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W W W. W C U Q UA D. CO M MONDAY, APRIL 28, 2014

VOLUME 106, ISSUE 10

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Bananas! Cupcakes! T-Shirts! Oh My!!! IIana Berger/ Photography Editor


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THE QUAD NEWS

News

Banana Day 2014 proves to be a success

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Clare Haggerty News Editor

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n April 23, West Chester University held its 18th annual Banana Day. Banana Day is one of the many unique things about WCU, and many students look forward to it all year round. Although many WCU students do not know the origin of Banana Day, they could learn something by visiting the official Banana Day website. Some of the information on the website is out of date, but it provides an interesting background to one of the best days at WCU. Apparently, Rodolfo “Rudy” Tellez founded Banana Day in 1996 when he organized the handing out of 3,000 bananas on campus. A similar event happened in 1997, and then

APRIL 28, 2014

Banana Day took a hiatus. However, the Banana Day that all West Chester students know and love resumed with full force in 1999, and WCU has never looked back. “Banana Day is just so much fun,” said student Colleen Curry. “Plus, it feels like spring is finally here when Banana Day comes, because everyone is outside playing games.” The thing about Banana Day that gets students excited is the free tshirts. 1,000 t-shirts were printed and given out for free to students who win games and answer trivia questions correctly. At a school of over 15,000, getting one of these limited edition t-shirts becomes very competitive very quickly. This year’s simple black shirts displayed a group of bananas at a crosswalk like the iconic album cover of “Abbey Road” by The Beatles. “After 11 a.m., the num-

ber of people wearing Banana Day t-shirts was increasing and the crowds at the locations with games kept getting larger and larger,” the SAC Contemporary Issues chair MaryBeth Sadow said. Banana Day volunteers handed out bananas all over campus, and students could play games to win t-shirts in multiple different places. The academic quad boasted a schedule packed with banana games, trivia, relay races, and a 50/50 raffle. Some of the activities on the academic quad included the game ninja and a challenge for students to give a speech without any fillers, such as “um,” “uh,” and “like.” The residential quad, on the other hand, hosted lawn games like Kan Jam, corn hole, and ladder golf, as well as more banana games and trivia. WCUR had DJs set up on the Sykes patio to do t-shirt giveaways and play music, while in the ballrooms, there were banana games and trivia,

Photo by Ilana Berger/Photography Editor

Photo by Ilana Berger/Photography Editor

By Ale Prac

as well as a mechanical surfboard and bananathemed snacks, including banana bread and banana smoothies. There were also banana games and trivia happening at the South Campus Clubhouse, and many bananas were given away on East Campus outside of Swope. Students who did not want to play games could skip all of the hoopla if they found one of the five golden bananas hidden around campus. Students who found a golden banana could go directly to Sykes 256 and claim their shirts, rather than having to compete for them like other students. Banana Day always has a special guest, and this year did not disappoint. The special guest of Banana Day 2014 was Dia Doce, a local bakery in West Chester, who gave away free cupcakes for the afternoon. There were also several students who got into the Banana Day spirit by wearing big banana suits or gorilla costumes. Banana Day lasted from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and then Banana Night, hosted by the Purple and Gold Club, began at 6 p.m. The Purple and Gold club developed

a photo scavenger hunt that could be completed in teams of two. The first 100 students who completed the scavenger hunt got a free Banana Night t-shirt. Some of the items on the scavenger hunt list included “the arch that whispers,” “a place where parking is free,” and “take a selfie with a worker in the library.” “Banana Day was defi-

nitely a success because of the amount of student involvement on campus,” said Sadow. “People seemed to be impressed with the shirts and even if someone did not win a shirt, they still had fun playing the games, which is what Banana Day is all about.” Clare Haggerty is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH77342@wcupa.edu.

Photo by Ilana Berger/Photography Editor


APRIL 28, 2014

ess By Alexandra Arbiz Practicum Writer

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he West Chester University Dance Company (UDC) opened their spring dance concert, Perpetual Motion, on April 24 at 8 p.m. at the Madeline Wing Adler Theatre in the Swope music building. The full length dance concert is a collaboration of the entire Department of Theatre and Dance. The Madeline Wing Adler Theatre was fully packed for Thursday’s opening night performance. Each piece had anywhere from five to 10 dancers. UDC, which is an SSI-sponsored organization presents two fulllength concerts each

THE QUAD NEWS

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West Chester University Dance Company presents Perpetual Motion

school year: one in the fall as well as one in the spring. The dance concert began with “In Search of the Tropicana,” which was choreographed by faculty dance instructor Maria Urrutia. The piece was a collaboration between faculty and students in the Latin Jazz Ensemble course, 3D Art course, and UDC. The dancers moved across the stage in quick salsa-like motions and featured a lot of hip movements. The second piece, “Encantadora,” was choreographed by UDC Vice President Carmen VanNess and it was performed to “Snowden’s Jig” by Carolina Chocolate Drops.

The third dance of the evening was “Revival,” which was choreographed by Mackenzie Holmes who is the treasurer of UDC. The piece showed the dancers emotion and it was dedicated in the program and inspired by fallen firefighters and their families and friends who embody true heroic strength and perseverance every day. The fourth dance titled “Chronology” was choreographed by Alison Sharp, a senior theatre major with a concentration in dance. It was performed to the sounds of telephones ringing, different types of vehicles, text message alerts, and even broadband dial-up sounds The fifth dance of the

evening was a tap number. The piece was titled “And We Are” and was choreographed by Kelsey Zolochik. This was one of the larger numbers of the show featuring nine dancers. It was performed to “So Fresh, So Clean” by Outkast and was a very quick and upbeat number. Following the fifth performance there was a 15 minute intermission. During this time UDC members filled the aisles of the theatre engaging the crowd while dancing in synch to Gas Pedal and Turn Down for What. Following the intermission, the sixth performance of the night, Onward and Upward, was choreographed by UDC

President Bailey O’Brien. “That Old Familiar Pain” by Trevor Gordon Hall and “I’ll Be There For You” by Boyce Avenue were the music featured during this number and the dancers played off of one another’s emotions as they moved across the stage. The Endless Knot was the seventh dance of the night and was choreographed by Bridget Carlin. The piece featured a lot of jumps and synchronization of the dancers. “Ctrl-Alt-Delete,” the eighth dance of the evening was a quick moving piece, and featured movements across the entire stage through the entire number. The ninth dance “A

Vestige in Time,” was another larger number featuring ten dancers. Choreographed by Natalie Flynn who is the secretary of UDC, this piece was emotional as well as very quick and directional. The final dance of the evening was “Catalyst.” Set to soft music, the dancers utilized the entire stage. The dance concert concluded with a bow of the entire dance company. They danced on stage as a whole cast to Pharrell’s “Happy.” From the music, lighting, and especially the dancers, the performance was a joint effort by all. Alexandra Arbiz is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at AA736117@wcupa.edu.

Rising number of sexual assaults leaves WCU students feeling anxious

After the fourth sexual assault in as many weeks, many students and their parents question WCU’s safety Adam Farence Editor-in-Chief

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est Chester University has seen an alarming rise in the number of sexual assaults in the past few weeks. The most recent assault took place on April 25, when an unknown assailant approached a female WCU student from behind. In a different incident, a female was inappropriately groped in Francis Harvey Green library. Public Safety, West Chester University’s police force, has apprehended the man and charges are being pressed. In response to these at-

tacks, President Weisenstein sent out an email to the entire university urging students and parents to remain calm; that Public Safety is appropriately handling the rise in assaults. He also urged the community to sign up for WCU Alert, which is Public Safety’s primary method to notify students of emergencies on campus. From the email, President Weisenstein reminded the community, “No campus is entirely isolated from crime and West Chester University is no exception. However, WCU has developed policies and implemented procedures in order to increase safety and security awareness and to provide precautionary

measures for all campus community members.” Given the rise is in assaults, it is understandable safety would become more of a concern. The semester is coming to a close and students are staying up later to prepare for final exams and assignments, as well as enjoying the warmer evening weather. “After I heard about the sexual assault at the library, I was anxious about going there by myself,” student Molly Herbison said, “especially since the assailant isn’t even a student here. I made sure to stay in a populated area while I was there, but it’s discomforting to feel unsafe on your own campus.” President Weisen-

stein’s message also encouraged students to report incidences of assault, even if the students themselves were not involved. Public safety is also actively taking measures in light of recent events. The Public Safety department intends to counteract the rise in sexual assaults by increasing the number of bike patrols, attending residence hall floor meetings to educate residents, and encourage students to use their walking escort program to help reduce to number of future instances of assault. Adam Farence is a third-year student majoring in history and French. He can be reached at AF764146@ wcupa.edu.

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A WCU student was assaulted by a man in the Francis Harvey Green Library. Security footage from the library aided police in apprehending the suspect, and charges are being pressed.


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THE QUAD NEWS

APRIL 28, 2014

Candidate for PA’s District 6 House Representative visits WCU

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By Sarah Falta Staff Writer

n April 17 2014, Dr. Manan Trivedi, a physician, an Iraq war veteran, and, as of now, the only democratic candidate running for the Pennsylvania’s District 6 House Representative position, visited West Chester University. With West Chester being one of the biggest schools in the sixth district, Trivedi came to the university to talk with the students about his campaign and what him winning the election will mean for them. With Congressman Jim Gerlach’s retirement, Trivedi has a good shot at winning the house representative position. He believes that his background in both the military and as a doctor will allow him to bring a new, and much needed perspective to Washington. As a doctor, Travedi was trained to listen to his patients and come up with effective solutions. He believes that a huge problem in Washington is that representatives are not listening to their constituents. He also knows that doctors have to get things done. “When I am in an emergency room, I don’t ask the nurse if she voted for Obama before we work as a team, to treat someone. We have a task at hand and we accomplish it,” Trivedi said. Trivedi’s humble beginnings have also had an impact on his views. With an engineering degree and hope for a better opportunity, Trivedi’s father immigrated

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to America. However, life for a new immigrant in the US was harsh, and his father found himself cleaning toilets and scrubbing floors. Through the hardships, his father carried an unfailing belief that in America you will succeed if you work hard and play by the rules. This concept was engrained in Trivedi at a young age. Today, he acknowledges that everyone deserves to find opportunity in America if, like his father, they work hard and play by the rules. The topics Trivedi came to talk to the students of West Chester about centered on Paul Ryan’s new budget plan. Trivedi shared that he and his opponent Republican Ryan Costello share starkly different views on the Ryan Budget. Why should we care what the Ryan Budget says? As Trivedi stated, “If you want to look at someone’s values and principles you should look at their budget” and the Ryan Budget does not prioritize the education system, many social

safety programs, and ultimately, the job market. First, the budget would freeze the maximum Pell Grant award, which is a big financial aid college funding tool for low-income families. Freezing the Pell Grant fund at what is now $5,730, would in 10 years result in cuts of $125 billion. Capping the Pell Grant means that money necessary to send many students to college will be used to balance out the federal budget. On top of the Pell Grant cuts, the Ryan Budget will also implement higher student loan interest rates. Under the budget, loans will begin accruing interest while the student is still in college, simply meaning more student debt. Trivedi provided a vivid comparison of priority when he shared that college students pay 7 percent on loans, but banks on Wall Street that take out massive loans and pay less then 0.5 percent. Trivedi shared that he supports teachers and a sustainable education

because that is the basis for a good economy. With joblessness being a top concern in the US, I was quite surprised when Trivedi shared that according to numerous studies, Ryan’s budget

would account for 3 million people loosing their jobs. The budget also proposes multiple changes to social safety programs. Trivedi shared that job training programs will be cut including those that help veterans learn how to do civilian jobs. As Trivedi stated, “If we can’t take care of our men and women who literally risk their lives for us, what kind of country are we?” Health care becomes a voucher under this budget, which means quite plainly it is not a guarantee. People with Medicare would be allowed to use up to the amount of money provided, however after it is spent Medicare will not cover any more of the costs.

As a physician, Trivedi knows that it may only take one medical bill to use up the money provided by Medicare. Trivedi promises that if he is elected as Pennsylvania’s District 6 House Representative, he will stand as an advocate for West Chester University and its student body. Washington needs someone who recognizes that capping Pell Grant loans and raising student loan interest rates will only perpetuate negative consequences for the education system and more specifically, the students of West Chester University. Sarah Falta is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at SF795820@ wcupa.edu.

NEWS D R I E W

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ive Australian snorkelers became stranded on a deserted island after their boat became unanchored and drifted away, taking their phones and all of their supplies wih it, including their stores of food and water. They looked for the highest ground and huddled together on a pile of rocks, preparing to spend the night. However, salvation came in the form of a helicopter, the pilot of which had seen the massive SOS that the snorkelers had written on a sandbar. The group was slightly dehydrated and sunburnt, but no injuries were reported. 42-year-old teacher allegedly performed a “full contact” lap dance on a middle school student in front of his Texas classmates for the student’s fifteenth birthday. The student admitted that he spanked her behind several times as she touched him “all over his body.” The teacher has been charged with having an improper relationship with a student after her four-minute performance. Florida couple and their neighbor ended up behind bars after a crack-smoking session ended in the neighbor bringing out his machete. Apparently the couple became angry when the neighbor ran out of crack, and the man grabbed the machete to defend himself. No one was injured.

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APRIL 28, 2014

Op-Ed

THE QUAD OP-ED

QUADOPED@WCUPA.EDU

To my editors, writers and photographers for the past two years, I was not too happy that I had to take over as editor in chief of The Quad two years ago. In fact, I was quite unhappy. I had been the sports editor, and I wanted to stay the sports editor for the rest of college. Truthfully, I was not that interested in anything else. But that all changed very fast. I quickly learned that, although I liked designing the sports section, I liked it more to be a part of the bigger picture, and really try to make a difference in the production and quality of The Quad. I don’t know if I did, but I felt like in the last couple of years we made some really great strides in terms of the look of our newspaper, our online presence, and the general quality of the news service we provided; I was honored to be at the head of that progression. There are a couple of lessons in this, but one in particular I wanted to point out to you as you continue your road to graduation, and eventually the workforce. Don’t say no to something just because it is not exactly what you want to do. But shouldn’t you chase your dreams? Try for that dream job? Yes, of course, but there is often no pre-set path to that job, and to close your mind to other opportunities and possibilities also closes doors on something you might really enjoy. In my case, that certainly would have been true regarding my position with The Quad. I’m not recommending you say yes to everything that comes your way, but at least think it through. College is as much about figuring out what you don’t want to do, as much as it is figuring out what you do want to do, and the way to figure that out is to try something you are unsure about. There is no better time in your life to take those types of risks than while you’re in college. I want to give you one other piece of advice along the same note. Don’t get discouraged if you are having trouble finding a job or internship in your line of work. I’ve had my share of worries, and still do, but someone once told me that employers don’t operate on your schedule, and if you do everything in your ability each day to better yourself and put yourself in a position to succeed, you should be able to go to sleep that night knowing you are doing the best you can. That is really all that matters. As I write my last editorial (and admittedly my first one in quite a while) I am proud to know that my editors and writers were amazing at trying out new things and taking risks for me and the paper. Our new editor in chief, Adam Farence will be doing just that, as he tries to give The Quad a larger online presence with his mobile journalism project. I am certain that he, and all of you returning staff members will transform the newspaper medium here at West Chester and make it into something even better. I’ve seen some of my fellow Quad members go onto to do some pretty big things, and I expect nothing less from all of you. Best of luck for the remainder of college and beyond, and remember to have fun! -Kenny Ayres -former editor in chief

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The Quad The Student Newspaper of West Chester University 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 610.436.2375 | quad@wcupa.edu | www.wcuquad.com

Adam Farence

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Clare Haggerty News Editor Drew Mattiola Op-Ed Editor Theresa Kelly Features Editor Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor Ryan Calpin Sports Editor Jose Mestre Photography Editor BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Drew Schmitz Business Manager Andrew Miller Advertising Manager

EDITORIAL STAFF Colleen Goldhorn Asst. Photography Editor AJ Arcaini Asst. Sports Editor

COPY EDITORS Drew Drevyanko Jeffrey Holmes

DISTRIBUTION Drew Schmitz Andrew Miller ONLINE EDITION Chris Wilwol FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumni. We do not accept submissions from members of the community who are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,000 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers Copyright ©2014 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the editor-in-chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, studentrun newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and, although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our website at www.wcuquad.com. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our website at www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


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THE QUAD OP-ED

From the Mayor’s Office Civic Involvement: How one person can make a difference

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f you have ever attended a Borough Council meeting, you might have overlooked one of the most important people in the room: the Borough Manager. Though he is not a member of the Council, Ernie McNeely has been an active citizen of West Chester for the past 27 years through his service. He has not missed a meeting and has the ability to take minutes of every meeting while not missing a beat should a question arise from a Council member or a concerned citizen. I interviewed Ernie this past week to gain insight of West Chester’s past and how far it has come, especially with his efforts. Ernie is originally from Washington, Pa. where he also found his first job after graduation. He studied politics at Bethany College and had envisioned politics as career but not on the local level. When he began his career as a local government administrator in Washington Pa. the town was in the midst of revitalization which would later encourage Ernie to join West Chester. When Ernie came to West Chester, he described the town as having good bones, however, it had slipped into a decline with a lot of problems but still had great potential. Downtown in the late 1980s had a few good restaurants, lots of vacant store fronts and there was little activity at night for safety reasons. Volunteers too saw the potential for the town and began working without josevinaxia.com any money or resources.

