of the day in pitch-black, freezing weather. West Chester University student Nicolette Boyd said, “I definitely get spring fever because I hate the winter. I hate the cold. I hate having to bundle up to go outside and shivering all day long.” A huge cause of this sudden burst of energy is from sunlight. Something about that shining, bright sun gets people energized and happier. Two chemical changes happen in the body due to sunlight exposure: in-

people sleeping less. This is also the time where seasonal affective disorder (SAD), also known as winter depression, starts to get lifted due to the increase in serotonin levels in the body. On the other hand, melatonin does the opposite; this chemical helps control your sleep and wake cycles. The increased sunshine signals the body to produce less melatonin, which plays an important role in sleep. “Once the weather gets warm, my thoughts are just always happy and I’m just excited about life,” said Spencer McKercher, senior at West Chester University. As diurnal creatures, humans are programmed to be outdoors while the sun is shining and home in bed at night. This is why melatonin is produced during the dark hours and stops upon exposure to daylight, which is when serotonin levels start to rise in the body. High melatonin levels correspond to long nights and short days, whereas high serotonin levels in the presence of melatonin reflect short

nights and longer days. Due to these two chemical changes, people find ways to be outside or keep the happiness flowing. This causes an increase in exercising and sex drive; obstetricians report high rates of unplanned pregnancies in the spring, according to the LA Times, which may be due to seasonal variation in sperm counts or the springtime peak of the “reproductive fuel” that produces testosterone in men and triggers ovulation in women, according to Scientific American. Another benefit to sunlight, but not too much sun, is the body receiving more vitamin C and vitamin D. Vitamin D can be synthesized in the skin through a reaction triggered by exposure to UVB radiation from the sun, unlike other vitamins that must be obtained through food. Aside from vitamin C, a lack of vitamin D is also very harmful for the body. According to Nathaniel Mead of Environmental Health Perspectives, “At least 1,000 different genes governing virtually every tissue in the body are now thought to be regulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, the active form of the vitamin, including several involved in calcium metabolism and neuromuscular and immune system functioning.” Vitamin C can be obtained through the lotion you use on your skin to help protect from the sun, and vitamin D is synthesized through the sun into your skin. Therefore, the sun plays an active role in helping your body contain these two vitamins. These are two very important vitamins for the body, therefore it is imperative to take supplements or food that is high in these vitamins throughout the winter months. Did you know almost one-third of Americans are not consuming enough vitamin C? In addition to being a powerful antioxidant, vitamin C helps prevent cancers and enhances cancer-fighting drugs, lowers risk of stroke and heart disease, lowers body inflammation, naturally slows aging, boosts immune system and improves physical performance.

Continued on pg. 22


April 16, 2018 rPage 15

ADVENTURE FOR THE PERFECT TREAT: DIA DOCE By Kirsten Magas Special to the quad

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hiccupped as I hurried against the brisk wind down High Street from a friend’s house in town, realizing I hadn’t sipped on any water today. Laptop in hand, I was prepared for another adventure to a small cupcake shop that had not only been featured on the Food Network show “Cupcake Wars,” but won! I was prepared for sweet bliss. After all, “Dia Doce” translates from Portuguese as “Sweet Day.”

“Acoustic music played lightly over the faint sound of running water and dishes clanging together in the back. Another customer tapped his foot in his platform shoes and hummed along...” “Close front door,” a voice spoke robotically as I stepped into the famous cupcake shop in West Chester. Too much watching of the Netflix Original “Black Mirror” made me question if I had stepped into some dystopian society, but the voice seemed to be a security system of some sort—nothing to worry about, just the precaution the owner took against the poor heat retention the older buildings in West Chester tend to have. Very weird doorbell. Metal stools nailed to the hardwood floor and a hardwood bar-style counter occupied much of the center room space and led to the back, where I’m assuming the baking area

Photo courtesy of Dia Doce via Facebook.

would be. “Hi! What can I do for you today?” The girl—probably a few years older than me—with bright blue eyes wearing lazy, ripped jeans walked toward the cupcake display under an out-ofplace chandelier, where I was standing. “I heard that I’ve just gotta try this place, that you’ve got the best cupcakes ever,” I said. “Well, we’ve got peanut butter blackout, party cake, bailey’s irish cream, chocolate chip cookie dough … ” She continued listing, but I had already made my decision. “I’ll take the Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough,” I hiccuped. “And something

cold to drink.” “We’ve got iced tea, iced coffee and water.” I decided on a triple berry iced tea with two pumps of the liquified pure cane sugar from the bottle on the wooden shelves behind the bar, which I have to report as some of the freshest iced tea I’ve ever tasted. $6.18 for one cupcake and a 16 oz iced tea—not too expensive, but not cheap either. I took a seat at one of the tables between two colorful, hand-painted chairs, which were generally not comfortable to sit at for the duration of writing this very article. However, I can’t complain about such a warm and artsy environment as the one they’ve created.

Acoustic music played lightly over the faint sound of running water and dishes clanging together in the back. Another customer tapped his foot in his platform shoes and hummed along after chatting with the cashier about how her boyfriend is doing. Like most five-year-old children would do, I licked the icing off my cupcake first to find the texture resembled cookie dough so much I worried if it was even healthy to be eating. Then, with critical intent, I sunk my teeth into the most velvety chocolate cake. My inner sugar demon had awoken. There is no professional way to say this: Dia Doce makes bangin’ cupcakes. Needless to say, my expectations had been surpassed. The oddest doorbell I’ve ever heard rang again and again, “Close front door.” Once it was a mother and son coming in with such a list of allergies—peanuts, tree nuts and eggs— that Dia Doce surprisingly accommodated, along with gluten allergies and providing vegan options. Once it was an older woman coming in not to buy cupcakes for herself, but to buy cupcakes for the next group of a grandmother and grandkids, who then decided to continue spreading the love and bought cupcakes for a couple that came in, which inspired me to add to the cycle just before I exited. Dia Doce doesn’t just sell amazing cupcakes, it has its own little community. Even a small act of kindness can brighten a person’s day and it made my heart smile to see that in action.

Rating: 9.5/10 Kirsten Magas is a second-year student majoring in English with minors in biology and creative writing.  KM867219@wcupa.edu.


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WCU ALZHEIMER’S FOUNDATION OF AMERICA By K aitlin Brinker Pr acticum Writer

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raduating senior Megan Rogers is leaving one last impression on WCU’s campus before leaving in May. This week the WCU chapter of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America was recognized as an official organization by the Student Government Association (SGA). Coincidently, the day the organization became official was also the third anniversary of the death of Rogers’s grandmother, who was a huge inspiration for her to bring the foundation to WCU. It was when Rogers was applying for scholarships her senior year of high school that she came across a scholarship through the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. Unfortunately, she was not awarded the scholarship; however, Sherri Chang of the foundation emailed Rogers in October 2017 asking if she would be interested in starting a chapter of the organization on WCU’s campus. Rogers was immediately interested, as she understood from her own experience why bringing andorganization like the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America was worth the effort to be established on WCU’s campus. “When I came to West Chester as a freshman my grandma was sick with Alzheimer’s, it was our sixth year taking care of her as a family and I didn’t really have anyone else to talk to about it ... here I didn’t know anyone. So that really was sad for me because I didn’t know who to turn to,” explained Rogers. “There is a lot of guilt associated with taking care of someone with Alzheimer’s because it’s like, ‘I’m really frustrated with you, but is it okay because you aren’t going to remember it?,’ but no it’s not because that is someone you

love … and it’s hard to know that you or your parent or someone in your family is going to develop this disease as well,” said Rogers. With nine steps to fulfill in order to make the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America a recognized organization on campus, Rogers knew that she may not be able to fulfill the requirements until the spring semester. The first step would be getting an advisor to oversee the organization. Luckily, it just so happened that Rogers was taking a course with Dr. Roman, a professor in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department, who is currently working on memory research.

ficial bylaws for the WCU chapter of Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. “I sat down with Jenny Yost, who helps with new student organizations and she helped me a lot. I’ve been talking to the Parliamentarian of SGA, Elizabeth [Gibson] pretty much every day for the past couple of weeks. She reviewed my bylaws with me,” said Rogers. After all of this hard work, Rogers was not sure she would see the day when the organization would be officially recognized by SGA. It seemed that SGA was booked solid for the remainder of the year and there were no available meeting times before her graduation. Despite the setback, Rog-

Rogers asked if Dr. Roman would be interested in advising the organization and he enthusiastically agreed. The next step was to reach out to President Ryan Long and Vice President Tyler Lonergan of the Student Government Association to see who to contact next. Long and Lonergan then provided Rogers with a list of all of the health science-related clubs on campus. Rogers then reached out to the presidents of those organizations to see who may be interested in helping her form this new organization. She was met with positive responses almost immediately. With board members established, the next step was to create the of-

ers kept a positive attitude about it. “I told them that if they could do anything that it would be great, and they said, ‘We will do whatever we can’ and sometimes people can’t present at SGA meetings,” explained Rogers. Luckily, Rogers was contacted on Friday, March 30, that a spot had opened up on Tuesday, April 3, just four short days later. Rogers said that she felt somewhat nervous and unprepared to get everything together in just a few short days. “My E-board members have been so supportive through everything and it has been great … and today I got the email that [Alzheimer’s Foundation of America] is a recognized organiza-

tion,” said Rogers. “The three things we are going to focus on are education, advocacy and a support group. The Alzheimer’s Foundation of course mainly focuses on Alzheimer’s, but there are other memory loss-related diseases, like dementia, and there are different types of dementia and there are different risk factors for that, so it is important to know what those things are, so that is the education aspect,” said Rogers. Rogers would love to have the club volunteering off campus as well as holding a healthy aging day in which the club shares ways to preserve your mind. Things like doing crossword puzzles and using your non-dominant hand help to make new connections in your brain. These are just a few examples of what Rogers would like to see the organization do. This project has become her baby this semester ,says Rogers. Despite graduating in May, she will only be a short distance away in New Jersey and would love to come back a few times a year to check in and see how everything is going. “I’m going to miss West Chester a lot, so I think this is a nice way to still be connected,” said Rogers. Reflecting on her family and all of the hard work she has put in the last few months, Rogers recalls the most meaningful part of the journey: “Today is actually three years to the day since my grandma passed away, and today is the day my club got recognized, so it means a lot to me.” Kaitlin Brinker is a fourth-year communication studies major with a minor in journalism.  KB835149@wcupa.edu.


April 16, 2018

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CALENDAR 3:00 PM

Philadelphia, PA

3:00 PM

WCU Campus

Baseball. WCUPA vs. Wilmington University (Del.) Bill Giles Tournament.

Men’s Tennis. WCUPA vs. Harford Community College.

Indiana, PA

Men’s Golf. WCUPA vs. Cecil Spadafora Invitational.

4:00 PM

WCU Campus

Women’s Lacrosse. WCUPA vs. Bloomsburg University.

12:00 PM

Sykes 254

Sutainability Research & Practice Seminar. A weekly lunch-hour lecture by WCU faculty from a wide variety of disciplines (Art to Biology, Public Management to Nutrition) on topics related to environmental, social, and economic sustainability. This week we welcome Dr. Jeff Osgood (WCU Senior Vice Provost) as he talks about Local economic development and sustainability policies: Exploring the relationships.

1:00 PM East Stroudsburg, PA

Baseball. WCUPA vs. East Stroudsburg University.

East Stroudsburg, PA

Women’s Golf. WCUPA vs. ESU Invitational at Glen Brook.

2:00 PM

WCU Campus

12:30 PM

Main 200

WCU Creative Writing Series: Mat Johnson Craft Talk. Join WCU’s Creative Writing Series in welcoming award-winning author and WCU alum Mat Johnson in this free event that is open to the public.

7:15 PM

Sykes 005

WCU Creative Writing Series: Mat Johnson Reading. The second part of this installment of the Creative Writing Series featuring Mat Johnson, author of prose novels “Pym,” “Drop” and “Loving Day” as well as graphic novels such as “Incognegro” and “Dark Rain”; this event is free and open to the public.

Softball. WCUPA vs. Wilmington University (Del.).

10:00 AM

Bloomsburg, PA

Men’s Tennis. WCUPA vs. PSAC Semifinals PSAC Tournament.

