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What Are You Falling For This Valentines Day?

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W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. FEBRUARY 13, 2012

V O L UM E 1 0 2 . I S S U E 3

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS

OP-ED

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PAGE 8

FEATURES

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ENT

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SPORTS

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THE QUAD NEWS

Statement on Gov. Corbett’s 2012-13 proposed budget Proposed spending plan would reduce funding to PASSHE universities by 20 percent By Kenn Marshall

Media Relations Manager PASSHE

Harrisburg – The following is a joint statement from Guido Pichini, chair of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education’s Board of Governors, and PASSHE Chancellor John C. Cavanaugh in response to Gov. Tom Corbett’s proposed 2012-13 state budget. The governor’s proposal would reduce funding to PASSHE by 20 percent, or more than $82 million: “The number one priority of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education is the success of our students. We agree with Governor Corbett that the needs of our students come first. “We also agree with the governor that every family in Pennsylvania should be able to afford higher education. That is why we have been very vigilant, not only in keeping our tuition the lowest in the Commonwealth, but also in maintaining the cost of attendance below the average in the mid- Atlantic region.

$170 million in state and federal education and general funding, compounded by a 50 percent reduction in our capital allocation and the loss of Key ‘93 funding dedicated to deferred maintenance. Taken together, these reductions now mean that we must increasingly decide whether to renovate and maintain

“We fully recognize the financial challenges facing the Commonwealth. Governor Corbett was right in saying that education is a key to the state’s financial recovery. That is especially true of our graduates, over 80 percent of whom stay in Pennsylvania for their careers and as community and civic leaders. H o w e v e r, our joint goals are at risk as a result of the budget blueprint for the Commonwealth presented today, which Tom Corbett gives his 2012-2013 budget speech. provides only $2 million more our existing physithan the system re- cal plant or provide ceived 24 years ago in students the courses 1988-89. During that and programs they period we have added require to graduate. “We do our part. We 23,000 students. “The proposed bud- have reduced our opget represents the lat- erating costs by more est in a cascade of re- than $230 million ductions to the State during the past deSystem in the past 18 cade and will continmonths. If this pro- ue to seek additional posal stands, we will efficiencies through have lost more than collaboration. Since

2010, we have over 900 current vacancies and/or eliminated positions throughout the System. We continue to review our academic offerings; we have eliminated or put into moratorium hundreds of programs. “We respond to the C o m m o n w e a l t h ’s needs. Our new programs have focused

News FEBRUARY 13, 2012

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

funds to these efforts without stable funding. “We will continue to look for ways to reduce our costs. Through the cooperation of two of our unions, AFSCME and SPFPA, we have achieved cost savings in our new agreements through the adoption of more flexible work rules and health and benefit savings. We hope to achieve similar cost savings in our ongoing negotiations with our faculty and coaches union, APSCUF, and our SCUPA employees. We need flexibility in what, where, and how we deliver programs and services. It is important to recognize that about http://www.pennlive.com 75 percent of our operating on meeting the needs budget is personnel of the shale indus- costs. try, filling workforce “We appreciate the training gaps in the support of and look Northern Tier of forward to working the Commonwealth, with the General and responding to Assembly and the the growing need for governor during the well-prepared allied upcoming budget health professionals, process. Our budget especially nurses and hearings will provide physician assistants. the opportunity to It will be challenging discuss the successes to continue to devote we have had in cost

control and reduction, as well as the impact of the proposed cuts. “We are also very pleased to participate in the Governor’s Higher Education Advisory Panel. The need for a true comprehensive strategic plan for higher education in the Commonwealth is great. We look forward to that conversation, and to charting PASSHE’s future.” The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education is the largest provider of higher education in the Commonwealth, with nearly 120,000 students. The 14 PASSHE universities offer degree and certificate programs in more than 120 areas of study. About 500,000 PASSHE alumni live and work in Pennsylvania. The state-owned universities are Bloomsburg, California, Cheyney, Clarion, East Stroudsburg, Edinboro, Indiana, Kutztown, Lock Haven, Mansfield, Millersville, Shippensburg, Slippery Rock and West Chester Universities of Pennsylvania. PASSHE also operates branch campuses in Clearfield, Freeport, Oil City and Punxsutawney and several regional centers, including the Dixon University Center in Harrisburg.


THE QUAD NEWS

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

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Recreation Center committee starts up again this semester By Angela Thomas News Editor

On Feb. 9, the Recreation Center Committee met once again to discuss the on-goings of the process of bringing the Student Recreation Center together. Students representing organizations on campus such as the Black Student Union, Latino American Student Organization, Student Government Association, Sykes Advisory Board, Resident Hall Association, Off-Campus and Commuter Association and more, came together to discuss the Recreation Center, which will be opening in the fall 2012 semester. As many students

might notice, the building is coming together very quickly. What was once a skeleton of a building is now becoming something more full. Exterior finishes are being installed as well as windows and heating. Dee Giardina, Executive Direction of Facilities Design and Construction, encourages students to watch the virtual tour on the Recreation Center’s website in order to get a full understanding of what the building will eventually look like from both the exterior and interior. A big discussion focus was the Climbing Wall. The Climbing Wall is a rock climbing wall that allows students to rock climb depending on

different skill levels. “The Climbing Wall stares you right in the face,” Steve Domenick, Project Manager, Department of Facilities Design and Construction, said. Domenick showed students an example of what the wall will be made of. The Climbing Wall will be seen from many points of the building and will extend to the top of ceiling. “We had a really good choice in flavors,” Domenick said about the selection of companies to go with to build the wall. The Wellness Wall will also be a very big feature in the center. “It will be a very unique wall in the building,” Diane DeVestern, Assistant Vice

President for Student Affairs, said. The Wellness Wall will span two floors and will be located behind the snack bar area. Students were given a survey to pick five inspirational words they would want on the Wellness Wall. “In order to be well in health, we must be environmentally well,” Mina Lele, Senior Interior Designer, Department of Facilities Design and Construction, said. “[The Wellness Wall] will represent wellness surrounding us.” Panels used for the Wellness Wall are made from all-natural materials. “It will be a really beautiful space. When working out, it will create a beautiful

focus,” Lele said. The center will also feature a bigger and better fitness center. The fitness center will be approximately 12,000 sq.ft. “Students wanted more cardio,” Steve Gambino, Director of Campus Recreation said, referencing a survey that was sent around to students asking what type of fitness equipment they would want. The fitness center will include 20 elipticals and 20 treadmills as well as free weights and more benches. “We did our homework and the equipment is top of the line,” Gambino said. The fitness center will also include three studios

for group fitness and spinning equipment. A student representative from the Sykes Advisory Board asked how the staff of the center will handle the influx of students wanting to participate in the Climbing Wall. Talk of creating scheduling blocks, much like the ones currently in the Sykes Fitness Center, was discussed. The building will also have a brand new feature outside on the patio. The Student Government Association Senate donation for $4,000 was passed and the money will go towards a bronzed statue of a ram. The ram will be See RECREATION on page 6


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THE QUAD NEWS

Update on Governor Corbett’s Proposed Budget for PASSHE By Greg Weisenstein President of WCU

As you may have heard, Governor Corbett has proposed a 20 percent reduction in funding for the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education in the 2012-13 state budget. For WCU, the impact of this cut would amount to approximately $9.5 million. Be assured that I will continue to provide you with updates as additional information becomes available. In the meantime, please know that the budget process has a number of steps and, as the Chancellor notes, we intend to tell our story.

