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W W W. W C U Q UA D. CO M MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012

VOLUME 103, ISSUE 8

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Not so ‘Sandy’ in West Chester See stories on page 2

Jessica Guzzardo/ Photo Editor


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News

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Superstorm Sandy wreaks havoc on East Coast By Carol Fritz Staff Writer

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hat was once a Category 1 hurricane, Superstorm Sandy caused severe damage along the east coast. PECO estimated that 20,000-50,000 people woke up without power in Chester County on Tuesday morning. All SEPTA services throughout the region were also suspended on Monday. Several towns along the Delaware River, which rose to a new record of 10.62 feet, were given mandatory evacuation orders. Emergency shelters in Chester County were opened around 7 p.m. on Sunday, and one was opened on WCU’s South Campus. The Philadelphia International Airport remained open, but all flight operations were canceled. In Pennsylvania alone, more than 200 roads and bridges were closed due to wind and flooding, and over 1.2 million people across the state lost power according to the Associated Press. Four individuals in Pennsylvania died due to the weather, including an 8-year-old boy who was crushed by a fallen tree limb. Mountainous areas across Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, and the Carolinas experienced several feet of snowfall along with strong winds from Sandy.

In New Jersey, more than 2.3 million people were without power. The center of the storm caused chaos in Atlantic City on Monday evening with 80 mph sustained winds. Hundreds of people were evacuated, and at least 3 deaths were reported. Hundreds of homes and businesses along the Jersey Shore experienced devastating damages. “The city that never sleeps” was blackened with more than 1.8 million power outages after President Obama declared a major disaster in New York City and Long Island. The superstorm caused the worst damage in the 108-year history of the NYC subway system as a record-breaking 13foot surge of seawater engulfed the city, causing damage on streets and in tunnels and flooding the World Trade Center construction pit. The New York Stock Exchange was closed for two days, which has not happened due to weather in over a century. Severe wind damaged several skyscrapers in the city. Superstorm Sandy caused more than 8.2 million people in the eastern United States to lose power, according to the Associated Press. The nation’s death toll climbed to at least 45 people in 9 states. Carol Fritz is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at CF716022@ wcupa.edu.

THE QUAD NEWS

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Hurricane Sandy hits West Chester By Nicholas Devoe Practicum Writer

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he Category 1 hurricane known as Hurricane Sandy was only a severe storm by the time it reached as far inland as West Chester. Nevertheless, the campus and community was impacted in a number of different ways by the ripple of this natural disaster that landed in South Jersey and ravaged Manhattan.

campus had an array of fallen trees, resulting in it being completely cut off from throughway traffic on Tuesday Oct. 30. Route 926 acts as a major backbone to West Chester traffic on the level of Route 202, or West Chester Pike. Dozens of near 100-foot trees fell throughout the area due to Sandy’s devastating winds. Pictured is a fallen pine that luckily fell in the direction

a house on South Walnut Street, and we had up to 800 people without electricity at one point, but as of early Friday morning there we had about a dozen people left who still did not have power…Otherwise families and businesses are generally returning to normal.” The state emergency personnel and many other authorities converged to make sure that

away from vehicles and apartments in the Treetops At Chester Hollows apartment complex on West Chester Pike. West Chester Mayor Carolyn Comitta explained the damage we sustained within the borough of West Chester due to Hurricane Sandy. “We were indeed very fortunate in the borough of West Chester, and in Chester County and the region. The storm did not hit us as hard as was predicted. We had a tree uprooted that damaged

if West Chester was hit as bad as weather forecasters predicted, that we would be prepared. In fact, the university greatly contributed to this cause by assuring that West Chester citizens would not be without refuge. “West Chester University was a designated emergency shelter. My understanding is that it wasn’t needed but I participated in the briefings, as a stakeholder, and was very impressed with the professional-

Photo by Amanda Simon

Luckily between borough officials, state emergency personnel, and WCU administrators, all provisions were made for the worst that weather forecasters predicted for West Chester residents and the surrounding area. There was an abundance of minor damages in the area. The Brandywine Creek flooded terribly to a point that state Route 926, or Street Road, was almost a foot under water. The same road closer to WCU

ism of the incident management team from the state, as well as the officials at the university for all coming together and doing what needed to be done to be prepared to help people,” Comitta said. With West Chester being the seat of Chester County, the town was prepared with the manpower to combat Hurricane Sandy’s 6080 mile-per-hour winds and the flood warnings received days before. The mayor extended her many thanks to those who served West Chester and the surrounding areas: “I thank our first responders, our ambulance, and our fire and police for being on duty and on call 24/7, which they really do every day, but they were staffed up full force for the hurricane…They were there for anyone who needed it. We remain on alert and on call to assist neighbors outside of our region who were more severely hit, as they would be here for us if we needed them,” Comitta said. A true collaboration of forces between various government authorities in the area assured West Chester locals and campus residents that West Chester is prepared for the worst of weather conditions. As the mayor expressed, the university was a willing receiver of those in need of shelter in this incident of emergency. As of this weekend, all power has been returned to West Chester. Nicholas Devoe is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at ND626335@wcupa.edu.


NOVEMBER 5, 2012

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THE QUAD NEWS

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WCU collects teddy bears for annual Bear Fair

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By Nicole Danik Special to The Quad

ometimes the most wonderful things we receive are rather small, but that does not mean they do not bring us a great sense of comfort and joy. West Chester University is hosting its 16th Annual Bear Fair in hopes of providing teddy bears to children in hospitals and children in need during the holiday season. The Bear Fair will be collecting teddy bears, as well as monetary donations from Nov. 1-30. Many of the teddy bears that are collected are given to children who may have to undergo surgery, have recently lost a family member, or have even lost everything they own. The

Bear Fair is a great opportunity to participate in making someone’s holiday season a little brighter and even providing someone with the support they need and the happiness they seek. Although a donation will make a great impact, it is extremely easy to participate in this event. You can acquire your own collection or collaborate with a group to donate during the month of November. The Bear Fair Committee suggests donating teddy bears that are at least six inches tall. The most popular teddy bears are found to be soft and cuddly and between eight to 15 inches. They also request that all donations are new teddy bears. This year’s goal is to col-

lect over 4,000 teddy bears and deliver them to welldeserving homes. As we become immersed in our busy schedules and concentrate on our own agendas, we must all do our best to understand how much even a small item like a teddy bear can lift a child’s sprit or bring them happiness when they need it the most. There is no such thing as receiving too many bears; there is always a child who can benefit from the generosity. For more information and/or to sign up and participate, please contact West Chester University Office of Service-Learning and Volunteer Programs at WCU at 610-436-3379. Nicole Danik is a student at West Chester University. She can be reached at ND766917@wcupa.edu.

What do you think? Your opinion does matter! Please tell us how we can improve Library Services by taking the LibQUAL+ Survey! This totally anonymous survey is voluntary and has been approved by the WCU IRB.

There is a random drawing FOR STUDENTS to win WCU bookstore gift certificates $$$$ Check your email on Nov. 5th for a link to the survey or go to the Library Home Page: http://wcupa.edu/library.fhg/ The survey is open to ALL WCU students and employees.

Veterans Council prepares upcoming parade Clare Haggerty News Editor

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t 1 p.m. on Nov. 11, the Veterans Council will be holding its annual Veterans Day Parade. The parade begins at the corner of Gay and Darlington Streets and it continues to the Municipal Building. There are many organizations involved, quite a few of them from WCU, including several service groups and Greek organizations, as well as the radio station 91.7 The Curve, WC Dish, West Chester Press, and the Chester County Journal, among others. This parade encompasses a five-point plan in order to educate the younger generation so that they may understand and appreciate the significance of Veterans

Day. West Chester is a county seat of the Chester County and has the largest veteran population of all the neighborhoods, so the parade aims to educate, raise awareness and appreciation, and inspire sponsorship and community. According to Ed Knight, owner of Culinary Deliveries and a member of Friends of West Chester Pa Veterans Support Committee, “The significance of the parade is to honor and appreciate the men and women who served in the military. West Chester is a great small town that has been recognized for its historic small town appeal.” The Veterans Council wishes to bring like-minded individuals together to volunteer their time and efforts in order to create a long-standing commitment by the community of West Chester to reflect

and honor those veterans who have given so much of themselves for others. The final goal is to have a parade that reflects the caring and appreciation of the community that rivals the outpouring of support shown by communities in the area. The Veterans Day Parade should reflect the same attention as any other fair or holiday that receives large crowds in West Chester. “This parade has played a significant role in bringing the community together throughout the last century,” Knight said. “This what we want to establish: a foundation for the future of this parade by educating and bringing awareness to such a special day that brings the community and university together.” Clare Haggerty is a second-year student majoring in English writing. She can be reached at CH757342@ wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD NEWS

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Patients evacuated after hospital generator fails in New York By Elizabeth Thompson Practicum Writer