1:00 PM

WCU Campus

1:00 PM

WCU Campus

Baseball. WCUPA vs. Kutztown University.

Softball. WCUPA vs. Shippensburg University.

Wilmington, DE

3:00 PM

WCU Campus

3:00 PM

WCU Campus

Softball. WCUPA vs. Shippensburg University.

4:00 PM

WCU Campus

SATURDAY

Women’s Tennis. WCUPA vs. Goldey-Beacom College.

TBD TBD

Women’s Tennis. WCUPA vs. PSAC Quarter Finals (if necessary) PSAC Tournament.

11:30 PM

University Hall

Tune-Up Tuesday. Join us near the Bicycle Fix-It Stand in front of University Hall from 11:30am - 12:30pm for Tune-Up Tuesday! English Professor and Bicycle Commuter Michael Burns will demonstrate simple bike maintenance skills. Even if you don’t have your bike with you, stop by, say hello and meet some of WCU’s avid bicyclists.

12:00 PM

Philly Campus

Coffe Chat and Tour | WCU Philadelphia Campus. Coffee Chats provide an opportunity to learn more about the undergraduate and graduate programs available at West Chester University in Philadelphia. Registration is preferred for the 30-minute session, which includes a tour of the Academic Suite and Student Success Center. Click here to register! If you would like to meet at a time not listed, please email ksmack@wcupa.edu directly to make arrangements.

10:00 AM

Sykes 251

SAC G5 Committee Meeting. Join us for a meeting of the Sustainability Advisory Council’s G5 (Gordon, Grounds, Gardens, Green Roofs, Gastronomical Systems) Committee. All students, faculty, and staff are welcome to attend.

Softball. WCUPA vs. Wilmington University (Del.).

ALL-DAY 5:30 PM

Baseball. WCUPA vs. Kutztown University.

5:30 PM 11:00 AM

WCU’s Annual Banana Day. WCU’s annual Banana Day is a student rite of spring featuring the doling out of more than 3,000 free bananas at almost every corner of campus, peeling around corners in banana and gorilla costumes, and competing in a bunch of bananathemed games all over the University to win coveted Banana Day t-shirts. A great stress-reducer for students prior to exams, Banana Day was founded in 1996 by WCU alumnus Rodolfo “Rudy” Tellez, who organized the distribution of thousands of bananas across campus as a way to celebrate WCU spirit.

The Quad

The Quad

WCU Symphony Orchestra Presents: Concert on the Quad. Join the WCU Symphony Orchestra for its second annual outdoor Concert on the Quad! Bring your picnic supper as you listen to WCU’s Symphonic Orchestra!

ALL-DAY

Chester, PA

ALL-DAY East Stroudsburg, PA

Women’s Track & Field. WCUPA vs. All American Invitational.

ALL-DAY East Stroudsburg, PA

TBD TBD

10:00 AM

10:00 AM

The Quad

Walkout | Dub C For Our Lives. Join students across the country on National School Walkout Day, by leaving class and joining the other memebers on the Quad. Make your voice heard, and take a stand!

Kutztown, PA

Baseball. WCUPA vs. Kutztown University.

Berlin to Broadway with Kurt Weill, a Musical Voyage. Berlin to Broadway with Kurt Weill, a Musical Voyage explores the musical catalog of the Tony-Award winning composer, from his work prior to fleeing 1930s Nazi Germany to the height of his international fame based in the US during the 1950s. Weill’s German work challenged government corruption and corporate greed while his American work addressed issues of racism and warfare. Featuring songs from The Threepenny Opera, Street Scene, and Lost in the Stars to name a few, set sail with this revue as we uncover a story of immigration that is as relevant today as it was when first made.

Women’s Tennis. WCUPA vs. PSAC Championship PSAC Tournament.

WCU Campus

Women’s Rugby. WCUPA vs. Alumni Match.

Women’s Track & Field. WCUPA vs. Weidner Invitational (Distance Only).

Women’s Tennis. WCUPA vs. PSAC Semifinals PSAC Tournament.

Softball. WCUPA vs. East Stroudsburg University.

TBD TBD

Chester, PA

Men’s Track & Field. WCUPA vs. Weidner Invitational (Distance Only).

3:00 PM East Stroudsbrug, PA

7:30 PM Main Stage Theatre

3:00 PM East Stroudsburg, PA

3:00 PM

WCU Campus

Women’s Lacrosse. WCUPA vs. Lock Haven University.

3:00 PM

Baseball. WCUPA vs. Kutztown University.

Baseball. WCUPA vs. East Stroudsburg University.

1:00 PM

Men’s Track & Field. WCUPA vs. All American Invitational.

SUNDAY

Gordan

Earth Week Events. Tree planting at the Gordon Natural Area

1:00 PM

Kutztown, PA

Baseball. WCUPA vs. Kutztown University.

1:00 PM 1:00 PM East Stroudsbrug, PA

Softball. WCUPA vs. East Stroudsburg University.

Old Courthouse

Earth Week Events. March for the Environment w/ Sierra Club (refreshments provided).


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quadphotography@wcupa.edu

Jim Thorpe-Glen Onko Waterfall Tr ail By Maureen Farley Staff Writer

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arrow paved roads coiled around the outside of the mountain like a snake slithering around its prey before it’s time to strike. The gravel crunched and popped beneath the sluglike tires. As our car inched higher and higher my ears began to pop, so I swallowed to relieve the discomfort as our car finally leveled into the grassy parking lot. With our shoes laced, and our packs set with food for the journey, we hopped out of the car with anticipation for the hard road ahead. As we approached the trail opening, a wooden sign with carved yellow letters warned “Danger ahead. Turn back unless you have climbing equipment.” My two best girlfriends and I only had granola bars to bring along, but we decided to go ahead and begin our hike up the Glen Onoko Trail of Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania. The opening of the trail was cast with refreshing shade from two boulders facing each other that supported a railway bridge overhead. The trail couldn’t be that bad if there were railroad tracks at the bottom. The damp, mossy boulders were stained with names, drawings and graffiti tags, whose colors seemed electric against the black slimy stone. We posed for some squad pictures against the grafiti to document the trip, and hoped to make it back out in spite of the ominous warning sign. To enter at the base of the trail, we had to pass through a dark cave. The cave growled with white noise echos, like holding your ear to a conch shell, except they were so loud that it felt as if your entire body was standing in the

hollow pink of the echoing conch. Bats laughed and fluttered fifteen feet above our heads, and our whispers of hesitation were amplified by the acoustics. “Holy shit, what are we doing” I asked, pondering all of the things in life that I wasn’t ready to lose by meeting death on an intense hiking trail in the middle of July. We continued through the cave, until light spilled through the other side, revealing another wooden sign explaining the trail’s significance, and an arrow pointing to a stack of rocks leading 70 feet up the mountain. And up we went, holding hands and helping to hoist each other up the rocks. There were several ledges to rest on, and several clear hand and foot holds, however because of the rain the night before, the rocks were almost impossible to grip. We used the dry t-shirts we wore to grip the rocks and to dry our hands off. I slipped, and the rock beneath me pierced my shin, and left me bloody and very sore. At the top of the bolder ladder, there was a hill slanted at a 45 degree angle . We chugged up the hill like the little engine that could, laughing and panting all the way. Native American Princess Onoko made this hike after making the journey in order to save her love. Legend says, she fell in love with a white settler, but their love was forbidden because of the cultural boundaries each lover faced. Her father, the chief, was horrified that his daughter fell for a white man, so the chief ordered that the man should be thrown over the side of the highest waterfall on the east side of the mountain. After Princess Onoko reached the top and discovered the murder, she dove off of the waterfall to meet her love again in spirit. Not only is the hike physically dangerous, but many visitors report supernatural occurrences. The easiest explanation is

that Princess Onoko and her love are catching up in the afterlife. We talked about the folklore as we climbed the obstacles along the trail. Slippery mud, downed trees, and piles of boulders blocked the trail that has been beaten into existence throughout the years from ghost hunters and eager hikers alike. The three of us agreed that Princess Onoko was being a bit too dramatic, but it did make for a beautiful Native American version of Romeo and Juliet. Above us, a magnificent canopy of kelly, sage, and hunter green leaves waved hello to us in the hot exhale of July’s breath. Ivy hugged the vast trunks of trees, while moss gave speckled kisses throughout their bark. About a quarter mile from the start of the hike, I started to hear a faint hush in the distance. With hurried excitement, our agile feet raced the through the brush toward the natural wonder that made the love story of Princess Onoko and her unrequited love: the Onoko Waterfall. The ten mile hike that would lead us over a thousand feet in elevation was just beginning. After about a half hour of following our ears toward the running water, we emerged from the green and found ourselves at the edge of a placid pool. The edges of the pool were clear and smooth, glimmering in the sun. Looking through the water’s edge, you’d be able to see the multicolored rocks and popcorn kernal pebbles at the bottom. I bent down to wash the sweat off of my forehead with the refreshing water. As I followed the ripples washing outwards toward the edge of the pool, My eyes were drawn to the epicenter of the crashing water, where the waterfall landed, and where Princess Onoko’s life ended. I wondered how it felt. The boulders lining the bottom of

the waterfall looked harder than normal behind the soft mist of the crashing water and amidst the roar of the flow. Peeking through the canopies, the sunlight penetrated the mist and painted a rainbow, speckled and transient. I closed my eyes and drowned in the peaceful violence of rushing water. We stopped to took off our shoes and socks and danced through the crisp pool. Playfulness bubbled out of us in laughter, and we frolicked like children with their puppies through the water, splashing one another. Sometimes in nature, you can have an incredibly peaceful moment where you forget that you live somewhere else, you’re called a human, and you have responsibilities. Somewhere in the heaviness of the July heat, the stickiness of the mud, the towering trees and the rejuvenating pool, I lost my concern for everything else in life. I washed my crusty blood off of my mosquito bite ridden leg, and we walked closer to the silver veil of the waterfall. Wading through the water towards bed of the waterfall made me feel so small. Mist from the friction of the crash stung my face. Through the wall of water just feet in front of me, I could see a figure standing and looking back at me. “Princess Onoko?” I thought to myself at first, preparing for an occult experience. “Yo we can climb up behind there!” my hiking partner Erica explained. Slightly disappointed that I wouldn’t be meeting the princess herself, I followed my barefoot friend to the corner of the waterfall where were a stack of

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rApril 16, 2018 March

“Waterfall” continued rocks piled like crooked teeth toward a ledge leading behind the waterfall. As we inched closer toward the water, our chattering turned to screaming in order to be heard above the bellow of the plummeting water. Now that we had a better view of the clay-colored rocks, I realized how steep they actually were, and how jagged the edges were. Carefully and intentionally, we climbed the rocks one at a time, trying to keep our center of gravity low and balanced. Jeanine made it to the top first and rolled toward the safety of the ledge. Her face lit up as she leaned against the rock face and looked out through the curtain of water. Erica and I followed. Breathing heavily, and moving like a toddler on a wet kitchen floor, I cautiously grabbed onto the rocks ahead of me. I stopped and looked down. I froze. Stuck on the edge of a rock between a pool of crashing water, and and scenic waterfall ledge, I thought about the tragic love story again, and imagined Onoko striking the bottom. I certainly wasn’t going to go out the same way. I focused on the rocks directly in front of me, and started singing in order to distract myself and wipe my mind from the idea of falling into the jagged rocks. I climbed higher and higher and was eventually eye to eye with the ledge. I grabbed hold of a rope that was nailed into the rock face, and pulled myself onto the ledge. I rolled onto the surface expressing the same relief that I watched Jeanine and Erica expieriene. I moved to my knees and wiped rock slime onto my shirt. Catching my breath, I turned to look at the water in front of me, and sat back onto my calves, weak in awe of the power, endurance and the wonder of nature. The furious wind aggressively whipped hair into my mouth as I turned to my friends trying to think of something to say that would describe the confusing feeling of being small and being a part of something magical all at once. “I have no words...” Jeanine yelled over the deafening rush of water. She said it best, I thought as I sat back and felt the rumble of the water beneath me. There was nothing to be said. We probably wouldn’t hear each other anyway. Maureen Farley is a third-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in theatre.