West Chester felon charged in killing of Philly man By Kathleen Brady Shea The Philadelphia Inquirer MCT Campus

wcupa.edu

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

Feb. 12--A second excon was taken into custody early Saturday, accused of spraying bullets in a West Chester neighborhood last month that killed a 23-year-old Philadelphia man. Gregory C. Arrington, 21, of West Chester, was charged with first-degree murder, attempted murder, conspiracy, firearms violations, and related offenses in connection with the fatal shooting of Towayne Uqdah, Chester County First Assistant District Attorney Michael G. Noone said. Police said Uqdah was shot nine times in a neighborhood near the borough’s business district at North Matlack and Chestnut Streets

about 2 a.m. on Jan. 27. Two companions with him were not injured, but a round went through the coat of one and another bullet went through a window of a home where a couple was sleeping, police said. Arrington’s alleged coconspirator, James J.E. Potts Jr., 28, who listed residences in West Chester, Downingtown, and Philadelphia, was taken into custody Jan. 31. A witness told police that Potts and Arrington discussed the killing afterward and that Arrington said he “shot his gun multiple times at all three subjects until it was empty,” according to a criminal complaint filed in Arrington’s arrest. Police said both defendants were prohibited from owning guns be-

cause of previous convictions. Prosecutors said Potts had been convicted of drug dealing, escape, assault, and resisting arrest. Arrington was still on probation for a July 2009 robbery conviction, according to court records. Uqdah’s court records show convictions for theft and drug offenses. West Chester Police Chief Scott L. Bohn said the investigation continues. Anyone with additional information should contact West Chester police at 610696-2700. Contact staff writer Kathleen Brady Shea at 610-696-3815, kbrady@ phillynews.com, or @ brandywinebits on Twitter. Read her blog, “Chester County Inbox,” at www.philly.com/chescoinbox.

Interested in writing for the News Section? Want an event covered on campus? E-mail Quadnews@ wcupa.edu.

Snowy with a chance of love.


FEBRUARY 13, 2012

THE QUAD NEWS

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WCU Professor’s struggle ends, wife wins appeal one to seven year sentence. Now she no longer has to report to her parole officer. Anne L. Clyburn, Stretton representformer CEO of a cred- ed Anne at her appeal it union, has won her hearing on Sept. 13, appeal, overturning 2011, in which he arher conviction of theft gued that Anne was related charges. Her not advised of her husband, Stephan, right to counsel, nor a professor at West did the trial judge adChester University vise her of her right has maintained high to testify. Stretton evaluations prior to argued she did not her arrest and con- voluntary waive her tinued through her rights to have a lawappeal. yer present at her Written in the Opin- trial. He said Judge ion, the three judge William R. Carpenter panel found the Dis- did state on the retrict Attorney’s of- cord that Anne gave fice failed to fully ex- up her right to counplain the elements of cil, however the judge the charges against never said, on the Anne. The trial judge record, that it was “failed to conduct a a competent underthorough, on-the-re- standing. cord colloquy before The Commonwealth allowing a defendant of Pennsylvania Apto proceed to trial pellee disputed this pro se constitutes a with an explanation reversible error” as that the trial judge listed in the Opinion. advised Anne against “We vacate the judg- representing herment of sentence and self, however it was remand the matter not transcribed at for a new trial,” the the time. Noted in Opinion stated in its the Opinion, when conclusion. a defendant waives Anne received a the right to counsel, phone call from her the judge must aslatest lawyer, Sam sert this “on the reStretton, with the cord, whether this news of her appeal. is a knowing, volunOriginally accused of tary, and intelligent stealing over $32,000 waiver of counsel.” while she worked for The Appellee agreed six and a half years Anne may have not as a Chief Execu- understood the whole tive Officer at United process of the trial, Food and Commer- but they argued she cial Workers Local understood waiving 1776 Federal Credit of her rights. The ApUnion, Anne is legal- pellee deemed her as ly free with a clean a sophisticated busirecord. Convicted in ness woman. July 2010, she served “I’ve seen students nine months of her submit papers longer By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief

than this and with better arguments,” Stephan later said in regards to the report the D. A. office presented in the appeal process. During the appeal last September, one of the Superior Court judges asked Stretton about Judge Carpenter’s hostility towards Anne, who threatened her with contempt of court several times during her three day trial by jury in a Montgomery County courtroom. Stretton could not give a reason for this, while the Appellee did not address the matter. The panel of judges reviewed the record of the trial and indicated the Assistant Dis-

The couple described themselves as emotionally exhausted after all the time that passed from Anne’s arrest in 2008 to her winning the appeal. To bring Anne to a new trial, the District Attorney’s office has 30 days from the appeal date to decide if they will attempt to prosecute her. The D.A. told reporters it is likely they will take Anne to court again. If they do attempt to prosecute her, they will have 365 days from then to bring her back to the courts. The claim for reistition has exceeded the deadline for the creditors to submit, the couple said. Recently the couple claimed

“My wife is everything to me . . .” Stephan reflected on the days his wife spent in prison, “There (were) some days I couldn’t go on.” trict Attorney failed to explain the elements of the charges against the defendant as necessary when a defendant waives their right to counsel. The Opinion continued to list how the trial court failed to follow procedures involving the waiver of counsel, and therefore ruled to “agree with the Appellant that her waiver of trial counsel was not knowing, voluntarily, and intelligent.”

bankruptcy after the trial and costs “financially ruined” their credit. While they filed, they discovered they were not held legally responsible to pay back the $32,469 that lead to her spending time in both a maximum and minimum-security prison. At her January 2011 parole hearing, Anne said no creditor or administrator from the credit union spoke against her. No

representatives from the D. A. office spoke against her either. “They can’t gain anything from this,” Anne explained by saying she’s already served time and the creditors cannot claim the restitution. “ . . . I have a confident lawyer this time.” With the news to remand for a new trial, Stephan said he is grateful, to which Anne added that she feels blessed. The Superior Court Treatment of Cases from Courts of Common Pleases in 2011, according to www.superior.court.state.pa.us, the Opinion had reversed the ruling of 13% of cases they viewed. Several students and faculty gave him the benefit of the doubt, Stephan said, when they wanted to hear more about his wife’s case. Some staff members of WCU, eager to help, attempted to raise money for their defense and other costs. Others from Higher Education, he said, read the newspapers and assumed Anne’s guilt. The Clyburns were familiar with not always having support as Anne’s family stopped talking to her 25 years ago, about two years before she married Stephan. His evaluations remained high while his acknowledgment of the past few years as he found it “hard to

concentrate on teaching” with his wife’s daily incarceration mixed with violent offenders. As a political science professor, he said it’s hard to teach about a legal system that he knows has flaws. “I spent nine months in (prison), what more do they want?” Anne asked rhetorically. Saying she remembers her days behind bars, Anne said she wrote daily entries in a journal about an “eye opening experience.” Since she returned home with her property, she hid the journal in the garage and hasn’t looked at it since. Separated during her prison sentence, the couple resorted to phone calls every 48 hours by reservation, one-way e-mails and letters. Anne felt concerned for how her husband managed to hold up during the time he described the separation to feel like losing a body part. This “steadfast commitment” started five years ago when Anne lost her job. Love kept the couple going, Stephan said. Despite the outcome of events, she knows he’ll never abandon her, he said, which has been evident as he stayed and defended her from day one. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.