The volunteers needed support to be able to have this revitalization effort become a reality and turned to Borough Council. Together in the mid 1990s they established the Commerce Department with a Commerce Director to begin revitalization. One of their first steps was recruiting Iron Hill. In 1999, however, the town lost their Commerce Director and at this time the Business Improvement District or BID was founded. The BID first failed but did pull through their second attempt and today there are over 200 properties in the BID each with a vote. Another surprising aspect of West Chester’s revitalization is that the university didn’t realize how supporting these changes would go hand in hand with bettering the college as well. Today, our university and Borough have a great relationship which continues to grow each year. For moving forward, Ernie says economic development is something to continue to work for. It’s never done and as soon as you stop, the slide will be faster than the climb. Parking will always be an issue in West Chester and can be found in old Borough meeting minutes; our streets were made for horse and buggies. As for the option of building up in the town vs. perhaps building underground for parking garages, building down costs nearly double the amount to build-up. Therefore this will prob-

ably not be an issue of looks but what will work economically, which could mean more multi-level garages in our future, this has not been determined yet. As for what is next for Ernie as his 27 year career in West Chester ends, he will begin his new leadership role as Township Manager for Lower Merion. He was drawn in to this town because it has similar characteristics, several business districts, and is looking for similar changes. Lower Merion is significantly larger than the borough and will give his career new challenges he is eager to meet. Lastly, I asked Ernie what his recommendations are for students wishing to become involved in the community. He encouraged engagement in the town to be a part of shaping it. Students have the ability to control seats on Borough Council if they want to. Ernie encourages all students to vote and for some to run for office. There are internship opportunities for students to work with the Mayor or the Borough Council. I too agree that the internship opportunity is a great way to become involved and find out not only the behind the scenes work done for our daily life, but also to see how a body of government works. Therefore, let us reflect from Ernie’s work and ask ourselves: What way can I be of service? Blair Campbell is an intern for the mayor.

APRIL 28, 2014

So It Goes. By Rachel Alfiero Staff Writer

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s the flowers begin to bloom and the trees start to regain a lost sense of life and color, it seems like nothing else could be transpiring other than the end of the spring semester. Walking from dorm halls to academic buildings is no longer the tedious act that it was three months ago- when the temperatures were low like everyone’s sense of overall enthusiasm. Long gone are the days when snow blanketed the

call move-in weekend, and the absolute controlled chaos that it was. Everything was so new (meeting my roommate, living away from home, the structure and setup of the classes, gaining a whole new group of friends) that it added more excitement to everything that was happening, which in turn made most of the semester a positive experience. Sure, there were some bumps in the road, and I’m not saying that

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ground and sat heavily on rooftops. Now there is never a shortage of people hanging out on the residential and academic quads, whether they’re playing frisbee, doing homework, or just lounging around. With this overwhelming sense of finality in the air, I have decided to end this semester’s column with an opinion of how my first year of college went. I suppose I’ll break my first year up into fall and spring semester, which seems like the normal thing to do, as opposed to going month by month. I can still specifically re-

I didn’t have bad times during my first semester. But as I’m looking back now (and as I’ll probably see it when I look back 20 years from now), my first semester of college was pretty good. The second semester started out great right from the beginning. I say this because I can still clearly recall getting the email stating that all classes were cancelled due to the weather. I was ecstatic at the time, highfiving my friends and jumping up and down with perhaps an overly elevated sense of glee. Little did I know that

soon I would be praying to the Gods of nature to stop gracing us with so much snow. Aside from the harsh weather in the beginning, spring semester had an even share of good and bad parts. I made a handful of great new friends, had some exciting (but also somewhat scary) experiences, and even ended up enjoying most of my classes. On the other hand though, this semester did have some crappy times. I let my nerves a n d anxiety get the best of me, and I procrastinated a little m o r e t h a n normal. B u t by the t i m e t h i s last iss u e of the Q u a d h i t s stands, there will only be two weeks left to go, and I’m going to make sure that I make the best of them. So I hope that you take a few minutes to look back on how this year of college went for you, whether it was your first or your last. A little retrospection never hurt anyone. With that piece of sage advice, I’ll bring this semester’s last column to a bittersweet end. Till next time friends, so it goes. Rachel Alfiero is a first-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at RA806657@wcupa.edu.


APRIL 28,2014

By Rebekah Balmer Staff Writer

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s I’m sure many of you and your inboxes have noticed, there has been an increased number of Timely Warnings sent out recently. I am thankful that these women feel comfortable enough to report the actions of these men. In turn, it angers me that these actions are occurring in the first place. I understand why we want to believe that our campus is omitted from these types of crimes. Being an alumnus of West Chester University of Pennsylvania Class of 2012, I am proud to be a Golden Ram. This has been my home for a long time and I see these e-mails and think to myself, what is happening to my home? And then I think, should I be asking this question? Or should I be asking, what is happening to our culture? I was having a discussing with a man the other day about the timely warnings. Our original topic led to a discussion about football. Now, you might be asking what football has to do with sexual assault and rape culture. I’ll give you some insight. Think for a moment what a coach or player might say to another player in order to “motivate” them to play better, harder, score more. They call them a “girl”. From a young age football, and I’m sure other sports as well, are molding the minds of young boys to think that to be a girl, is to be weak, and being weak means being of lesser value; A human,

THE QUAD OP-ED

Time for No More Timely Warnings being of lesser value, in 2014? These comments, hopefully, are not said to provoke this kind of thinking, but essentially that is what’s happening here. But we cannot just blame sports teams. In fact, I’m not sure pointing a finger is going to be helpful at all. However; yes, people need to take responsibil-

we can do to change this idea that women are disposable and that men are inherently uncontrollable in regards to sex and it’s just the way they are “wired.” Biologically, men and women are different in some ways, but when it comes to the ability to control one’s sexual desires men and women are exactly the same. It

to surface level conversations we will never be able fight this epidemic we are facing. After having these meaningful discussions we need to make concrete action plans. What can we do to help prevent future occurrences from happening? What steps need to be taken to move forward, not backward in terms of viewing sexual assault

assault as a “woman’s issue.” I think Jackson Katz explains it best in his TED Talk entitled, Violence against women— it's a men's issue. He discusses how men are directly affected by violence done by other men. They have mothers, sisters, best friends who are survivors of sexual assault, rape, and domestic

jezebel.com ity for their own actions, and I’m not talking about what a woman chooses to wear on a night out with her friends, I’m talking about what a perpetrator chooses to do with their hands or other body parts. The length of a dress, neckline of a shirt, or color of her shoes is not an invitation for rape. Furthermore, we need to be looking to see what

is social construction that instills and reinforces the notion that “boys will be boys.” We are taught these things. They are not biological. So now that you’ve received your sociology of gender lesson in one paragraph, what should we do now? First, we need to expand the dialogue box. If we restrict ourselves

and rape as a real issue? And the last point I’d like to make is the “we” I keep mentioning, needs to include men. When women fight for issues that involve women, men often think it’s not about them, or not their place to get involved, or feel uncomfortable for whatever reason. Or most often, in this case men view rape and sexual

violence. There are boys who are survivors of sexual assault, child molestation, rape and domestic violence. He emphasizes the fact that they as men have the power to be heard louder than women. He understands making that statement is sexist, but he also understands the statement is true. Men will listen to other men. He speaks about

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how the same system that produces men who abuse women, produce men who abuse other men. The system needs to be stopped and the best way to intervene is to no longer be a bystander. A bystander is anyone not directly involved in the occurring situation. I’m not suggesting putting yourself in danger, but I am suggesting making an effort to help the person in danger find safety. Katz explains bystander behavior very clearly. The line can appear blurry sometimes, but it is clear. He uses the example of bystander behavior in reference to racism and heterosexism. If a person says a racist comment and no one says “Hey, that’s not cool, don’t say that.” It is giving that person and everyone else around who heard the comment permission to continue to degrade and dehumanize the ethnicity in which the comment was about. If no one says anything at all, it is giving permission. Silence is a form of consent. If we are not willing to stand together; both men and women alike to end violence against women both here on campus and in our lives, then I’m not really sure what we are doing. I’m not asking you to be a warrior. I’m asking you to be a change agent, to not sit silent anymore. I think this one simple sentence said by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is so profound and power and it is the last thing I want to leave you with, “In the end what will hurt the most is not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.” Rebekah Balmer is a second-year graduate student studying Higher Education Counseling and Student Affairs. She can be reached at rb649636@wcupa.edu


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THE QUAD OP-ED

Pope Francis asks forgiveness for child abuse by clergy

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By Marisa Clagget Staff Writer

ope Francis of the Roman Catholic Church, famously revered around the world for his more progressive stances and involvement with the poor, has proved his humility to the world. Although it appears that Pope Francis is changing how many people view the Church, he has also inherited the damage and sins of priests who have committed sexual abuse against young boys. In a statement on April 11 on the Vatican radio, he “personally ask[ed] for forgiveness for the damage [some priests] have done for sexually abused children.” Pope Francis has also set up a committee last year with the hopes of assisting clerical sex abuse victims; however, many believe, including the United Nations, that not enough has been done to fight abuse and punish the offenders. With everything that the new Pope has done to restore the reputation and appeal of the Roman Catholic Church, what I consider is whether his actions toward sexual abuse by Catholic priests will really change how many perceive the legitimacy and credibility of the Church. Although there is skepticism as to whether reforms will change perceptions, I believe that Pope Francis’ plea for forgiveness is likely to convince many disbelievers to update their views.

Accusations against the Vatican Church and its handling of sexual abuse allegations have come from organizations such as the UN committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP). Many have accused the officials of the Vatican church of hiding abuse and putting the reputation of the officials above finding justice for abused children. Scandals of clerical abuse

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have been reported since the 1970s and 1980s, with even more uncovered in the last decade. Issues have occurred where allegations were not reported to legal authorities. Because of the lack of transparency by the Church in the past, many believe that the Vatican is not taking strong enough measures to combat abuse, help victims, and maintain the integrity of the Church. While Popes in the past, like Pope Benedict XVI, have apologized to victims of sexual abuse, Pope Francis has gone so far as to ask for forgiveness for sexual abuse by clergy. While many may see this as insufficient, he has tak-

en actions along with his plea that will hopefully bring sincere change to the Roman Catholic Church’s policies. Last year, a committee was formed to assist victims of clerical sexual abuse. Pope Francis has also vowed to impose sanctions against the perpetrators, as well as instructing officials to send clerical pedophiles to local police authorities rather than straight to the Vatican. The message portrayed by the Pope is one welcomed by many h u m a n r i g h t s organizations, including the UN committee on the rights of the child. A l though s t e p s taken by the Pope are keen to change public perspective, there are still obstacles to improving the Church’s image. Despite distinct actions to fight abuse, the Vatican is still being scrutinized for its mishandling of sex abuse scandals in the past and allegedly not addressing the long standing problem within the Church. Hopefully with the oversight committee on sexual abuse created last year and Pope Francis’ appeal for forgiveness, in time, the Vatican church will be seen once again as a credible religious entity. Marisa is joring in minoring reached edu.

a first-year student mapolitical sciennce and in Arabic. She can be at Mc808919@wcupa.

APRIL 28, 2014

Reflection; why college was worth the cost

By Evan R. Smith Staff Writer

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My first year here, I had to make friends once more, and start things new. But the school had a better feel to it in the first week than the other school did the whole time I was there. In the fall of my sophomore year, I was able to meet a lot of people by being able to play in the fall for the baseball team. Though I didn’t make it as a walk-on, I made some great friends and wasn’t

ften the question is posed: is college worth the cost? To many, it may be a resounding no, with costs skyrocketing in recent years. Now, I’m not going to bore you with statistics or anything of that nature. I can safely say that to me, college was a priceless endeavor worth experiencing. Coming out of high school, I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. Like many, my course of action seemed ambiguous. How was I supposed to choose what I wanted to do for the rest of my life at the mere age of 18? I wasn’t the greatest student in high school, but I knew that I wanted destinationsdreamsanddogs.com to play baseball. I had a as disappointed when I recouple of coaches recruit- alized how good the team ing me from some smaller was that year- going on to division three schools, but win the DII college world I eventually decided on a series. After taking a couple private school in northern New Jersey called Far- of classes in Political Scileigh Dickinson. While ence at West Chester and all my high school friends at FDU, I knew that I were having a great time had a keen interest in the at Rutgers, I was seem- subject, but I didn’t know ingly trapped in a miser- precisely what I wanted to able situation, where ev- do. My junior year brought erything was unfamiliar and things weren’t going a lot of new opportunities, as planned. After real- as I decided to partake izing that my baseball in various organizations. situation wasn’t what I Two of the most importhought it would be, I de- tant of these clubs becided to transfer. Work- ing The Quad and West ing hard in my first year Chester University Radio. paid off, as I was able to Through these outlets, I have better options this was able to really find my time around. Now, I was calling, something I had faced with another tough not been able to do before. decision, go to Rutgers 10 I also took a video producminutes down the road or tion class, where I found venture out to Pennsyl- myself enjoying every asvania, and try something pect of it. Through some new. We all know how of the projects we completed, I was able to bethat turned out.

come more familiar with a path that I have grown to take pleasure in. As a result of the hard work I put into my junior year, I was rewarded with an internship at CBS in New York City- my big break. What started out as a fun hobby turned into something that may potentially be my career. College helped get me to that point, without it I don’t know what I’d be doing. Not that I have a job yet, but now I have a direction, a sense of purpose. Now with only a few short weeks left in my college career, the maturity, knowledge and wisdom I have gained have been immeasurable. College teaches you to think critically about things, and I can certainly say that I do now. Yes, there may be many cons to college, like the cost of tuition, the bad food, the poor bus system here, among other things. It may be cliché, but college is what you make of it, and I feel that I have made the most of it. I can confidently say that I have forged lifetime friendships , have honed a craft, made unforgettable memories, and now hopefully have a career and a future. Perhaps, I will regret it when I’m paying off my student loans 20 years down the road, but for now, I will bask in all that college has offered me. Evan R. Smith is a fourth-year student majoring in political science with minors in international business, business and technical writing, and Spanish. He can be reached at LW738484@ wcupa.edu

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APRIL 28,2014

THE QUAD OP-ED

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A life changed for a person who wants to change the world By Evan R. Smith Staff Writer

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eople’s lives change, sometimes for the better, and sometimes for the worse. In 2008, Chris Dittrich, suffered a near fatal car accident. A resident of West Windsor, New Jersey, Dittrich was on his way back from lunch when he was going too fast around a curve. Subsequently, he hit a tree, and smacked his head hard enough to the point where he was in a coma for a month. When he finally did come to, his tedious journey to recovery would begin. Dittrich admitted he was bitter for sometime after, but has no regrets that the car accident happened. “I woke up one day and my right side was paralyzed, and I had no idea what had happened. I went through those phases where I was angry, I was upset. But now, I’m in that stage where I know why. I feel like everything happens for a reason. We all have the power to overcome our difficulties and I want to help others do that.” Dittrich went on to say, “March 3rd, 2008 was the best day of my life. I’m not physically perfect, but I am so much more mentally there. I’m just a more ready and prepared person for whatever is going to come next and I am more here for the people to help others.” After the accident, Chris was remarkably able to participate at graduation, with the assistance of his dad escorting him onto the stage. He would then proceed to take a year off from school, and subsequently apply to schools down south, in the warm weather. He would decide

on the University of Miami, where he could continue his rigorous physical therapy with the hope of getting better one day. “I felt kind of welcomed at Miami, it seemed like people were happier down there,” he said. Though the decision was easy to make, the first year or so was not easy. “My freshman year, I was in awful shape. I struggled walking to classes.”