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Tales From the Ram’s Horn Diner By Kirsten Magas Special to the Quad

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inally, April had brought a warm day. The winter had lifted its curse of skin-pinching temperatures. I opened my eyes to the pleasant sound of finches singing for the first time in months before attaching myself to my PlayStation. I had time to kill before my parents arrived for their once-per-semester visit to me at college. Home is about an hour and a half from West Chester—I understand why visits aren’t so frequent. It’s tough to be so far away when you miss so much. My phone started buzzing incessantly. I could already hear the two outside my window, wrapped up in an argument that most likely started with a wrong turn halfway through the drive over. I quickly scooped up the candy wrappers that had accumulated around my bean bag chair to prevent my mother’s almost-sure comments on my cleanliness. I caught my mom stepping out of the late 1990s, generic “family car” waiting at the meters outside. There’s nothing quite like a mother’s love. She hugged me a bit too tight, but I didn’t think much of it. “Where are we going to eat?” My dad looked to me. I looked to my mom. “Does the Ram’s Horn Diner work for you two?” My mom playfully rolled her eyes. “Works for me.” My dad and I said in unison. He looked at my mother as if he were anticipating a statement. He took her hand. The Ram’s Horn Diner wasn’t a far walk, but time went slowly with every passing face in town. We took a corner booth as per mom’s request in the old-fashioned diner with metallic-coated everything. “I’m so happy to see you two! School has been going great—much better than last semester. I’m in the running for president of games club and the current president has been advocating for me to the other members. I’m almost sure I’m going to get it. My grades are great in all my classes, except for

physics. There’s so much math in it, but I’m still passing. What about you guys?” I place my elbows on the table much to my mother’s disdain, but she says nothing. I’m eagerly awaiting stories of the new puppy causing chaos or the wildly rude patients my mom deals with at the hospital, but there’s a second too long of silence. My mom’s eyes rested on my dad. I’ve seen this glance before. The last time I saw it, the two had to break it to me that they were selling the house

ask for, more than the Thanksgiving he burnt his whole palm on the turkey pan, more than the time he had to carry me up his basement steps to my dad after I had been pushed by his son, more than being unable to apologize for not having a beating heart to attend the next birthday party or graduation. I didn’t understand, but my sinuses did. I could already feel my eyes stinging and throat tensing. “What can I get for you all today?”

“The Ram’s Horn Diner wasn’t a far walk, but time went slowly with every passing face in town.” I had grown up in. Whatever they’re about to say is bad news. “Honey, Uncle David passed away.” My mom spits the words out like sour candy. I laughed. “What?” I shifted a bit in my seat. “He... Uhm...” My mom is looking for words that aren’t cliché. “It was an accident.” My dad chimes in. “He’s in a better place.” I can’t help but think that was a stupid thing to say. There can’t be a better place than here, fingers still able to hold the bowling ball custom-made to fit his, fingers still able to hold his loved ones. I swore the finches stopped chirping their songs. “How?” I didn’t know why I asked because I already knew. My uncle had a sickness, a very permanent kind of sickness that you don’t really need a doctor to tell you you have. It’s a sickness that weighs heavy on motivation to get out of bed and the desire for cigarettes. He wasn’t less beautiful because of it. He still cracked jokes and never forgot a birthday. The skin didn’t even wrinkle by his eyes and his hair was another three years from going grey. My curiosity made me wonder if it were pills or a train, not because I’m morbid, but because I wonder if it hurt him more than the alarm clock subjecting him to another day he didn’t

The waitress looked at me. I ordered pancakes that I knew I wouldn’t touch. Conversation returned to as a normal as it could and that bothered me. After lunch, my parents walked me back to my dorm, hugged me tight again, and drove home. I laid in bed and stared out the window. The newly blossomed tree branches hanging looked more like a sulk than just gravity at work. My phone buzzed on my desk: “Missed call from Zoey.” I scrolled through my contact list alphabetically to find her name but stopped at “Uncle David.” I glanced at the name for a second, then called. After a few rings, I reached his voicemail. “Hi, you’ve reached David Wick. I’m sorry I can’t get to the phone right now, leave a message and I’ll get back to you. Or maybe not.” Beep. Of course, I didn’t expect anyone to answer. I smiled as hot tears I had been holding for too long overflowed onto my cheeks. Eventually, his number will get disconnected, reassigned, and his voice will be overwritten. Dropping my phone on the space next to my pillow, I closed my eyes and listened to the finches sing once again. Kirsten Magas is a second-year student majoring in English.


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April 16, 2018

THE QUAD CROSSWORD

CLASSIFIEDS

The Quad SuDoKu Fill in the grid so that each of the numbers 1 - 9 appears once & only once in each row, each column, and each 3x3 square.

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Down 1 Honshu city 2 Relinquished 3 Reprimand ending 4 Roleo item 5 Delaware’s Twelvemile Circle, e.g. 6 11th Greek letter 7 Works of Sappho 8 Liq. measures 9 Fox Movietone piece 10 In that connection 11 Outer coating 12 Curriculum range, briefly 13 Escaped 18 ‘70s embargo gp. 19 Tactic on a mat 24 Wrestler Flair 25 Minute minute pt. 26 Frail sci-fi race 28 “Elmer Gantry” novelist 29 Where the iris is 30 Gambler’s giveaway 31 Tries to learn 32 Good-natured taunt 33 Humerus neighbor 34 “There’s nothing wrong with me” 39 Checked in 40 Driver’s needs 41 Opera house section 44 Result of too much suds? 47 Green shade 49 Fleshy-leaved plant 50 The BBC’s “Pinwright’s Progress” is reportedly the first TV one 51 Crazy way to run 54 Band that sang “The Star-Spangled Banner” a cappella at the 2000 World Series

Solutions will be published 4/23/18

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Center for International Programs, WCU. $625 per semester. The Center for International Programs (CIP) currently has a position opening for an Education Abroad Graduate Assistant for the 2018-2019 academic year. This position would work within the CIP, with specific focus on Education Abroad, including study, intern, volunteer, and teach abroad programs. This position will be responsible for assisting with study abroad outreach and program promotion, attending Preview Days and Accepted Student Days to represent the office, assisting with study abroad program presentations across campus, providing support for event planning for various CIP events throughout the year, and completing other study abroad related duties, as assigned. Interested graduate students should send a resume and cover letter explaining their desire to work in this position and their qualifications to studyabroad@ wcupa.edu by Monday, May 14, 2018.

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Fox Pool Managment; Locations all over the area. Duties: Keep swimmers safe and enforce rules. We provide raiming for Red Cross Lifeguarding Certification. Go to website or call 215-860-7125. www. foxpoolmanagement. com.

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Philadelphia / West Chester KOA Campgroun. Daily cleaning of campground’s 2 bathhouses.Maintain cleanliness of campground’s laundry facility, recreation building and 5other2 buildings as needed.Clean and maintain 19 cabins 9campground’s 7 as they are rented.Provide 8guests 1 with excellent customer service. Intersted should contact 7applicants 8 campground manager by phone; Cara Mason (610) 6291-8383 3

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Room Sales and Hospitality Associate4Penns 6 Woods Winery is seeking a part-time tasting room sales and hospitality We are ©associate. Philip A. Thompsen, Ph.D.searching for an outgoing individual that loves people, has a passion for wine, and can thrive in a high-energy atmosphere. This position entails selling wine and wine club memberships as well as advocating and telling the story of our small, family-owned winery. We strive to provide a memorable wine experience through our excellent customer service and high quality wine. Please send cover letter (optional) © Philip A. Thompsen, Ph.D. and resume to Raechel@ pennswoodswinery.com.

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April 16, 2018 rPage 21

A KRILLER CONDITION By Abbey Bigler Staff Writer

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ou have probably heard that more and more polar ice is disappearing due to climate change. We have all seen the depressing clips of malnourished polar bears, right? However, some optimistic scientists thought that there might be at least one upside to reduced seasonal polar ice. They believed that the types of algae blooms occurring in open water where ice had previously formed were beneficial because they could help trap carbon in the ocean and prevent it from being released into the atmosphere. But, a study published in Biogeosciences on April 4 suggests that replacing seasonal ice with open water may have negative implications for marine polar species. Antarctic krill have long been studied for their key role in the Antarctic food web and their commercial value. However, the population has

decreased significantly as seasonal sea ice has decreased. Researchers believed that this may have been related to decreasing amounts of the specific algae that grow in icy areas and the marginal ice zone (MIZ), a seasonal zone of ice that partially melts over the summer, but they did not have a way of measuring this algae easily. Algae blooms in open water are typically measured by looking at satellite images, where they show up as green patches due to chlorophyll. However, algae blooms in icy areas cannot be measured in this way because they cannot be seen through the ice. In order to determine how the types of algae found in icy areas and the MIZ were related to krill growth, the researchers looked for two biomarkers in krill populations. Krill eating a type of algae that grows in ice, Berkeleya adeliensis, would contain a compound called IPSO25, while krill eating the algae most common in the MIZ would contain a compound called HBI III. The researchers collected and

tested krill from 47 sites in the Scotia Sea for these compounds. They found that IPSO25 was present in krill from 21 of the sites, HBI III was present in krill from all 47 and overall krill with high concentrations of both IPSO25 and HBI III were healthier than other krill. This means that krill feeding on algae from icy areas and the MIZ were healthier than those feeding primarily on open-water algae. The researchers believe this is because the ice protects the algae that grow in icy areas and the MIZ and allows them to photosynthesize more effectively and produce more nutrients than algae in open water, which are subject to wind and constantly churning seas. They also found that the positive effects of seasonal ice could be seen for some time after it melted. Krill in areas where seasonal ice had been present showed high concentrations of IPSO25 and HBI III up to a month after its melting. Researchers believe this is because the water remained relatively calm and some of the algae associated

with icy areas and the MIZ remained. Krill from areas previously occupied by seasonal ice that fed on remaining MIZ algae, indicated by high HBI III levels, were heavy for their size. After feeding there for two weeks, their growth matched that of krill that had fed on open-water algae for 16 weeks. So why does it matter if krill need algae associated with seasonal ice to thrive in the Antarctic? Well, krill are a key food source for other Antarctic sea life, the bottom of the food chain. And, if you remove the bottom of a food chain, everything above it comes crashing down. It is one more serious issue we will be forced to confront if climate change is not addressed, and with this year being the second worst for seasonal Arctic ice in the last 39, according to the National Snow & Ice Data Center, we do not have time to waste. Abbey Bigler is a fourth-year student majoring in English with minors in business and technical writing, communications studies and biology.  AB842693@wcupa.edu.

A LOOK AT OUR LEGACY: 1960’S WOMEN’S DRESS CODE By Amanda mills Staff Writer

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ne of the things I’m going to miss about college is the fact that I can go about my weekdays dressed to the nines or dressed like I rolled out of bed. I have the freedom to present myself how I please, and it’s awesome. Once we reach the workforce, we most likely will not have this luxury, so enjoy it! Moreover, students (especially women) just 50 years ago at West Chester University and other college campuses couldn’t live their lives with such flexibility. Granted, dress codes set a standard of professionalism on campus, which is not necessarily a bad thing. Yet it is worth noting, before the late 1960s, women were not allowed to wear pants (slacks) to the library. Even at the time of this editorial publication, women had to wear

skirts and dresses to the dining hall and to class—what a different life that would be, having to dress up to go eat at Lawrence! Below is a 1968 editorial (author not listed) stating women’s requests for revision of the dress code, especially concerning comfort for the winter months and finals week.

Revisions Needed in Women’s Dress Code Author unknown, published in the West Chester State College’s student newspaper, Quad Angles, April 23, 1968. Although the women’s dress code has undergone several needed changes in recent years, there seems still to be the need for revision. Very few girls object to the “classroom

dress” and most are even grateful that they are now permitted into the library in slacks. We wonder, however, at the request to wear dresses and skirts into the town of West Chester. (Would that include picnics at Everhart Park?) How many coeds have you noticed wearing skirts on Saturdays to go shopping? There is also a distinction made between sports dress and informal sports dress. The informal breed includes sweatshirts, tee-shirts, cutoffs and regular sports dress that has become aged. This attire is inappropriate in classrooms, administration buildings, the dining hall, the library, and at any college event for which some other dress IS appropriate. That leaves your own room, and possibly even the hallway of your floor, officially. But cutoffs and sweatshirts are often seen on campus, sometimes even in the hallowed confines of the dining hall on a weekend. It would be nice if

the dress code more realistically mirrored the acceptable practice on campus. Complaints about the code reach a peak during finals and snowstorms, both because of comfort. Even though it is now permissible to spend the day studying in the library in slacks, girls must carefully put on classroom dress for each meal during finals week. And they must dress for each final. Students are uncomfortable Just experiencing a long exam. Could it be possible to suspend classroom dress requirements during finals for the comfort of our coeds? Just a few minor revisions are needed, but needed now. Editor’s Note: After this editorial was written, Women’s Residence Council initiated beginning steps for the adoption of a new and/or revised dress code. Amanda Mills is a fourth-year student majoring in political science.  AM836938@wcupa.edu.