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Recreation from page 3

in the center of the patio and the patio will be similar to the Residential Quad. Earlier in the fall 2011 semester, students were given the chance to sign small tiles that will be put together in a collage with the help of the Department of Art’s chair, John Baker. DeVestern is hoping to incorporate school colors into the collage and hopes to create a look much like Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens Mosaic on South Street. DeVestern also said that next to the collage there will be a plaque of some sort describing the story of how students signed the tiles.

THE QUAD NEWS There have been 125 students involved in the planning of the Recreation Center since 1997. Those alumni involved have been asked to sign a tile and so far, 45 alumni have responded. Students may be wondering what will happen to the space that the Sykes Fitness Center currently occupies. SGA has endorsed for the space to be made into additional meeting spaces for clubs and organizations. To learn more about the center, visit the site at http://www.wcupa. edu/studentrecreationcenter/default.asp Angela Thomas is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at AT683005@ wcupa.edu.

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

New food business offers students late night delivery, unique treats By Elana Beckett Special to The Quad

West Chester Snax, a food delivery company for West Chester University students and surrounding residents, is now available. “We’re a business tailored to students, offering them products they wouldn’t normally be able to get delivered,” co-owner, Ben Seleznow said. WC Snax, strictly a delivery service, is a convenient way for students to get fast food, party supplies, microwave dinners, drinks, salty snacks, and candy without having to leave their buildings. Students can order by phone. Online ordering is not yet available. “We’ve built the business with students in mind,” co-owner, Andy Sharkey, said. Co-owners and West Chester residents,

Seleznow and Sharkey, officially opened WC Snax on Jan. 27. They prepared two months in advance for the opening of their business. They run WC Snax in addition to their full-time jobs. “There was a program like this where I went to school and it was a good idea,” Seleznow said. Although there are a few businesses like this one, WC Snax offers more than its competitors. “A lot of food services close, but our business is open until 3 a.m., so students can just give us a call,” Sharkey said. WC Snax is open Thursdays from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. and Fridays and Saturdays from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. “If people call before or after our hours and ask nicely, we’ll be happy to deliver,” Seleznow said. Delivery costs $5 for fast food and $2 for candy.

Deliveries arrive thirty to forty-five minutes after purchasing. Fast food deliveries may take up to an hour. “Our food prices are generally cheaper than Wawa and, if ordering in a group, delivery prices are only about an extra dollar per person,” Seleznow said. WC Snax provides many food items not normally found on a delivery menu. “No other place offers delivery of Swedish Fish,” Seleznow said. In the future, WC Snax may also be able to offer West Chester students more than just late night deliveries. “We’re a startup business now, but we’re definitely interested in hiring students,” Selezn said. WC Snax will hopefully be able to start hiring later this semester.

“Once we have more people responding to our services, we’ll be looking to hire students,” Sharkey explains. Students will work in the delivery and office departments. In addition to hiring more help, WC Snax may also expand to other places. “Once we grow our business to a certain extent, we will look to branch out to other universities,” Seleznow said. Seleznow and Sharkey are always looking for new ideas and products to help their business. Email them suggestions at wcsnax@gmail.com. To view their business, visit wcsnax.com. WC Snax is also an active member on facebook and twitter. Elana Beckett is a second-year student majoring in English with a minor in creative writing. She can be reached at EB733766@ wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 13, 2012

THE QUAD OP-ED

Opinion & Editorial

Valentine’s is special in any way

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The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 Phone: 610.436.2375 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief QuadEIC@wcupa.edu EDITORIAL BOARD

EDITORIAL STAFF

Angela Thomas News Editor Bill Hanrahan Op-Ed Editor Rebekah Balmer Features Editor Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor Kenny Ayres Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Photography Editor

Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor Jess Guzzardo Asst. Photography Editor

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Ginger Rae Dunbar Business Manager ***Position Available

COPY EDITORS Kelly Adams Bethany Van de Water ***Position Available

DISTRIBUTION Alexis Caporizzo Mike Coia ONLINE EDITION Laura Blyton

My favorite part about Valentine’s Day will always be the chocolate. It’s similar Mike Mills FACULTY ADVISOR Advertising Manager Dr. Philip A. Thompsen to the approach of St. Patrick’s Day, with McDonald’s limited edition of the shamrock milkshakes. You don’t have to have Irish blood to enjoy it and you know every year you can look forward to the sale. It’s the same concept with Valentine’s. Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] I couldn’t imagine couples going to McDonalds for Valentine’s, but I realize not Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes every couple has dinner at the fancy restaurants. I remember I had work one night on Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary Valentine’s. Our main customers that Tuesday night were mostly our usual customers for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address who order the same items. My co-worker and I knew we had an easy night of work, and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/ artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, since we realized not many people would bring their dates to a deli. faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. One couple came in, she immediately sat down while he ordered. He ordered Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not them sandwiches and a plate with the vegetables on the side. He instructed me to edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and neatly structure the veggies, and winked at me when he told me to make it look nice. Opinions not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West University. The middle-aged couple seemed to enjoy their dinner, sitting in the booth. They Chester The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m. were the only people who enjoyed our seating area in the five-hour shift I worked. Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Their dinner seemed so simple and yet they seemed to have a good night. I said to my male co-worker how I thought I would have a different reaction Copyright ©2012 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and than the man’s date. Valentines dinner at a deli . . . did he forget to call in their rescommentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. ervation? My co-worker told me he and his girlfriend planned to meet when they Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the were done their shifts. He promised her he’d bring home dinner, hoagies from work. student-run academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budI watched the couple continue to talk as they sat there, and I realized that this day is get through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. another example of how simple things in life are better. After all, it’s just another day. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be ~Ginger Rae Editor-in-Chief

placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


What’s with all of the potty talk?

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THE QUAD OP-ED

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

As some of you may have noticed on the first floor of every traditional residence hall there is now a gender neutral bathroom. Some of you are mad about this, it makes you uncomfortable and some of you just don’t care. And why should you? There are many reasons why you should care about having gender neutral bathrooms on-campus and in society for that matter. I understand why people are uncomfortable about using a gender neutral bathroom. People think it’s gross to go to the bathroom next to someone of a different gender. Women often think men’s bathrooms are dirtier than women’s. People often think it’s a safety issue to

have to share a bathroom with someone of a different gender. But have you thought about the benefits of gender neutral bathrooms? First of all, it’s easier for everyone. There’s no more finding the bathroom for your gender in an unknown place, or traveling halfway across the building to find a restroom with your designated sign on the door. As far as the cleanliness goes, if bathrooms were shared I think they would be more clean, or just as dirty as they are now. They wouldn’t be dirtier. People would make more of an effort to keep the bathroom environment clean for everyone. Safety; this is the biggest issue of them all. People are worried that if we have gen-