This past fall, the 24-year-old created a Facebook page called “Change the World with Me?” where its goal is to help people share inspiring stories. He wants to try and get his message across as best he can to as many people as possible. “People find it amazing; they can’t believe some of my stories. That’s why I started the group, but I don’t want to push my own

Chris’ dad, who he calls his hero, would help him out for important doctor appointments and come down there in times of need. Now, Chris often jokes with his dad that he shouldn’t have been sent to school that year because of the poor shape he was in. The dreadful situation allowed Chris to truly understand the meaning of hard work. The experience humbled Chris and he knew that if he could make it through this that others could too.

stories, I don’t want it to seem like self promotion. I’m posting other stories that are not necessarily about similar injuries, but circumstances and situations of some sort that we are all in.” The page currently has close to 800 members and has continued to grow since its inception. The goal of the page is ultimately to share stories that are inspirational and ones that promote good deeds. It’s the small acts of kindness that can make

the biggest difference and in turn can work like a domino effect. Dittrich sees it a little bit like the movie “Pay It Forward,” where others will feel compelled to act generously from hearts. A small example, that Chris pointed out occurred when he saw a homeless man outside the CVS. Dittrich didn’t have any cash on him, but without hesitation, he invited the man into the store with him to buy him groceries and whatever else he wanted. He described the man’s look on his face to be priceless- like he had just won the lottery. A man who was sitting in his car saw what happened, appreciated the situation and gave the man a little money tooto help out. The homeless man Fortune.com said that it was the best day of his life. “You never know when that little bit is going to push someone over the edge to get him to do something better, you can save a life by spending 15 minutes,” Dittrich said. Dittrich wants more people to participate in these types of acts whenever possible and he sees that as a gateway for a more compassionate society. He hopes that this page sparks others to share similar stories that help motivate people- to

accomplish these sorts of feats. He wants people to share these stories and apply it to their lives. After surviving the near fatal accident, Chris has nothing to promote but joy and jubilation. “I am the happiest person in the world and it’s my job to make everyone as happy as I am. Even if you have unrealistic goals, and you don’t achieve them, you’re going to get somewhere close.” He admits, though, sometimes it’s hard to get people on board to joineven his friends. “They’re a little hesitant sometimes but I just want everyone to share because that’s how things can change for the better.” Dittrich likes to remain active in the community and has traveled to many places to help others. While in Belize, he broke his collar bone while playing games with some kids. This was just weeks before he was scheduled to participate in a charity bike race. As a result, he would have to endure surgery, but was still able to participate in the bike race. Though it was unpleasant, Chris would persevere and end up biking 35 miles as part of a charity event for the Miami Project. The project has the goal of finding a cure for paralysis. It was founded and funded by former Dolphin Nick Buoniconti. Dittrich was able to help raise a remarkable 30,000 dollars as part of the event. Chris has been through tough hardships, which helps him better understand people of all sorts, something that the ‘Change the World with Me?’ page hopes to accomplish. “I’ve been at the low of the low; I have empathy for every type of person.”

He has made tremendous progress from where he came from. With the hard work of physical therapy in Miami, he went from being able to walk with his father at his high school graduation, to the point where he can now moderately run and even throw a ball. Chris has recently started taking lessons in how to become a public speaker, and was invited to go to the Florida Speaker’s Association, which meets once a month. Here he will be able to learn how to become a more polished talker, as he wants to reach out to groups all over. People can learn from what he has learned, which is what he would hope others would take away from his speeches. This would be a dream come true for him because it would be the ultimate way of paying it forward. “We the people need to bring about the change, laws can’t change the people. We ourselves have to do it. Obviously, it’s a very idealistic point of view, but any little bit can help.” When asked what his idea of changing the world would be he replied, “I just want to start a movement with people being more optimistic and overcoming adversity, as they strive to reach their goals. I want it to be a chain reaction, where people help each other. That would be immeasurable.” Dittrich has gone from his life being changed dramatically in the blink of an eye, to trying to change the world one step at a time by whatever means possible. Evan R. Smith is a fourth-year student majoring in political science with minors in international business, business and technical writing, and Spanish. He can be reached at LW738484@wcupa.edu


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Disney World from a bird’s eye view

By Ashley Cantasano Staff Writer

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e all know Disney World is the happiest place on Earth. A talking mouse? Princesses? Rides for all ages? What could be better? I consider myself quite the Disney expert, and have tested out almost every attraction. So, to ensure that you have the best time while visiting Disney World, I have compiled a list of my top eight attractions. Be sure to hit them all up on your next vacation! It's A Small World (located in Magic Kingdom): Since neither me nor my mother are extreme ride people, we tend to get off the boat and jump right back in line. Childsized dolls are dressed to look like people from the country they are representing. They also sing and dance to traditional songs from that country. It is a ride for all ages! Kilimanjaro Safari (located in Animal Kingdom): This safari ride through Africa is my favorite thing in Animal Kingdom. It really feels as though you are in the heart of Africa, watching the animals in their natural habitat. The last time I was there, I went twice, once in the morning and once in the afternoon. I noticed that in the morning they were much more

active, so go then if you can! Tree of Life (located in Animal Kingdom): This attraction too is located in Animal Kingdom. The characters from “A Bug's Life” narrate the show, showing us what goes on during the life of a bug. The special effects are really cool; for example, air is blown from your seat to make it feel as if bugs are

mctcampus

crawling under you, you get sprayed with water at various points- and it's all in 3D! Visiting The Little Mermaid (located in Magic Kingdom): If you read my last article, you know Ariel is my favorite Disney Princess, so visiting her is a no brainer. I have not been to the recently updated Ariel's Grotto, so it is number one on my list of things to do upon arriving at the park. Wishes Nighttime Spec-

THE QUAD OP-ED

tacular (located in Magic Kingdom): This is more than a fireworks display: it's a magical, Disney display. Definitely stay for the show if you are not too tired, it is something worth staying up for. The World Showcase (located in Epcot): This is something good to do inbetween all of the crazy rides. In The World Showcase, you walk around to the different countries, all of which host different events. Some have restaurants, shopping, and one or two even have rides. Cinderella's Castle (located in Magic Kingdom): You can't miss Cinderella's Castle- you walk through it to get into the park! If looking for a spot to announce to Facebook, Instagram, etc., that you have arrived at Disney, this is the place to do it! Sometimes, if you're lucky, Cinderella herself may even grace you with her presence. Magic of Disney Animation (Disney Hollywood Studios): When I was a kid, I thought this was the coolest thing ever! A professional animator goes step by step on how to draw a specific Disney character (when I went, it was Mickey Mouse), and you get to take the drawing home with you! I hope this has been helpful! Ashley Cantasano is a secondyear student majoring in marketing. She can be reached at AC784683@wcupa.edu.

APRIL 28, 2014


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THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

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Follow the Quad on Twitter! @TheQuadWCU QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU WCU student talks with Pfister, “Transendence” director

Entertainment W

Rob Gabe Staff Writer

ally Pfister, a descendent of visionary director Christopher Nolan, working as cinematographer for several of Nolan’s films including “Batman Begins,” “The Prestige,” “The Dark Knight,” “Inception,” and “The Dark Knight Rises,” is at the helm of his first featurelength film with this April’s “Transcendence”. “I think it’s been knocking on my door for a few years and finally it was time to try it out” Pfister said in a recent interview I had with him. “I started thinking about it more and you want to try different things in life.” “Transcendence” stars Johnny Depp as Will Caster, the leading scientific researcher in the field of artificial intelligence. After he’s shot by a member of a radical, antitech organization know as R.I.F.T. (Revolutionary Independence From Technology), he uploads his conscious, with the aid of his wife (Rebecca Hall) and close colleague (Paul Bettany), to a super-computer where he can outlive his mortal lifespan and continue to progress the future towards The Singularity, or what he refers to as Transcendence, (a point in time in which the technology we have created surpasses our own intelligence, wholly altering our society and what it means to be human). I spoke about The Singularity a few months back in my reviewer for Spike Jonze’s “Her,” a film that

solicits very similar human and moral inquiries to “Transcendence.” During our interview, Pfister gave me his take on the “Her” comparisons: “I know one journalist called our film the dark side of “Her.” Wally laughs. “When I saw “Her,” I’d already completed our film and I felt relieved that there are two very different movies.” He added, “I was a huge fan of “Her.” “Transcendence” probes a bit deeper into the technological advances as of the late, really focusing a keen eye on the potential, high-tech breakthroughs that could be right around the corner, notably Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter. Pfister, eager and enthusiastic to talk about the research he’d done explained, “I did an enormous amount of research. I went on my own little college tour in early spring of 2012. I went to visit MIT and talk to professors in the field of nanotechnology, neurobiology and robotics, and even in the media lab to look at some of their projections and get ideas for what was the state of the art in terms of projections and holograms and that sort of thing.” He elaborated, “I also visited Stanford and spoke to professors there and then did the same thing at Berkeley. I landed on two professors at Berkeley, one in neurobiology and the other one in nanotechnology. They were so helpful. They became full time consultants on the film and were involved in every stage of vetting the

science and the medical applications in the film. So I felt pretty confident by the time we started filming that I had a pretty clear idea as to what was really possible, and where we are kind of bending it in a sense.” Just how far off are we from the cutting edge, hyper-technological realities of what’s depicted in “Transcendence?” “Obviously you cannot upload a human brain with the current technology now.” Wally chuckled, “Where most of the sciences are right now is in mapping the human brain. There are several projects around the world where they are slowly and meticulously working on mapping of a human brain, which is basically logging in the synapses and the communication between neurons.” He elaborated, “Beyond that, of course, the nanotechnology is our own creation. It is based on sort of speculation and what might be plausible in the future. And that’s what the two main professors that were my consultants are comfortable with saying, is that most of what we deal within the films is currently time plausible.” He chimed in laughing, “it’s important for everybody to remember the “fi” in sci-fi, it’s fiction.” Similar to his mentor, Christopher Nolan, Pfister is another traditionalist director who’s refused to give up shooting film in trade for the digital medium, going as far to make sure “Transcendence” was shot in IMAX. “I’m waiting

for digital technology to catch up.” Wally admits, “With digital technology, we only have 4K cameras, maybe there is a 5K camera coming out soon, but anamorphic 35-millimeter film is between 8 and 10K. So it’s obviously much higher resolution. It’s better contrast, better color saturation. If you want more detail in the shadow and more detail in the highlights, and an overall richer look, film is still the superior medium. It may seem nitpicky to some because of the digital cameras looked pretty good on a big screen, but the film looks better and I think that a lot of the beauty of photography is in the subtleties and the nuances.” Pfister added, “Digital is getting there. Bit by bit, incrementally, we see improvements, but until it’s equal or better than film, I don’t see any reason to give up film as long as it’s available.” Wally confessed to how

grateful he was for having an A-list cast showcased in his directorial debut “It’s mind blowing.” He chuckles “I feel incredibly fortunate to be lucky enough among my first outing as a director to have the likes of these incredible actors. Obviously I’ve known Morgan Freeman and Cillian Murphy for ten years. We’ve all done three “Batman” pictures together and it was very comfortable working with them, but Depp is just a joy to work with and he is a really smart guy.” He added, “Paul Bettany is a lot of fun, as is Rebecca. Bettany has a great sense of humor, so there is a really nice, calm levity on the set that I think made a comfortable environment for all of us. To have this kind of talent, backing me up on my first effort was pretty phenomenal. I feel very privileged.” Concerning the film’s themes, Wally was quick

to voice his input on the perceived cautionary message of the film. “I would say there is no statement being made by the director and that’s what sort of important to me. I think that it’s really the characters that make the statements. I wanted to make film where the characters are making statements rather than the filmmakers.” He also added his personal feelings towards his own technological devices. “I’m not that crazy about giving out personal information on social medial sites.” He humorously added, “I also get a little annoyed when my phone makes me upgrade to the new software, but I love my computer, my cell phone and my iPad.” He concluded by emphasizing, “I guess, I have a love-hate relationship with technology.

Mike Naples Special to The Quad

ing never been a big fan of La Dispute apart from acknowledging the band’s most popular singles such as “King Park” and “Such Small Hands,” I wasn’t sure that I was worthy of reviewing an album from a band with such a passionate and dedicated fan base, and thought that maybe the job was better left to someone else. Nevertheless, the aura that surrounds the band

enticed me to give Rooms of the House my best, and I hope that I can write a review worthy of an album so deeply written and thought out that I have yet to fully comprehend Dreyer’s lyrical complexities and the band’s descriptive instrumentation. Rooms of the House is a beautiful concept that is portrayed through sto-

Rob Gabe is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RG770214@ wcupa.edu.