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n Oct. 29, at least 300 patients were evacuated from New York University’s hospital and transported to other hospitals after Hurricane Sandy caused their backup generator to fail. Hospital officials confirmed that all patients, including 20 newborns all in the neonatal intensive care unit, were successfully moved to other hospitals for the night. The patients were transported around midnight just after the storm hit New Jersey. Anywhere from 50 to 70 ambulances were lined up along First Ave in Kips Bay to transport patients. According to Lorinda Klein, an NYU spokeswoman, the evacuation went on all night and emergency personnel were

still evacuating patients on Tuesday morning. She said they were hoping to finish by noon. The evacuation was slow because it had to be carefully executed to avoid accidents. Also, some patients needed several nurses with them. The hospital’s electricity went out earlier that night. In fact, most of Manhattan from 39th Street to the financial district was without electricity. The backup generator was working at first, but started to fail around 11pm. “We had a failure of our primary power, our secondary power, our backup, all the backup systems failed within 30 minutes,” Dr. Robert Grossman, NYU Langone Medical Center Dean and CEO, said. Skeptics are asking why the generators were not checked before the storm, and wondering if they

were even working before the storm. “Our generators are fully compliant with all state and federal regulations and, using good prudence, we test them all the time as we have to do anyway,” Lisa Greiner, a spokeswoman for New York University Langone Medical Center, explained to Huffington Post. However, one of the hospitals trustees, Gary Chon, told Bloomberg TV something different. He said the generators “are not state-of-the-art” and that the hospital’s board was aware of the problems. “The infrastructure at NYU is something old,” said Cohn. Other board members and hospital officials refused to comment on Cohn’s remark. Hospital officials thought the generators would hold up through the

storm because they did not expect a storm of this magnitude. The chairman of the hospital board and founder of Home Depot, Kenneth Langone, was a patient in the hospital at the time and fully aware of the sketchy generators. He, too, thought they would fine. “Do you think they’d have kept me in there if they thought I was going to be unsafe?” Langone told Bloomberg News. Mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg, made the call to leave the hospital open even though it sits right alongside the East River and was in the evacuation zone. Bloomberg closed the hospital last year for Hurricane Irene. However, NYU hospital personnel took the initiative and canceled all non-emergency services for Monday and Tuesday

76ers announcer Marc Zumoff visits WCU By Nicholas Devoe Practicum Writer

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n Oct. 25, WCU communication studies professor Dr. Thompsen had 76ers announcer Marc Zumoff as a guest speaker for his COM-212 class, Mass Media Communication. Zumoff provided a stimulating lecture on job placement and stepping stones to building a career. The sportscaster gave COM-212 real world guidance and summarized his career path, as well. He placed an energized emphasis on internships in his advice to the class. Within Zumoff’s discourse he revealed the truths about how to get a career in what one wants to do, rather than just getting a job after graduation. He expressed a yearning to get to the youth to really seize opportunity within our reach. “In order to

achieve a dream you have to be unconventional… Keep your options open, be flexible!” Zumoff said excitedly. “The number one thing you have to do is believe in yourself.” Among the various topics Zumoff discussed, internships were a primary objective. He told his story and how he landed the impressive career he has today as the play-byplay announcer for the Philadelphia 76ers. Mentioning that he worked at KYW Radio as an intern and emphasizing the importance that role has in shaping careers, the sportscaster really identified with the students in Dr. Thompsen’s class. This Philadelphia native gave specific advice to students on how to network and enter the business world. One example he gave is sending an email to a “high-up”

in a prospective company mentioning a connection you have to that person. Whether it be a mutual friend or something else, anything can connect those two people. He summarized the steps of getting a career: “Go out and make friends. Get to know people! Whatever it is you want to know—ask!” Zumoff said. Through his insightful lecture, Zumoff bestowed a gift to every student in COM-212. He worked to get an idea for what kinds of careers the students were interested in at the beginning, and followed with the steps to actually execute to make that dream job a reality. The sportscaster enthusiastically laid out the proper plan of attack to make a career out of something one loves to do. That really is everyone’s goal, is it not? To be able

to wake up, turn off the alarm and actually want to go to work as opposed to some dreary desk job the person dreads going back to every morning. Zumoff cited a pivotal quote he credits to author Robert Kriegel: “Passion helps good people to do great things.” The broadcaster’s visit to Dr. Thompsen’s class gave over one hundred WCU students the opportunity to see first-hand how humble someone so successful and wellknown can be. Thanks to Marc Zumoff and his contributions to the communications class, those one hundred students are that much more prepared to take the education from this school and actually go out and use it to make their dreams into reality. Nicholas Devoe is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at ND626335@wcupa.edu.

and started to evacuate. Hospital staff manually transported patients down 15 flights of steps. The hospital had very low lighting, and many used flashlights as their only source of light. Newborns that were on breathing respirators were carried down nine flights of stairs while a nurse operated a breathing bag that delivered air to the babies’ lungs. Dr. Andrew Brotman, Senior Vice President and Vice Dean for Clinical Affairs and Strategy told CNN that the process as very “labor intensive and extremely difficult.” Many things could go wrong when transporting a patient, especially a baby. “Some of those breathing tubes can be very tenuous, they come out very easily. Someone obviously manually ventilating, providing

air and ventilation to the baby, even if someone gets tired- that can be a huge problem. Babies breathe faster than adults, so you have to be doing this quite quickly,” said Dr. Sanjay Gupta, the chief medical correspondent for CNN. He also explained that dangers for the other patients can be changes in temperature, blood pressure, and heart rate just from being moved outside during a storm. However, it seems that the 1000 plus doctors, nurses, residents, and medical students were extra careful and attentive because all patients that were evacuated survived and are currently scattered among local New York hospitals. Elizabeth Thompson is a fourthyear student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at ET715984@wcupa. edu.

N D E R WS I E W T

he Catholic Church is upset with a Polish coffin maker who has created a calendar which depicts topless models posing with his coffins. The Church believes that the calendar is inappropriate and death should be treated with solemnity, but the coffin maker defends that coffins are just a product, like jewelry or clothing. Pennsylvania man shot his young cousin after thinking she was s skunk. The girl, dressed in a black Halloween costume with a white feather on her head, was lying facedown on the ground playing hide-and-seek when her cousin shot her. She is still in the hospital recovering from her wounds.

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NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Op-Ed

THE QUAD OP-ED

QUADOPED@WCUPA.EDU

Don’t take favorite shore points for granted All of you locals out there, think back to some of your best experiences at the Jersey Shore. Whether it’s walking around the Ocean City Boardwalk, going out for a night in the Atlantic City Casinos or relaxing on the beach in Cape May, the Jersey Shore has brought so many of us the best memories of our childhood. But what if that place was not there anymore? For most of us it still is. Our favorite shore ice cream places, restaurants and stores are still standing with little damage and six months for them to recover from any damage before it is time for us to visit them again. However some people are not so lucky. Sandy caused damage at some level to most of the shore points, such as pieces of the famed Atlantic City boardwalk torn up, and electrical damage to the rides at Morey’s Pier, but some places had it way worse than others. Seaside Heights was one of those places. Much of the town was destroyed. The roller coaster that children and adults alike ride every year is in the ocean. While most of us will still have that which we look forward too every summer, those who travel to Seaside Heights won’t, not to mention the people that live there all year long who just lost their homes. The point of all of this is, if you are one of those people who spends their weekends at the shore each summer and has been doing so since a young age like myself, don’t take it for granted. Fifty or sixty miles south and the storm could have done away with Ocean City, Ventnor, Margate or Atlantic City. Our favorite places, after all, are located on an ocean. It only takes a freak storm to cause irreparable damage. When you are down the shore next summer sitting on the beach you have sat on your whole life, think of the people who travel to Seaside Heights and other places that were hit hard. Think of the people whose beach is now located on top of their houses, and whose shore towns may not be back to normal for many years, if ever. Have fun at the shore. Create memories and have nothing but good times in the towns you grew up visiting. Because someday you might say, “Eh, I didn’t go down this year, I’ll just go down the shore next year” and it might not be there. A storm can wash away a house or a boardwalk or even a town, but it cannot wash away a fond memory. -Kenny Ayres Editor-In-Chief

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The Quad The Student Newspaper of West Chester University 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 610.436.2375 | quad@wcupa.edu | www.wcuquad.com

Kenny Ayres

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Clare Haggerty News Editor Jack Barnett Op-Ed Editor Samantha Schaule Features Editor Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor Joey Samuel Sports Editor Jessica C. Guzzardo Photography Editor BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Erica Brooks Business Manager Kellyn McNamara Advertising Manager

EDITORIAL STAFF Ilana Berger Asst. Photography Editor

COPY EDITORS Colleen Cummings Stephanie Loeh

DISTRIBUTION Mike Coia Stephen Hood ONLINE EDITION Patrick Thomas FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumni. We do not accept submissions from members of the community who are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,000 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers Copyright ©2012 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the editor-in-chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, studentrun newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and, although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our website at www.wcuquad.com. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our website at www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