der neutral bathrooms more sexual assaults will happen in them. I hate to break the news to people but most sexual assaults and rapes don’t happen in bathrooms. They happen elsewhere. And don’t you think that by having gender neutral bathrooms it would make it safer, because there are many people who wouldn’t tolerate a sexual assault or rape to happen around them? If something bad was happening, there would be a higher volume of people entering the bathroom who would be able to stop it. I think we need to take the time to think about how a transgender person may feel when they need to use the bathroom. Having cisgender (a person who is not transgender) privilege is hard to

acknowledge because that is the tricky part about privilege, you may not know you have it. Many people do not think twice about going to the bathroom, but every time a transgender person has to use the bathroom they have to worry if someone will tell them they are in the wrong bathroom, or even worse, act violently towards them. We really need to be thinking about the safety of everyone, and by having gender neutral bathrooms we are doing just that. We are making the bathroom environment safer for everyone. I do not understand what all the fuss is about. They are just bathrooms. The sociologist in me doesn’t see the issue with sharing a bathroom with every gender, and yes there

are more than just two. We have to remember this change is for the benefit of everyone. And the people who are getting so upset don’t even understand the importance of this change nor are they trying to find out why the change is happening. We need to have more gender neutral bathrooms around campus for our transgender community to feel included as a part of our community, because in the end, it is their community too. We need to not make them outsiders. I would really encourage those of you who are mad or upset or uncomfortable with these gender neutral bathrooms to really put yourself in the shoes of someone who is transitioning or who

has transitioned. This process is not easy and to have to be worried about which bathroom to use on a daily basis doesn’t make the process any easier. If you would like to talk with me more about the gender neutral bathrooms please e-mail me and we can set up a time to talk about it. This issue is important to everyone and having gender neutral bathrooms is a positive thing, not negative. Please consider your opinion of this matter and take into consideration not everyone has the privileges a cisgender person does .

By Dr. Edward Lordan Special to The Quad This past week, Governor Tom Corbett proposed a budget for the coming year that will reduce state funding for the PA State System of Higher Education (of which West Chester is a member) by 20 percent. This dramatic reduction, on top of last year’s equally devastating cutback of 18 percent, will have a direct, negative impact on the cost and quality of education at WCU. The governor’s funding cuts harm students at West Chester in a number of important

ways: Tuition – This past Fall, students paid $436 more in annual tuitionthan they did the year before, a direct result of last year’s budget cuts. Tuition is not going down – next Fall, WCU students will pay this increase again, and if the governor’s proposed cuts for this year are approved, tuition will be even higher. There is no way WCU can cut enough in material, personnel, and services to make up this shortfall and not raise rates: reduced funding means higher tuition. At the same time, the Governor’s budget addition-

ally proposes to reduce further state funding for student loans. Class size – Last year’s budget cuts forced the WCU administration to increase the number of students admitted to many classes on campus. Larger classes reduce the quality of interaction between professors and students and the overall educational experience. Faculty and students both want and benefit from the personal relationships that are critical to the WCU experience. Reduced funding puts even more pressure on the university to squeeze even more students into

classrooms, even as students are paying more to come to WCU. Class availability – Remember your frustration when you tried to register for classes last semester, and MyWCU kept listing courses as “closed”? For some students, this was a major disappointment, because they were unable to pursue the subjects that were most interesting to them. For others, however, this was an even bigger problem, because they were unable to sign up for classes needed to graduate. If Governor Corbett gets his way, funding for

state universities will drop to its lowest level in more than two decades. If his funding cuts are approved, students will pay more money to get into larger classes, if they can get into those classes at all. Access to a high-quality public education will get harder for all Pennsylvanians. That’s the bad news. The good news? There’s still time to change the budget, and you can do something about it – in less than two minutes. Make your voice heard by urging your legislator to support funding for higher education. You can find out who your

legislator is and how to contact him/her by going to http://www.legis.state. pa.us/cfdocs/legis/home/ findyourlegislator/. The last few years have been difficult for Pennsylvania, but it is unfair for Governor Corbett to ask WCU students to bear more than their share of the burden. If you are ever going to make your voice heard, now is the time to do it.

By Rebekah Balmer Features Editor

Rebekah Balmer is a fifth-year student with a dual major in women and gender Studies and sociology. She can be reached at RB649636@wcupa.edu.

Proposed budget cuts are bad for students

Dr. Edward Lordan is a Professor and Internship coordinator with the Department of Communications Studies. He can be reached at ELordan@wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 13, 2012

THE QUAD OP-ED

Political Cartoons

Letter to the Editor To the Editor: Dear Students and Faculty, 1N Bank is set to become part of Susquehanna Bank over President’s Day weekend, February 18 to February 20. In preparation for this, we began the ATM transition on campus and unfortunately encountered a few issues that affected several of you. There was an equipment failure involving one of the ATMs, which has since been replaced with a newer model. In addition, we’d like to clarify that the West Chester University community will not be assessed a surcharge for using either of the Susquehanna ATMs located on campus. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for your patience and understanding. We look forward to continuing 1N Bank’s commitment to providing exceptional service to the West Chester University community. — 1N Bank and Susquehanna Bank

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Want to be the next Op-ed Editor of The Quad? E-mail quadoped@wcupa.edu stating your year, major, and a statement of interest. Interested students can also come to a staff meeting in the Quad office at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday (Sykes 253).


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THE QUAD FEATURES

Teacher Feature Presents: Dr. Timothy Brown By Carol Fritz

Entertainment Editor

Dr. Timothy J. Brown is a professor and the Department Chair of West Chester University’s Department of Communication Studies. He attained both his B.A. and M.A. in communication studies from WCU and his Ph.D. in rhetoric from Ohio U n i v e r s i t y. Dr. Brown has been teaching for 15 years. He taught for five years at Buffalo State College, and has taught for 10 years at WCU. He has been Department Chair for five years. Dr. Brown teaches Rhetorical Theory and Criticism, Public Speaking, African American Culture and Communication, Communication Theory. He also teaches two graduate courses, Rhetoric and Leadership and Culture, Media and Representation. When asked what his favorite part about WCU is, he said, “I would say the people and the students. You always get to engage and talk with them

and see what’s on their minds. So that’s the part that I enjoy. And then seeing people grow and develop over their time here.” Dr. Brown said that he loves his job because he’s always adapting day-to-day. “It’s always changing. I’m juggling a lot of different demands at the same time, so each day

achieving professor status, having tenure, and having the ability to teach on campus. Along with being a husband and a father, his biggest personal accomplishment is having matured and he realized that, “a lot of it’s not about you. It’s about the other folks. For most of your life, you grow up, and you’re doing things for yourself. And then you take on these other things, which you have to learn to mesh.” A goal that Dr. Brown would like to accomplish is changing his focus from immediate, day-to-day tasks to figuring out his long-term goals. When asked to share something that few people know about him, Dr. Brown said, “I’m actually a little bit of an introvert, and I’m a homebody. If you asked me what is the best thing I could do, I would say to just be home. A lot of people think that because you’re a chair, and you’re this, and you’re

“Put all of your heart and your mind into your studies...” is always different. That’s the fun part.” He stated that one of his biggest academic accomplishments would certainly be being elected by his colleagues as the Communication Studies Department Chair. He also received an award from the Eastern Communication Association for his service and research that he has done. (Two students in Dr. Brown’s department will be presenting this April at the Eastern Communication Association Annual Convention.) Dr. Brown said he is just as proud of

see BROWN on page 13

Features FEBRUARY 13, 2012

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Staying fashion savvy on a college budget Column by: Lauren DiCrecchio Practicum Writer

I’m not afraid to admit that I’m a shopaholic and I love clothes. If you were to look in my room, you would find stacks of the latest issues of Glamour and Vogue. Nothing makes me want to spend money more than the touch of new silk or cotton and the smell of leather on newly displayed bags. When I walk into a store, I feel at home.