La Dispute releases new concept album

La Dispute has always been a group that asks a lot of their listener. Jordan Dreyer’s post-hardcore quintet from Grand Rapids, Michigan has just released their third full length LP, a concept album entitled Rooms of the House, and I was admittedly very hesitant to select it for review. Hav-

See LA DISPUTE, page 12


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THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

APRIL 28, 2014

“Enemy” ending leaves viewers frightened and questioning

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Rob Gabe Staff Writer

haos is order left undeciphered. This is the aphorism and opening text to Canadian director Denis Villeneuve’s “Enemy,” the same filmmaker of last year’s mystery, childabduction thriller, “Prisoners.” It’s an enigmatic philosophical verse that’s a huge indicator of what the viewers in for, a clueless, mind-bending, arthouse conundrum that has no intentions of explaining itself. Loosely based on a novel entitled, “The Double” by José Saramago, Villeneuve’s adaptation throws some curve balls into the mix including bodysnatching tarantulas and seedy underground sex clubs. Adam (Jake Gyllenhaal), a college history professor, lectures on the talking points of dictatorships and totalitarian governments to his barley attentive students. When he’s not having sex with his emotionally blunted girlfriend (Mélanie Laurent of “Inglourious Basterds,” and “Now You See Me”) he slogs through a mundane routine, loafing around in his cluttered apartment, without

LA DISPUTE from page 11 rytelling composition at it’s finest. Upon a first spin, listeners are very likely to be confused with the album’s story. Rooms of the House is a spiderweb of sorts, cross-referencing its major themes and subtle nuances among its eleven tracks through major events or just simple words such as “furniture” and “glass.” The tale is one that I still have yet to completely wrap my head around, but upon the fourth listen I have come

much real interest in anything besides sipping alcoholic beverages, grading his students’ papers, and zoning out. The pattern is broken when he’s recommended a video rental by one of his colleagues, a local film called “Where There’s A Will, There’s A Way.” Back at home, Adam views the film on his laptop. The end credits roll and they’re met with an underwhelming sigh before he decides to kip down for the evening, however he’s restlessly woken in the middle of the night by a foreign inclination to revisit it. What exactly is it about film that hints at him to return to it? A doppelganger, a double, an exact look-a-like that mirrors Gyllenhall’s outward appearance is spotlighted in the film, setting him on a quest to seek out the Hollywood dead ringer. “Enemy” sternly assaults its viewers with unbearable white-knuckled anxiety in the same tradition that films likes “Eyes Wide Shut”(1998) and “Inland Empire”(2006) do. With a combination of an uncomfortably oblique score by Saunder Jurriaans and Danny Bensi, resembling something from the creative mind of John-

ny Greenwood, Villeneuve somehow manages to make simple aerial shots of an architecturally distorted Toronto bleached in a yellow toxin unusually eerie. There’s a feeling of absolute panic that permeates the movie, never easing off, and remains ongoing into the abrupt, shockingly impactful, final shot, that’s so well executed, it’s justifiable why David Ehrlich, writer of Film.com, proclaimed

that it “Might have the scariest ending of any film ever made.” Be that as it may, researching the ending before seeing “Enemy” will only diminish its flabbergasting power, given it looses potential to frighten once taken out of context of the film. Part of what will determine how viewers respond to “Enemy” is what they expect of it. “Enemy” is an

to the realization that this is a story that doesn’t necessarily make perfect sense, because it has to be interpreted differently by each listener. Rooms of the House is a masterful example of how music can be the perfect venue for telling a story that has an open meaning, as lyrics are almost always written to be a source of interpretation. There are certainly elements of the album that hit me on a personal level. It would be a futile attempt to sit down and try to factually piece this tale together, because in

my opinion even if it could be done it would defeat the purpose of the album. Rooms of the House is a storm that mercilessly tossed it’s wreckage about and leaves it up to the listener to piece it back together in the best way they personally see it. Instrumentals are a touchy subject with a band such as La Dispute, as the way in which they portray their art relies so heavily on their lyrics, it can be easy to overshadow the album’s message with stuffy and overclouded composition. Kevin Whittemore

hend, even when it reaches its final outcome, it is surely leaving audiences puzzled, blurting out a collectively perplexed, “Huh?” or “What was that about?” What’s disappointing about “Enemy” is that this familiar ambiguity and lack of clarity fails to work in the same spellbinding method seen before in tantalizing films

like “Videodrome” (1983) or “Lost Highway” (1997). Not indifferent to last year’s “Only God Forgives,” a nightmarish, arthouse. Bangkok revenge flick dedicated to avantgarde filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky, “Enemy” does little on it own to differentiate itself from being a near homage film. “Only God Forgives” felt like Jodorowky for folks who haven’t seen Jodorowky. With “Enemy,” you get the idea that Villeneuve is playing dress up, or trying on the shoes of the adults, In this case the parents are fellow Canadian director David Cronenberg and surrealist director David Lynch. The film never hurdles over its influences, at no time attempting to assert itself as its own individual work in the process. With that said, “Enemy” still works in the suspense department although its tension begins to plod in the latter half, before being revamped again right in the nick time for the ending. What exactly is the film about anyway? No in-person conversation or online outlet seems to have any clue, or a solid theory on its symbolism. Is it a Kafka-esque parable concerning adultery,

or is it a body-snatching movie about totalitarianism? I have no clue. I’m not ashamed to admit that once “Enemy” cut to credits, I had no idea what it was ultimately about, or what it was trying to say. Not that I wasn’t expecting to in the first place. In most cases, surreal films need no explanation, but “Enemy” certainly suggest it’s drumming up some sort of commentary on male infidelity. Whether this obscurity is a positive or a negative, it’s up for the viewer to decide. While its web has not been fully weaved, “Enemy” is still an exciting psycho-sexual, erotic thriller with classic Hitchcockian suspense. Expectations should be tampered however, as it doesn’t achieve enough flair to set it apart from the films it unmistakably idolizes. It’s not the potential future cult film I was hoping to gloat about, but time will tell on how others respond to it. Also, keep a look out for a familiar nightclub singer cameo about halfway through the film, an appearance surrealist cinema fans will enjoy.

and Chad Sterenberg’s guitar playing is catchy where it has to be and perfectly complements the intensity or subtlety that Dreyer is portraying in his vocals, while Adam Vass and Brad Vander Lugt do a great job keeping the album rhythmically grounded as music instead of just poetry paired with guitar riffs. While the album might contain some of La Dispute’s most poppy efforts yet, as exemplified in the almost radio friendly tracks, “For Mayor in Splitsville” and “Extraordinary Dinner Par-

ty”, Rooms of the House strikes a fluent balance between upbeat tunes and more taken aback pieces that entrance the listener into personal reflection. Such songs that struck me as introspective include the urgent “35,” the brutally honest “The Child We Lost 1963”, and the grandiose spoken word of the culminating track “Objects In Space”. Rooms of the House is nothing less than an emotionally taxing journey of sorting through personal history, and the album is hard to listen to only be-

cause it invokes such introspection in its listener. La Dispute continues to ask for a lot from their audience, but with an album like Rooms of the House, you get back what you put in. A rewarding journey awaits those who are ready to take it, and it’s recommended to pack light and listen with an open mind, because you’re sure to find a lot to take back from an album as shamelessly written as Rooms of the House.

entirely different type of thriller then Villeneuve’s outing with “Prisoners.” “Prisoners” was a more commercial movie with identifiable dramatic scenarios that parents could easily empathize with, or really just anyone willing to put themselves in another’s desperate circumstance for two-and-ahalf emotionally draining hours. Where as “Enemy” is theoretically abstract, and difficult to compre-

collider.com

Rob Gabe is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RG770214@ wcupa.edu.

Mike Naples is a student at West Chester. He can be reached at MN805392@wcupa.edu.


APRIL 28, 2014

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 13

“Rio 2” director discusses Brazil and the creative process

H

Rob Gabe Staff Writer

ometowns, or the places we grew up, often linger in our mind years after we’ve left them. Carlos Saldanha, the director of animated musical comedy “Rio 2,” who grew up in Brazil, has nothing but good things to say in regards to his enchanting, culturally rich, home-sweet-home. A location he revisited in preparation for “Rio 2,” the sequel to Twentieth Century Fox and Blue Sky Studios massive worldwide blockbuster, “Rio.” “Rio 2” pulled in $39 million this weekend, nearly the same as it’s predecessor, only being beaten to a slim margin to Marvel’s “Captain America: The Winter Solider,” which Kenny Ayres took first place. Editor-in-Chief Blue, (Jesse Eisenberg) the once sidelined Macaw parrot, who would rather have remained caged and Clare Haggerty content than spread his Newsand Editor explore his wings natural habit, joins a new congregation of ultrasparse birds in “Rio 2.”

Sam Schaule Features Editor

Alongside his adventurous new wife (Ann Hathaway) and their three zany children, the unique, rare feathered creatures leave Rio de Janerio and venture off deep into the Amazon jungle to find an unseen tribe of Macaws that are possibly the last of their species. Both “Rio” films are director Carlos Saldanha’s love letters to his country of Brazil. “I’m from Rio, I grew up in Rio. When we were developing the story, and I worked with the artist, and we started to look at the visuals and all that stuff, I remember a lot of the images I would get from the artist looked like a tourist version of it. It felt like a nonauthentic version, like Kenny Ayres someone trying to portray Editor-in-Chiefthat they resomething ally don’t know.” This was frustrating for Saldanha who was attempting to capture the atypical wonClare Haggerty ders of the city. “What I Editor told News them was, you’re all Blue. You’re all Blue coming to Rio for the first time and I don’t want you take

Sam Schaule Features Editor

pictures of the stuff we see all the time. I want you to notice the things that attract you.” He elaborated, “For example; a sidewalk, or crack on the wall, or graffiti that’s hidden somewhere, or the people you notice on the street, or something you eat, or something in the market that you’ve never seen before. I wanted to catch the unusual.” After six months of dissatisfaction with the quality of replicating the true spirit of Rio, Saldanha had finally had enough. “I would just look at the things and feel that those images were foreign to me. I said to them, we have to get a dream team together, and we have to go to Rio.” This pre-production study Kenny was a Ayres mini-vacation for Editor-in-Chiefhis wife and Saldanha, four children as well as a chance for Saldanha and his art team to paint a better canvas of the viClare Haggerty brant world he was aimEditor ing News to mirror. “We did and it was incredible. I did five days, the exact the journey of the movie.” Colleen Cummings Features Editor

On the various fun events the group participated it, he replied, “We went hang-gliding, we went to the crowded beach, we went to the markets, we paraded. They also had to learn how to samba and to dance.” Saldanha made it clear to his team that they had to go during Rio’s world famous festival. “We had to go at the most complicated time, which is Carnival. The city is the fullest and it’s the most expensive time to go. I would say don’t go that time of year because it’s going to be very crowded. “ He then humorously added, “Unless you really want to go to party.” “Rio 2” migrates from the city of Rio de Janerio to the biologically overKenny Ayres flowing tropical setting ofEditor-in-Chief the Amazon rainforest. Saldanha, who had never been there before, stated, “I’ve always had the dream of going to The Clare Haggerty Amazon as a kid. That was News one Editor of my childhood dreams, but I never went and I was afraid I was going to make a movie that Colleen Cummings Features Editor

would not feel right.” Sal- what I wanted to convey danha openly admitted to in the movie’s message: traveling with a runner’s It’s protected, so don’t fanny pack, a confession try to change it or make that had the interview it something else because room erupting in laugh- you disrupt something ter. “Before I went, I tried that was done already in to pack tons of bug spray.” a special way.” What arose from SalHe jokingly commented, “I have one of those runner’s danha’s return to his fanny packs, but you don’t homeland was a better see it. A hidden fanny comprehension of where pack that I tend to carry he wanted to take the through my journeys, but story and characters of nobody knows that I’m “Rio 2.” “When I came wearing it!” When asked back, I had a clear vision the details of his vast and more inspiration of wilderness expeditions, what I wanted to do with Saldanha stated, “I felt the movie. The change of almost like an intruder. perspective on the movie It’s one of those places was so different.” Speakyou’re in awe of, but you ing on the trip as a whole, don’t feel like you belong Saldanha emphasized, “It there. It’s just so perfect. was more of a personal The cute 1. Copy old badgecreatures that journey, so I could discovwere born and live there, er and better understand 2. Ungroup the copy and the plants and the an- the character dynamics.” 3. Select thetheir old photoco-existence He concluded with a final imals, telling statement about 4. Place the new photoThe (replacing the old one) is so perfect. water, 5. Remove the oldthere’s clipping path the forest, a cycle his homeland, “When I ofCreate lifenew that feels 6. clipping pathnatural, come to Rio, I feel like I’m home.” but you are not 7. Regroup the new badgea part of “Rio 2” is in now playing that cycle. It’s not your natural cycle of life. I can’t in theaters everywhere. explain it, but that’s the Rob Gabe is a third-year student vibe that I get.” He fur- majoring in communication studies. ther elaborated, “That’s He can be reached at RG770214@

Molly Herbison everything from the gritEntertainment tiness of Skinny Puppy to Editor the pristine beauty of Tim Hecker. I saw that I could push him by introducing ideas that Ivo Matlec or Oliver Suskin-Santarelli John Wiese would find Sports Editor one on of their recordings. Together, we constructed these compositions that took the walls of noise and washes of reverb common Ryan Calpin to both noise and shoeAsst. music, Sports Editor gaze learning that our styles of writing complimented each other. We decided to release a fullJoytogether Wilson after posilength Editor we got on tive Op-Ed feedback earlier recordings that we co-wrote and performed on together. MH: Describe the sound

Molly Herbison you were going for. Entertainment JH: Reggie and I were trying to Editor encompass several different areas of experimental and avantgarde music. The majoriOliver Suskin-Santarelli ty of the album falls under Sports Editor the guise of electronica, with several tracks identifying as either IDM, ambient, or industrial music. Most of my musicianship Ryanhigh Calpinschool was during Asst. studying Sports Editor jazz musispent cians that range from big band greats like Count Basie to the fusion artists like Brand X. This jazz Joy Wilson background really shines Op-Ed Editor in tracks like “Illiodd” or “Daddy’s Dreamcoat” with walking bass or sparse jazz chords being played

on piano. I tried to channel several harsh noise and power electronics artists, such as Ramleh, Jason Crumer, or Cremation Lily in how I created many of the album’s textures. I felt like walls and washes of abrasive noise functioned as an effective juxtaposition in the record’s more tender moments. This goes handin-hand with Reggie’s industrial influence. Tracks like “Restless Nightmare” or the extended break in “Chex Mix” feature the pulsating percussion that would (hopefully) make Front Line Assembly proud. Some of the other tracks like “Paper or Plas-

New 2013 versions

wcupa.edu.

Album showcases WCU students’ experimental talents

Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor

O

ver Spring Break, West Chester sophJoeyomores Samuel Jeff Holmes Editor Smith got and Sports Reggie together and made Beekeeping. Holmes was kind enough to answer some questions about the duo’s Jack Barnett creative The alOp-Edprocess. Editor bum can be streamed from jeffreyholmesandreggiesmith.bandcamp.com and can be purchased at Riley Wallace Electric Avenue in West Asst. Sports Editor Chester. MH: Why did you two decide to work together? What Reggie and I share is an interest in seemingly niche experi-

Molly Herbison mental or fringe music. My Entertainment love of avant-garde and harshEditor noise compositions compliments his interests in industrial andJoey shoegaze. For us, Samuel we choose not to listen to Sports Editor a piece of music to take away a hook or a catchy chorus, but for how instruments and musicians Jack Barnett interact with one anothEditor er onOp-Ed a recording. First meeting Reggie, most of our conversations were centered around our favorite books and authors, Riley Wallace butAsst. theSports moment Editor I learned he played piano, my impulse was to jam with him. From there, I was immersed into this spectrum of sound that channeled

Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor

Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor

tikman” or “Tomorrow’s Memories” feature programmed drums and keyboard arpeggiation that hearkens to musicians like Aphex Twin, the Orb, and Plastikman, some of the IDM artists that Reggie and I both love. The last style that we wanted to encompass was our own take on pop music. “Chex Mix” features myself singing a pop-ish melody, but over a wash of ambient swirls void of any rhythmic pattern. We both agreed that it sounds like something Animal Collective would go for. Molly Herbison is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at MH757997@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 14

THE QUAD

APRIL 28, 2014

Greek Week Lipsync 2014 Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Relay For Life Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

WCU Earth Fair Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor

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PAGE 16

Features

THE QUAD FEATURES

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

(M)Anorexia: a tale of friendship and recovery Jeffrey Holmes Copy Editor

M

y name is Jeffrey Holmes, and I have a story to tell that people need to hear. In the autumn of 2012, I entered West Chester University as an English BSED with the aspirations of becoming a Mr. Holmes to a class of students that needed to know their Shakespeare and their Dante. I ate at the Lawrence Dining Hall, and I studied at the library whenever I had work that needed to be done. On the surface, I was merely another college student, much like the people that I hope are reading these words right now. However, there was a clincher: my body weight, upon entering West Chester, was a standard 175 lbs for a person of my height. The start of my sophomore year, this past fall, I had dipped to a mere 125 lbs. Instead of beating around the bush, allow me to address this directly: after the substantial loss of roughly fifty pounds, I became a victim of anorexia nervosa. By definition, anorexia nervosa is a severe eating disorder in which the patient intentionally restricts their food intake, maintains an abnormal diet, and obsessess over

their figure. In many happened to me. Unrelatcases, the person with an- ed to this condition, a car orexia also develops bodi- accident I was in resulted ly dysmorphic disorder, in in chronic back pain. This which all perceptions of past summer, I worked a the body become distorted job in retail that aggraand inaccurate and are vated this pain which exacerbated by mirrors. led to me being unable to According to ANAD, the work out. No more runNational Association of ning, no more basketball; Anorexia and Associated my body could not handle Disorders, over half of it in conjunction with my American teen girls and job. This instilled a fear one-third of American in me that I would gain teen boys use unhealthy more weight and become methods to control their obese, much like the midbody weight, such as skip- dle school incarnation of ping meals, crash dieting, myself. So, to counteract or using laxatives at same this, I started restricting point in their adolescence. Additionally, anorexia ranks as the third most common mental illness among these adolescents. Perhaps what is most alarming is this: out of the 24 million Americans that suffer from my Photo by givingtuesday.org disorder, only 10 percent receive treat- food. Restrictions turned ment. Those malefic stir- into skipped meals, and rings of isolation are what skipped meals turned into bring me to addressing days without food. My this matter in front of my stomach had physically entire school, exposing shrunk. My roommate myself on what is one of at the time tried to get the most vulnerable and me to eat more, throwing naked levels possible. I fully-portioned meals at do not want anyone else to me, but my body rejected feel like this is a struggle it, my stomach being unthey have to face alone. able to maintain much at The actual process of a given time. The process developing anorexia is taking place inside of my unique to each case, so mind, however, was far allow me to explain what less human.