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THE QUAD OP-ED

Saving the best song for last or even never By Evan Smith Special to The Quad

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few weeks ago I had the privilege of attending the Rock Allegiance concert. There was a multitude of bands, some renowned, others less prominent. The concert started out slow, as the lesser known bands kicked off the show. The day began to pick up, as the bigger-name bands gradually came out. The atmosphere of the crowd became increasingly ecstatic, as the concert started to build up. My friend and I grew increasingly anxious for the better known bands to come on stage. Bands such as Puddle of Mudd, Fuel, Daughtry, and Seether warmed up before the final two acts. The final acts included two quality bands, Three Days Grace and Stone Temple Pilots, both of whom have extensive fan bases. While the Stone Temple Pilots played many of their hits, they missed some of their bigger songs. This trend has been a common occurrence at many of the concerts I have attended in recent years. As fans, it is demoralizing that we pay a lot of money to see our favorite bands play their best songs and yet we are deprived of that opportunity. Obviously every band is not going to be able to play all of their songs and by no means is that what I am asking for. I just ask that they play the songs that made them famous because without those songs, we would not be fans of these of bands. For example, after attending an Incubus concert, we were left without hearing some of their best

songs which included “Stellar,” “The Warning,” and “Love Hurts,” among a few others. This was particularly disheartening because I was set on hearing the songs I frequently listen to on my iPod. Perhaps they avoid playing all their best songs to give people incentive to come back next time they are in town. Another example where this happened to me was at the Red Hot Chile Peppers concert. While they did play most of their good songs (which they have a lot of), they missed some of the ones I particularly enjoy. The songs they missed included “The Other Side” and “Tell Me Baby and Snow.” Do not get me wrong, I thoroughly enjoyed the concert, but came away a tad disappointed. One more example would be at the Blink 182 concert I attended, where they played the majority of their songs, except for Adam’s Song. This song holds deep meaning to the group because it is about their good friend who committed suicide. Perhaps Blink 182 did not want to dim the mood on a night where they were doing so well . On this night, the band that I had desperately waited for, for so long was finally about to come out, as the crowd became electric. The Stone Temple Pilots started out with one of their better songs, continuing this theme for several songs. Like most concerts in the middle, some of the better songs began to lag. Then they played their best song, in my opinion, (“Plush”) somewhere in the middle, which was a curveball, as I was sure this was going to be in their planned encore. I was baffled, but under-

stood that they wanted to mix in some of their great songs. I now had no idea what would be their encore, as they still had a plethora of songs to choose from. As the show came towards a close, there were still many songs that had not played. I thought to myself, “What if they do not get all of their hits in? Surely enough, this turned out to be the case, as they did not play fan favorites such as “Sexy Type Thing” and “Creep.” They had saved some good songs for last, but never played other great songs. This made me wonder, why bother playing strictly the songs that are not fan pleasers. Perhaps it is because the band wants to salvage their vast array of songs to show that they are diverse? Maybe it is because this way, the diehard fans are satisfied? Or it could be because the band would get weary of constantly playing the same exact set list over and over? While I do enjoy variety, how often am I going to get to go the same concert? Chances are I am not, so why not play their best songs every time out? Bands that we enjoy have a formidable compilation of hits, which is why we like them. To prevent dissatisfaction at concerts, a democratic system could be implemented that would allow the fans to get the songs they desire to listen to? Perhaps a system could work where before, or in the middle of, the concert, fans can text a number for the songs they want to hear. Similar to a jukebox where the listener gets the song of their choice, this would be an attempt to accomplish the same thing.

This will allow ticketholders to be content with the band’s song selection. Even an electronic ballot would be a possibility, where fans will submit their own set list an hour before the concert. Fans should also be able to choose the songs they want to save for later on in the show. While this may decrease the enigma of the songs chosen and increase predictability, gratification will rise up. This way, the fans will not have to worry about to a band saving their best songs for never. Evan Smith is a third year political science major, with a minor in communications. He can be reached at es777403@wcupa. edu

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Weekly Comments

Election Day is soon to be upon us. Both President Brack Obama and former Governor Mitt Romney. People are already trying to call the election. If I were a betting man, I would put my money on Obama. He has had a consistent, albiet small edge on Romney. Obama has already some an edge in early voting in the state of Ohio. Ohio is a critical battleground state. Obama also has leads in Wisconsin and Iowa. They are still not sure things. Romney seems like he will take Florida which has a huge 29 electoral college votes. A key state is Colorado which has 9 electoral college votes. This state has somewhat been underrated by the media. Obama was just able to turn Colorado blue in the 2008 election, after it had voted for George W. Bush into office twice. What is looking good for Obama is that last election he won Colorado by a 10% margin over John McCain. Of course Obama had much more favorable circumstances last election. Still I would bet on Obama winning the 2012 election. Any takers?


NOVEMBER 5, 2012

THE QUAD OP-ED

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A compromise would be wise Fixing our massive military budget By Evan Smith Special to The Quad

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ith election season in full swing, political analysts are constantly bickering about which candidate would best serve the nation. In reality, the President of the United States cannot make progress with a stagnate Congress that has vetoed a multitude of bills. The Senate and the House are essential to ensure that the President does not wield more power than he should. This system of checks and balances can be efficient, but of late has been counterproductive. An excessive amount of filibusters in the Congress have delayed the process of passing bills for progress. These bills could have the potential to help the fiscal situation, but have been denied by Congress. For example, the Simpsons-Bowles Bill was a bi-partisan bill that was supposed to help the economy, but was struck down by six republicans who cosponsored the bill; they changed their minds as the bill was being voted on. Many pundits speculated that this was a direct sabotage to put the president in a bad light. Another problem with our political system is rider bills, which result in pork barrel spending. Politicians often attach other bills of their interest onto big prestigious bills so they get it passed, because alone they would not have passed. These rider bills contribute to unnecessary spending, creating more fiscal problems. Without the line item veto, these bills are forced to be passed together or not at all. The line item

veto would allow the president to pick and choose what part of the bill is necessary, but in turn, many pundits speculate this would give the president too much power. Bill Clinton had held this power in 1996 for a brief period of time, before it was repealed. These underlying issues contribute to the finical mess we currently have. Both sides are too stubborn to compromise, which results in a stalemate, where nothing gets accomplished. Pundits and politicians are extremely narrow-minded, as they only see things from one perspective rather than understand both sides and making a decision based off that. A pundit, like Sean Hannity, can have hardcore right-wing philosophical beliefs that he will not back down from, while the same could be said for Chris Mathews on a left-wing basis. This arrogance that one side is better than the other creates unnecessary tension and divides what is supposed to be a united nation. Gandhi once stated that “an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind,” and this is essentially what is happening in America. Each side wants to one-up the other, and as a result, progress has been put to a halt. Without a strong third party to step in and make an impact, the format will continue to remain a two-party system, where all our beliefs may not be adequately represented. These pundits and politicians obviously do not critically analyze the situation, as their biases lead them to go in with preconceived notions. These premeditated ideas lead

pundits to make up their minds before they even hear the proposals or rhetoric at hand. This applies to the debates, where Fox News already had their mind made up that Romney won all the debates, while MSNBC had their mind made up that Obama won the debate. There is not an efficient media station that has a non-partisan agenda (CNN probably comes the closest) that calls it how it is. Proponents on both sides have been reluctant to fix an upcoming financial problem that is lurking on Dec 31, where the fiscal cliff will automatically force cuts in many crucial programs. If the issues are not addressed, we will lose essential programs, or if politicians try to save it, it could possibly add to the enormous debt. We must ignore the smoke and mirrors that are used to deflect each candidate’s ‘lies’ and negative ads. Negative ads have been proven to be an intelligent campaign strategy, but are counterproductive, as they ridicule the other candidates rather than focusing on the key issues at hand. Politicians are obviously charismatic and articulate, so to decipher who is the better choice, we must look at their vision and policies to ultimately make our own decision. We must be open-minded and listen to the policies to see if they will benefit our needs, rather than automatically assume they will not. In an effort to get the wheels back in motion, a compromise between parties would be wise. Evan Smith is a third year political science major, with a minor in communications. He can be reached at es777403@ wcupa.edu.

Jack Barnett Op-Ed Editor

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he United States spends a lot on defense. By a lot I mean more than China, Japan, Russia, the U.K., France, Germany, India, Saudi Arabia, and Brazil combined. These countries are not a threat to our national security. In fact, all of these countries are considered allies. Although we stand heads and shoulders above everyone else in defense spending, we continue to spend more with no end in sight. Since World War II and the Cold War, defense spending has expanded enormously. There is no Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, Imperialist Japan, or Soviet Union to effectively challenge the United States militarily. You could bring up countries such as Iran and North Korea as examples, but it is comparing apples and oranges. Neither of those countries could effectively beat the United States in a military conflict. Global terrorism is not defeated by battleships or tanks. These units are useless in an unconventional war which is how terrorists fight. We are spending billions to fight and enemy that does not exist. The current budget is $695.7 billion. We could cut the budget down to $500 billion and we would still be the top global spender. I constantly hear politicians (mostly Republicans) harping on cutting the fat out of Washington and stopping the government from spending irre-

sponsibly. Instead of this budget, I hear plans to cut Planned Parenthood and NPR (National Public Radio). Both these programs are dwarfed by defense spending. The grants the federal government gives NPR only amount to 2% of their budget. That is a paltry sum compared to $695.7 billion, which is still not the end to defense spending. Take into account national security activities which would be $35.5 billion in the fis-

military spending is that we would lose jobs and our international prestige. Let us look at the first point of jobs. The military is a great employee. Brave men and women serve in the military. It gives valuable training to these people. However, all of the money is not going to giving jobs but costly projects. An example of this is a F-22 fighter jet that costs about $350 million. I understand defense spending for the United States creates new technologies that I most likely use. The problem is making another F-22 model. The technology has been discovered already. Do we really have to churn out another fighter jet that costs us millions of dollars? Think of the jobs that could be creatPhoto by Rebecca J. Moat ed with that money. We could easily cal 2013 year. Research scrap ridiculously expenanalyst Mattea Kramer sive projects such as this. estimates that plus ad- It would do no harm to ditional costs, the budget this country. The budget comes out to $931 billion. can be cut without losing Almost $1 trillion. This a massive amount of jobs. does not seem likely to Next is the subject of interend. Both Barack Obama national prestige. As menand Mitt Romney have tioned before, the United pledged to keep up mili- States could still cut $1 tary spending. Romney billion from its budget and actually proposed a $2.1 be a top spender. We are trillion rise in additional the global economic and spending over the span of military superpower. We the next ten years. This do not have to do a conmakes Obama’s measures stant military build-up to seem libertarian in com- try to keep our stop. That parison. Romney is doing is what actually one of the this due to claims that the reasons that doomed the military is weakest under Soviet Union. They were Obama because “our Navy spending 25 percent of is smaller than it’s been their GDP on military and since 1917” and that “our could not sustain it. We Air Force is smaller and should refocus our efforts older than any time since on areas such as educa1947.” This discounts new tion and healthcare where technologies such a drones we are lagging behind the and nuclear weapons. I global community. mentioned before we are Jack Barnett is a fourth-year stustill the global champion dent majoring in history and political science. He can be reached of military. A criticism of cutting at JB723722@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 8