I’m sure you are wondering, as a college student, how do I feed my addiction? Well it all started two years ago when I worked for Express as a fashion expert in the fitting rooms. My first employee purchase allowed me to get $150 off a $300 sale, AND if I opened a credit card, I was able to save another 15 percent on top of that. A dream come true, right? Well after I started working a couple of shifts a week, I realized I was not saving any money.

Each time I got paid, I spent it on the new merchandise we received, or I would put it on my credit card. As time went on, and the paychecks kept coming in, my roommates began to notice my constant spending and they would yell at me every week. Each time I would promise that there would not be any more purchases, but my shopping addiction became so bad see FASHION on page 13

College, a different perspective Column by: Leah Skye Staff Writer

The coveted college experience: The time when we are free to branch out from the binding parental nest and make our own decisions. Most incoming students arrive and are immediately awestruck by the amusement park that awaits of house parties and an endless flow of lowquality liquor. It’s all

too easy to get lost in the excitement and forget that this is an experience that is meant to prep you for the cut-throat world of employment. In American society, the four year college plan has become somewhat a rite of passage. For most, it has lost the reputation of being an opportunity reserved for the privileged only to be replaced by a shared sense of entitlement. Consequently, this ideal

has made its way into students’ minds concerning landing a job after graduation. I can assure you from my sobering personal experience, though, that it is not that easy. College is accompanied by a slew of stereotypes, and with good reason. I’ve personally witnessed many of my peers see COLLEGE on page 11


FEBRUARY 13, 2012 College from page 10

wasting away mommy and daddy’s money by blowing off homework for a frat party or an intense game of beer pong. I’ve witnessed people fail classes because they plagiarized a paper they were too lazy to write on their own, or just not write it at all because they chose a dubstep blasting bar and overpriced drinks over their class priorities. Or there are the ones who just coast along, doing the bare minimum to get the C’s they need to pass the class and not an ounce more.

THE QUAD FEATURES It should surprise no one that this type of work ethic makes it very unlikely for these people to succeed in securing a career without an absurd amount of luck. But what does surprise me is the enormous amount of students who did nothing of the sort and are still facing great difficulties post-graduation. This means the ones who strived to be the best in their class, who sought personal relationships with their professors, and put their hearts into every assignment thrown their way. This is where I found myself, but I now re-

alize that had I directed those efforts in some alternative areas, I may have been in better shape my senior year as graduation approaches. After we are handed that diploma, we are sent plummeting full speed into one of the most daunting job markets this country has ever seen. Having a communication studies degree and a journalism minor, something many people these days consider to be an unworthy degree, I’ve got my work cut out for me. Too many students dismiss the cautionary advice to plan ahead while they

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are in school and justify it with the excuse that they are too busy. Many are quick to assume that if you pass your classes and get a degree, you’re set for life. This is so tragically wrong, and the first step in avoiding this bitter end is to accept the grim truth of the situation that awaits. It is no longer good enough to have an outstanding GPA if you don’t have experience to back it up; this means internships. Having a 3.8, I swore I was untouchable and employers would be competing for me to come work for them. For the most part, paid internships are really difficult to come by, at least for my major. This was my biggest mistake, and I wish I hadn’t been too stuck up to realize it before it was too late. Many companies are cutting back, and paid intern positions are often the first to go. This is not meant to discourage, but rather re-prioritize your plans. Being in college and fully supported, I should have taken the free work to reap the benefits later. I thought “I’m too good to work for free. I can’t waste my precious time there when I could be out making money.” I wanted the instant gratification of a paycheck, and I realize now that having those unpaid positions padding my resumé could have

PAGE 11 really helped me out. In addition to internships, it’s become imperative in this technology-dependent world to utilize social networking tools to your utmost advantage. We students spend so much time surfing Facebook and Twitter, and not enough time using these outlets as a productive way to showcase your skills. As a writer, blogging is also an incredible resource for getting your talent recognized. Instead of just having that you wrote for the school newspaper on your resumé, have a link to on-line copies of all of your articles for employers to review. If you have a particular company in mind, start a blog catering to what they do. If you’ve got a niche, which you’re going to need as a writer, highlight it. Start a fashion blog about how to shop stylishly and affordably as a college student. If you’re into advertising, try designing your own ad campaigns. Getting the ball rolling in any of these areas will show future employers that you have the tenacity to succeed, and it will look a lot better on your behalf than a plain resumé for them to throw into a bottomless pile. Lastly, if you haven’t figured this out by now, learning how to network is a necessary survival

skill for any area. Cliché as it sounds, it really is not about what you know, it’s about who you know. Having a well connected collection of colleagues can help you out beyond belief. Go to career fairs, they are not as stupid as they sound. Join clubs concerning your major, and actively participate. It isn’t just about being there physically, you need to be involved enough to make some lasting connections and oh, you might actually learn a thing or two. When I started my first day of college, four years seemed like an eternity. I thought I could make tangible every hope and dream I had and still have time to party, study abroad, and make some money. It turned out that those years flew by and, enjoyable as they were, they ended up being a lot less productive than I had originally anticipated. Have fun, but don’t think you’re above trying. Be creative, and set yourself apart in ways beyond just getting good grades. And, if you’re among the group I mentioned that cannot be bothered with trying at all, well good luck to you because you’re really going to need it. Leah Skye is a fourthyear student majoring in commincation studies, with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at LS685444@wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD FEATURES

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10. Pope Gelasius declared Feb. 14 St. Valentine’s Day at the end of the 5th century. 9. Written Valentines didn’t begin to appear until after 1400. 8. The first Valentine’s Day card was sent in 1415 from France’s Duke of Orléans to his wife when he was a prisoner • The Student  Research  and  Creative  Awards  (SRCA)  Committee  announces   in the Tower of London following the Battle of Agincourt. the  2012  competition  for  West  Chester  University  students   7. In the 1840s, Esther A. Howland began selling the first   mass-produced valentines in America. • A  maximum  of  12  awards,  of  $500  per  proposal,  will  be  presented  to  student   6. In addition to the United States, Valentine’s Day is celscholars  at  the  March  29,  2012  University-­‐wide  Research  Day   ebrated in Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, France and Australia.   5. About eight billion candy hearts were made in 2009, the as• You  can  submit  your  class  project  or  independent  research  &  creative   sociation says—enough to stretch from Rome, Italy, to Valenactivity  that  you  have  previously  done  and  have  the  opportunity  to  win   tine, Arizona, and back again 20 times. $500     4. On average, parents receive one out of every five valen   tines. 3. Valentine’s Day in the United States generated $14.1 billion For  more  details  please  visit  http://www.wcupa.edu/srca     in retail sales in 2009.   If  you  have  any  questions,  please  contact  Dr.  Xiaowei  Zhu  (xzhu@wcupa.edu)  or           2. Women purchase approximately 85 percent of all valentines. Dr.  Mike  Ayewoh  (mayewoh@wcupa.edu)   1. Today, according to the Greeting Card Association, an es   timated one billion Valentine’s Day cards are sent each year, Application  Deadline:  Friday,  February  24,  2012  at  5:00  PM  to   making Valentine’s Day the second largest card-sending holiday of the year. (An estimated 2.6 billion cards are sent for srca2012@wcupa.edu   Christmas.)   Office  of  Sponsored  Research,  Filano  Hall,  2nd  Floor,  Room  205   (Informatio from History.com and nationalgeographic.com)