I had broken mankind’s instinct of eating to live. I could sit down at a dinner table with my roommate and his family this past summer, or I could sit down with my friends at West Chester. The actual motion of reaching down with a hand to carry food and liquid to the mouth was so effortless, carried with the kind of finesse I had never paid mind to before. Eating is such a natural action for people that it felt like no one even noticed the trepidation in my eyes and the tremors of my hand as I reached down to try to carry a bit of something to my mouth. I was unable to stomach normal-sized portions of food, and questions of, “why haven’t you finished your rice, Jeff? Isn’t rice your favorite?” led to gauche moments I was far from prepared to deal with. To appease my friends and avoid awkwardness, I would force myself to stomach a full meal, but going three days without eating anything prior meant I would not have the stomach for whatever I was putting into myself. Then came the excuses to go the bathroom. “I didn’t go once I finished my shift. My food got my hands sticky, so I need to wash them.” At first, so many people just went with it. Despite the darkening of my mood and the change in my demeanor moving into mealtime, no one suspected that I had an eating disorder. People had noticed my body had lost weight, but my clothes were too baggy at this point to reveal that I was literally wasting away under my shirt and pants. Those closest to me latched onto what was going on once I worsened. My moods went from un-

APRIL 28, 2014 predictable to essentially nonexistent. I would either lash out at the most trivial situations, or I would have zero reaction to what was considerably severe. By now, the month is October, and I finally found the courage to tell someone that I might be having a problem. My roommate at West Chester was the first person to know. I had enough of a grasp on my emotions to pull myself together and ask for a modicum of his time to confess, “I have an eating disorder, and I need help.” I threw a burden on him that neither of us knew how to deal with. It seems to be a common conception that men do not get eating disorders. Men are too strong to be affected by the images seen on a magazine or in a television to feel the need to conform to them. This mold of a stoic, unfaltering man may go on in American culture, but whatever he was, I wasn’t. I was here, in a parking lot, confessing to my best friend that I had been letting my body rot. The next major event in this story happened a little over a week after this confession. After nearly a week of ingesting nothing, I was sent from this school to the Chester County Hospital emergency room. My muscles were atrophying. An intravenous was shooting electrolytes and vitamins into my body. I spent five hours taking questions of “why do you want to kill yourself?” juxtaposed with the more logical “when was the last time you ate?” I didn’t really answer most of these. It was more of a groan and the shifting of hazy eyes. It didn’t occur to me that day, but the truth was as follows: I was dying. A boy of 19, not even at the halfway point of his college career was dying, ready to leave his friends and his sister behind. I’m beyond appalled knowing

that low point wasn’t the (m)anor convincing factor for me to finally start seeing a specialist. Life went on, somehow. I passed my classes that semester, somehow. The start of this current semester, my three closest friends chose to sit down with me inside one of the dormitories one afternoon. With the heaviest tears in his eyes, my roommate, in the middle of these three, looked at me and said, “I’ve already lost before. I’m not losing another.” Everyone that I cared about was being directly affected by the neglect I had shown my body. People that I loved were hurt. The single best friend I had was in front of me, crying that he wasn’t going to get to hang on to me for much longer. Flashes of being inside the emergency room were in my mind’s eye once more, and it finally clicked: I was dying. Later that week, I found a doctor specializing in eating disorder therapy in Exton. Every session was far from any expectation: there was less unpacking of the physical and more of the mental. What broke my train of thought and my instinct to reject food? Why did I lose perception of my body? Details spared, I learned more about my upbringing and how it shapes the person I am to some degree. I began to realize exactly to what degree my self-loathing was, and how my lack of self-love created self-inhibition. That brings me to the present. There is no happy ending because this story is far from over. My longest streak of eating two meals a day, which is my current goal, is seven weeks. That doesn’t mean I didn’t relapse and went a day without eating and a day with only a sin-

See (M)Anorexia page 17


APRIL 28, 2014 (m)anorexia from p age 16 gle meal over a week ago. I’m not celebrating a victory because I’m genuinely scared of my own mortality. Victories or losses aside, that doesn’t mean I don’t have my own reasons for deciding to fight against my condition. I have people that love me, and I’ll be damned if I don’t love them with all my heart. I have goals, just like any other college student. But the one lesson that anorexia has taught me is that I value myself. In rejecting death, this organic sense of purpose had finally developed. Today, I want to experience life. There are people I have yet to meet, and friends I have yet to make. There are books I haven’t read and songs I haven’t written yet. Most importantly, I need to tell not just one person or two people; I need to tell everyone. I have support, not everyone does. I have a specialist, and someone to take me there every two weeks. Not everyone has this, and I shudder at the mere thought that there are thousands upon thousands of people on this planet living with an eating disorder that are all by themselves. If you are reading this and you feel like I do, you don’t have to feel alone. People at the counseling center on campus are here to talk to; my specialist is a counselor in Exton. ANAD’s website is simply anad.org. My email is listed at the end of this article, go ahead, and reach out to me. I want you to read this and learn that the quality of your life can improve. You might even be able to get better one day! Look at me, I got close enough to dying to finally start living. Jeffrey Holmes is a second-year student majoring in English with a minor in ethnic studies. He can be reached at JH791223@wcupa. edu.

THE QUAD FEATURES

Keep your summer boredom free in West Chester By Alexander Libutti Special to the Quad

A

s the weather gets warmer, the sun shines brighter, and motivation unfortunately decreases becaue before anyone knows it, the school year will be over. While I’m sure everyone will miss waking up for those 8 a.m. classes, and having to enter some major crunch time at the library with three essays due the next day, summer is coming in full swing and everyone is embracing it. Summer right around the corner brings up the next big question on every-

one’s minds: what is there to do? And the answer to that is simple: a boatload! The Chester County Historical Society has many interesting and new exhibits that are frequently changing and provide an open door to learning in a fun way during the summer. They have everything from “History Trivia Night,” to exhibits showcasing clothing that was worn in the West Chester Area in the 1800s. The West Chester Railroad is another conduit for fun during the summer. It will give people a magnificent view of Chester Creek Valley, and open up the doors to the wonders

PAGE 17

of the nature and valley as I have asked myself areas around West Ches- the same question as well! ter and surrounding areas. There is plenty the summer One can also spend a day has to offer to those on a at the Brandywine Valley budget and to those who do Wine Trail. The trail begins not want to spend money. at the Kreutz Creek Valley The sweet summer weathtasting room, located on 44 er keeps the days warm E. Gay Street. and the nights cool – one For a small bus fee from can walk the nature path the campus of West Ches- on South Campus, or walk ter, a student can also take around town and browse the bus to the King of Prus- the many shops. Other fun sia Mall. The King of Prus- activities to do during the sia mall is the second big- summer can be bonfires gest mall in America! They with friends, marshmallow have everything from Rolex roasting, going to the beach, watches, Tesla Cars, all the way to “As Seen on TV!” stores. That mall truly does have it all. Now, after reading all those examples, the next question comes to the mind of college students is “What do you ter.com do if you are a Photo by downtownwestchesbroke college student?” Don’t be ashamed, relax at a park, play sports outside with your friends

Eagles 2014 schedule release previews for an exciting season By Alexandra Arbiz Special to The Quad

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he Philadelphia Eagles announced their 2014 regular season schedule on April 23 at 8 p.m. The upcoming season looks promising as the Eagles open up at Lincoln Financial Field against Jacksonville on Sept. 7. It was also announced that six of the team’s games will be aired on national television this season with two being on Sunday night and two being on Monday night. The team then travels to Indianapolis for week two to face quarterback Andrew

Luck and the Colts for the first of the two Monday night games of the season. Upon returning home from Indianapolis, the Eagles then will play in possibly one of the most watched games of this year’s season. During week three, the team will host former wide receiver DeSean Jackson and the Washington Redskins on Sept 21 at the Linc at 1 p.m. Jackson, who was released from the Eagles’ roster in March, returns to the Linc for an intense and exciting game. Following the home game against the Redskins, the team will

then travel to San Francisco for week four to face quarterback Colin Kaepernick and the rest of the 49ers roster at the new Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara on Sept 28. The 49ers had another successful season in 2013 which will make for a good matchup. In weeks five and six the Eagles will return home to face the St. Louis Rams on Oct. 5 and the New York Giants on Oct. 12, which will be the first of their two Sunday night games. The team then has a bye for week seven and will be on the road for weeks eight and nine

which they will travel to face the Arizona Cardinals on Oct. 26 and the Houston Texans on Nov. 2. Upon their return home, the Eagles will play their second Monday Night Football game of the season during week 10 in which they will face the Carolina Panthers and quarterback Cam Newtown on Nov 10 at 8:30 p.m. During Week 11, the team will then travel to Green Bay to face the Packers on Nov 16, and then play Tennessee Titans at the Linc on Nov. 23. For sixth time in franchise history, the Eagles will participate in

like football, baseball, soccer, etc. One can also rally their friends and go fishing, kayaking, canoeing, or camping. The best and easiest activity to do during the summer, is to relax. Finals are over, all the projects, essays, and “My Math Lab” homework assignments have been handed in. So rest easy, knowing that you have completed another (or perhaps your first) year of college, and that it is now behind you. Be excited for the following year, but also don’t forget to take time out to pat yourself on the back for completing a challenging school year to the best of your ability. The possibilities are endless for this summer, just remember to enjoy the summer, but do so safely! And we will see everybody again, before you know it, in the fall. Alexander Libutti is a first-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AL803657@ wcupa.edu.

the Thanksgiving Day festivities this season. The team will travel to Dallas to face the Cowboys which will be an awesome game to watch while enjoying Thanksgiving dinner with family and friends. The team hasn’t played on Thanksgiving Day since 2008. The following week, the Eagles will host defending Super Bowl Champions the Seattle Seahawks for an exciting match-up on Dec. 7 at 4:25 p.m. The following week the Cowboys will be in Philadelphia on Dec. 14 for the Eagles final Sunday Night game of the season. The team will conclude their regular season away, facing both the Redskins on Dec. 20, and the Giants on Dec 28. Alexandra Arbiz is a fourthyear student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at AA736117@ wcupa.edu


PAGE 18

THE QUAD FEATURES

International Workers’ Day to be celebrated on West Chester’s campus

By Laura Wayne Staff Writer

T

he Industrial Revolution marked a major turning point in the progression of the world that marked the transition to new manufacturing processes. The Industrial Revolution began in Great Britain around the year 1760 and spanned the length of a little over half a century, ending sometime between 1820 and 1840. Beginning in Great Britain, the era comprised of progression and advancement in various areas of technology as well as societal structure. The Industrial Revolution hit the United States a few decades after Great Britain. The Industrial Revolution allowed for ordinary working people to have an increased opportunity for employment in the new mills and factories. When the United States began to industrialize, people began to swarm to the cities and out of the ever unreliability of farm life. Women, used to staying close to the farm, could now gain independence by working in a factory and making a living wage. While the era played a vital role in progressing our nation forward and offered the world a wide breadth of technological advancements that have stood the test of time and have laid the groundwork and foun-

dation for the modern world, the Industrial Revolution’s influence on the time was not all positive. The era profoundly affected the world in a negative way in terms of its treatment of workers, many of whom were lucky to have a job, but suffered under the strain of excruciatingly long hours, low pay, child labor, unsafe working conditions, and a lack of job security or financial support in the instance of injury. Often, the work day functioned under strict working conditions with extremely long hours of labour. The pace of the work was set by machines and so, were extremely difficult to match. During the peak of the Industrial Revolution, the average

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working day ranged between 10 and 16 hours a day, six days a week. In

dustry functioned under an even longer work day clocking in at 12 hours. At this time, the use of child labour was common. On May 1 1886, Chicago workers protested their mistreatment and demanded more rights. Police attempted to disperse the worker’s assembly during their general strike for an eight-hour workday. In the midst of the strike,

1810, Robert Owen first gave voice to the demand for a 10-hour day, instituting it in his socialist enterprise at New Lanark. By 1817, Owen had set the goal of the eight-hour day and, with those efforts, coined the slogan, “Eight hours labour, eight hours recreation, eight hours rest.” Women and children in England were granted the tenhour day in 1847, which, although beneficial, was still an extremely long Photo by hot-dogma.com work day. Even as late as the year an unidentified person 1900, many industrial threw a bomb at the workers in the United police who immediately States still worked a responded by opening 10-hour day yet earned fire on the workers, killfrom 20 to 40 percent ing four demonstrators. The event is now known as the Haymarket affair and marks International Workers’ Day. The day was officially declared an annual event at the International’s second congress in 1891. The Industrial Revolution now stands as an example to the world of the need for workers rights. To commemorate the day, a rally will be less than the minimum held in West Chester’s deemed necessary for a academic quad from 11 decent life. The steel in- a.m. - 3 p.m. on Thurs-

APRIL 28, 2014 day May 1. The rally’s mission is to celebrate the achievement of the eight-hour work day in this country. The rally will further show support for those workers in the United States and around the world who are still mistreated and suffer the same fate as those of the Industrial Revolution. West Chester Student Chelsea Leusner comments, “worker rights is an issue for

everyone, it effects so many people, from the adjunct faculty who work on this campus to the textile workers in Dhaka, Bangladesh who make the clothes that many people wear on this campus.” Workers around the world struggle for worker rights. The rally will be in testament to their struggle and in recognition of the fact that the world still has a long way to go in terms of workers’ rights. The rally’s representation of strength in solidarity will help lead the world there. All are invited to come rally for all or part of the event’s length. For more information about the rally, contact Chelsea Leusner at CL763090@wcupa.edu. Laura Wayne is a fourth-year student majoring in English with minors in international business, technical writing, and Spanish. She can be reached at LW738484@wcupa.edu.

knowledge from p age 19 stein said. “We have gotten people to work together to discuss.” “We are moving forward, building on these themes,” said Mell Josephs, executive director of Student Services Incorporated at West Chester University. Perhaps just as importantly, the conference directly provides incredible opportunities for students receiving higher education. Being in one place with institutional leaders from so many other countries leads to collaboration between those countries, and often times opportunities for students to spend time studying internationally, which is hugely beneficial to students, both now and in their future careers. “I have never been to any other country I couldn’t bring back something useful to use here—even the most impoverished countries,” Weisenstein said. “There are a lot of benefits of Knowledge Crossing Borders for West Chester University, and one of them is to create more opportunity for students to get that international experience.” For more information on the upcoming Knowledge Crossing Borders conference in Costa Rica, please scan the QR code below, or type http:// www.wcupa.edu/kcb into your web browser.

Kenny Ayres is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at KA739433@wcupa.edu.