Features

THE QUAD FEATURES

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

From the “Holocaust” to ‘Band of Brothers’ By Dr. Brenda Gaydosh Special to The Quad

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ast May, more than 30 of us from West Chester University met in Philadelphia International Airport’s terminal A, excited for the journey that would take us through Germany, Poland, and the Czech Republic. Leaving from Philadelphia late had us running through Heathrow to make our connection to Berlin. Guess what did not make the connection – you are right – our luggage. Some people in our group wanted to say that the luggage “was lost,” but it arrived on a later flight that evening. That was not the last crisis of the trip – when the bus arrived the next morning for a city tour, it did not have enough seats to accommodate our entire group (48, as WCU had joined with a group from South Dakota). No problem! I said to Wesley, our excellent tour guide, “I’ll take six with me and we’ll meet you at Checkpoint Charlie.” A few problems easily solved. Given that our tour was “The Holocaust in Europe,” a few problems like this should not have rattled anyone. Those traveling on this tour faced a myriad of emotions from anger to sadness to caring

(through great bonding). In Berlin, we saw the Brandenburg Gate, Unter den Linden, Holocaust Memorial, Checkpoint Charlie, Reichstag, Topography of Terror, Ku-Damm, Jewish Museum, Jewish Quarter, and Wannsee. Some of

Saturday morning, everyone had to be up early to catch the train (five and a half hours) to Warsaw, a mode of transportation that was not flexible in its timing. In anticipation of visiting Poland, several students had some pieroPhoto by Dr. Brenda Gaydosh

the students visited their first concentration camp outside of Berlin, taking an S-Bahn train to Sachsenhausen. Ryan Woodward notes, “Eleven of us visited Sachsenhausen on a quiet and empty Friday afternoon and stayed for a few hours touring the grounds of the former camp. It was not only a highly emotional experience, but also an academically enlightening one to share with other history students, seeing how the site and memorial had been preserved for the past 70 years.”

gis in the train’s dining car. Arriving in Warsaw, we faced a new city, a new currency, and a new culture. In Warsaw, we visited the old city where one could purchase amber, artwork, and beautiful jewelry. On Sunday, I visited Father Maksymilian Kolbe’s monastery at Niepokalanow, while 20 participants went to Treblinka, one of the six death camps operated by the Nazis. Others enjoyed free time in the city. Students had the opportunity to visit a variety of museums.

We just happened to be in Warsaw on one of the four nights in the year where the museums remain open late. Students rushed out of our hotel dinner so quickly to get to the museums that us old folks (Dr. Bill Hewitt, his wife Cheryl, others from SD, and I) had the tasty dessert all to ourselves. Monday morning, we left for Krakow, stopping en route to visit AuschwitzBirkenau, the best known of the six death camps. Here, participants let their emotions run freely. One of the most difficult exhibits for students was the large pile of human hair. Robert Battista describes his reaction, “The part of the trip that most affected me was when I saw the room full of human hair that the Nazis cut from the prisoners upon their arrival to Auschwitz. It was by far the most horrible thing I had ever seen in my life. When I entered the room I just collapsed to the floor, I could not handle it. I started crying and gagging, I honestly thought I was going to be physically ill it was so terrible. I started thinking about all the innocent children that passed through that camp and had their hair cut off. I began to think about my younger brother and sisters and I realized that if they lived there back in those dark times, it could very well have been their hair in that room. I love them so much and I could not imagine losing them like that.” Following the moving visit to the camp, many were glad to see the beauty of Krakow. “As America is only 236-237 years old, our history and our culture are relatively young,” Josh Hoskins said, “When I walked through the center of Krakow, I was overcome with the history that

NOVEMBER 5, 2012 surrounded me. It was as if I walked into a time machine and came out in Medieval Poland. The beautiful old world architecture with the elaborate churches topped with spires reaching for the sky

Leaving Prague, we headed by bus back into Germany. On our way to Munich, we stopped in Nuremburg to see the Nazi Party Rally site and have lunch. The city of Munich, like much of what Photo by Dr. Brenda Gaydosh

were breathtaking. The cobblestone town square had a distinct feeling unlike anything I had ever seen in America. Visiting the old world cities was a historical and cultural experience I was incapable of receiving in the United States. It was an experience of a lifetime.” Many of us visited the Wieliczka Salt Mine, one of the oldest salt mines in Europe and a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage site. It was something that none of us could have imagined. Hundreds of feet underground, there appeared what looked like a small city. On day nine, our bus carried us to the third country of our tour, as we visited Prague. On arrival, we immediately went on a walking tour of the city. The next day was free allowing students to visit the ghetto camp of Theresienstadt, visit the beautiful synagogues, walk around the engaging city of Prague, or sleep in and take a dip in the hotel pool. I did the latter so I would have the energy for an evening concert in one of the Prague churches.

we had already experienced, offered us beauty in the Glockenspiel, Marianplatz, and castles, and the sadness of our last concentration camp – Dachau. Many students noted that this was a “trip of a lifetime.” Pam McMahon maintains, “Learning by experience cannot compare to learning in the classroom through lecture or reading a book. The experience was limitless as far as academic enrichment. So, would you like to travel with us to Europe next May? We are taking an EF College Study Tours trip to Europe again. This time, our 16-day tour will cover England, France, Belgium, and Germany – “World War II in Europe.” Wesley, a fun-loving Irishman, will again be our guide. If you have any interest in our trip, please contact me (Dr. Brenda Gaydosh, bgaydosh@wcupa.edu, Main Hall 409). See our trip on Facebook: www.faceook.com/wcuww2. Dr. Brenda Gaydosh is a professor at West Chester University. She can be reached at BGaydosh@ wcupa.edu.


NOVEMBER 5, 2012

THE QUAD FEATURES

Rocking motion ties to brain activity By Kelly Ratka Special to The Quad

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lfred Monapert, writer of The Supreme Philosophy of Man, wrote, “Do not confuse motion and progress. A rocking horse keeps moving, but doesn’t make any progress.” Someone must have had some major issues with his rocking horse as a child. Perhaps the embittered Monapert was half right. Motion may not be progress, but rocking motion may be key to our progress as it clears our minds for thought. The Swiss Center for Affective Sciences reports that research at the University of Geneva has discovered some shocking ties between brain activity and this particular form of motion. For instance, napping in a hammock can achieve fuller rest than in a bed. This is significant because one in three adults experiences at least one symptom of insomnia. Far from the sign of mental chal-

lenge we often interpret it to be, rocking really rocks. Engaging in rocking motion while performing simple daily tasks, such as falling asleep or reading, can positively affect each and every one of us. In order to gain a new appreciation for how rocking can move us in the right direction, let us begin by exploring the current stereotype of rocking motion; next, we will dip into what research has recently revealed about rocking before; finally, we will raise our attention to the applications of the results. Let us swing back to the first noted observations of rocking motion. Rocking motion was first recorded in Egyptian schools where the students, who sat crosslegged on mats on the floor, would recite passages of the sacred Qur’an while swaying in unison. These practices seemed bizarre to 19th century European travelers. Men from a “modernized” culture

who were accustomed to sitting at desks and reading from textbooks viewed this as a savage practice. Gregory Starrett recalls that Alfred Milner, undersecretary for finance in Egypt during the BritishOccupation, criticized the ritual. Describing it as “an anti-educational process,” he claimed that Egyptian students were memorizing material, not learning it. Yet Sigmund Freud contracted the idea that tying motion with thought in order to recall information was an indication of mental illness. Fast-forwarding, “body rocking” is a behavioral trait that appears in today’s medical dictionaries as a common symptom of autism, mental retardation, and psychological illness. It has since become a stereotypical indicator; people typically assume that a person participating in a body-rocking movement while sitting is mentally or psychologically challenged.

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PAGE 9

On a more positive note, rocking motion has also been coupled with helping to induce sleep in restless infants for centuries in the belief that the movement mimics the slight rocking felt by a fetus in a mother’s womb. It apparently works. In the Aug.15, 2009 issue, Associated Newspapers Limited of London published that infants under the age of six months were able to fall asleep 90 percent faster when sleeping on a rocking cot. Now sway that thought towards sleep-deprived adults. Michael Mulethaler and Sophie Schwartz, neuroscientists at the University of Geneva, mapped the brain waves of adults during a mid-day nap. One half of the volunteers slept on a stable bed, the other half on a slightly oscillating bed. The brain waves that were mapped showed some notable dif-

ferences, but first let us discuss what these waves represent. The first stage of sleep is called the N1 stage, commonly referred to as “light sleep,” which is followed by a much deeper sleep in the N2 stage. The brain activity of the N2 sleep stage is significantly lower than the N1 stage, producing occasional bursts of rapid waves. Located at the center of the brain is the amygdala, an almond-shaped area that plays part in controlling the senses and states of emotion. Mulethaler and Schwartz imply that participants experienced a relaxed feeling during the rocking motion due to vestibular connections with the amygdala. Rocking enlarges the natural brain waves of those napping while in the N2 phase, achieving 50 percent more brain activity during their rest.