FEBRUARY 13, 2012 Brown from page 10

teaching and you’re going places…but it’s taken me a while to get comfortable in that role. If it was up to me, I would just like to be home and just not be bothered. But I find in my life that you have all of these competing demands that want to pull you out of that shell.” His advice for students is to “take advantage of the many opportunities that you have here and to develop your skills while you have the opportunity to do it.” He also said that students

THE QUAD FEATURES should “put all of your heart and your mind into your studies. Even if you’re not sure what major you want to be, finish it, because most of the time you’re going to change occupations after you get done. So the most important thing is to put your energy into what you’re doing, do well, finish your degree, and get involved.” He also suggested getting to know professors and workplace supervisors and to accomplish personal goals. Carol Fritz is a thirdyear student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at CF716022@wcupa.edu.

http://communication.wcupa.edu Dr. Timothy Brown, chair of the Communication Studeis Department

Want to nominate a professor for the “Teacher feature”? E-mail quadfeatures@wcupa.edu

Fashion from page 10

that I would actually hide bags in my car so they wouldn’t notice. Pathetic? Extremely. I finally realized that there are other ways to afford my clothing habit. College students can maintain great style on a reasonable budget, and maybe even earn money in return. First things first, do not shop brands, shop styles. Getting to know your body type and what styles suit you can save you more than you realize. I have purchased tops on numerous occasions that I didn’t try on and bought for the heck of it. If I didn’t like the way it looked, it would move to the bottom of my dresser, not to be touched. For some, it’s all about following the latest trends, but as much as we all hate to admit it, not every single thing we buy is going to look good. Stick to what works for you. Once you have your own look down, the next step is to know where to shop. Say goodbye to the high end brands, and hello to discount stores. Yep, I said it. For some, this

can be a hard transition, but there is nothing wrong with spending $10 on a shirt at TJ Maxx that would cost you $39.99 at Ex-

PAGE 13 I’m a list maker. I would not survive without lists. Before you leave to go shopping, write down or key into your smart

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press. Other discount stores like Target and Marshall’s have great finds as well. Thrift stores such as Salvation Army on Market Street and Good Will on Lincoln Highway can also hold hidden treasures. Thrift shopping can be hard and a turn off for some, but with a little research of the store and knowing exactly what you want, it can really pay off and save you lots of money. My only piece of advice when thrift shopping, take your time. Finding a good piece in thrift stores takes time. The key is patience.

phones exactly what you want to buy and set yourself a spending limit. Shopping on impulse is not an option for us broke college students, and by carrying a list you can prevent the unecessary spending. Another tip, before you leave to go shopping, examine your closet and take a mental note of your inventory. We’re all hoarders to some extent. Give your clothing a time line. If you haven’t worn something in six months, its time to say goodbye. Did you know that you can actually make money off of your

clothes? Items that you have only worn once, or have been sitting in your closet for months, can be sold to consignment shops such as Plato’s Closet. Once I made $70 in a trip to Plato’s, and luckily for West Chester students, there is one located in Exton. With that in mind, if you are planning on buying a new top, sell another one back. Shopping on a budget does not have to be stressful. It’s time to get back to basics. Simple and solid or printed shirts with a pair of skinny jeans can easily be accessorized. Stocking up on cheaper promotional accessories from stores such as Forever21, H&M and Charlotte Russe can transform basic tops into multiple stylish looks. There are many simple ways to help cut back your spending, and no need for the disgruntled feelings towards price tags. Just because we are broke college students, does not mean our fashion has to suffer! Lauren DiCrecchio is a fifth-year student majoring in liberal studies with minors in journalism and Spanish. She can be reached at LD658004@wcupa.edu.

Want to write for the Features section? e-mail quadfeatures@wcupa.edu


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THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Check out the Quad online! wcuquad.com

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

Entertainment QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

Spotlight on The Darkness: the comeback and the Trocadero concert By Molly Herbison Special to The Quad

The Darkness are making a comeback. The band’s front man, Justin Hawkins, just appeared in a Samsung commercial during Super Bowl XLVI. Although hardly anyone can remember what Samsung was trying to sell, the spandexclad Hawkin’s performance of “I Believe In A Thing Called Love” managed to make a lasting impression. Immediately after the commercial aired, the song became the most downloaded rock song on iTunes. This Super Bowl cameo coincides with The Darkness’ reunion tour, which began its run in 2011. The band only released two albums (“Permission to Land” in 2003 and “One Way Ticket to Hell ... and Back” in 2005) before disbanding in 2006. Though the British band has gained most of their popularity in the U.S. from “I Believe In A Thing Called Love,” they maintain a dedicated American fan base with a love for The Darkness’ entire body of work-a fact proven by the

attendance at their Feb. 7 show at the Trocadero in Philadelphia. Opening for the Darkness were the six members of Cincinnati’s Foxy Shazam. No strangers to the television spotlight either, Foxy Shazam have starred in a pair of commercials for Microsoft’s search engine called Bing. Additionally, their 2010 s i n g l e “Unstoppable” was featured in last year’s Super Bowl. They have released four albums since 2005. Their most recent album, “The Church of Rock and Roll,” was released on Jan. 24 of this year and was produced by Justin Hawkins. The HawkinsFoxy pairing becomes perfectly clear after examining the similarities between the two bands. Both The Darkness and Foxy Shazam have become known for their theatrical style and flamboyant band members. More importantly, both bands made

Philadelphia go crazy. Foxy played their many hits, including “Unstoppable,” “I Like It,” and “Welcome To The Church Of Rock And Roll,” with unmatched enthusiasm; the bearded Sky White stood atop his keyboard and

member -- regardless of whether or not he or she has previously heard the recordings. The end of Foxy’s set left everyone in the crowd with a wild grin and a desire to hear much, much more from the talented group. After Foxy Shazam

through “Love Is Only A Feeling,” “One Way Ticket,” and many other songs from both of their albums. When Hawkins announced that they would be playing a new song, however, the entire crowd calmed and listened with anxious ears. He sang to the c r o w d : “Everybody www.loudwire.com have a good time,” (as if they were not already) and fans realized that The Darkness can still deliver a simple, fun message with the same enthusiasm from their beginnings back in 2003. Hawkins explained that the new A new album from The Darkness is still in progress . album, still in progress, would result danced for the had warmed up the in another tour in audience, while front audience, The which Philadelphia man Eric Nally Darkness made their would definitely be a jumped on the m u c h - a n t i c i p a t e d stop. shoulders of guitarist entrance. Drummer As the show proLoren Turner and Ed Graham, Bassist gressed, The sang at the top of his Frankie Poullain, Darkness’ strength lungs. and brothers Dan inevitably built up to After listening to and Justin Hawkins the moment everyone their addictive worked the City of had been waiting for. albums a n d Brotherly Love into After teasing the marveling at Nally’s a heated frenzy that audience with a acrobatic vocal capa- would last for the familiar opening bilities, I can report rest of the night. chord, the band that his live voice A dedicated mosh blasted “I Believe In will not disappoint pit at the center of A Thing Called any audience the crowd pulsed Love.” The entire