APRIL 28, 2014

THE QUAD FEATURES

WCU to send students to Knowledge Crossing Borders Conference

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By Kenny Ayres Staff Writer

this date, hosted leaders and executives from 25 countries around the world. The conference provides the opportunity for countries to work together in person to find solutions to pressing problems threatening the future of higher education. This is especially true at the Presidential Conclave. The conclave is a round-table discussion among not only institutional leaders from around the world, but also experts in various fields related to higher education. For instance, in 2012, Microsoft sent

rom Oct. 6-10, 2014, West Chester University will be sending 25 faculty and 16 students to participate in the biennial Knowledge Crossing Borders conference of higher education, which will be held in Heredia, Costa Rica at Universidad Nacional. The conference will include four days of presentations discussing contemporary issues that effect higher education worldwide, such as food supply, peace, and environmental sustainability. There were also be a Global Presidential Conclave on the future of higher education, where leaders from institutions around the world meet to discuss how to address issues facing higher educa- Photo by operationworld.org tion and move representation to the forward together. conclave, to discuss and Knowledge Crossing take ideas on how techBorders developed as a nology can be best utiresult of a partnership lized in the future of between West Chester higher education. University and UniversiSix major issues that dad Nacional, and since are deemed the most 2010 has occurred once important worldwide in Costa Rica, and once will be discussed, with here at West Chester the experts providing University. Following the background and the the 2010 conference, it presidents of the instituwas decided that Knowl- tions discussing possible edge Crossing Borders solutions. In 2012, one of would occur every other those issues was ethics, year, alternating be- and the obligation to pretween the two schools. pare generations to reaThe 2012 conference, son and make decisions which was the first and based on fundamental only at West Chester to ethical values. Other

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The Quad Staff 2014 Photo by Ilana Berger / Photography Editor

topics have included environmental sustainability and economic development. They are not all inherently higher education issues, but issues that can alter the face of higher education throughout the world, which is why it is so beneficial to have global representation discussing these issues all at once. “It is important that we work together,” said West Chester University president Greg Weisenstein. “We have limited resources to solve problems, so by duplicating efforts across countries, and bringing people together to share knowlFrom left to right: Clare Haggerty, Laura Wayne, Oliver edge really advances Suskin-Santarelli, Molly Herbison, Colleen Goldhorn, Ryan programs that can inCalpin, Kenny Ayres (atop the Ram), Jose Mestre, A.J. fluence quality of life around the world.,” he Arcaini, Ilana Berger, Jeffery Holmes, Drew Drevyanko, said. Drew Mattiola, Adam Farence, and Theresa Kelly. “A major part of the mission of higher eduDifficulty level: Diabolical - 13 cation is to address the issues nationally, internationally, and globally. Working together makes it much easier to advise a solution.” Knowledge is not just crossing borders at the conclave. The entire conference will be a sharing 7 9 8 1 5 3 6 2 4 of research from profes1 3 6 7 2 4 8 9 5 sionals and students around the world, and 2 5 4 6 8 9 1 7 3 that is one of the biggest 6 1 2 3 4 7 9 5 8 goals of the conference: to discuss. 3 4 5 9 6 8 2 1 7 “We have started con8 7 9 5 1 2 3 4 6 versations that are important conversations to 9 2 7 8 3 5 4 6 1 start, and that has led 4 6 3 2 7 1 5 8 9 to research and collaboration [between] people 5 8 1 4 9 6 7 3 2 © Philip A. Thompsen, Ph.D. with similar interests and passions,” Weisen-

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Sudoku and Crossword Puzzle Answers

See Knowledge page 18


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THE QUAD

Classifieds

The Quad Crossword Across 1 In the know 6 Simplicity 10 Dundee damsel 14 Ledger entry 15 Cannonball, e.g. 16 In the know about 17 “The Caine Mutiny” novelist 19 Walk or run 20 Some NASA data-retrieval missions 21 Invitation “S” 22 Take the wrong way? 23 Empty (of) 24 “Reward Your Curiosity” soda 27 Fragrant resin 29 Dusk, to Donne 30 Aus. language 31 Crescent piece 33 Underworld piece 34 Medical breakthrough 35 17th-century artistic style 38 Booted, say 40 Org. with complex schedules 41 Lump 42 Mr. Potato Head part 43 Tankard filler 44 Ferry stops 48 Early Schwarzenegger nickname, with “The” 53 Asia’s __ Darya river 54 Glisten 55 “__ Wiedersehen”

APRIL 28, 2014

VISIT WCUQUAD.COM TO SEE YOUR AD HERE

HOW TO PLACE CLASSIFIED ADS IN THE QUAD AND AT WCUQUAD.COM

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56 Oscar-winning Whitaker role 57 Stadium access 58 People of good breeding 61 Tommie of the Miracle Mets 62 Unpopular spots 63 __ Claire: women’s magazine 64 Sew up 65 Woody __, “Cheers” bartender 66 Strictly controlled refrigerant Down 1 Stay attached 2 Cotton pest 3 Wear away 4 Glass edges 5 Two after epsilon 6 Dickens’ Drood 7 Pungent mayo 8 “Law and Order: __” 9 It’s a scream 10 Columbo asset 11 Veggie burger, to a hamburger 12 Price place 13 “In your face!” 18 Decoding org. 22 Twitter follower 24 D.C. neighbor 25 Edward known for limericks 26 Reveal 28 Certain domestic 32 Some like it hot 33 Word with log or burner

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To place a classified ad in The Quad, visit www. wcuquad.com, and click on 6 the 4link 3for 8“classifieds.” 7 9 Then enter the wording of 9your3ad exactly 4 2as you 1 wish 8 it to appear, select a category, 1choose 2 dates 9 of5publication, 6 3 and pay for your ad on our 7secure 8 server 6 with 9 any4major 5 credit card. Your ad will ap2pear6on our 7 website, 3 5as well 1 as be published in both our 33print56product 24 and 15 our88mobile 71 phone/tablet edition on the 58dates74 you17select.66 The92rate 49is 30 cents per word, minimum 85of 20 17 words 59 ($6 41 minimum 23 68 charge). Deadline for placing 49classifieds 93 81is 1177a.m.36on the 22 4Sunday 1 before 2 publication. 3 9 6

34 Wrigley team 21 35 Revelation foursome 2 36 City ESE of Los Angeles 3 37 Nestlé product introduced in 1948 68 38 Big name in liquor 5 39 Railroad charge Difficulty level: Moderate - 6 43 Ulna locale 6 7 Fill2in the grid 5 so that 8 each 4of the 3 45 Rossellini film renamed “Ways numbers 1 - 9 appears once and of Love” in its American version 3 1 only5once in6each row,9each column, 7 4 46 Actor Estevez and each 3x3 square. 47 Like the Titanic 4 6 8Solutions 3 to the 2 puzzles 5 7 49 Wrapped, as an ankle from our last issue 50 Nursery employee 7 2 5 96 4 83 8 47 9 12 1 5 51 Exposed publicly 7 9 3 4 2 1 8 5 6 52 Old gridiron gp. 8 Diabolical 1 2 9 -514 6 3 7 4 56 Where some worship fromDifficulty level: 1 7 8 6 9 4 5 3 2 58 Shoot the breeze 9 2 6 7 3 5 1 4 8 59 “Foucault’s Pendulum” writer 4 3 5 2 1 8 7 6 9 60 “Unbelievable” rock group Solution to the crossword puzzle from our last issue

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Taught by well known professional. Looking for serious intermediate and advanced students. First lesson free. 610.688.8863 or info@ 2 1 jamesdorchestras.com

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15Read54The Quad online at 8wcuquad.com 7 9

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SERVICES

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, dated 12/15/2013: Chief SERS investor withheld information about a $3,000,000.00 loss in a pension fund investment. Despite its outside managers, SERS has faced a growing gap between its assets and its expected pension payouts, which the state had to meet by increasing taxpayer contributions to the system - about $1 billion in 2013, more than twice the level of two years ago. That has prompted Corbett to refer to SERS as a “tapeworm” in his budget... When you separate from service at WCU, transfer your funds immediately, to a SIPC insured retirement account, by calling Vance Usher, Securities Service Network 610-329-1056

The Quad SuDoKu

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The solutions to both of the puzzles on this page can be found elsewhere in this issue of The Quad.

Difficulty level: Diabolical - 13

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APRIL 28, 2014

THE QUAD

PAGE 21

Black and Latino Greek Council Step Show

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Photo By: Tiffany Hundley

WCU Weekly interview with Derek Sanders from Mayday Parade Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor


PAGE 22

Sports

THE QUAD SPORTS

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Women’s lacrosse wins four straight A.J. Arcaini

Asst. Sports Editor

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annah Cowan and the West Chester University women’s lacrosse team had an excellent two-week run, winning all four of their contests. The wins came against four tough PSAC opponents, Shippensburg University, Edinboro University, no. 7 ranked IUP and East Stroudsburg University. Cowan continued her remarkable season dominating the offensive side of the game in all four

matches. First up for the Rams was a 7-5 Shippensburg team. The game was played on South Campus at Vonnie Gros field on April 15. West Chester scored 11 first half goals compared to Shippensburg’s three, and exploded for nine more in the second half. Cowan totaled four goals in the contest, but WCU was lead by sophomore Erin Scheno who notched five. The two dominated the Shippensburg defense and scored almost at will. The Rams controlled the shot total, nearly tripling Shippens-

burg’s total of 11 with 29. A big advantage for West Chester was the draw control, which helped the Rams dominate in time of possession. The final score of the game had West Chester on top, in a blowout win, 20-5. Next up for the Golden Rams was Edinboro University. Much like Shippensburg, Edinboro has had an average season, posting a five hundred record. WCU’s command was also no different from the match against Shippensburg. Cowan attacked yet again, adding four more goals to her already impressive photo by Shannon Filippelli

The Lady Rams lacrosse team mentally prepares for their last regular season game on Saturday afternoon against East Stroudsburg University. The seniors shined in their final home game as a West Chester Golden Ram.

APRIL 28, 2014

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season total. Sophomore their first lead, 13-12 on Stroudsburg on a beautiErin Eckert matched an Eckert goal. Cowan ful Saturday afternoon. Cowan with four goals of added another with sev- Since it was the last her own, while Scheno, en minutes left to give home game for WCU, junior Sarah Dennison West Chester a two goal senior day festivities ocand freshman curred in the Dina Cifeli pre-game cerBy Dy added a pair emony, honorS of goals each. ing seniors on Cifeli also their hard work added three on the field and omin assists in the off. West Cheswhe game, which ter honored six 1, th she has found seniors, Denni-closed out continued sucson, goalkeeperson going cess in all Jess Henderson,14 games season. Cifeli Liz Wilson, Ginaseason. W ranks among Eberwein, Juli-Bloomsbu the top five anne Williams,West Ches in the counMelinda SpeersPSAC Eas try in Division and Jordan Hei-title. II in assists. delbaugh. After a w Through anS a t u r d a y ’ swent a pe other impresgame was theWest Che sive offensive last in the regu-3) began t showing, the lar season, anddoublehea Rams grabbed resulted in theven (10-21 another win, Rams on the13. The L 17-6 over Edwinning end yetshut out 3 inboro. again, 8-3. Eber-ing game, Next up wein and Cifeli(8-5) suffe was one of led WCU withthe moun the toughest two goals apiece,continued matchups that with Cifeli add-game two West Chester ing three moreheader, lo would be dealt assists. WCUlone run o all season. No. photo by Shannon Filippelli led the whole off a JP N 7 ranked IUP game and theirMichael M has been on lead was notsuffered h Senior Gina Eberwein led the Rams with two goals a tear, winclosely testedthe year, in the Saturday afternoon win against ning eight of after about 15hits and f East Stroudsburg University. their last nine minutes intoinnings pi games, and the first half. After b posting an The win gave 11-4 record (9-2 PSAC). lead, which proved to be the Rams an 11-4 recordLock Hav Despite the success that the decider after a late (8-4 PSAC) with just oneter had th IUP has recently had, IUP goal. West Chester game remaining in thebounce ba day with the Rams would not back prevailed in the back and season. against down. Cowan exploded forth game, grabbing a As the regular seasonversity(15 for one of her strongest huge win, 14-13. comes to a close, Weststarting games of the season, Cowan’s impressive Chester’s final recordGolden Ra notching seven goals performance did not go seems it will be enough along with freshman unnoticed, as she was to make the PSAC tour-her own ca Kelsey Gumbert adding named PSAC East wom- nament. Despite a fewsingle in three of her own. Cifeli en’s lacrosse athlete of tough losses, the RamsWest Che continued her unselfish the week. Cowan has have accomplished quiteMansfield play by assisting on four scored an impressive a successful season. Aswith fou runs to g goals. 51 goals on the season we wait to see seeding’s The game was a defi- in what has been a sea- for the PSAC and possi-lead afte nite battle straight down son of a lifetime for the bly national tournament,Kelly An the comeb to the wire. WCU trailed Wilmington, Delaware the Rams will continuewith a tw for almost all of the game native. Her leadership as to work hard and preuntil, with 16 minutes re- a sophomore has shined pare to tackle whicheverand Jillia maining, the Rams went and helped this team ac- obstacle comes their way.the game an RBI sin on a run. Cowan and the complish some key victoRams won AJ Arcaini is a second-year stuoffense would not give ries this season. dent majoring in communica-eighth tha up, crawled their way The final game in the tion studies with a minor in back, and with 13 min- two-week span for the journalism. He can be reached atsingle by E an RBI sin utes left WCU grabbed Rams came against East AA788494@wcupa.edu

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APRIL 28, 2014

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 23

Lady Rams clinch PSAC East softball title

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tenburger to win the first on the year. Game two game 7-4. West Chester was another blowout, excompleted the sweep of cept this time, in favor of Mansfield in game two with a 6-2 victory. Murl picked up her second win of the day to improve to 10-5 on the season. Norris went 4-4 in game two, and Quense led the Lady Rams with two RBIs off a tworun home run in the second. photo by Colleen Goldhorn The Golden Rams traveled to Millersville Shippensburg this time. University (20-20, 8-12) for West Chester scored its a doubleheader on April lone run in the second off l8. Murl pitched a com- an Ali Vavala RBI single plete game but suffered with Shippensburg up the loss for West Chester 2-1. Shippensburg would in game one in a 1-0 loss. score six unanswered runs In game two, the Golden to lead to an 8-1 victory Rams bats’ failed to show to split the doubleheader. up yet again, as they suf- McSpadden (9-2) suffered fered another shutout loss her second loss on the 4-0. Katie Erb pitched five year. innings and suffered the West Chester traveled loss, allowing four runs on to the University of the seven hits. Sciences of Philadelphia The following day, the (10-23) on April 22 for a Golden Rams traveled to doubleheader. Murl conShippensburg University tinued her recent success (25-9, 11-7) for a double- and picked up the win on header. West Chester fell the mound in a 3-0 shutout behind 1-0 in the second, for the Golden Rams. Anbut that would be the lone derson opened up the scorrun Shippensburg would ing for West Chester in the send across the plate for fourth with an RBI sacrithe rest of the game. The fice fly, and Altenburger Lady Ram bats exploded padded the lead in the sevfor a seven run fourth in- enth with a two RBI triple. ning led by two RBIs each The Golden Rams completby Megan Kelly and Mur- ed the sweep in game two ray for a 7-1 lead. West with another shutout, and Chester added to its lead another win for Murl, in in the fifth, scoring three a 7-0 victory. Murl helped more runs to lead to an her own cause in the game, eventual 10-1 victory in going 3-4 with a pair of game one. Murl picked up RBIs. Murray and Quense the win to move to 11-6 each added two RBIs of

their own in in the 7-0 victory. Murl moved to 13-6 on the year, and picked

up her 40th career win in game two. Senior Day for the Golden Rams was held on April 25 at home for a doubleheader against East Stroudsburg University (14-23). This year’s softball roster featured seven seniors: Jessica Schuck,

JP Norris, Jillian Murray, Kim Murl, Kim Begley, Megan Kelly, and Kelly Anderson. Murl got the start for the Golden Rams and continued to stay hot. West Chester got out to a 5-0 lead behind a pair of RBIs by Schuck, and a solo home run by Quense. The lone run allowed by Murl in her complete game came in the seventh off a solo home run in the 5-1 victory in game one. The Golden Rams couldn’t ask for a better senior day, completing the sweep in game two with a 9-1 victory in six innings. Murl (15-6) picked up another win, and went 3-3 on the day with five RBIs including two home runs. West Chester closed out the regular season on the road with a double header against Bloomsburg University (24-14, 16-9) on April 26. Bloomsburg got out to a 6-0 lead after four innings. The Golden Rams put one run on the board in the fifth off a Schuck RBI single, and two more in the sixth off of Altenburger and Norris RBIs.