The duration of each participant’s nap period, rocking and stationary, did not show any significant difference. Both nap periods averaged about 45 minutes. What was significant was the amount of time that nappers spent in their stages of sleep. It took the non-rockers one full minute longer to fall into stage N1 sleep, and just under 20 minutes to reach N2 sleep- the deep sleep stage. Those who slept on slightly rocking beds fell asleep four minutes faster and transitioned into N2 sleep after only 11 minutes total. These findings have really rocked the boat in terms of stereotypical responses to body swaying, escalating attention to an entire field that was once at a sit-still. I would like to raise your attention to how

See ROCKING page 10

pus Cooking m a C with Molly & Jenna

Pumpkin Spice Pancakes

Servings: 6 Preparation Time: 10 minutes Cooking Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients: 1 1/4 cup flour 1 1/2 tsp baking soda 1 1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp table salt 1 1/4 cup buttermilk 1 cup canned pumpkin, do not use pumpkin pie filling 2 large eggs 3 Tbsp packed brown sugar 1 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted Instructions: 1. In a bowl, mix together flour, baking soda, pumpkin pie spice, cinnamon, and salt. 2. In a second bowl, beat together buttermilk, pumpkin, eggs, sugar, and melted but- ter. 3. Mix the two bowl’s ingredients. 4. Coat a griddle or pan with cooking spray, and heat to medium heat. Spoon 1/4 cup batter for each pancake. 5. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes per side. We made these pancakes for dinner one night when we had some friends over. They were a huge hit, and we think they are a perfect treat for a fall day. Enjoy!


PAGE 10

THE QUAD FEATURES

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Grab campus events by the horns. Scan code to check out WCU Weekly’s Facebook page

Rocking from page 9 rocking motion has recently been applied in medical research. A slight swaying motion while asleep helps the body achieve a deeper sleep mode and requires less amount of time at rest. It is also followed by a quicker recovery, so when the rocking sleeper wakes up he or she feels more alert. In the Aug. 2007 edition of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Dr. Thomas Roth, director of research at the Henry Ford Sleep Disorders and Research Center, estimates that 30 percent of adults admit to suffering from one or more symptoms of insomnia. Engaging in rocking motion to get to sleep and stay asleep can serve as an alternative to a pharmaceutical remedy for such individuals. Perhaps

this is the reason why four mattress manufacturers have already initiated contact with the neuroscientists from the University of Geneva. Moreover, the waves that were mapped during rockers’ N2 phase of sleep have in the past been correlated with an active memory: These brain waves show an increased ability to recall recent events. Nancy Shrute, reporter for the National Public Radio health blog, notes that these same brain waves have also been recognized as signs of brain plasticity. This is the brain’s ability to rewire itself, or recognize neural pathways based on new experiences, an ability that would be phenomenal in post-stroke recovery therapy. Even the back and forth rocking motion produced by sitting in a rocking chair has

proven worthy in its ability to reduce post-surgery discomfort. Post-surgery patients, interviewed by Dr. Massey in the 2010 issue of Journal of Applied Nursing Research, were to rock for a total of 60 minutes per day after their surgery. Those who engaged in the rocking described having alleviated symptoms and also required less pain medicine than those who did not rock. When Alfred Monapert derided his rocking horse experience, he was clearly underestimating the ride. With all of these amazing new studies being conducted in the past years, it seems that Freud and his fellow 19th century Europeans were more than a little hasty in their criticism of Egyptian “savage rocking.” Rocking is stereotypically viewed today as the trait of a person

suffering from a mental or psychological illness when in fact, it is a motion that we all can mentally, psychologically, and physically benefit from. The intrinsic value of the rocking motion is anything but basic; it can serve as a resolution to sleep deprivation, as well as replace pharmaceutical attempts, improve people’s ability to recall information, and even serve as a therapeutic treatment for numerous physical disabilities. Perhaps we have all graduated from the days of playing on rocking horses, most of us unscathed, but the pleasure we derived from those rides to nowhere operate at a level that is much deeper than mere child’s play. Kelly Ratka is a West Chester University student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at KR676071@wcupa.edu.

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NOVEMBER 5, 2012

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Entertainment QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

McTeigue’s “The Raven” a great homage to Poe’s literary genius Kenny Ayres Editor-in-Chief

A

lthough James McTeigue’s film “The Raven” hit theatres last summer, I found it appropriate to review the macabre tale as it was just released on DVD in time for Halloween last week. “The Raven” stars John Cusack as Edgar Allen Poe, the mysterious 19th century American writer famous for his chilling poems and short stories. Cusack, in my opinion, plays Poe as wonderfully as anyone could. He captures his egotism but at the same time, shows Poe as a sincere, grief-stricken man whose life experiences have inspired his writing. “The Raven” takes place in Maryland in 1849, just days before Edgar Allen Poe dies of an unknown cause, but when it begins, he is perfectly healthy. A string of strange murders has been gripping the town, and they are all too familiar to Detective Emmett Fields (Luke Evans) of the Baltimore Police. The gruesome murders mirror Poe’s most famous stories—a woman dead in a seemingly locked room (“The Murders in the Rue Morgue”), and the gory tale of a man being cut by a lowering pendulum blade (“The Pit and the

historically accurate fiction, this movie does an incredible job showing the desperation of Poe while searching for his love. I will not say how the end comes about—that is for you to watch and find out—howwww.slate.com ever, I will say that the end is exactly how it was in real life. Edgar Allen Poe is found wandering the streets of Baltimore, dazed and repeating the name “Reynolds.” He died shortly after, and nobody knows why. Perhaps the real circumstances of Poe’s life, and cerJohn Cusack plays Poe in “The Raven.” tainly his death, are what really yet very innocuous, sto- drove this film. Poe was ries have caused someone such a curious character to act in violence. The with a mysterious life and police enlist Poe’s help death, which made it easy to catch the killer, as he to make a fiction movie knows better than anyone while staying incredibly what the he might be up historically accurate. If the historical context to next. The film takes Poe and and accuracy of the facts, the police around Bal- costumes and props was timore in search of the not the best thing about killer and one of his kid- this movie, it was a close napped victims—Poe’s second to the mystique fiancée, Emily Hamilton and gore surrounding (Alice Eve.) Hamilton is Poe’s literature. The vioa beautiful young blonde lence, though fairly limwoman who has just ited, was just as Poe made agreed to marry Poe, and it in his works, gory and gives him a very personal chilling. The use of gore incentive to find the kill- was absolutely necessary er. It is well documented in a film like this, and the that the real Edgar Allen filmmakers did a great job Poe lost almost everybody of not overusing those that cared for him and See RAVEN page 15 he cared about, and as a Pendulum”). When Fields confronts Poe, it is obvious that he is not the one committing the vicious murders. In fact, he is shocked and horrified that his dark,

PAGE 11

Follow the Quad on Twitter! @TheQuadWCU

Tweets of the week

Brad Loekle @BradLoekle

Remember that a lot of times you can use banking points, airline miles, loyalty rewards, etc to donate 2 charities helping in #sandy relief

Doug Benson @DougBenson I forgot that Haley Joel Osment was in FORREST GUMP. Just yelled at the tv, “Forrest Gump Jr. can see dead people!” #HAF

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PAGE 12

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PAGE 14

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Famous people born this month: Rachel McAdams Joshua Shapiro Staff Writer

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erhaps most recognized for her role in the romantic drama, “The Notebook,” back in 2004, Rachel McAdams has quietly established herself as one of Hollywood’s most sought-out stars. In fact, her popularity became too much for her only two years after “The Notebook.” This fact is understandable, as her presence seems to light up every scene that she is in. Rachel Anne McAdams is the first of three children born to Sandra and Daniel McAdams on Nov. 17, 1978 in London, Ontario. McAdams caught the acting bug by the age of seven, but her initial interest was in figure skating. At the age of nine, she had an opportunity to live in Toronto for more inten-

sive pairs training, but by that time, she had already refocused on acting. McAdams later reflected that figure skating provided her with performance experience and the physical conditioning needed for acting. In 1997, McAdams enrolled in a four-year theatre program at York University and graduated in 2001 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts honors degree. Later, in 2001, her first feature film, “My Name is Tanino,” was shot in Italy and the flight there was her first time on an airplane. Her breakout role did not come until three years later on the set with Lindsey Lohan in “Mean Girls.” Her convincing portrayal as the “queen bee” Regina George made her an instant fan-favorite. Her role in “Mean Girls,”

www.fanpop.com

in combination with her role as Allie in “The Notebook,” also filmed in 2004, made for a monumental break-out year. McAdams appeared in three movies in 2005 (“Red Eye,” “Wedding Crashers,” and “The Family Stone”) before she withdrew from the acting scene in 2006 to focus on her family and evade the media frenzy surrounding her. While on hiatus, she turned down roles in blockbuster titles “Casino Royale” and “Mission: Impossible III.” McAdams’ return came in 2008 when she appeared as Kay in the film noir “Married Life,” sharing the spotlight with Pierce Brosnan and Chris Cooper. Most recently, she has appeared in “The Vow” alongside Channing Tatum and “To The Wonder,” both of which

are romantic dramas. McAdams currently resides in the Harbord Village neighborhood of Toronto and has admitted, “I never thought I’d say this, but I actually miss L.A. when I’m not there.”

any bus driver… the airplane… It’s just a much more dramatic sort of way to present the issue.” On getting his “big break” into the movie industry: “It wasn’t just one big break… the thing that was the key moment… you have to write, that I would say is the most specific and important calling card.” Zemeckis is actually a registered pilot himself. His experience helped him lend a sense of authenticity to “Flight” that otherwise, he implies, the movie would not have had. During the round table interview, he also praised Washington’s talent and work ethic, and revealed that he is very particular about the relevance of camera angles to the movie and characters involved. In addition, he stated that a screenplay

should “dictate everything” about the movie’s format. Overall, the interview process went smoothly, and I appreciated the fact that Zemeckis did not act like he was above anyone. He genuinely enjoyed listening to and answering all of our questions. I had read about “Flight” and watched the official trailer, finding the movie interesting from the outset. However, I did not know beforehand that there had been a screening of “Flight” in New York City on Oct. 14. Having said that, as of Friday, Nov. 2, “Flight” is in theaters everywhere. The movie features Washington, Don Cheadle, and John Goodman, among others.