floor began to shake, and even the males in the audience were belting out their finest falsettos. The nearly four minutes of jaw-dropping madness ended with a dark stage and hundreds of sweaty people begging for an encore. Not ones to disappoint, the band quickly returned to the stage to play their final song. At one point, Justin Hawkins climbed to the upper level of the Trocadero and proclaimed “I’m gonna do this!” His leap of faith (or his “trust exercise,” as he later referred to it on Twitter) found him in the arms of hundreds of screaming fans. People grabbed at Hawkins’s third outfit of the night, hoping that a bit of his charm might rub off on them. In the end, of course, even those members of the audience who did not get a piece of Hawkins were charmed by The Darkness’ wonderful performance and the promise of a new future for this deserving band. Molly Herbison is a first-year student at WCU. She can be reached at MH757997@ wcupa.edu.


THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

Tweets of the Week By Liz Thompson

PAGE 15

“Learning to recognize the good from the bad people in your life is one of the most important things you can do for yourself.” --@BenSavage

“Paula Abdul was fired from “The X Factor.” She would have kept her job if it had been called “The Rx Factor.” --@Joan_Rivers

5 best guy flicks for your sweetheart By Gary Thompson McClatchy Newspapers

‘ Ti s nearly Valentine’s Day, fellas, when you’re expected to sit down with your gal to see “The Vow,” or something like it. Something very dangerous to your relationship, your selfesteem. Starring someone like Channing Tatum _ bigger, betterlooking, unafraid of commitment, supplied by screenwriters with an endless supply of cute things to say and do. In “The Vow” Tatum asks his girlfriend to move in with him by spelling out the question in the blueberries he places next to the pancakes he’s just made for her. See what I mean? You cannot compete with that. And yet you do owe her that flick. The

trick is to find something you both find rewarding. Something with true love, and true grit. So here are the five most guy-friendly romantic movies you can watch. 5. “Shaun of the Dead.” Yes, it’s a zombie movie, but the zombies are really a backdrop for the story of a backsliding boyfriend trying to win back the girl he doesn’t deserve. And Simon Pegg is not Channing Tatum. 4. Anything by Ron Shelton. He’s known as a guy who makes movies about sports, but he really makes movies about love and sex _ “Bull Durham,” “Tin Cup,” “White Men Can’t Jump.” 3. “Say Anything.” You have to have writer-director Cameron Crowe on

this list. He’s popular with both genders because he plays fair with male and female characters. “Jerry Maguire” would work, or even “Singles,” but we need something here for the teen demo. 2. “Die Hard.” Why does Bruce Willis kill every member of a global assortment of terrorists who take over an office tower? For love, of course. 1. “The Terminator.” Still James Cameron’s greatest love story, with apologies to “Titanic.” Guy travels through time to save the woman who will give birth to the man who will save the world from cyborgs, and ensures that she does by actually fathering the child. Take that, Nicholas Sparks.

Attention WCU Students Governor Corbett announced his annual budget last Tuesday. He proposes to

CUT BY 20%

your state university funding.

This will affect class size, class availability, loan amounts, lowenrolled majors, services offered, and YOUR TUITION. In LESS THAN ONE MINUTE, you can make your voice heard in Harrisburg. Urge your legislator to support higher education and fight these funding cuts. HERE’S HOW: 1. Find your legislator on this site: http://www.legis.state.pa.us/cfdocs/legis/home/findyourlegislator 2. Type in your address and zip code 3. Click the name of your house or senate representative 4. Click any of the communication link icons 5. Let them know how you feel!

Tell us how these budget cuts have and will affect you. EMAIL YOUR STORY TO:

apscufcommunications@wcupa.edu APSCUF Faculty and Coaches Association of PA State College & University Faculty


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THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

The Fray’s “Scars & Stories” is a solid success

On Feb. 7, 2012, The Fray released their much-anticipated third long-play album, “Scars & Stories.” The album is unlikely to leave The Fray fans disappointed. As a whole, the album fits together nicely and is distinguishable from their two previous albums, while at the same time retaining the characteristic features of The Fray—it is uplifting, sentimental, packed with emotion, and full of addictive beats. The piano seems to be less prominent which is not necessarily good or bad. The following is a review of the songs: “Heartbeat” (8.4/10) This song was the first single. It is good but it does not showcase Slade’s vocals very well and there was not much in the way of lyrics. As one iTunes reviewer put it, “there is not enough to sing along to.” “The Fighter” (10/10) This is the flagship song of the album. It has intere s t i n g instrumentation and rhythm that allows Slade’s vocals to really shine. This song is likely to be the second single. “Turn Me On” (9.2/10) This is a good song with a slight edge and a good beat. “Run For Your Life” (9.6/10) This is an excellent song with

meaningful and substantial lyrics and lots of emotion. I almost want to sing along with the chorus in an arena with other The Fray fans — it just has that feel to it. It also has an edge while simultaneously being extremely serene. “The Wind” (8.5/10) This is a unique song that has an epic sound to it. Joe King does great backup vocals. The only downside is that it seems a bit disjointed. “1961” (9.4/10) This song complements “Turn Me On” pretty well. The vocals are awesome and haunting, and once again, I love King’s prominent presence with backup vocals. It is slow-moving but keeps a good beat. “I Can Barely Say” (9.4/10) This song brings back the piano and reminds me of “Hundred” from their first album. It is a good song to listen to alone at night when you’re feeling kind of down. “Munich” (9.0/10) This song is good and features Slade’s vocals noticeably higher than usual. It reminds me of a song by Snow Patrol, which isn’t a bad thing. The song is heartfelt and epic sounding. “Here We Are” (9.1/10) this is perhaps the edgiest song on the album. It is done well, but I am disappointed when I compare to their other edgier songs such as “We Build

Then We Break” or “Little House.” It is a solid track nonetheless. “48 to Go” (10/10) This may be the overlooked gem of this album (meaning it may not be a single) just like “Say When” from their second album. This song is excellent and is arguably the best on the album. If anything, it ties with “The Fighter” for the number one spot. It has a similar beat to “The Fighter” but is unique. The best moment of this album (not just this song) is when Joe King and Isaac Slade say “blowing your hair back” together, with equal force. Usually, each singer either does lead or backup vocals but they sing on top of one another here and it works perfectly. They are two great singers and they are almost twice as good combined. I want to see more of this on the next album. “Rainy Zurich” (9.9/ 10) This is Joe King’s song and he delivers at his best. It is better than the album version of “Ungodly Hour” and can stand its own next to “Heaven Forbid.” King should have at least two songs per album. “Be Still” (7.2/10) This should have been a bonus track like “Fair Fight” was for their second album. It just is not that good, compared with the rest of the

album. It is too slow and boring and repetitive. I do not feel like it even does justice to Slade’s vocals. I have not listened extensively to the bonus tracks on the iTunes deluxe album, but I am disappointed that they are all covers of bands inferior to, and very different from, The Fray. It is unfortunate that The Fray is inspired by Bruce Springsteen. Issac Slade clearly does not understand how good his voice is. The bonus songs should be b-sides from this album, of which there are probably plenty. In fact, the actual song “Scars & Stories” was taken out because it did not make the cut, according to Slade. Why not give us that as a bonus track? Besides the disappointment of the bonus tracks all being cover versions of other songs, this is a solid album. Everyone who likes pop and/or rock music should be able to enjoy The greatness of the Fray, and, of course, devout fans will find plenty to like on this third album. Overall, I would give this album a rating of 9.7 out of 10. Bill Hanrahan is a fourth-year student majoring in political science and philosophy. He can be reached at WH750431@wcupa. edu.