The Bloomsburg offense was too much to overcome as West Chester suffered the loss in game one 103. Murl and the Golden Rams had the chance to bounce right back in game two and they did just that. Behind a complete game shutout pitched by Murl, the Lady Rams split the doubleheader in the regular season finale with Bloomsburg with a 2-0 victory in game two. With the win in game two of the doubleheader against Bloomsburg, West Chester clinched the PSAC East regular season title. The Golden Rams finished the season with a record of 34-17, and 19-9 in PSAC play. Behind the pitching duo of Murl and McSpadden, and the consistent offense of Norris, West Chester looks to continue its success in the opening round of the PSAC tournament on April 30. Dylan Harrison is a second-year student majoring in communications with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at DH785892@ wcupa.edu

Athlete of the Week: Kim Murl wcupagoldenrams.com

a beautiafternoon. the last or WCU, ivities ocin the me cerBy Dylan Harrison honorStaff Writer niors on ard work field and oming off a stretch est Cheswhere they went 13nored six 1, the Golden Rams , Denni-closed out the regular seaoalkeeperson going 8-6 in the final enderson,14 games of the regular son, Ginaseason. With a win against ein, Juli-Bloomsburg on Saturday, Williams,West Chester clinched the a SpeersPSAC East regular season rdan Hei-title. gh. After a week where they u r d a y ’ swent a perfect 6-0, No. 23 was theWest Chester (26-11, 13the regu-3) began the week with a ason, anddoubleheader at Lock Had in theven (10-21, 5-11) on April on the13. The Lady Rams were g end yetshut out 3-0 in the open8-3. Eber-ing game, with Kim Murl nd Cifeli(8-5) suffering the loss on CU withthe mound. West Chester als apiece,continued to struggle in ifeli add-game two of the doubleree moreheader, losing 4-1 with the WCUlone run of the day coming he wholeoff a JP Norris RBI single. and theirMichael McSpadden (9-1) was notsuffered her first loss of testedthe year, allowing seven about 15hits and four runs in 2.1 s intoinnings pitched. rst half. After being swept by win gaveLock Haven, West Ches1-4 recordter had the opportunity to h just onebounce back the following ng in theday with a doubleheader against Mansfield Uniar seasonversity(15-7, 7-5). As the ose, Weststarting pitcher for the l recordGolden Rams, Murl helped e enoughher own cause with an RBI SAC tour-single in the first to give te a fewWest Chester a 1-0 lead. he RamsMansfield answered back hed quitewith four unanswered eason. Asruns to get out to a 4-1 seeding’slead after four innings. nd possi-Kelly Anderson ignited rnament,the comeback in the sixth continuewith a two RBI double, and pre-and Jillian Murray tied whicheverthe game up at 4-4 with their way.an RBI single. The Golden ond-year stu-Rams won the game in the communica-eighth thanks to a two RBI a minor insingle by Erin Quense, and be reached at an RBI single by Laura Alu

This week’s athlete of the week is senior pitcher Kim Murl. Murl hurled a six-hit shutout in a 2-0 shutout at Bloomsburg on Saturday, clinching a PSAC east conference championship for the Lady Rams.


PAGE 24

THE QUAD SPORTS

WCU drops series to PSAC champs By Michael Murphy Staff Writer

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fter dropping two games at Millersville on Friday, West Chester looked to end the series, and season, with a couple of big wins. Millersville, the crowned PSAC winner, posed the Golden Rams a substantial challenge in the season finale. Before a pitch was thrown, West Chester honored their graduating seniors on the field. Rob Spekhardt, Dylan Zigman,Chris Pula, Mike Raimo, John Barr, Fred Breidenbach, Matt McAllister, Kyle Weary, and Kyle Frazier were the seniors honored. This graduating class was part of the National Championship run that took place in 2012. Following the senior day ceremonies, West Chester looked to be on the attack as they struck for two early runs in the first. With no outs and the bases loaded, Tyler Coleman hit a deep sacrifice fly to center to score the game’s first run. Two batters later, true freshman Robert Knox singled to the right to make it a 2-0 deficit. That would be all the runs West Chester would score in this ball game. Millersville pitching seemed to smell the coffee and wake up. West Chester was mowed down like freshly cut grass from the second to the sixth inning. On the other end of the spectrum, Millersville’s offense got right to work in the second as they quickly tacked on two runs to tie the game. They would not stop there. They quietly took

the lead by slowly adding on runs in the fifth and sixth to make it a 5-2 game. West Chester looked to stage a comeback in the bottom of the sixth. It all started with a Coleman HBP followed by a Matt Petrizzi single to put the Rams in business. After a wild pitch, Coleman and Petrizzi sat at second and third with no outs just begging to be scored. The momentum seemed to just disappear as Millersville got three consecutive outs to end the threat. West Chester went down quietly in the bottom of the seventh to end game one in a 5-2 loss. The Golden Rams would turn it around in game two to end the season with a 6-1 win over the PSAC champions. The offense may have scored six runs in this game, but the man on the mound shut down Millersville. Junior RHP Ryan Swearingen pitched a stellar game for the Golden Rams. He held a shutout until the top of the seventh when he let up an RBI double which was classified as too little too late. Swearingen scattered 10 hits in seven innings while only allowing just one run. The stat that pops out is the one walk allowed in seven innings. Swearingen was pin point accurate with his pitches as he kept the ball down in the strike zone and forced hitters to get themselves out. “Swearingen did a phenomenal job,” said team captain Breidenbach, “it’s tough getting the start after three losses and competing. So that was a big deal with him stepping up.”

West Chester’s offense backed up Swearingen’s performance with a hitting frenzy. After the first and second, West Chester attacked in the third inning. Following a Petrizzi double the Rams were set stage for an offensive explosion. Four consecutive runs crossed the plate as Coleman, Pula, Knox, and Spekhardt drove in runs. These were not big time hits the Ram’s batters just put the ball in play and capitalized on the defense’s mistakes. Millersville’s two throwing errors in the third were costly as West Chester jumped to a 4-0 lead that they would not let go of. With Swearingen holding down Millersville’s offense, West Chester extended their lead in the fourth and fifth by driving in two more runs to make it six runs on the day. West Chester was able to cap off their season with a win and hopefully provide some momentum going into the PSAC tournament. “The second game was a good example of just us continuing to play hard and in the end pressure caused their mistakes,” said Breidenbach, “so hopefully that continues in the next level of the season.” West Chester will be the second seed in the west bracket for the PSAC tournament next week. Their first game will be on Wednesday 9:30 a.m., the team they will play is still to be determined. Michael Murphy is a first-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at MM802071@wcupa.edu

APRIL 28, 2014

Men’s and women’s tennis finish off season with victories Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Sports Editor

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hough the season did not end with a PSAC championship for either squad, the West Chester men’s and women’s tennis teams were able to finish the season off with victories. Just squeezing into the playoffs, the men’s tennis team entered the PSAC tournament by immediately going into the semifinals match, squaring off with Kutztown University. In a battle of golden rivals, the Golden Rams could not take down the Golden Bears, as West Chester fell to Kutztown 0-5. The Rams tried their hardest to keep up with the Bears, but were simply overmatched, especially in doubles competition. In a heartbreaking loss, Jimmy Aridas and Chaz Irwin fell just short to Rich Lichtenwalner and Ben Nace of Kutztown, losing 8-9. In singles competition, Jared Howat lost to Rushi Amin, 6-2, 6-1. Irwin was also unsuccessful in his singles match, falling 4-6. Looking to bounce back from their PSAC tournament lost, the men’s team next had a home-matchup with Gloucester County College. Unfortunately, the match was cancelled due to rain, and West Chester went into their final season game against Eastern University. Hosting the Eagles in their final home matchup, the Golden Rams put their heart and soul into their game. It paid off, as West Chester would go on to defeat Eastern University on Senior Day, winning with a dominant score of 9-0. West Chester was ruthless in every way, winning

all six singles competitions to start the day off. Irwin and Howatt recovered from their Kutztown losses, bringing home wins in their final season games. Connor Dunn, Lars Kristiansen, Cody Leimback, and Joseph Cooke also achieved singles wins, as well. In doubles competition, the Rams were victorious once again. In the first matchup, the team of Howat and Leimback won in strong fashion. Next up was the team of Dunn and Ryan Learn, also victorious against Eastern. Last, but not least, the team of Cooke and Aridas brought home the last wins of the season, solidifying the team’s final record of 6-10. On the women’s side of the court, West Chester started their PSAC tournament quest strong, winning their quarterfinals matchup against Kutztown, 5-1. Cassidy Branigan was the star of the game, as she helped propel the Golden Rams to the victory. The sophomore from Lansdowne, Pa., was a deciding factor in the Rams’ win, moving past Kutztown to advance to the PSAC semifinals. Though they hosted the semifinals match, the Rams could not get past their opponents, California, Pa. The Rams were eliminated after losing 0-5. Abriana Nolan and Jami Dumler suffered singles losses against the Vulcans. Four of the other singles matches were unfinished. Doubles competition was not any kinder to the Lady Rams. The teams of Maddy Shaak and Nicole Fahringer, Nolan and Amalia Hartman, and Stephanie Cifarelli and Branigan could not pull out any wins for the Golden Rams against Cal.

By G

Speci Just like the men’s team, the women’s matchup against Gloucester County s th College got rained out. To and end the season, just like win the men’s team, the Ladymen’s tra Rams won in decisive fash-ished on ion against Eastern Uni-They had versity, finishing their sea-nant perf son on an 8-1 win. West Ch Shaak, Braningan, No-Ram Invi lan, Dumler, and Haleyheader on Wissinger all closed outApril 12 their seasons with singlesRams pla wins. Fahringer put upevents.Th a hard-fought battle, butpartook a fell in singles competition,presentat West Chester’s only loss onAll-Ameri the day. al on Apr Fahringer bounced back During to win in doubles competi-riod in wh tion with Shaak. HartmanRams In and Nolan also teamed upheld, the to earn a doubles victory.riety of Finally, Branigan and Ci-tendance, farelli took home a finalwere: doubles win to end the sea-Haverford son with a winning recordUrsinus, of 11-10. and many Reflecting on the season,The Ram though it did not end ina total o any tournament wins, theWith that men’s and women’s tenniskey contr teams fought hard in eachthe victor and every game, ratherBruno, S than giving up. The wom-Nick Dro en’s team, in particular, truly proved this by winning six of their last seven matchups. Both teams have ascending players that will help West Chester bring home victories for years to come, and hopefully, championships as well. These teams will look to work extremely hard in the off-season, and to bounce back for next season. With players such as Irwin and Braningan leading these teams in the future, expect the Golden Rams’ tennis teams to prove that they are serious contenders for tennis gold.

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Oliver Suskin-Santarelli is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at OS753461@wcupa. edu.


APRIL 28, 2014

THE QUAD SPORTS

Golden Ram mens track and field begins preparation for PSAC championships gan, Jimmy McDaid, Golden Rams who placed who placed second, Ryan Nick Angelina, Caleb in the 200 meter dash Heimbach who placed Belle, Mark van Teyens were first place Bruno sixth (23.49 seconds), and Shawn and Tyler Esfinpey. Ricky Bruno wcupagoldenrams.com Young ished 14th placed first with(23.87 secin the 100 meter onds). In the dash with a time 400 meter of 10.97 seconds. dash, three Meanwhile, teamm e m b e r s mate Gabriel Lofrom the gan finished right track team behind him with a f i n i s h e d time of 11.40 secin the top onds. Caleb Belle, three: Dix freshman from finished first Williamsport, Pa. with a time finished seventh of 49.06 secin the 100 meter onds, Shawn dash, with a time Young placed of 11.62 seconds. second with The Rams caught time of 49.12 fire very early seconds, and during the meet. then Elias The events in Bogale placed which the Rams third sequenplaced in were tially with a the 100 meter time of 49.16 dash, 200 meter seconds. dash, 400 meter In the 800 dash, 110 me- Ricky Bruno set school history by being the second runner meter run, ter hurdles, 400 to ever finish the 200 meter dash in under 22 seconds. Jim McDaid meter hurdles, Bruno finished with a time of 21.95 seconds. placed sixth 4x400 meter rewhile Nick lay, high jump, pole vault, shot put, and (22.24 seconds), Ghas- Angelina placed 12th. the multiple decathlons. san Dix (22.52 seconds) Angelina also placed sixth within the 1500 meter run. In the 5000 meter run, Andrew Dombrowiecki placed fourth. BABYSITTER NEEDED In the 110 meter hurdles, Ryan Heimbach 18 year old autistic teen placed first with a time of 15.16 and Mark van $15.35/hour Teyes placed third with a time of 15.20. Another event, in Monday and Friday afternoons 3:30pm – 8pm which the Rams had Saturday and Sunday afternoons 4pm – 8pm started off on a very high note, was the ESU AllAmerican Invitational. Downingtown home, north of Exton off Rte #100 Only a select few universities were in attendance at the ESU track meet Dressing and potty training, recreational activities, that varied from Millersfeeding meals, teen is non-verbal, owning a car is necessary ville, Mansfield, and Seton Hall to East Stroudsburg. Ricky Bruno, sophomore from Exeter, Pa. had an exceptional meet at the Golden Rams

By Gabe Smith

Special to The Quad men’s team, matchup er County s the outdoor track ed out. To and field season just like winds down, the the Ladymen’s track and field finisive fash-ished on a strong note. tern Uni-They had another domitheir sea-nant performance at the n. West Chester Golden ngan, No-Ram Invitational doublend Haleyheader on April 11 and losed outApril 12 in which 10 th singlesRams placed first in 10 r put upevents.The Rams then battle, butpartook another in solid mpetition,presentation at the ESU nly loss onAll-American Invitational on April 19. nced back During the two day pes competi-riod in which the Golden HartmanRams Invitational was teamed upheld, there were a vaes victory.riety of schools in atn and Ci-tendance, those schools me a finalwere: Millersville, nd the sea-Haverford, Bryn Mawr, ing recordUrsinus, Immaculata and many more colleges. he season,The Rams accumulated ot end ina total of 10 victories. wins, theWith that being said, the en’s tenniskey contributors to all of rd in eachthe victories were: Ricky me, ratherBruno, Shawn Young, The wom-Nick Drozd, Gabriel Loparticular, s by winlast seven

ve ascendwill help ring home s to come, championhese teams extremely eason, and for next ayers such Braningan ams in the he Golden teams to are serious nnis gold.

arelli is a majoring in dies. He can 461@wcupa.