Joshua Shapiro is a second-year student majoring in both English and education. He can be reached at JS762110@wcupa.edu.

Scan the QR code to read about and watch clips of one of McAdam’s most famous movies, “The Notebook.”

Robert Zemeckis talks with WCU student

Chike Ezeife Special to The Quad

The questions asked by the round table were diverse indeed, ranging n Saturday, Oct. from inquiries about the 27, I had the rare time period opportuwww.foxnews.com “Flight” was nity to interview inspired by, movie director to what disRobert Zemtinguished eckis, who anDenzel Washswered questions ington as an about his new actor, to how movie, “Flight,” involving a alongside five screenplay other people in a should be. Inround table setterestingly ting. He came enough, the to the seventh movie was floor of the Four shot on a limSeasons Hotel in ited budget Center City to ($31 million answer questions according to about his latest the Los Angemovie,“Flight.” les Times) and As I had never involved, done anything Denzel Washington stars in Zemeckis’ latest film “Flight,” it according to quite like this which premieres everywhere on Friday, Oct. 14. Zemeckis, an before, I was “anti-hero” understandably very nervous throughout whole interview was just concept, which was popular in the 1970s. An antithe interview Zemeckis over 20 minutes long.

O

took the time to answer all of our questions, and because he gave honest, yet concise answers, the

hero is a protagonist who does not possess the typical traits of a hero, and has obvious moral shortcomings, yet is not evil. I prepared eight questions for this round table interview, three of which I actually asked. Below are some quotes from Zemeckis when answering my questions: Regarding the memorability of this movie compared to others, including the Back to the Future trilogy and Academy Award winning Forrest Gump: “Making movies is a job… so some moments of the movie are more memorable than others; and some things you don’t remember at all.” Concerning recent high profile airplane crashes, and whether they were relevant to the movie and its timing: “He (the protagonist) could have been

Chike Ezeife is a fourth-year student majoring in Professional Studies. He can be reached at CE635470@ wcupa.edu.


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NOVEMBER 5, 2012 RAVEN from page 11 types of scenes. What also helped make this film stand out was the cleverness of Poe in solving the murders. It was almost reminiscent of the way Sherlock Holmes solved crimes, by deduction and keen observation. In terms of criticism, the only noticeable detriment to the film was the time between action. When there was no murder, advancement in the case, or puzzle being solved, the movie became quite slow, and when you almost would think it was going to halt, it would pick up again. It never really allowed much anticipation to build up until near the end. It was not a terribly long movie, just under two hours, but at times it felt like it had been on for quite a while. And, although I admit this may be trivial, it

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lacked physical altercations. Poe did not engage in any fights, which in a film like this is generally expected, despite whether or not it fit his character perfectly. Drawing reference to the Sherlock Holmes movies again, Holmes’ character does this occasionally and it makes for a more exciting movie. Even though Holmes is not often seen fighting in Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories, a little bit of action on his part was still realistic, and the same should have been done with Poe. So if you have a yearning for a film that is churning with excitement and with gore,watch “The Raven,” I give it four—only this and nothing more.

Kenny Ayres is a thirdyear student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at KA739433@wcupa.edu.

PAGE 15

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THE QUAD

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NOVEMBER 5, 2012 by Harry Bliss


Written by Brian Tracey / Drawn by Tyler Mertens

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

THE QUAD

PAGE 17

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SERVICES ARRESTED 4 DUI/ DWI? UNDERAGE DRINKING OR DUI? Call the FitzPatrick Law Group, LLC 610-4008766 40 Driver’s needs 41 Opera house section 44 Result of too much suds? 47 Green shade 49 Fleshy-leaved plant 50 The BBC’s “Pinwright’s Progress” is reportedly the first TV one 51 Crazy way to run 54 Band that sang “The StarSpangled Banner” a cappella at the 2000 World Series 55 “Came up short” 56 Pushes 57 Friends 58 Handling the problem 59 Author’s inspiration 60 Lady of pop 63 Icy comment 64 Leaves in hot water 65 Dungeons & Dragons foe Solution

to last week’s puzzle


Page 18

Sports

THE QUAD SPORTS

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

West Chester falls to Slippery Rock in PSAC semifinals Joey Samuel Sports Editor

W

est Chester’s defense fell apart with six minutes remaining in a PSAC semifinal game against Slippery Rock, and The Rock’s Stephen Donnelly took advantage by scoring a late winner that eliminated the Golden Rams men’s soccer team from the playoffs. After an astonishing end to the regular season in which West Chester won its last five games in a row, expectations had

grown for the team as they entered the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference playoffs. The Rams had climbed all the way up to second in the league standings, which allowed them to skip the quarterfinal round and travel directly to the campus of Mercyhurst University, where the final four for men’s soccer was being held. It was the team’s first trip to the playoffs since 2007, and they wanted to keep the winning streak going in order to earn a spot in the NCAA Tournament. “Executing in the fi-

nal third, offensively, is something we have been talking a lot about,” coach Dan DeMasters told the university’s athletic website. “We give them a basic structure to work off of and just let them have fun and create off of that structure up front. We don’t want them to be tense.” But despite DeMasters’ advice, the team struggled to score during its semifinal match against Slippery Rock. Both teams created chances throughout the first half, but the goalkeepers played extremely well. The Rock’s Clayton

Interested in writing for the Sports section of The Quad? We are in need of writers for several winter sports. Email us at quadsports@wcupa.edu if you are interested in writing for us!

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Master made two saves while WCU’s Garrett Bleiler made three saves in the first 45 minutes. The Rams’ Cameron Scott came close to scoring with a header in the 33rd minute, but Master was there to save it. The second half saw much of the same, at least until the very end. Master and Bleiler each came up with two more saves, and the game seemed to be heading to overtime at 0-0. That all changed in the 84th minute, when a mishap by Bleiler led to a goal for Slippery Rock. Deep in West Chester territory, Donnelly stole the ball from Bleiler, and easily kicked the ball into the open net to give The Rock a valuable 1-0 lead. Neil Gallagher and Taylor Eisenhauer each came close to a late equalizer for the Golden Rams, but Master was there to save each attempt on goal. Slippery Rock held on for the last few minutes to seal a victory and a place in Sunday’s PSAC Championship game, where they

will face host Mercyhurst. The loss brought an end to a highly successful season for West Chester. After ending the season with an 8-8-2 record, it is not likely that the team will earn an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament; the Rams only would have made it had they won the PSAC. Nevertheless, the players can keep their heads held high after a solid season that saw them earn their highest win total since 2008 and their first playoff berth since 2007. Just a year ago, the team failed to win a single PSAC game, but this year the Rams finished 6-2-1 in the conference. A number of important seniors will depart the team, including goalkeepers Bleiler and Kevin Marron, defenders Eisenhauer, Andrew Solimeo and Brett Snyder, and midfielders Gallagher, Jake Maxwell, and Peter Mais. But many key contributors to the team will remain. Forward Conor Malarney will be back next year, along with a

trio of current sophomore midfielders in Tommy Ryan, Christian Benner, and Roberto Silva. Last week’s Quad Athlete of the Week Kevin McCann will return as well. And this year’s crop of freshmen, including Alex Badulak and Alex Caplan, will surely be top players for years to come. It remains unclear if suspended head coach Kendall Walkes will return to the sidelines next season. One final note: after the loss to Slippery Rock, Snyder, who is a senior defender and criminal justice major, was named this year’s PSAC Champion Scholar for men’s soccer. Snyder has a 3.90 GPA, the highest of any player competing in the PSAC semifinals. He becomes the second WCU athlete to earn the honor; last year, women’s basketball player Meghan Kerrigan won the award, as well. Joey Samuel is a fourth-year student majoring in political science and Spanish. He can be reached at JS719745@wcupa.edu.