Page 22 rApril 16, 2018

CR AFTSWOMAN By Lauren Detweiler Editor-in-Chief

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ook out, art lovers—a brand new art show will be arriving in West Chester, Pa. on May 11 from 7 to 10 p.m. at Local Yoga Café. Dubbed “Craftswoman,” the event will host approximately 10 different vendors who will be selling and showcasing their goods ranging from jewelry, essential oils and candles to fine art and photo prints. If art isn’t your scene, Craftswoman will also have food, drinks, live music and even a woman doing henna. The event is a brainchild of fourthyear communication studies major and West Chester University student Amanda Saleh. When asked what her inspiration was for creating the event, she responded, “I was prompted to do this event for a few reasons. In January, I started a job at a marketing firm in Fishtown as a marketing coordinator. I was super excited about it at first, but staring at a white wall and a computer screen for six hours just wasn’t cutting it.” “I wanted to do something more meaningful,” she went on, saying that because she liked candles, she decided to start making her own and selling them. The actual idea for the event came about after she attended “Time to Pretend,” an art show in Philadelphia which also focused on art created by women. On the event, Saleh remarked, “It was super inspiring, and after some thought, I realized that I could do the same thing too.” I asked Saleh about the significance behind both the name and the focus on women artists; she replied, “I think women in art aren’t as respected as they should be, and they need an excuse to do what they love, so I created a reason for them to do so.” From there, Saleh discussed the idea with her friend, Kaitlin, who is also the owner of Local Yoga Café. After reserving the space for the evening of May 11, Saleh began contacting vendors and artists. The rest is history. When asked what her experience has been like planning an event of this scale, Saleh was generally enthusiastic about it. This isn’t her first time

working on an event like this: she interns for Briana Louise Photography in Philadelphia, who also happens to be an event coordinator and who, Saleh said, has “been really supportive.” Additionally, Saleh works for Kaly Clothing in downtown West Chester where she also has some experience helping out with events. Overall, the community has been very supportive of Saleh in her efforts in making this event a success: “I am really overwhelmed by the amount of interest this event has received from the community, and I’m super grateful for the support from people like Polly Zobel, my boss—the owner of Kaly—and the owners of [local] businesses such as Cookie Dope and Prana House.” While this will be the inaugural showcase, Saleh hopes to continue it in the years to come. She said that if it’s successful, she’s hoping to bring it back approximately every six months in various locations such as Kennett Square. Saleh finished off our interview with her final reason for organizing Craftswoman, saying that for the past year, she’s interned at WCU’s Center for Community Solutions, helping small businesses get off the ground. She went on to say, “Working with small businesses has taught me that I need to really be concerned about where my products and services are coming from, and I would much rather help out a small business than Starbucks or Target.” Before departing, Saleh left me with some food for thought: “People in this day and age are starting to become more self-employed, which is amazing, and we need to create outlets to provide for this niche.” Tickets for the show cost $10 ahead of time and $15 at the door; this will include food and drinks. Additionally, local band Mesén Around will be performing live at 8 p.m. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit amandasaleh.com/ craftswoman. Lauren Detweiler is a fourth-year student majoring in English writings with a minor in communication studies. LD838069@wcupa.edu.

“Spring Fever” continued Surprisingly, those are only half the benefits, which shows how important and beneficial this vitamin actually is to the body. According to Jayne Leonard, who is a frequent health writer on naturallivingideas.com, there are 10 warning signs of vitamin C deficiency. A majority of the signs are very easy to notice, which are easily bruising, slow wound healing, swelling or bleeding gums, splitting hair and nails, dry skin and poor immune function. Unexplained weight gain, fatigue or depression, painful joints and frequent nose bleeds are also symptoms of vitamin C deficiency. However, these four signs can also be caused by a number of other possibilities. Known as the “sunshine vitamin,” vitamin D also plays a vital role in the body. Vitamin D helps promote absorption of calcium and phosphorus in the blood. These two nutrients work with each other to make bones stronger. A lack of vitamin D can cause osteoporosis, more susceptibility to broken bones, higher risk of certain cancers and serious mood issues such

as depression and anxiety. One way to tell if you lack vitamin D without a blood test is noticing that you are getting sick more often than you normally do. A key function of this vitamin is boosting the immune system, like vitamin C. Another huge issue is fatigue, which can have negative effects on the overall health and quality of life. Other key issues include muscle pain, back pain, bone pain or loss, depression, anxiety and hair loss. Vitamin C and D deficiencies are very similar, only with a few differences. It is vital to make sure the body has enough of these vitamins in order to aid in a properly functioning body. In a sense, spring fever can actually be a real disease, but in a good way. You are not alone in this seemingly uncontrollable urge to clean the whole house, take a jog outside or even go and smell the newly blossomed flowers and trees. Embrace the spring fever feeling and let the happiness and sunshine fill your body; you deserve it. Marie Bray is a fourth-year student at majoring in communication studies.  MB822035@wcupa.edu.

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rApril 16, 2018

SCIENCE AND FAITH CONFERENCE

By Olivia Kimber Staff Writer

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uring this semester I’ve experienced some people who perceive that science and faith are incompatible. Therefore, I decided to explore this and go to a Science and Faith Conference outside of Philadelphia this past weekend. This article will explore the pros and cons of evolution and then pose an alternative to bring up discussion. First, all scientists have their own personal beliefs about the material world and a higher power or lack thereof. Many of these beliefs cannot be proven empirically. Beliefs that answer questions like: What is the nature of ultimate reality? What is the nature of material reality? Who/what are human beings? What happens to a person at death? Why is it possible to know anything at all? How do we know what is right and wrong? What is the meaning of human history?

Definitions The Science and Faith Conference delved into the science of human history, specifically the scientific evidence for and against evolution. Evolution has three meanings: Change over time, changes within a species (microevolution) and changes from one species to another (macroevolution) Evolution as change over time is used to describe the evolution of the smartphone, or the evolution of the American economy. This is a straightforward explanation and no disagreements can be found. Evolution as changes within a species or microevolution describes what happens when breeders decide they like a specific trait so they breed animals with that trait until it is found in the whole population. For example, if a sheep breeder wanted a woollier flock, they would breed the most woolly sheep and separate the rest, then

the wooliest of those would be mated, and so forth until the breeder had the woollier flock. The intelligent breeder guided the change in their flock. Darwin describes the same process but unguided via natural selection. He states that a frigid winter would kill off the less wooly sheep, therefore only the woolliest would mate and reproduce. If this occurred several winters in a row, the flock would be more woolly. Again, there is no disagreement on microevolution because there is ample historical and scientific evidence to show its validity.

Challenges to Evolution The first two types of evolution are part of a science called nomothetic science that studies the regularities of nature. All of these ideas like cellular structure, gravity, intermolecular forces and movement of objects or light are studied many times in various contexts so general statements are valid and useful. The third type of evolution is quite different because we cannot reproduce the Big Bang, or the first cell. This type part of historical science studies irregular occurrences. Because these occurrences only happen once, it is not outside of the realm of possibility for the regularities to be broken, but let’s explain what the third type of evolution is first. Evolution as changes from one species to another or macroevolution describes the change from apes into humans, or a common ancestor diversifying from a single cell into the variety of organisms described in the Cambrian explosion. Darwin attributed this phenomenon to natural selection, an unguided process in which organisms must adapt to their environment by random mutation while only the best suited for the environment survive and reproduce. Despite what is socially acceptable to think, evolution is dealing with questions that are historical exceptions. While nomothetic science explores regularities like how strong the intermolecular forces are in water, it ignores

exceptions when the regularities are not met. For instance, in humans, evolution is stating that we are not an exception; we are here by a chance accident. Some evidential challenges to natural selection include the origin and specified complexity of genetic in for m ation—DNA , genetic circuitry— chromosomes and body systems, and epigenetic informat ion—i n for m at ion needed outside of the DNA to ensure the correct processing of the DNA . If we look at human evolution, as Dr. Raymond Bohlin stated in his talk at the conference, the common ancestor found to bridge us and chimpanzees is about 6-8 million years old. Currently humans have 16 physical differences from the ancestor, not including unknown mental, emotional and spiritual differences. It takes approximately one million years for a mutation to arise in a population, then five million more to have it in the whole population. As more mutations are added, it takes more time due to compiling small probabilities.

Posing an Alternative Evolution differs from intelligent design, which states that major changes in organisms and new species originate from an input of information from an intelligent designer. Intelligent design only looks at the scientific evidence and therefore does not give input on what or who the intelligent designer is because that falls outside of the realm of science and into the realm of philosophy and theology. Let’s unpack that more. For something to be designed intelligently, it cannot just be unlikely. For instance, each mountain is very unlikely to form exactly like the ones next to it and oth-

Page 23

Photo via Flickr.

ers around the world, but most of those unlikely traits could be formed by natural (unguided) processes like uplift and erosion. However, if you look at Mount Rushmore, it also follows a pattern of meaning, namely four faces of American presidents. Those could not have formed from natural processes like uplift and erosion; it was obviously formed by an intelligent agent, humanity. Mount Rushmore has specified complexity: complex because it is unlikely, specified because it matches an independent pattern. Specified complexity is what defines the difference between something rising from an unguided process or something rising from an intelligent source. Intelligent design states that phenomena with specified complexity were designed by an intelligent source. Considering the discussion above, we haven’t arrived at a conclusion, but there is definitely more data to sift through before making a decision. If you have any questions or would like to discuss this topic more, please email me and we can start a discussion. Truth is most important. Olivia Kimber is a third-year student majoring in chemistry education.  OK851646@wcupa.edu.


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rApril 16, 2018 March6Page 25

Op-Ed

THE STUDENT NEWS SERVICE OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

QUADOPED@WCUPA.EDU

253 Sykes Student Union West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 610.436.2375

QUAD@WCUPA.EDU

WWW.WCUQUAD.COM

LAUREN DETWEILER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | QUADEIC@WCUPA.EDU

Dear West Chester,

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ello! I hope you’re all still riding the high of this 80-degree weekend we just had; there’s just something indescribable about finally being able to walk outside without a coat on, and, dare I say it, in shorts and sandals.

For those of you who haven’t yet heard, the newly-formed DubC for Our Lives Coalition has planned a school-wide walkout in support of gun-law reform this Friday, April 20, at 10 a.m. No matter your political affiliation or stance on gun control, the whole day is planned to be informative, educational and beneficial to all sides. The walkout will take place in the Academic Quad from 10 – 11 a.m. followed by various workshops (such as one on voter engagement), and finally, from 12 – 1:30 p.m. will be the town hall in Sykes Theatre! The Quad is very excited to officially be helping out with the town hall portion of the day and will be providing coverage for the event. Six different local representatives and political figures from various political backgrounds will be on the panel including Democrat, Republican and Libertarian, so make sure to stop by, ask them some questions, and enjoy an engaging conversation about gun control as told from various backgrounds and beliefs. To learn more, you can visit their Facebook event entitled “DubC Walkout For Our Lives.”