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Sandy Lyons 610-804-7535

Invitational. His specialty is the sprints and jumps. He has performed well and consistently throughout the season. He became the second runner in history to complete the 200 meter dash event in less than 22 seconds. He finished with a time of 21.95 seconds, which later won the event. Alexander Foulke had a legendary performance in which he had one of the best times in the PSAC during the 2014 season. He finished with a time of 22.17 seconds which made him second to Bruno. In the 1500 meter dash, Angelina once again showcased a great performance finishing first place, crossing the line with a time of 4:09:57. These last few weeks were very pivotal matchups because it’s always good to end your season before getting into the PSACs. Not only had the men’s track and field competed their best effort, but they chased history by breaking and tying records. The men took home first place for 13 events combined from both of the track meets. West Chester’s final regular season meet was at home on Saturday. There were a lot of schools that competed, and the men were able to have a bunch of top three finishes, including three that placed first. The three men that placed first were Ghasson Dix, who ran the 200 meter dash in 22.63 seconds. Jake Siegel was the only athlete who was able to finish the 10,000 meter run, which is about 6.2 miles. He accomplished the feat in just under 33 minutes, 32:41.80 seconds, which

is a five minute and 15 second mile. Also Eric Hunter finished first in the pole vault, vaulted 4.50 meters. As a team, West Chester did very well, as they competed in every event, with a top three finish in a lot of them. For the men they will now travel to Shippensburg for the PSAC’s, on May 1, 2, and 3. If they compete well enough some of the men will have a chance to compete in NCAA’s in Michigan at the end of May. The best chance that a runner has for West Chester to compete in NCAA’s would be Ricky Bruno, who has the second fastest 200 meter dash time in the PSAC’s during the entire regular season. He ran it in 21.95 seconds, a couple weeks ago. The only one to do it faster than him is Matthew Kujawaski from Shippensburg, who beat Bruno’s time by .8 seconds. All of these meets lead up to the PSAC’s, in which they have been training for the entire season. Every track member will be giving it everything they have to try and qualify for NCAA’s. This home meet was the final regular season meet of the year. And pending on a strong performance in the PSACs, it could determine Rams future on May 24 at the NCAAs in Allendale, Michigan. They did a good job and need keep the momentum heading into the stretch run. Gabe Smith is a second-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor psychology minor. He can be reached at GS783203@wcupa. edu.


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THE QUAD SPORTS

NBA playoffs kick off with a wild first week

A.J. Arcaini

Asst. Sports Editor

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little over a week into the NBA playoffs, and the excitement has surely been everything sports fans hope for. Overtime thrillers, high running emotions, and as impressive slam dunks as we have seen all season. If you are a general basketball fan, odds are your happy with what you have seen. Entering the 2013-2014 season, the NBA had its select front runners which have been common in years past. First, the Miami Heat, obviously. Between their two consecutive championship wins and the big three thriving, the Heat seemed a clear front runner. The San Antonio Spurs are always strong, along with the young and edgey Indiana Pacers, a team who many think will give the Heat their greatest challenge yet. The Los Angeles “Lob City” Clippers have climbed the charts as one of the best teams in the game, while Dwight Howard and James Harden continue to grow with the Houston Rockets. Despite all these great teams, there is one great thing about the NBA playoffs. Any given team can win on any given night. As the 2013-2014 playoffs began just over a week ago, we saw the familiar names, but also were lucky to see some more new rising stars. The playoffs are known as a time to make a name for yourself, and players like Damian Lilliard and Lamarcus Aldridge from the Portland Trailblaz-

ers are certainly taking advatage. The Trailblazers were faced with a tough matchup in the first round, Dwight Hoawrd and the fast paced Houston Rockets. Despite the excellent season we saw from the Trailblazers, they still were seen as the “under dog”. Apparently this didnt sit well with Lilliard or Aldridge, as they exploded through the first two games. Aldridge average 44 points and 11 rebounds in the first two meetings, while Lillard has average just over 26 a game. These two young rising stars have taken the series by storm and that has not went unnoticed around the league. The playoffs have also shown the emergence of the Washington Wizards and a stealth back court of point guard John Wall and shooting guard Bradley Beal. The two have night in and night outcontinued to produce for the Wizards, who in their series with the Bulls, have surprised many with their play. Entering the playoffs, any normal fan would probably think the Heat, Pacers or maybe the Spurs were a clear front runner to win the prized possesion of NBA Champion, but just a week in and things have taken a surprising turn. The Heat showed their dominance as they aproach a sweep of the Charlotte Bobcats, but throughout the series we have seen some struggles. A normally high power defensive team, the Heat have allowed Bobcats point guard Kemba Walker to play extremely well, and have had trouble controlling him in crunch time. An

unhealthy Dwayne Wade always leaves the Heat with questions of just how succesful the “big three” can stay. The Pacers were another team that many thought entering the playoffs would be completely dominant. Earning the one seed and home court advantage in the last week of the regular season certainly gave Indiana the upper hand. We are now four games in to the Pacers’ series with the Atlanta Hawks, and we have seen an unexpected outcome. Knotted at two games a piece, the Pacers have struggled extremely on the offensive and defensive glass, which they usually are exceptional on, and Indians superstar Paul George has not been able to find his rythm. Veteran small forward Kyle Korver and point guard Jeff Teague have boosted to another level, both playing some of the best basketball of their careers for the Atlanta Hawks. This series will be an interesting one to watch unfold if the Pacers offensive struggles continue to affect them. As the playoffs continue, we cant really know what we are in store for. Will George find his stroke for the Pacers and help them get back on track? Will Wade’s health stay strong and help bring the Heat back to the top? Or will the young guns like Wall, Aldridge and Lilliard rise to the occasion? If we have learned one thing in the past week, it’s that anything is possible when it comes to the NBA playoffs. AJ Arcaini is a second-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AA788494@wcupa.

APRIL 28, 2014

Billionare Donald Trump interested in purchase of Buffalo Bills franchise By Drew Mattiola Op-Editor

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he NFL community was heartbroken and shattered, when the news of Ralph Wilson’s untimely death arrived on March 25, 2014. For those who aren’t familiar with Ralph Cookerly Wilson Jr., he was the longtime founder and owner of one of the AFL’s original teams, the Buffalo Bills. At the seasoned age of 95, Wilson died of natural causes making him the oldest owner in the NFL and the secondlongest tenured owner since George Halas of the Chicago Bears who surpassed him by 63 years. Wilson was also the last founding member of the AFL which merged with the NFL, 1970. Without Wilson, the sport would not be where it is today. Wilson witnessed moderate success with the Buffalo Bills as a majority owner dating back to the team’s inaugural season in 1960. Since their inception, the Bills have qualified for the playoffs over 17 times, became the first team to win four conference championships, visit the Super Bowl on four consecutive occasions during the early 1990s, and, lastly, sent a vast number of tremendous athletes to the Football Hall of Fame such as O.J. Simpson and Andre Reed. However, in recent years the Buffalo Bills have lost their keen edge, especially upon arrival in the 2000s. Since 1999, the Buffalo Bills are the only team in the NFL to have not yet qualified for the playoffs entering the 21st century. The Bills’ playoff drought currently stands at 14 seasons and

the streak of losing seasons stands at nine, both of which are the longest active droughts in the league. The last time the team documented a winning record was in 2004 when Mike Mularkey avasted the Bills to a 9-7 record leading the NFL in kickoff returns. This saddening streak the Bills have experienced has shown little to no signs of diminishing as the team hasn’t had a head coach since Dick Jauron to receive a contract extension beyond three years and a franchise quarterback since Jim Kelly who has taken the squad to the postseason. In addition, the Bills have suffered a considerable string of heavyhanded attendance problems at Ralph Wilson Stadium, particularly encroaching into the later portions of the season, when Buffalo’s inanimate weather declines and the team typically falls out of playoff contention. According to ESPN, out of 14 home games at Ralph Wilson Stadium in 2010 and 2011, six match-ups were blacked out due to the failure to sell out. With Wilson’s recent passing, it’s difficult to imagine the team’s future becoming anything less than grim. The looming news of relocation has haunted the Bills since the beginning of April and with the stadium’s new lease sitting roughly around $200 million with punitive $400 million buyout option, the franchise’s existence in Orchard Park, Buffalo could be in limbo. With that being said, Wilson’s widow,

Mary, is now in control of the team’s trust holding after her husband’s death, creating further assumption that the state of the franchise has become relatively unclear. The team is expected to enter the open market in 2015 and thus far a handful of noteworthy corporate figures and business moguls have expressed interest in purchasing the Bills. Even long before Wilson’s departure, musician, Jon Bon Jovi and former Bills quarterback, Jim Kelly have expressed their impulse to keep the Bills in Western New York. Kelly in particular told the media that he wants to run the Bills’ front office once the team’s trust was available. Among the candidates that stand out notably is renowned investor and tycoon, Donald Trump, who has exceeded public opinion both negatively and positively. Trump’s desire to purchase the Bills could potentially open an avenue to newfound prosperity the squad hasn’t seen since the 1990s, considering his boundless knowledge in economics and his expertise as an oligarch and the chairman of the Trump Organization. The Bills have been a team on demise since the beginning of the 21st century and poor ownership, small marketing, and the mismanagement of personnel have set the franchise back for quite some time. As of 2014, the Bills have installed 13 starting quarterbacks, hired seven head coaches, rotated six gen-

See TRUMP page 27


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APRIL 28, 2014 TRUMP from page 26

eral managers, and have amassed an ugly record of 94-136. Those are not statistics fans and ownn controlers expect to see from a rust hold-national football club. husband’sWhat the Bills need is a g furtherfresh face – a leader who hat thecan make the approprinchise hasate football transactions vely un-and generate revenue into a ghostly Ralph Wilexpectedson Stadium that has pen mar-hosted only one Sunday d thus farnight game since 2009. oteworthyThe fact that Trump has res andhad previous experience s have ex-in operating a profest in pur-sional sports team makes lls. Even“The Apprentice” host lson’s de-even more qualified to cian, Jonown the struggling Bills rmer Billsespecially since Trump im Kellyonce had star running their im-back, Hershel Walker, he Bills inin his back pocket when York. Kel-he maintained the New r told theJersey Generals. Being a wants tohighly savvy, wholesale ront officemind, Trump’s moxie outperforms trust wascertainly ong theKelly and Bon Jovi. at standTrump’s credentials in renownedlimited liability, real tycoon,estate, resort licenswho hasing, and entertainment c opinionmedia speaks volumes and posi-above any venture Kelly and Bon Jovi have forre to pur-gone. However, Trump’s could po-extravagant lifestyle and an avenueoutspoken manner have prosper-convinced the NFL that asn’t seenthey are still distasteful consider-about their former relass knowl-tionship. mics and Trump and the NFL s an oli-have shared a rather chairmancontentious history as Organiza-far as the eye can see. In have been1984, the sources from mise sincethe USFL confirmed that f the 21stTrump acquired the New or owner-Jersey Generals from marketing,Chuck Fairbanks and nagementJ. Walter Duncan. The ve set theleague believed that the for quiteteams based in the naof 2014,tion’s two largest marinstalledkets were owned by the quarter-owners with the deepven headest pockets which made d six gen-Trump a subject of publicity given his enormous wealth. Trump and fellow Los Angeles

THE QUAD SPORTS Express owner, J. William Oldenburg drew national attention as the USFL’s biggest spenders as both went on a notorious signing spree in the 1984 offseason. During his maiden year as majority owner of the New Jersey Generals, Trump poached a large number of highly-regarded collegiate players as well as several NFL starters, including Cleveland’s QB Brian Sipe. This combined with a general lack of quality quarterbacks and runn i n g b a c k s tipped off ano t h e r explosion in league spending as U S F L teams practic a l l y raided the NFL and coll e g e r a n k s just to k e e p ahead. With the new wave of teams, an assortment of college stars such as Marcus Dupree, Mike Rozier, Reggie White, Steve Young and even Buffalo favorite, Jim Kelly signed high dollar contracts to play for USFL teams in 1984, as they did manage to lure high profile NFL stars like Doug Williams, Joe Cribbs, and Gary Barbaro. In 1984, the league began discussing the possibility of competing headto-head with the NFL by playing its games in the fall beginning in 1986. Despite multiple protests of many of the league’s “old guard,” who wanted to stay with the original plan of playing football in the spring

months, the voices of Chicago Blitz owner, Eddie Einhorn and Donald Trump, would eventually prevail. Trump and Einhorn argued that if the USFL shifted to the fall schedule, it would ultimately force a merger with the NFL in which the older league would have to accept at least some of USFL’s various conglomerates. They sold a majority of ownership stakes on the gamble that if a merger did indeed occur; the surviving teams’

original beleagurement would more than double. A consulting firm recommended sticking with a spring season. Nevertheless, on October 18, 1984, the league’s owners voted 12-2 to go along with Einhorn and Trump’s idea and begin playing a fall season in 1986. The spring advocates had lost, and the fall advocates now set their sights on forcing a merger with the NFL, or at the very least, winning a sizable settlement and securing a TV network for fall broadcasts. Spring football had been replaced with an incredibly risky gamble for a huge return. As a direct result of this decision, the Pittsburgh Maulers

under anti-trust laws, was tripled to $3.2 million. When it folded, the USFL had lost over $163 million. In another effort to keep themselves afloat while at the same time attacking the more established National Football League, the USFL filed an antitrust lawsuit against the older league, claiming it had established a monopoly with respect to television broadcasting rights, and in some cases, the access of stadium venues. The USFL claimed that the NFL had bullied ABC, CBS, and NBC into not televising USFL games in the fall. It also claimed that the NFL had a specific plan to eliminate the USFL, the “Porter Presentation.” In particular, the USFL claimed the NFL conspired to ruin the Invaders and Generals. The USFL sought damages dailynewsen.com of $567 million, which would have been trition of fall play in 1986, pled to $1.7 billion under Einhorn decided not to antitrust law. It hoped field a team for the final to void the NFL’s conlame duck spring 1985 tracts with the three maseason. Within a few jor networks. The USFL weeks of the decision, the proposed two remedies: USFL had been forced to either force the NFL to abandon four lucrative negotiate new televimarkets, abort a move sion contracts with only to a fifth and suspend two networks, or force operations in a sixth. In the NFL to split into hindsight, this destroyed two competing 14-team leagues, each limited to a the USFL’s viability. In 1986, the USFL, contract with one major having recently decided network. The case went to trial to compete directly with the NFL, filed an anti- in the spring of 1986 and trust lawsuit against lasted approximately 42 the National Football days. On July 29, a sixLeague. The NFL was person jury solidified a found to have violated verdict that devastated anti-monopoly laws. the USFL, even though it However, in a victory technically won its case. in name only, the USFL The jury declared the was awarded a judg- NFL a “duly adjudicated ment of just $1, which illegal monopoly,” and ultimately folded rather than compete with the Steelers, the sale of the struggling Washington Federals to Weiser’s Miami-based ownership group dissolved, the well supported Philadelphia Stars and the New Orleans Breakers carried out relocation. Then the 1983 champion Michigan Panthers surprised the commissioner with an announcement that they would not be playing in Michigan for the 1985 season. With an expecta-

PAGE 27 found that the NFL had willfully acquired and maintained strong monopoly status in professional football through predatory tactics. The jury found that the USFL had changed its strategy to a more risky goal of merger with the NFL. Furthermore, the switch to a fall schedule caused the loss of several major markets. It has been established that Trump specifically wanted to force a merger knowing that the majority of teams would be eliminated. Trump’s presence in the NFL could be a smashing success or a colossal disaster waiting to happen. He appears very adamant about keeping the Bills in western New York and he does possess the tangibles of engineering a sports franchise, but so many things could go wrong with Trump pulling the strings. The Bills have limited salary cap space with $16.44 million and given Trump’s net worth of $3.9 billion as well as his sudden urge for a winning franchise, the Bill’s small budget may not accommodate Trump luxurious philosophy. Trump’s image is something that could strongly benefit the Bills, but his racial allegations, foul nature, and unfocused schedule may not be what the city of Buffalo is looking for in an owner. He already developed rift with the NFL in the 1980s and this bitter tension could carry over into the present day if Trump becomes the bidder of the Bills. Only time will tell who the Bills future torchbearer is and as 2015 lurks around the corner, this attainment could make or break the Buffalo Bills as we know it. Drew Mattiola is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RM814408@wcupa.edu.


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Lady Rams softball closes out regular season, grabs PSAC East title - Page 23 photo by Colleen Goldhorn


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