Flyers Update with Sean Bobbie

With the lockout in full swing, Flyers prospects have taken to the Adirondack Phantoms. Seven of this year’s Phantoms spent time with the Flyers last year, notably Braydon Schenn, Sean Couturier, Zac Rinaldo, Erik Gustafsson, and Marc-Andre Bourdon. Schenn has taken charge of the Phantoms offensively, leading the team in goals (four) and assists (seven) during the first nine games of the season. The 19-year-old Couturier trails Schenn closely with two goals and eight assists of his own after notching a three-point night in the Phantoms most recent game, a 4-0 win over Albany. Gustafsson has had a good offensive year thus far, but also has a team worst minus-six rating. Bourdon has missed two games with small time injury but remains a solid part of the team’s defensive corps and leading the team with 27 penalty minutes. Most encouraging is grinder Zac Rinaldo’s turn around. He is playing a more disciplined game while retaining his edge. With the exception of one off night, taking three minors, Rinaldo has lived up to his promise and has not taken a single penalty in the other eight games this year. The Phantoms’ record stands at 4-5 as they move on to play rivals Rochester and Albany this weekend.

Gold


NOVEMBER 5, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

Golden Rams downed by No. 13 Bloomsburg

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By Riley Wallace Staff Writer

he Golden Rams come up just short on the road against perennial PSAC East contender Bloomsburg, losing 24-23 Saturday afternoon. With their playoff hopes on the line Saturday, West Chester (6-4) traveled to No. 13 ranked Bloomsburg (9-1) and gave the Huskies everything that they could handle. Bloomsburg never trailed in the game, but West Chester never let them get too far out in front. Twice they managed to stretch the lead to 11 but the Rams answered right back to pull back to within one possession. The Huskies got things started off when running back Dai’Shon Munger broke off a 30 yard run to cap off Bloomsburg’s first drive of the game and put them in front 7-0. On West Chester’s first drive, they went 51 yards in 11 plays as they methodically worked their way down the field, coming away with a Shawn Leo 35 yard field goal to make it 7-3. With the field goal, it was Leo’s 31st career field goal passing former kicker John Marotta for the school record. The No. 13 team in the country answered right back with seven more, this time they struck again using a big run by Franklyn Quiteh who ran for 31 yards to make the score 14-3 with three minutes remaining in the opening quarter. In the second quarter, the teams continued to exchange scores, as running back Rondell White pulled in a six yard pass from Mike Mattei to pull the Rams within four, 14-10. Bloomsburg came back with under six minutes to go in the half with a 33 yard field goal

to push the lead back to seven. The Golden Rams continued having success moving the ball on the Huskies defense, this time going 78 yards over 11 plays and kicking another Leo field goal, this time from 23 yards out as time expired to go into the locker rooms down 17-13. In the second half, Bloomsburg struck first as they scored on a 28 yard pass with just under nine minutes to go in the third quarter. With the score 24-13, the Golden Rams defense stiffened up as they didn’t allow another point during the last 23 minutes of the game, but an 11-point deficit would prove difficult to overcome during that time. On West Chester’s very next drive they took it 35 yards, but once again they could not find the endzone as they settled for Leo’s third field goal of the game, this time from 30 yards. Following a dismal punt of only 13 yards by Bloomsburg, the Rams didn’t waste any time taking advantage of their great field position, starting from the Bloomsburg 41-yard line. Two plays later White was standing in the endzone after taking the hand-off and going 41 yards for the score. With two and half minutes remaining in the third quarter, Coach Bill Zwaan elected to kick the extra point and pull the Rams within one, 24-23 instead of going for the tie. With still over a quarter to play, neither team thought that kick would be the last points scored in the game. In the fourth quarter, the Golden Rams squandered a few opportunities losing two fumbles, including one at the Bloomsburg 12-yard line. The inability to capitalize on red-zone opportunities

with six points really hurt the Golden Rams as their upset bid fell short 24-23. White had another spectacular game on the ground as he carried the ball 30 times for 211 yards and a touchdown. White needs 218 yards rushing next week versus Clarion to tie Mike Eckmeyer for the single-season school record of 1,539 yards. White currently is ranked seventh nationally in allpurpose yards, averaging about 183 yards per game. Despite Bloomsburg rushing the ball 18 more times than West Chester, they only gained 31 more yards on the ground. Mattei had himself another solid day posting very respectable numbers while taking care of the ball. He completed 19 of his 32 passes for 197 yards and a touchdown. White led the receiving corps as well piling up 94 yards on nine catches and another touchdown. Captain Carl Barnes led the Golden Rams on the defensive side of the ball, making 11 totals tackles, 5 solo tackles and 6 assisted tackles. Linebacker Ronell Williams, who leads the PSAC in total tackles and is sixth nationally, was second on the team in tackles,

recording nine total tackles. Three of those tackles were solo tackles with six being assisted tackles. He also had one tackle for a loss. The Golden Rams did convert on four of their five red-zone trips but three of those resulted in field goals rather than touchdowns. West Chester did out-gain the Huskies 422-340 but with Blommsburg’s offense centered around the running game, they held the advantage in time of possession by over four minutes. Next weekend, West Chester will conclude their 2012 campaign by traveling to PSAC West foe, Clarion (4-6). The Golden Eagles are coming off two blow-out losses to IUP 45-0 and to Edinboro 48-13. With last week’s victory over lowly Cheyney, the Golden Rams have clinched a winning season, but really needed to beat Bloomsburg as well as Clarion next week in order to have any hopes of making the playoffs this season. Kickoff will be at 1 p.m. Riley Wallace is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at RW718681@wcupa.edu.

Page 19

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West Chester running back Rondell White looks on as quarterback Mike Mattei receives a snap.

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Page 20

THE QUAD SPORTS

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Volleyball team wins pair of matches vs. Kutztown, Cheyney By Joshua Shapiro Staff Writer

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ith only one week left in the regular season, the West Chester women’s volleyball team is well aware that their last two matches will be a pivotal factor in deciding what team they will face in the opening round of the playoffs. As of right now, they hold the No. 3 seed in the PSAC East. First-place Lock Haven (13-3 vs. conference opp.) and secondplace Shippensburg (11-5 vs. conference opp.) are both miles ahead of the pack, and will undoubtedly finish as the top two seeds. However, Millersville, currently the No. 4 seed, has posted an almost identical conference record (6-10) as West Chester and serve as the most serious threat to the No. 3 seeded Rams. This weekend’s action

was a great indication of the high-level of confidence the girls seem to have going into every match. They were able to notch wins in both contests, the first of which coming against a solid Kutztown squad on Saturday in Hollinger Field House. After coming up short in a hard-fought battle with the Golden Bears earlier in the season, it was the Rams’ turn to come out on top. The match began with Kutztown taking the first set (25-17) as West Chester was self-destructive on offense, ending the set with a .000 attacking percentage (7 kills, 7 errors). Luckily, the Rams got their mistakes out early and were able to find their stroke in the second set, posting a .279 attacking percentage for 25-21 victory. The next two sets finished in similar fashion (25-20, 25-16) with West Chester simply outgun-

ning Kutztown in a highly offensive showcase. Outside hitter Lexi Kegerise hammered the defense all day, leading the team with 15 kills, 43 total attempts, and two block assists. Julia O’Brien, who had 13 kills and three block assists in the match, was instrumental in sustaining such a high level of offensive pressure through the last three sets. Freshman setters Tori Hutchinson and Mandy Flynn were called upon after sophomore setter Mary Faust went down with a sprained ankle early in the first set. Hutchinson posted a season high 27 assists and Flynn contributed with 20 of her own. Defensively, Morgan Litak (17 kills), Kegerise (15 kills), and Dana Markol (12) succeeded in shutting down a persistent Kutztown offense to secure the victory.

“It was a big win that should get us into the playoffs. We will finish either third or fourth but it looks like we are in!” said an enthusiastic Coach Bellaver after the game. Sunday’s match with Cheyney proved to be not much of a test at all. Cheyney, winless all season (0-27), have had the majority of their troubles on offense. As a group, the Wolves have only registered 317 kills compared to the 957 kills by the opposition. In fact, Cheyney has committed more attacking errors (424) than kills through 27 games played. The Rams, who have already defeated the Wolves once this year, made it a short visit to Philadelphia, snatching the win in the minimum three sets (25-9, 25-13, 2511). Kelly Martin had an excellent day on offense finishing eight out of 10

attempts and committing only one error for a .700 attacking percentage. She also had a block solo, six assists, and a dig to cap to it off. Kegerise added 14 kills to her total on the season, and Allison Grammer chipped-in with another five. Tori Hutchinson led the Rams in assists for the second straight game (nine), in addition to six digs. Junior libero Tyler Sheafer dominated the back line, posting 12 digs and 8 service aces in the win. With wins in both games this weekend, the Rams are now at 17-15 (7-10 vs. conference opponents) on the year, with just two regular season games left to play. In preparation for the important matches that lie ahead, Coach Kassie Bellaver continues to stress the importance of communication and energy on the court. “They are probably the

two most important factors of the game. If we communicate well and feed off of each other’s energy, that is when we play our best volleyball,” junior hitter Grammer said. The girls will certainly need to play their best volleyball next weekend, as they are scheduled to close out the 2012 season with two home matches against Millersville and Shippensburg. Millersville will be looking to avenge the five-set defeat they suffered the last time the two sides met while reclaiming the third spot in the PSAC East in the process. Shippensburg on the other hand, would like nothing more than a disheartening victory over a West Chester team that could pose a serious threat to their postseason success. Joshua Shapiro is a second-year student majoring in English and education. He can be reached at JS762110@wcupa.edu

Jess Guzzardo/ Photography Editor

Jess Guzzardo/ Photography Editor

Junior right-side hitter Allison Grammer gets up high to attempt a spike during the win over Kutztown. West Chester won the final three sets of the match.