DANIELLE CRAVEN MANAGING EDITOR | QUADMANAGING@WCUPA.EDU EDITORIAL BOARD ALEX BRETH | PHOTOGRAPHY/ DESIGN EDITOR HALLE NELSON | NEWS EDITOR MICHAEL PLUMMER | OP-ED EDITOR MAX JAMES | FEATURES EDITOR ERIC RYAN | ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR TYLER GRACE | SPORTS EDITOR SUNNY MORGAN | MULTIMEDIA EDITOR

JUSTIN CURRIE | ASST. PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR ALEX SHAKHAZIZIAN | ASST. NEWS EDITOR MIKAYLA DEITER | CLASSIFIEDS/CALENDAR EDITOR

OLIVIA BORTNER | COPY EDITOR ALYSSA PALUMBO | COPY EDITOR

Additionally, I have an exciting announcement: The Quad will officially be bringing on a social media manager next semester! Social media has been something staff has helped out with when we get the chance, but I look forward to hiring somebody who will exclusively be able to concentrate on sharing our award-winning content consistently in the virtual realm. If you’re interested in the position, please reach out to me at QuadEIC@wcupa.edu and I will send you the application. Quickly, I’d like to thank everyone who has helped make The Quad so wonderful this semester, from writers to staff members to faculty and more. I’m so incredibly proud of the work that’s gone into this publication and cannot wait to see where it goes after I graduate. Having a strong sense of community and an open vehicle for sharing ideas, opinions, events and important issues with a local focus is something I hold so dear to my heart, so I am deeply grateful for all those who share this passion and work so hard to make it an actuality week after week. All right, there’s my sentimental diatribe for the week (it’s obligatory since I’m graduating in May, right?). Anyway, have a wonderful week as always, West Chester, and enjoy the drastically improved weather!

MADI OGBORN | DISTRIBUTION ALEX DIPERI | ONLINE EDITIOR DAMIEN YASIPOUR | BUSINESS MANAGER MICHELE HOBAN | ADVERTISING MANAGER

QUAD MOBILE JOURNALISM SUNNY MORGAN | EXECUTIVE PRODUCER TORI BAUVER | MOBILE JOURNALIST MAUREEN FARLEY | MOBILE JOURNALIST ALEX HARRER | MOBILE JOURNALIST NATASHA VILLACIS | MOBILE JOURNALIST DANIELLE CRAVEN | MOBILE JOURNALIST VICTORIA MOLUMO | MOBILE JOURNALIST DR. BENJAMIN KUEBRICH | FACULTY ADVISOR Tweet us @TheQuadWCU Like us @ facebook.com/wcuquad

Sincerely,

Follow us on instagram.com/wcuquad

DISCLAIMERS

Lauren Detweiler Editor-in-Chief SUBMISSIONS POLICY Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumni. We do not accept submissions from members of the community who are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,000 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Copyright ©2018 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the editor-in-chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and, although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our website at www.wcuquad.com. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our website at www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


rPage 26 March6April 16, 2018

R AISING THE MINIMUM WAGE HURTS (YOUNG) WORKERS By Michael Plummer Op-Ed Editor

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npaid internships are the minimum wage jobs of rich kids. Follow me on this. Internships are supposed to be valuable because even though you’re mostly doing menial tasks (getting coffee, answering the phones, etc.) you also learn valuable lessons and skills necessary to succeed in your career. In the job market, where employers must compete for the most skilled labor, these are known as a worker’s “soft skills.” And while it sure is nice to be able to afford to work an internship for free, many families cannot afford to do so. Where could a young person from such a background learn those skills? Traditionally, they have learned those skills in entry-level, minimumwage jobs. You know these jobs: lifeguards, line cooks and retail clerks are among the most common. These entry-level jobs are how unskilled young people obtain those “soft skills.” They learn to be reliable workers who can collaborate effectively with

their coworkers and take direction. Most importantly, they increase their productivity through experience. These skills increase a worker’s value on the open marketplace, which enables them to take higher paying jobs in the future. And the data reflects this. As a matter of fact, only one in three minimum wage workers still makes minimum wage a year later. The other two-thirds of workers go on to earn more than that, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research. As these figures indicate, there is great mobility among minimum wage workers. This is evidence that minimum wage jobs are not intended to become careers; their intended purpose is to serve as a stepping stone to better jobs and higher pay. The ultimate effect of legislation that aims to raise the minimum wage is to reduce the number of these jobs available to young people entering the workforce. As a simple matter of supply and demand, higher minimum wages force employers to then discriminate against the young and unskilled. This occurs because older, more skilled workers are simply more productive than those just entering the

workforce. Again, the data tells the story. The minimum wage was increased seven times between 1990-2009, nearly doubling to reach the present rate. In the same period of time, teenage unemployment soared from 5.3 percent in 1990 to 9.3 percent in 2009. This was due to government policies that priced millions of kids out of the marketplace. Young workers rely on entry-level jobs in order to advance to higher paying jobs. When the minimum wage is arbitrarily raised, there are fewer entry-level jobs available. It is the young people who truly pay the cost imposed by minimum-wage laws. Imagine you ran a cupcake shop, and you had two applicants for an open position that pays $10 per hour. The first candidate is in her midtwenties and has experience making cupcakes that makes her highly productive; let’s say she can make three dozen cupcakes nd decorate two dozen every hour. Her productivity yields you, the employer, a surplus value on the $10 per hour you’d be paying her. The second candidate, a high school student, is inexperienced and less productive. He can only make and deco-

rate a dozen cupcakes every hour. Because of his low productivity, you cannot afford to pay him $10 per hour and still turn a profit. But you could afford to pay him $5. And, as he gained experience, you could pay him higher wages commensurate with his increased productivity. If you didn’t, his skills would enable him to go work for your competitor across town for that $10 per hour. But what minimum-wage laws do is stop that process from ever getting started. They say you must pay all workers at least this much, irrespective of market forces like productivity. This precludes employers from offering young workers the chance to rise. If we truly want to help the poor to rise, we should encourage as much job creation as possible, instead of setting limitations on who can work for whom and for what price. Part of doing so involves leaving market forces alone to set prices—it’s what they do best. After all, if one person is perfectly willing to work at a wage another person is perfectly willing to pay, who is the government to step in and tell them “no”? Michael Plummer is a third-year student majoring in communicaion studies.  MP882401@wcupa.edu


rApril 16, 2018 March6Page 27

Letter to the Editor HOW TO RECOGNIZE M YOUR GREATNESS To the Editor:

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

By Danaé Reid Staff Writer

W

e live in a society that encourages self-love and appreciation—but only to a certain extent. As children, we are constantly reminded of how smart, attractive, talented and good we are by our elders, but it seems that once we begin to grow up and acknowledge these qualities for ourselves, we tend to be viewed as someone who is pompous, pretentious and/or arrogant. All of the descriptors listed carry a negative undertone and couldn’t be further from the truth. When acknowledging positive qualities, it’s about being confident and appreciative of ourselves and nothing more. Today’s society has seemingly confused what it means to be arrogant with what it means to be confident. Confidence is self-esteem, positivity and inner strength. Arrogance is boastful, self-righteous and ostentatious. When I think of someone who is confident, I picture someone who knows their worth and is proud of all they’ve accomplished, but doesn’t feel the need to boast. When I think of someone who is arrogant, I think of a person who lacks humility and uses their accomplishments to put others down. Unfortunately, in this hateful space that we seem to occupy at this point in time,

people seem more comfortable to stick with the definition that seeks to lessen the “shine” of another person than to accept that another person is simply confident and filled with self-love and appreciation. An excess of sangfroid in others can be threatening to someone who lacks conviction within themselves. Often times, people who struggle with selfconfidence purposely downplay the accomplishments of others in order to feel a feigned sense of either sameness or superiority. Because of this, sharing accolades with friends or family may be a little more difficult for some than it would be if they disclosed said information solely on the internet. Most of us can relate to someone trying to condemn us for our excitement in whatever capacity, again, making it hard for us as a whole to fully accept the greatness we possess. Feeling good about yourself is crucial which is why I am a huge advocate for self-love. I have endured hate from people who’ve fallen envious of my successes, and I’m sure whoever is reading this has experienced the same. Unfortunately, it’s a part of life. Because I’ve been through the same cycle multiple times with various people, at one point, I started to question if I had tricked myself and others into believing that I possess greatness and am really doing wonderful things in the classroom, community, workforce and my personal life. Thankfully those mo-

y biggest disappointment in reading the recent “Rethinking White Privilege” is how much it coasts on tribal stereotypes of progressive political activism and how little detail it offers about specific policies or positions that supposedly make white persons tools “for revolution aimed at destroying your own civilization.” True dialogue between those holding very conservative political positons and those holding very progressive political positions means not resorting to slinging caricatures about “tyranny” and “revolution” (with no evidence offered to support such incendiary accusations). It means examining the research that’s the basis for why “white privilege” was coined in the first place, research that concludes racist attitudes, behaviors and policies are still prevalent in American culture. For instance, Michelle Alexander explains in “The New Jim Crow” that 60 percent of the poor black men on Chicago’s West Side with criminal records

are for drug convictions. In comparison, poor whites are “far less likely to be imprisoned for drug offences” (196). In another example, Implicit Bias testing research shows, when making split-second decisions, study subjects wrongly identify black faces as posing a threat. Namely, subjects “falsely claimed to see a gun more often when the face was black than when it was white” (http://www.psych.uncc.edu/ pagoolka/cdps287.pdf). These are examples of factual research that confirm the relative disadvantages African Americans suffer within American culture. If Mr. Dugan would like constructive discussion on how to rid this country of such unjust practices, there are plenty of politically progressive people on West Chester University’s campus interested in real dialogue about solutions. Anything short of that seems disingenuous.

ments don’t last long. As aforementioned, there was a time when I’d felt like I couldn’t share things about myself out of fear that people would judge me negatively. However, I finally got tired of questioning myself and realized that I didn’t need validation from anyone else. I am great and so are you. I’ll be the first one to say out loud that I’m “killing life” or that I look beautiful today: I don’t say that to brag or to have others agree with me, but because I genuinely feel good and I see nothing wrong with attesting to it. Posting multiple pictures of yourself on your social media account does not necessarily mean you think you’re superior. Telling your friends of your successes does not make you a braggart and so on. We must change this mindset and replace it with positivity. Acknowledging self-love and appreciation should not be viewed as an attempt to make others feel small. It’s a celebration of greatness. In my case, I use those positive moments to encourage others to work hard and appreciate themselves more.

I constantly remind people that there is room at the table for everyone and we need to spend more time lifting one another up than finding reasons to put one another down. If you are currently struggling to realize your self-worth, I’d like to be among the first people to tell you that greatness lies within you and offer the following suggestions to help get you on the path to finding that greatness for yourself. Keep a gratitude journal to record the good things in your life. Celebrate the small, seemingly insignificant wins and accomplishments. Get involved doing what makes you feel good such as exercising, serving in your community, and the like. Perform self-care routines (whatever that looks like for you) and go out there and kill your goals! I’ll be rooting for you the whole way!

Sincerely, Margaret Betz, Ph.D.

Signed, A Serial Optimist & Positive Thinker Danae Reid is a fourth-year student majoring in communications studies with a minor in AfricanAmerican studies. DR822867@wcupa.edu


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AUTHOR’S RESPONSE TO “A RESPONSE TO ‘BREAKING THE ORTHODOXY’” By Sam Dugan Staff Writer

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ast week, Kate MacDonald published a response to my piece, “Breaking the Orthodoxy.” Herein I will address some of the critiques of that response. First, MacDonald pointed out that no alternative, opposing ideas were proposed against the dogma of political correctness in my article. That is true. And it is true because that was not the point of my article, and at no point in the article did I suggest that it was. The point of my piece was to encourage people to get engaged in the classroom and on campus by sharing their own opposing viewpoints. I claimed that our university has an obsession with identity politics fused with Marxism. MacDonald objected to that claim based on the fact that most of the faculty does not self-identify as Marxist. But what was glossed over was Marxism’s fusion with identity politics, of which the synthesis can be called Neo-Marxism. Beginning with the Frankfurt School (refer to my article, “The Ideology of Censorship”), out of which critical theory emerged, Classical Marxism was transformed into Neo-Marxism. Whereas Classical Marxism divides people up into groups based on their economic class, Neo-Marxism divides people up based on aspects of identity such as race, gender and sexuality. And whereas Classical Marxism pits the proletariat against the bourgeoisie, Neo-Marxism became a more pervasive doctrine by simply pitting the oppressed against the oppressors. This Neo-Marxist doctrine underlies much of the politically correct creed of diversity, inclusivity and equity. That is what I was claiming. Not every member of the university needs to subscribe to this doctrine in order for it to have an overwhelming influence, and I never claimed otherwise. However, what I did not mention in “Breaking the Orthodoxy” were the statistics on the ratios of Democrats

to Republicans among college faculty (refer to my article, “Diversity Is Not Our Strength”), and MacDonald never mentioned in her piece the statistics from my piece on the significant percentages of faculty who self-identify as “radical.” If we take together the percentages of self-identified Marxists, radicals and activists among college faculty, and couple that data with the overarching ratio of Democrats to Republicans, we get a much more striking picture, especially when looking at the social sciences and the humanities. Looked at in this light, my claims in “Breaking the Orthodoxy” are entirely reasonable. Another critique was that political correctness was left undefined in my article. That is true, because I made the assumption that my audience knew what is meant by political correctness. MacDonald suggested that political correctness is essentially about being considerate of others, but that is not true. If that were the case, we would just tell people to be considerate or polite. But when we tell people, implicitly or explicitly, to be politically correct, we are telling them to do what is correct “politically.” Thus, to be politically correct is to toe the party line. Political correctness is about drawing borders between opinions which are ideologically acceptable and those which are unacceptable, between ideas which are allowable and those which are unallowable. Politically incorrect opinions and ideas are then censored, shunned or never voiced to begin with. This happens both by explicit policy measures and implicit social pressures, although social pressures are the more pervasive manifestation of political correctness. Thus, in many ways political correctness is anti-free speech and it leads many people to self-censor. MacDonald also questioned why political correctness was objectionable. Here is one reason: As Steven Pinker has recently pointed out, when certain viewpoints cannot be expressed and certain topics cannot be brought up

at all, that actually helps the alt-right to radicalize and to grow in number. People are being driven to the alt-right because the views of the alt-right are in many ways not engaged from the other side of the political spectrum. Bad ideas need to be countered with good ideas, which is not currently happening because we are not discussing sensitive—yet important—topics.

“Political correctness is about drawing borders between opinions which are ideologically acceptable and those which are unacceptable, between ideas which are allowable and those which are unallowable.” For anybody reading this who thinks the solution to the alt-right is to ban their speech altogether, I would encourage you to rethink that. As I have mentioned in previous articles (“The War On The Individual” and “What Jesus Revealed”), what allows the alt-right to grow and to radicalize is the same thing that allows any extremist group to do so: a sense of victimhood. When a group has a sense of being attacked, marginalized or oppressed, and they have something at which they can point to support that feeling, they can then use that for recruitment and they can use it to justify violence. So, by silencing the alt-right (or any extremist group), you do not get rid of them or their ideas. You only drive them underground, where they will radicalize and grow. The solution to bad ideas is not to silence them, but to counter them with good ideas, and that is one of many reasons why political correctness is objectionable. Next, MacDonald brought up that

Karl Marx never used the term “political correctness,” and she questioned how political correctness was related to Marxism. Those objections are fair enough, however, political correctness is implicit in the ideas of Marx, and political correctness was practiced explicitly (and taken to genocidal lengths) in Marxist regimes during the 20th century. Karl Marx held that people’s ideas were socially conditioned, and that conditioning was a result of their economic class. The bourgeoisie had politically incorrect views, and because their views were socially conditioned, they were incapable of changing their minds themselves—and therein we see why Marxism necessitates violence. Capitalists cannot change their minds, and so they must be “removed.” Marx’s implicit idea of political correctness was then applied and taken to its logical conclusions in communist regimes throughout the 20th century. Political correctness was demonstrated, for example, in the genocidal regimes of Maoist China and the Soviet Union. People were not allowed to go against the ruling ideology. As a result, both self-censorship and censorship by government fiat were rampant. Those who held politically incorrect views were typically sent to slave-labor camps or exterminated. So, not only is political correctness objectionable for the reason that Pinker pointed out (along with plenty of other reasons), but it is also objectionable in that its logical conclusions, foreshadowed in the ideas of Marx himself, were the imprisonment and murder of what is likely over one hundred million people in the 20th century. Lastly, as I have shown in a previous article, “Envy and Resentment,” the doctrine of equity is objectionable and dangerous because it necessarily leads to tyranny by requiring a massive central force to impose redistribution. Sam Dugan is a fourth-year student majoring in economics and philosophy  SD829860@wcupa.edu


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WHITE FEMINISM VERSUS INTERSECTIONALITY By Stacey Milas

Special to The Quad

A

s the current political climate heats up with the latest marches and advocates for women’s rights, the media’s attention on white feminists becomes more obvious. White feminism is not about white people who practice feminism; rather it’s a brand of feminism that diminishes or erases the voices and experience of those who are not white, cisgendered, of a decent economic status, and/or heterosexual. Namely, it’s feminism that is not intersectional.

“[White feminism] is a brand of feminism that diminishes or erases the voices and experience of those who are not wh ite,ci sgendere d ... and/or heterosexual.” Intersectionality was first coined in 1989 by Kimberlé Crenshaw, a law professor and social theorist, in her 1989 paper “Demarginalizing The Intersection Of Race And Sex: A Black Feminist Critique Of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory And Antiracist Politics.” Initially, it was used to intersect blackness and womanhood, but it was expanded to understand other differences such as individuals’ sexual orientation, age, class, disability and more. White feminism, however, only cares about a certain kind of woman and person and only caters toward those individuals. The media glorifies white actresses who speak out against misogyny, the wage gap and sexual assault, especially those who exhibit white feminism, while ignoring just

about every other voice. The #MeToo campaign and the Women’s March are two primary examples that call attention on white feminists. The media focuses on white women in pussy hats during every Women’s March, excluding everyone else from the narrative. Women who take part in the march lashed out when the Women’s March Twitter denounced McGowan for her latest transphobic comments, some going as far as to say transgender women are men, and do not know what it is to suffer as a woman. Actress Rose McGowan herself especially has the #MeToo movement’s spotlight, and is one of the most celebrated sexual assault survivors despite her transphobic and racist opinions. McGowan stated on an appearance of RuPaul’s Drag Race that “they [transgender women] assume, because they felt like a woman on the inside, that’s not developing as a woman—that’s not growing as a woman, that’s not living in this world as a woman.” More recently, she threw a fit at one of her book signings when a transgender woman called her out for excluding transgender women from her feminism. She lashed out with comments like “What have you done, women?” What’s also detrimental is the fact that the #MeToo movement’s creator, a black woman named Tarana Burke, does not have even close to the amount of media attention as her white women advocate counterparts. White feminists, despite outwardly advocating for the punishment of sexual assaulters, tend to stand back when it’s not in their interest. Many white actresses will dress up in black for the Golden Globes, write lengthy speeches on how “enough is enough” and stand up and applaud over basic moments of “shading” the patriarchy, but the moment a friend or someone they associate with is accused of sexual assault, they step back.

Lena Dunham, for example, defended her former colleague, Murray Miller, against sexual assault allegations.

“As long as the media promotes these white feminists...feminism is not going to have the needed impact.” Dunham stated his accuser, a young woman of color, was part of the small percentage of those who misreport sexual abuse, despite being a self-proclaimed feminist and women’s advocate.

While, yes, there have been obvious changes over the past few decades in not only women’s issues, but racial and transgender issues as well, there is never going to be enough change when feminism lacks intersectionality. Feminism needs to be about benefiting all of women, not just a select few. As long as the media promotes these white feminists, especially celebrities in the spotlight, feminism is not going to have the needed impact. It was white women, as well as white feminists, who helped bring Donald Trump into office, after all. Stacey Milas is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism.  SM827414@wcupa.edu


rPage 30 March6April 16, 2018

Arts & Entertainment

QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

“CAPTIVE”

“A QUIET PLACE” HALLE NELSON NEWS EDITOR

S

o, apparently getting men known for their comedic roles to be directors of horror movies is a thing that really, really works. Noted. “A Quiet Place” is “The Office”/”Devil Wears Prada” crossover I didn’t know I needed. Seriously though, this new thriller is well-acted, suspenseful and overall well-executed. The film centers around a family living in a world where aliens have crash-landed. These aliens are attracted to sound. The moment a character makes a noise they are quickly tracked down and annihilated by these creatures. The premise is so ingenious that any sound, any sound at all, serves as a jumpscare. There have been plenty of times that I have recommended movies to my friends. Rarely has there been a time that I’ve insisted people see a film in theaters. That’s because this film’s concept allows for what might be the most unique in-theatre experience I’ve ever had. The movie is so quiet and tense that the audience gets drawn in. No rustle of wrappers. No whispers between patrons. People even froze in their seats so as not to distract from the scene. I doubt I’ll ever see that kind of reaction again. There’s a lot in this movie I can talk about. I can say that the sound design is very effective. The design for the aliens is distinct. Real-life married couple John Krasinski and Emily Blunt share an on-screen chemistry that’s worth the price of admission alone. The ending lends itself to sequels that I foresee happening in the near future. The fact that Michael Bay produced a movie that didn’t have copious amounts of explosions. Truly, I could go on and on. However, there’s one element of this film that I person-

ally feel deserves the most recognition: Millicent Simmond’s portrayal of Regan Abbot. As a Deaf studies minor, I would’ve seen this film regardless for its integration of American Sign Language, or ASL. While deafness has appeared in more content over the past few years with projects like Freeform’s Switched At Birth, storylines relating to deafness are still few and far between. When it is integrated, there are times when it’s portrayed as a weakness or simply tacked on as a way to claim diversity without delving into what it means to be a part of the Deaf community. “A Quiet Place” does neither of these things. The film’s predominant language is ASL. Having a Deaf daughter in the film has allowed for our heroes to have a background in the silent language long before the alien invasion. Without ASL, there’s no possible way this family would have survived for this long in the movie’s timeline. Regan, portrayed by a Deaf actress, is not a character pitied by the film. Rather, she is shown as a complete person with her own opinions, sense of responsibility, quick thinking and bravery. Her father, portrayed by Krasinski, continuously attempts to create for her cochlear implants with higher frequencies. However, the film recognizes that a.) cochlear implants are not a cure for deafness and b.) cochlear implants don’t work for everyone. The film never delves into what caused Regan’s deafness, but there are a multitude of reasons why they could be ineffective for her. That is not what’s important here. What is important is that with her deafness Regan is still capable of navigating the abnormal environment she’s stuck in. She doesn’t persevere in spite of or because of her

Continued on pg. 31

Jennifer Odiatu Staff Writer

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t first, I didn’t know if I would be interested in watching “Captive” since it was only a class assignment in ESP 309 with Dr. Pagan. Once I actually sat down and analyzed the contents of the film, it made me think about how disturbing it is that a government or its officials could cover up such a horrific event that took place in Argentine society. After watching this film, I was compelled to look into further details on what took place in the military dictatorship in Argentina. Between 1976-1983, Argentina had a gruesome military dictatorship that destroyed many individual’s lives. The statistics stated that 30,000 people randomly disappeared while 500 babies were born in captivity. The statistics alone surprised me, but while watching the movie, I felt a sense of sympathy for the main character and all of the real lives that were destroyed over the span of several years from this war. “Captive” is a 2003 Argentine film produced by Gaston Biraben. The film makes its grand entrance by showing raw footage of the 1978 Argentina World Cup. While a victorious win is taking place for Argentina, a shocking event is simultaneously happening. This event is otherwise known as the Dirty War of Argentina. While everyone is celebrating the win for Argentina, the main character, Cristina Quadri, and her father are dancing for her birthday celebration, not knowing that after her birthday celebration, her life would take a turn for the worse. Shortly after a few scenes from Cristina talking with her alleged parents and traveling back and forth from school, an out-of-the-ordinary incident occurs. A judge by the name of Miguel Barrenechea summons Cristina in from school with a judicial court order.