The Golden Rams celebrate after winning a point against Kutztown. West Chester dropped the first set, but came back to beat Kutztown in four sets.

Wo


NOVEMBER 5, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

Page 21

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Women finish 12th, men 11th at NCAA Cross Country Regionals By Kyle Banta Special to The Quad

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he men and women’s cross country teams met their rivals for the Division II NCAA Cross Country Atlantic Regional Championships at Lock Haven University. The women’s squad placed 12th overall in this 6k run out of 27 teams of 171 runners. This is three places higher than last year’s showing. Amanda Eisman placed 10th in the field, with a time of 21:32.3, which was the fastest time on this course by a West Chester runner in the past nine years. She missed a trip to the national championships by only two places. Brittany Boyer came in finishing 34th, with a time of 22:22.3, the fourth fastest time by a West Ches-

ter Golden Rams in past nine years. Leigh Manning-Smith ran a time of 23:04.5, placing her 66th in the field. Trish Evans finished 24:00.2, giving her a 99th place finish. Mara Kelly’s time was 24:23.5; Amber Key, 24:30.4 and Megan Berberich had a time of 24:31.2. The men’s team had a field of 153 runners in a 10k run. The men placed 11th out of 25 teams, only two points away from 10th place and four places higher than last year’s finish. This was the men’s squad’s highest place finish since 2008. Placing 52nd in the field was Sean Sebeck with a time of 33:09.9, the second-fastest time on this course in nine years. Zack Mussleman’s time of 33:16.0 57th in the field,

making this the third fastest time by a Golden Ram to run this course in the past nine years. Ed Brittingham had a time of 33:33.6 placing him 64th in the field. A running time of 33:43.5 gave Jack Barnett a spot at 70th. Cody Borders ran a time of 33:48.9 right behind Barnett and Jake Siegel’s time of 33.57.0 was the 10th fastest time by a West Chester runner in last nine years. This season was overall a very successful one in improving individual and team performance. With no runners qualifying for the NCAA Championships in two weeks in Missouri, this concludes the 2012 cross country season here at West Chester. Kyle Banta is a third-year student majoring in English. He can be reached at KB683859@wcupa.edu.

wcupagoldenrams.com

The women’s cross country team finished 12th at the NCAA Regionals tournament in Lock Haven, Pa. No runners from West Chester managed to qualify for nationals.


Page 22

THE QUAD SPORTS

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

West Chester advances to national semifinal with win over IUP La By Timothy Mulqueen Staff Writer

A

fter running through the PSAC tournament to be crowned PSAC champs for the first time in school history, the Golden Rams earned the No. 2 seed in the South region of the NCAA national tournament. Despite being No.1 in the nation, Shippensburg was given the No. 1 overall seed over West Chester in the South region. The Rams were not discouraged as they came out Saturday ready to beat whoever stood in their way of defending their National Championship. As the No. 2 seed, West Chester earned home field advantage for the first round of the playoffs, and the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Crimson Hawks had to travel to West Chester for the third time this season. The previous two trips ended in onegoal losses to the Golden Rams, the most recent in the first round of the

PSAC playoffs. Saturday proved the same outcome as the Lady Rams toppled IUP 5-2, earning them a date with Shippensburg in the semifinals of the NCAA tournament on Nov. 9 in Lowell, Massachusetts.

West Chester drew first blood only eight minutes into the game when PSAC tournament MVP Michele Schrift found the back of the net off an assist from Kelsi Lykens. The Crimson Hawks quickly responded with

a goal of their own when Kate Bruce tied it up in the 15th minute. Kelsey Cheek scored off an assist from Kayla Gluchowski giving the lead back to West Chester. Moments later, Cheek tacked on her sec-

Jess Guzzardo/ Photography Editor

West Chester scrambles to clear the ball on defense. The Lady Rams played solid on defense throughout the game, giving up only two goals.

ond goal of the half, this time unassisted, giving the Golden Rams a promising and well-deserved 3-1 lead heading into the locker room. The score remained 3-1 for a majority of the second half until Lykens broke the scoring drought for the Rams as she poured on two more goals within five minutes of each other. The first goal came off a penalty stroke extending the lead to 4-1. In the 67th minute, Lykens added her second goal of the half off an assist from Stef Pirri, solidifying the victory for the Golden Rams and putting a nail in IUP’s season. Kate Bruce was able to add one final goal in the last minute of the game, but it proved worthless as the Rams were well on their way to a hard fought victory. The score ended 5-2 in favor of the host West Chester Golden Rams. “We cannot wait to go back. We have fire in our hearts right now that’s driving us, “ Lykens said about a chance to get back to the National

Championship. West Chester will travel to Lowell, Mass. to take on No. 1 Shippensburg in the semifinals of the National Tournament and it is safe to say Coach Amy Cohen has done everything she can to keep her girls focused and motivated to bring back another trophy. “We’re just really focused on getting a championship back. We knew all year we have been defending the fact that we were the Division II National Champions of last year, but that was last year, that was in the past,” Cohen said. “So right now we have the eye on the prize, which every team that is in the tournament right now is looking forward to that big trophy next weekend. We are really just happy and feel special and fortunate to be at this point in the season where we are able to compete for a national championship.” Timothy Mulqueen is a third-year student majoring in marketing. He can be reached at TM734386@wcupa. edu.

O

Athlete of the Week: Kelsey Cheek wcupagoldenrams.com

With the team so close to a second straight NCAA championship, it is only natural that a field hockey player is the Athlete of the Week. Cheek scored a careerhigh two goals against IUP. The team needs more of the same against Ship on Friday.

Jess Guzzardo/ Photography Editor

West Chester’s Abbey Hordendorf receives a pass during the win over Indiana (Pa.). The win saw West Chester move on to the NCAA semifinals next week.

F


NOVEMBER 5, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

Page 23

Lady Rams upset by Slippery Rock in PSAC quarterfinal By Taylor Maren Staff Writer

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he Golden Rams women’s soccer team (13-4-1) has faced adversity this season, especially as of late against some stiff PSAC competition. As they moved into the PSAC Tournament, they realized their upcoming tests would challenge them more than ever before. A bright spot for the ladies, though, was that they would host playoffs, giving them a great chance to come away with the championship. The team’s first opponent would be a familiar one in Slippery Rock as they narrowly beat out the Rockies a mere few weeks ago in overtime. This time again proved to be a tough matchup as Slippery Rock struck first off the foot of Cailin Con-

nor in the 15th minute. Up one going into halftime, the Rockies would keep the pressure on the Lady Rams as a loose ball would be hammered home in front of the net for Slippery Rock. A common problem for West Chester was breaking down the defense of the Rockies, which seemed impossible until late in the match. West Chester would finally strike in the closing moments of the game with a tap in by Carly Yost, but to no avail for the ladies as they dropped their match 2-1. Each team struggled to find shots as both only tallied three apiece for the entire game, placing most of the pressure on the goalkeepers. Another deterrence for the Golden Rams was the missing of their senior captain and goal scorer, Melissa McK-

eary, who was out with an injury. Though a disappointing loss for the ladies, their season hasn’t finished up just yet as they still await to play in the NCAA Tournament. Prior to playing in the PSAC Tournament, the ladies finished up their season as they traveled to Millersville (5-8-5). Even with their average record, the ladies learned that they cannot take anyone for granted in the PSAC this season. The Marauder’s goalkeeper played her best game as she turned away all 11 of West Chester’s shots that came her way. Couple that along with a 73rd minute goal from Millersville by Megan Kelly sealed the win as West Chester dropped a tough game, 1-0. With that loss, it is the first time that they have been defeated by the Ma-

rauders since 2004 and upset the ladies’ plans to host the final four in the PSAC Tournament. With their early exit in the PSAC Tournament, the ladies must now regroup for the NCAA Tournament, which they will surely get an automatic bid for. Unfortunately, their final loss could harm the chances for West Chester to host the

first round of “pod” games and forces them to win on the road to get through the region. The top two teams in the Atlantic Region host the other two at-large bid teams, so the Golden Rams will have to wait to see where they will be heading for the tournament. No matter who they face though, the game will be held on Friday with the place and

wcupagoldenrams.com

exact time to be unveiled on Monday at 7:30 p.m. To see who and when they will be playing, be sure to watch the selection show or log on to NCAA.com to hear the announcements. Watching this team go through its up’s and down’s, these women have a chance to be even more successful if they can come together as one cohesive unit. Hopefully with the return of Melissa McKeary, West Chester can play up to their potential and make a long run in a season where they have much to be proud of. Remember to go out and support our team, especially our seniors who have played such an important role for the team this season.

Junior forward Brianna Hires looks to bring the ball past a group of defenders. West Chester lost to The Rock by a 2-1 score.

Taylor Maren is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at TM741168@wcupa.edu.

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THE QUAD

The Philadelphia 76ers opened their 2012-13 season on Oct. 31, beating the Denver Nuggets 84-75. In a game against former Sixer Andre Iguodala, Spencer Hawes and Jrue Holiday stepped up to give the Sixers their first season-opening win in six years. However, on Sunday, the 76ers were beaten by the New York Knicks to fall to 1-1. Newly-acquired center Andrew Bynum has yet to debut.

Men’s soccer upset in PSAC semifinals

Sports

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Volleyball tops Kutztown, sweeps Cheyney Page 20

West Chester tops Indiana to advance to NCAA semifinals - Page 22

NOVEMBER 5, 2012

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU


Quad 103-08