Her school teachers had no choice but to take her without acknowledging her alleged parents’ consent. Confused at what was happening, Cristina decides to follow a few officials to the judge’s office. Upon arriving at the office, Barrenechea asked for Cristina’s I.D. but goes on to say that she isn’t who she appears to be—her name, age, or anything of her identity is false in the eyes of the law. He later explains that during the Argentine military dictatorship, there were a series of events that took place that left children without their biological parents and forced to be raised by individuals who just took them away. He tells Cristina that unfortunately she is one of the children that were abducted from her biological parents and raised by the Quadri family. He called Cristina’s case appropriation. Appropriation is defined as the action of taking something for one’s own use, typically without the owner’s permission. Already in a state of shock, Cristina is presented with an elderly lady, who is her biological grandmother. Automatically in denial, Cristina disregards all evidence against how she isn’t the biological daughter of the Quadri family and immediately runs out of the judge’s office. If I were to describe what was going on in Cristina’s mind, I would call it an unsettling truth forcing to unveil itself. The film goes on to show how Cristina faces her true reality with the help of her friend revealing key moments and details needed to help Cristina see who see really is and what kind of life she could have lived if she wasn’t abducted by the Quadri family. Even if she knew from the very beginning who her real family was, I don’t think she would like to stay with them know-

Continued on page 31


rApril 16, 2018 March6rPage 31

“Captive” continued

ing that her biological parents are still missing or possibly dead. The film “Captive” spread light to the injustice of what occurred during the military dictatorship of Argentina. While celebrating an exciting event (Argentina World Cup), there are other serious matters that were taking place that no one actually knew about. hoice but The director captures the depressing dging her reality that many individuals at that nfused at time, and even now, are still facing. a decides Just as Cristina experienced nighthe judge’s mares that had her wondering who ffice, Barher actual parents were at the time, the s I.D. but same shows how all individuals during who she the Dirty War experienced psychologie, or anycal traumas that either left them to end n the eyes their lives or not know the truth at all. that durThe director shows how great storydictatortelling can tell a detrimental event that vents that needs to be known for many centuries. n without Despite her alleged parents blatantforced to ly kidnapping Cristina, the director just took wants the audience to feel sympathetic that unfor them since her assumed mother children lost her child at birth. biological adri famppropriaed as the for one’s e owner’s

, Cristina lady, who er. Autodisregards e isn’t the adri famut of the describe a’s mind, I th forcing

how Crish the help moments Cristina at kind of he wasn’t mily. Even eginning on’t think em know-

Forty years later, the grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo continuously march against the dictatorship that took their children away in the late ‘70s. Many of the grandmothers are still trying to find answers as to where their children are, if they are dead or alive and why this sort of incident even occurred. While winning the victory of the Argentina World Cup, the military dictatorship put on a façade to let everyone know that nothing was happening and that all was well. They were trying to hide the truth for many years and pretend that none of the incidents from the Dirty War ever took place. Cristina was merely held captive and forced to live and believe a life that was false from the very beginning. It is sad to know that in reality, many individuals are still dealing with this traumatic event that that happened over 40 years ago. Jennifer Odiatu is a fourth-year student majoring in communications with a minor in journalism.  JO820471@wcupa.edu.

STRESSED OUT?

Homework? Term Papers? Exams?

Tai Chi

Relax & Improve Grades PEA 144 & PEA 244 Summer 2, Summer Post, Fall 2018

INVASION OF PRIVACY By Danaé Reid Staff Writer

T

he world was first formally introduced to Belcalis Almanzar, universally known as Cardi B, on the reality TV show “Love and Hip Hop” in December of 2015. Cardi B quickly became a fan-favorite because of how transparent she was. Throughout her career and even prior to it, Cardi has been candid about where she’s from and has never been ashamed of any of it—which in my opinion is a necessary attribute in the making of a lasting artist. Though Cardi B wasn’t new to music when her first single, “Bodak Yellow,” smashed the charts in 2017, the song propelled her career to the next level. Radio stations and DJs began to play that song in heavy rotation, forcing everyone to anticipate when her first album would debut. We would later find out that the answer to that question was Friday, April 6, 2018. The long-awaited album, “Invasion of Privacy,” gets straight to the point with its 13 original songs and a run time of only 48 minutes. Cardi uses her raw lyrics, beguiling beats and some familiar voices, including but not limited to Chance the Rapper, SZA and Migos to tell stories of tribulation, triumph and much more. With her confidence paired with her heavy Latino/Bronx accent and candid lyrics, Cardi effortlessly welcomes you into her domain as only she can, which is why it’s no surprise that her album went certified Gold immediately. It’s safe to say that the “trap Selena” has certainly earned a rightful space in the rap world. The album starts with “Get Up 10,” a song that is very reminiscent of Meek Mill’s “Dreams and Nightmares” intro; however, I don’t believe that it will garner as much popularity. “Get Up 10” is a song about humility as she pays homage to her roots whilst simultaneously praising herself for her accomplishments. “Invasion of Privacy” is jam-packed with both songs you can turn up to as well as songs that will make you reflect. The album is fun because you never know what you’re going to get next. The best song on the album in my opinion is “Bickenhead” because it’s an accurate portrayal of Cardi’s

character. This song forces you to realize that she’s going to continue to push the envelope and reinforces the notion that female rappers, like male rappers, should have no boundaries. “Bickenhead” is an ode to female sexual liberation and also to getting money, two things I am a huge advocate for Cardi is just getting started and does not plan to slow down or stop any time soon. Though the album did have some hits, I wouldn’t say that it’s going to be the best album of 2018. Her inaugural work is respectable and I believe that she has the potential to become a megastar. As aforementioned, the beats were astounding and she had some dope features. My only criticism is that her flow is still a little choppy and that she still has a lot of growing to do as an artist. However, I do believe that she will get there due to her talent, drive and committed fan base. Understandably so, she pays much homage to the greats that came before her, but I think it’s best that she holds off on referring to herself as, “Big Pop’ mixed with 2Pac, I’m like Makaveli,” as she did on “Get Up 10,” but her confidence is admirable and I wish her continued success. Danaé Reid is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in African American studies.  DR822867@wcupa.edu  @duhhnay_.

“A Quiet Place” continued deafness. It’s simply a facet of her life. Without giving too much away, her deafness is relevant to the film’s climax. However, even at that point, it is still evident that it takes the whole family’s skillsets to defeat the monster. I guess, ultimately, that is what this film gets down to. “A Quiet Place” is not about the monster. It’s about their family. Our families. It’s about the lengths you would go to protect your loved ones. It is using everything at your disposal, at all levels of ability, to guard love when all else is lost. This movie is among my favorites in the genre, and I certainly won’t be keeping hush about it in the future. Halle Nelson is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with minors in deaf studies and English literature.  HN824858@ wcupa.edu.  @Halle_N_Nelson.


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Sports

April 16, 2018

EA

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU www.wcupagoldenrams.com

PHILLY SPORTS SCENE: MATCHING UP AGAINST MIAMI By Andrew Heller Staff writer

T

hree years ago the Philadelphia 76ers were a ten-win team and broke the record for most consecutive losses by a professional sports franchise. The same year, rookie center Jahlil Okafor got into a literal fistfight with Celtics’ fans on the streets of Boston after a tough 80-84 loss. I remember thinking to myself, “This team has a lot of heart, they clearly don’t want to lose.” Three years later and the Sixers aren’t losing anymore. In their series finale against the Milwaukee Bucks, the Sixers won their 16th straight game and broke the NBA record for most consecutive wins to end a regular season. In the same game, the Sixers put up 80 points in the first half and rookie point guard Markelle Fultz became the youngest NBA player ever to record a triple double. “The Process” is nearly complete, but it’s still missing one crucial piece of the puzzle: playoff success. Philadelphia will enter the 2018 playoffs as the third seed in the Eastern Conference and will play host to the Miami Heat in a seven game series. During the regular season, the Sixers and the Heat split the four games they played against each other with the Sixers winning both games in Philly and the Heat winning two games in Miami. Despite splitting the season series with the gutsy Heat team, Brett Brown’s men are in a prime position to carry their regular season momentum deep into the playoffs. Even with All-Star center Joel Em-

biid potentially missing the first few games of the season due to his injured orbital bone, the Sixers match up really well against the Heat on paper. Comparing point guards, Ben Simmons has a clear advantage in talent over the veteran Goran Dragic. Simmons has averaged close to a triple double per game this season with a 15.6 point per game average, 8.1 rebounds per game and 8.2 assists per game. Simmons is also averaging close to 34 minutes per game making him a constant threat for the Heat. Dragic is averaging 17.1 points per game with 4.1 rebounds and 4.8 assists per game. Dragic may be able to play well off the dribble, but the recently strong defensive coverage by Robert Covington should be enough to stifle Dragic’s shots when the two match up. While Simmons overpowers the strength of Dragic, the Sixers do need to be weary of Miami’s center Hassan Whiteside. Whiteside has done damage to the Sixers in the past, especially when the two played in Miami during the regular season. During that game, Whiteside tallied 26 points and eight rebounds. Without Embiid to start the series, Whiteside may be able to take advantage of the Sixers in the paint. However, it won’t be enough to stop the juggernaut of an offense that Brett Brown has created. In the season finale, Philadelphia scored 80 points in the first half without getting a single bucket from Simmons, Embiid or J.J Reddick who, like Embiid, also missed the game due to injury. Marco Bellinelli, Justin Anderson, T.J McConnell, Richaun Holmes and Markelle Fultz all scored more than ten points against a playoff caliber Milwaukee Bucks team. Although the

Heat have the 2006 NBA Finals MVP in Dwayne Wade as their ace in the hole, Philly has a plethora of talent coming off the bench that will prove to be too much for the Heat to handle. The Sixers could easily take care of business against the Heat in four or five games, which means they would play the winner of the series between the Boston Celtics and the Bucks. If the Bucks manage to knock off Boston early in the first round, the Sixers should have no trouble advancing to the Eastern Conference Finals. Like Miami, the Sixers split their season series with the Bucks. By that point in the semi-finals Joel Embiid would hopefully be back to full strength and would provide enough support to cover the Greek Freek, Giannis Antetokounmpo. Besides Antetokounmpo, Milwaukee is pretty shorthanded as far as scoring ability, but the squad does have a strong shooting guard in Tony Snell, whose 40.3 shooting percentage from beyond the arc could be troubling for any team. A much more intriguing Eastern Conference Semi-finals matchup for the Sixers would be against Boston. The Celtics gave the Sixers a lot of trouble during the regular season, winning 3 out of 4 games. The loss of Kyrie Irving is clearly a huge blow to Boston’s chances at making a run for the NBA Finals. The Sixers lone win against the Celtics came in late January when Kyrie missed the game due to shoulder soreness and Joel Embiid went off with game high numbers in points, rebounds and assists. Boston has a really solid young squad filled with players like Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown who will have talent for years to come. Colin

Cowherd of Fox Sports One has boldly predicted that the Celtics, not the Sixers, are the future of the Eastern conference, “I don’t know what to make of Philly, but I know they’re not going to win the East this year. And in the next ten years, they are going to be behind Boston” said Cowherd. Well, ten years down the line isn’t right now. And right now, this Philadelphia team has the chemistry and momentum to go deep into the postseason regardless of who they face. According to Cowherd, the Sixers are, “Like the fat kid who is finally in shape. He gets to the first 61 degree day and runs to the beach to take his shirt off” Guess what, “finally in shape” is an understatement, Mr. Cowherd. Other than the 83’ championship team, this is the most complete squad that Philly has ever assembled. The fat kid isn’t just going to the beach; he has a date with Lebron James in the Eastern Conference Finals. Andrew Heller is a first-year graduate student majoring in English.  AH804286@wcupa.edu.

BRETT BROWN: COACH OF THE YEAR NOMINEE • 50-WIN SEASON • 16 GAME WINNING-STEAK TO END SEASON


April 16, 2018

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EAGLES MAKING KEY OFFSEASON MOVES By Connor Sodak Pr acticum Writer

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he NFL offseason is well underway, and that means another hectic and crazy free agency period. Contracts have expired, and players who have reached the end of their deals are free to test the market and see who’s interested. It is always exciting to see old faces in new places. However, this year was exceptionally insane with the amount of players who inked deals with a new team. We’ve seen organizations completely reconstruct the foundation of their franchise and prove that no player in this league is completely immune from being traded or released. Despite numerous teams making big splashes in the headlines with notable signings, many eyes in the NFL fell on the defending champs, the Philadelphia Eagles. As many Super Bowl teams are susceptible to, Philly entered the offseason with many players hit-

ting the open market — a whopping 13, to be exact. Teams as talented as this Eagles squad can’t always keep the big names that they’ve acquired for their title run. However, not many teams have a general manager as smart and shifty as Howie Roseman. Despite losing some key contributors such as Vinny Curry, Trey Burton and Patrick Robinson, Roseman was able to fill those holes pretty quickly. The Eagles were able to trade for Pro Bowl defensive end Michael Bennett from Seattle, giving up just a couple late round draft picks. Philly also added defensive tackle Haloti Ngata, another veteran who has made this front seven even scarier than the group that wreaked havoc on the league last year. Roseman didn’t stop there as he traded an aging Torrey Smith to Carolina for their starting cornerback Daryl Worley. Worley, a Philadelphia native, is still on his rookie contract and coming off of a very strong season. Roseman was able to free up more cap room with this move and cut ties with Smith, who

was no more than an afterthought in the Philly offense this season. With second round pick Sidney Jones set to come back healthy this season, the Eagles secondary looks deeper and stronger. The Eagles filled Torrey Smith’s void pretty quickly as they signed veteran speedster Mike Wallace. The moves have just kept coming this offseason as Howie Roseman has kept the Birds in the headlines and in Super Bowl contention. Deals like this just don’t make sense from the standpoint of an objective fan. Philadelphia has the perennial target on their back, yet Roseman has been able to get the best of teams and steal away some of their most talented players. Eagles fans, still basking in the sunlight of the Super Bowl victory, have to be more than satisfied with what Roseman has done. He’s taken a Super Bowl winning team and made it even better, which is almost unheard of in today’s NFL. Many players and coaches run for the huge contracts and cash in on

their success once their team has accomplished the arduous task of winning the Lombardi Trophy. Though this remains true for this Eagles team, they were able to keep their core intact and build around it with cheaper yet talented players. Many players who have gotten the big contracts in past years now have set their sights on acquiring a ring. They want to join a winning culture, which is exactly what Philadelphia has become. Howie Roseman and the Philadelphia Eagles aren’t going into the offseason quietly and have made it clear that they are still the kings of the NFL. They enter the 2018 season with a roster that is stronger than the one that just won a Super Bowl. The Birds aren’t falling off anytime soon, which is a very scary thought for the rest of the league. Connor Sodak is a fourth-year student majoring in communications and minoring in journalism.  CS824220@wcupa.edu.

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK WOMEN’S ATHLETE OF THE WEEK: AMANDA HOUCK www.wcupagoldenrams.com

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manda Houck (Gap, Pa./Pequea Valley) was a force inside the circle this past week as she went 5-0 allowing just six earned runs while striking out 19 over the course of her 22 innings of work. Houck began her week on Thursday afternoon against Kutztown when she tossed back-toback five inning complete games surrendering just three hits and one run in each game while striking out four in game one and one in game two to help lead West Chester to a sweep of Kutztown. Houck saved her best performance of the week for senior day when she went seven innings in game one scattering nine hits and one unearned runs while recording a season-high 10 strikeouts to pick up the 4-1 complete game victory.

MEN’S ATHLETE OF THE WEEK: JUSTUS NOR MAN www.wcupagoldenrams.com

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ustus Norman (Arlington, Texas/ Conestoga Valley) competed well once again this week as he won the long jump for the second week in a row with a mark of 23 feet 8 ¼ inches. This performance was enough to allow Norman to surpass seven Division I athletes and variety of Division II competitors en route to the victory. 2016-17: Placed 1st in the Men’s Long Jump and 3rd in the Triple Jump in the 2017 PSAC Outdoor Track & Field Championships. Justus also claimed 1st in the Men’s Long Jump and 2nd in the Triple Jump at the 2017 PSAC Indoor Track & Field Championships. 2015-16 PSAC Championships: Placed 3rd in the Men’s High Jump.


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April 16, 2018

SIXERS CLAIM NO. 3 SEED By Connor Sodak Pr acticum Writer

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he NBA regular season has come and gone and to much of the delight of fans, playoffs are officially underway; 16 teams will compete to hoist the Larry O’Brien Trophy in June. As fun as the regular season is, there isn’t much that competes with the level of playoff basketball. Players seem to turn it up a notch and the competitiveness is unmatched. Despite the buzz surrounding impressive teams such as the Raptors, Warriors and Rockets, the talk of the town going into the playoffs has been none other than our Philadelphia 76ers. For the past month and a half they have been the hottest team in basketball and are going into the playoffs on an extraordinary 16-game

win streak. No other team in history has finished their season and started the playoffs with such a streak. The Sixers are playing some of the best basketball in the league right now and are entering the playoffs white hot. It seems that everything has come together for this team at the right time. Ben Simmons has transformed into one of the best point guards in the league, J.J. Redick has lived up to his gaudy contract, mid-season signings like Marco Belinelli and Ersan Ilaysova have made a huge impact and first round pick Markelle Fultz is finally coming into his own after sitting out most of the season. They’ve also been winning without one of their best players, Joel Embiid, who’s been out with an injury for nearly a month. As fun as this season was for the Sixers and their fans, it is time to turn it up a level in order for a

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deep playoff run. The Sixers won their way into the No. 3 seed in the Eastern Conference, and despite being the embarrassment of the league in years past, many people are picking these Sixers to potentially reach the Conference Finals. To think that this team could go all the way to the conference finals after winning a total of 38 games in the past two years is absolutely absurd. However, when you actually see the path the Sixers might take, it is very possible that they could be one of the final four teams remaining. Their first-round matchup is the No. 6 seeded Miami Heat, who gave Philadelphia some trouble in the regular season. Miami is an enigma of a team, wherein they have young talent that has underperformed and old veterans who they can’t let go of. Despite this, they’ve fought their way into the playoffs which basically is the start a new season. Miami has the advantage in experience and coaching. Erik Spoelstra is one of the experienced coaches in the playoffs and knows what it takes to win a playoff series. He has two championships under his belt from the days of the Big Three, which is nothing to sneeze at. Miami still has Dwayne Wade as well, who might go down as one of the most clutch players in NBA history, and always seems to bury a dagger in the Sixers’ hearts whenever they match up. Let’s not forget dominant big-man Hassan Whiteside, whose had some social media run-ins with the Twitter king, Joel Embiid. Looking at all of this, the Heat are no doubt a scary matchup and a tough task for the Sixers so early in the playoffs. However, do I think that Miami will win this series? No. Despite everything Miami has, Philadelphia is simply more talented and if they perform how they’ve been this past month, they should dispose of the Heat swiftly. Philly also has home-court advantage and have won all but one game in Wells Fargo Center since New Year’s. Let’s look at the second round matchup, where the Sixers would face the winner between the Milwaukee Bucks and Boston Celtics. Let’s assume

that Boston takes this series and faces off against Philly in the Eastern semifinals. Again, Boston has the coaching fter advantage with Brad Stevens leading the this team to the No. 2 seed despite lospro ing his best player, Kyrie Irving, for the best seaso season due to injury. However, the loss of the team of Kyrie Irving is nothing to glance Flyers ha over. The Celtics are a collection of and mom role players and have been looking for ing the s their identity ever since Irving went this team down. They aren’t as intimidating as can make the Raptors or Cavaliers, and roll out Some h one of the youngest starting lineups included in the league. Despite the veteran 100 point presence of Al Horford, young players time sinc like Jayson Tatum, Jaylen Brown and other high Terry Rozier don’t have much play- Sean Cou off experience and lead their team in with his s minutes played. It is very possible to The Flyer see Philly come out of this matchup first caree victorious with the level of basketball against t they’ve been playing. They have bet- Flyers we ter shooting, more talent and more chemistry than the Celtics. As good as Boston’s defense is, they will only be able to contain the dominance of Ben Simmons and Joel Embiid for so long. Like I said, after breaking down this potential path that Philly would take, it is hard to believe that they couldn’t reach the Conference Finals. It is safe to say that The Process has worked, and as ugly as it was, Sam Hinkie’s master plan is finally taking form even earlier than we anticipated. The Eastern Conference has been put on notice: Watch out for the 76ers.

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Connor Sodak is a fourth-year student majoring in communications and minoring in journalism.  CS824220@wcupa.edu.

JOEL EMBIID: ALL NBA/ ALL-DEFENSE NOMINEE • FIRST IN OPPONENT FG % • SIXTH IN DEFENSIVE RATING • FOURTH IN NET RATING (11.6)


April 16, 2018

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FLYERS POISED FOR A PLAYOFF RUN By Ryan Bednash Pr acticum writer

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fter a near 100-point season, the Philadelphia Flyers showed promise. While it was not the best season, there were many aspects of the team that looked impressive. The Flyers had moments of looking great and moments of looking bad. Observing the season with a positive view, this team has a lot of young talent that can make them great in the future. Some highlights from the season included Claude Giroux putting up 100 points for the Flyers for the first time since the 1995-96 season. Another highlight worth mentioning was Sean Couturier getting his 100th goal with his short time being in the NHL. The Flyers goalie, Brian Elliot, got his first career shutout win for the Flyers against the New York Rangers. The Flyers were also the first team to beat

the Las Vegas Knights at home in their new stadium. This Philadelphia team and its players have done a lot to be proud of. The Flyers were on a 10-game win streak following the new year. This win streak showed that they had potential to be a top team in the NHL. Aiding in the win streak and the season was the trade to receive a young goaltender, Petr Mrazek, who looked to be outstanding through the mid-way point. Something that is cause for hope is the young talent Philadelphia has. Travis Konecny and Ivan Provorov have very promising futures in the NHL given the demonstration of their scoring ability and shut-down defense. Having young guys like this on the team can give fans confidence knowing the Flyers can be a top team in the future. This Philadelphia team has many young players who will be crucial for a high caliber team.

Having the playoffs in sight, the Flyers made a late push and the team fought for a wild card spot. One can say the Flyers had a sub-par season but they still managed to sneak into the playoffs and they deserve to be there. After all, the Flyers placed third in their division and are a better team in the league. Headed into the playoffs, the Flyers do not have much depth. The team relies heavily on the veterans to push them to victory. The lack of depth the Flyers have will be hard for them to accomplish much in the playoffs with such a competitive atmosphere. The Flyers struggled throughout the season with a weak defense. With that being said, a lack of depth and poor defense could be their demise in the playoffs. A preview of how the team will look in the playoffs happened on Wednesday night when they played their first game of the series against the Pitts-

burgh Penguins. Pittsburgh had themselves an easy victory with the final score being 7–0. The Flyers did not have a good first outing in the slightest. The team simply lacked any offense or defense. Moving forward into the series, it is hard to predict if the Flyers will step up and win the series against Pittsburgh. But as fans we can do our best to remain optimistic and hope the Flyers start playing like they want the trophy. Hopefully, there will be better games ahead after their devastating loss. The Philadelphia Flyers are a team that made it to the playoffs for a reason, the talent they have is capable of making greatness. Ryan Bednash is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism.  RB842278@wcupa.edu.

WCU WOMEN’S RUGBY UPDATE

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e’d like to show recognition to the West Chester University Women’s Rugby Team, as they won the Bloomsburg 7’s tournament! They outscored opponents 152-7, allowing only one try and one conversion throughout the tournament. West Chester’s improving defense recorded four shutouts in the five matches played, only allowing Navy to score in the semifinal match. Casey Evans led the day with six trys followed by captains Lili Riley and Aalea Ray with five and four tries, respectively. Haley Spangler contributed four tries and Juah Toe and Katie Moritz touched down for a pair of tries each. The Golden Rams opened pool play with a 24-0 victory over York. Riley finished with three trys, two conversions and 19 points. Next up was host Bloomsburg and three players registered double figures to lead the Rams to a 47-0 blanking of the Huskies. Ray

recorded 11 points while Evans and Spangler each had 10. The final pool play match of the afternoon featured West Chester against Navy, and the Golden Rams were victorious, 40-0. Ray posted three tries and 15 points while Riley put up 10 points on five conversions. Evans scored a pair of trys as well. The semifinals was a rematch of that final pool play competition. This time, West Chester took the measure of Navy, 17-7. Riley, Evans and Spangler each had tries while Riley added a conversion 24-0. The championship match featured West Chester against host Bloomsburg, and the Golden Rams secured their first 7’s tournament title with a 24-0 blanking of the Huskies. Riley lead the way with a try and a pair of conversions for nine points. Evans, Moritz and Spangler each added a try.

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WCU WOMEN’S RUGBY WINS TOURNAMENT STORY ON PG 35 | PHOTO BY: WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

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