ELECTRIC FACTORY:

Upcoming Shows

By Bill Hanrahan Op-Ed Editor

February 25 - The Pink Floyd Experience March 9 - moe. March 23 - Odd Future March 28 - Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band April 10 - Snow Patrol

THE TROCADERO: February 17 - Less Than Jake March 4 - Rookie of the Year March 7 - Mindless Self Indulgence March 9 - Mutemath March 30 - Jordan Knight

THE TLA: February 17 - Chris Webby February 29 - Company of Theives March 7 - Jon Anderson March 15, 16, 17, 18 - O.A.R. March 19 - Eisley

THE NOTE: February 18 - Winter Battle of the Bands February 23 - The Devil Makes Three February 24 - Ben Lee March 3 - The Future Unwritten March 23 - Splintered Sunlight

Interested in writing for The Quad Entertainment section? E-mail: quadentertainment @wcupa.edu


THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

PAGE 17

Local band, “Penrose,” mixes 70s heavy metal, hard rock and blues

By Jessica Marie Cavaliere Special to The Quad

At Screwballs in King of Prussia, Pa. on Jan. 27, I saw a new band— Penrose—a long way from the 80s rock bands I usually see. I saw them in November, and I liked the sound they had: clear and heavy, they blend today with the bygone era of 70s heavy metal, blues and hard rock. The boys of the band also stole my heart with their blonde hair and crystal blue eyes. The lead singer’s baby face captured my heart the most. But beyond looks,

they can rock. Formed in their hometown of Wayne, Pa. in 2009, Penrose consists of Tom, Pat and Dan Murphy. The Murphies blend hard rock and blues together for a successful symphony. Penrose’s songs hit a chord with the audience in Screwballs. Mark Schinski, the band’s manager and friend (a friend of mine as well), opened for the band and played a perfect rendition of Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin.” He also made fun of Adele’s “Rolling In the Deep.” Schinski set up for an awesome show.

A family in attendance on Friday night brought their young children and the little girl mentioned to her father that she “loves them” and thought they “sounded good.” Everyone in the establishment loved the mixture of blues (Eric Clapton) and hard rock (Black Sabbath). The Murphies can also write songs as well as play them. Dan’s guitar ripped the riffs that accentuated the bellowing of Pat’s bass and the beating of Tom’s drums — for Penrose this was a smashing (literally and figuratively)

cover of Black Sabbath’s “War Pigs.” The way the song was played gives “War Pigs” a heavier sound and more heart than what Ozzy gave the song back in the 70s. Penrose later played songs from Modest Mouse and Pink Floyd. Being more familiar with Pink Floyd than Modest Mouse, it sounded like I was listening to them on the radio — Penrose’s playing is very clean and distorts when the song calls for it. They also played their songs “Devil’s Grip” and “Crooked Teeth” with such clarity. The way the

songs were played was beyond words. The people sitting at the bar felt the vibrations and watched the show as intensely as I did in the front row. The Murphy brothers did not disappoint. I was in awe of Penrose’s performance. The decibels their instruments emitted sounded even better than the songs they covered. There is something about a live show that makes one come alive. Penrose’s songs also left me breathless and speechless. They definitely know how to put on a good show. Penrose currently

plays in Philadelphia and the King of Prussia area but are looking to play at The Note sometime soon. To keep up with the band, their website is www.penrosemusic.com, or “like” Penrose on Facebook. On their Facebook and via their site, listeners can also sample their music. The Murphy brothers’ playing skills and musicianship will not disappoint. Jessica Marie Cavaliere is a fourthyear student majoring in English with minors in creative writing and philosophy. She can be reached at JC671566@ wcupa.edu.


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Hard work earns wrestling program premier status in Pa. By Brian Johnson Staff Writer “Eat right, sleep right, live right.” These are the instructions assistant coach Glenn Koser gives the West Chester University wrestling team at their practice at Ehinger Gym on Thursday nights. It seems like a rather simple mantra to live by (although most people might say otherwise), but rather it’s the least they can do for a program that has, for the past four years, done so many things right. In its four years as a club team in the National Collegiate Wrestling Association (NCWA), the team has finished with two Mid-East Conference championships and two top ten finishes at the National Championships along with

18 national qualifiers, nine All-Americans, and five National Champions, including the team’s captain, senior Dustin Tancredi. “There’s a little less pressure because I already won [a National Championship],” Tancredi said, “But there’s still a lot of pressure to go and win it again. I’m excited for the end of the season; it’s the last month of my career really, so I’m excited to go get back on top of the podium.” Other returning AllAmericans include junior Ryan Kreppel, who finished seventh in the nation at 235 last season, and sophomore Luke Bilyeu, who finished third at 141 during his freshman campaign. Bilyeu has continued the momentum

from his finish last season into a stellar 19-2 record. “I feel a lot better because last year I came in as a transfer in the second semester, so I only had a half a year to get ready,” said Bilyeu. “I feel a lot more confident because I had a whole year to prepare for the end of the season.” And the preparation that Bilyeu has done to this point is not lost on the coaching staff. “I’m really pleased [with his season], Luke’s a hard worker, he’s self motivated... and it shows,” assistant coach and former WCU wrestler Alray Johnson said. “Dustin’s the same way, being a leader and a captain, you have to put the time in.” Tancredi and Bilyeu are examples of the hard work and success that head

coach Joe Miller has had since he restarted the program. “He got all the alumni back together and we donated a little here and there,” said alumnus Mark Chew, now a coach (and restaurant owner) in Maryland. As the program continues to grow, coach Miller’s goal of a National Championship within five years looks even more attainable. Especially since the success has caught the eye of wrestlers from outside southeastern Pennsylvania. “I get e-mails from kids telling me that they want to come to West Chester to wrestle,” coach Miller said. The program is also bolstered by WCU alumni sending their children here to learn. “I think they do a phe-

nomenal job,” Mark Chew said. “I coach a high school wrestling team, so I bring some of my boys up so Joe can work with them.” With all the success and attention the program gets, it begs the question of whether or not the program will ever be accepted as a NCAA sport by the university. “You always want to compete at the best level you can, at the highest level you can,” coach Johnson said. “We’ve shown here at the club program that we can compete at the Division III or Division II level, and we’ve even run into Division I competition.” The decision, however, lies in the hands of the university, and with the current budget crisis in Harrisburg, that dream may have to be put on hold

for a while. But as long as the team continues its run of success and continues to attract wrestlers, the program will remain strong in the years to come, with or without NCAA designation. “We’re blessed that [the university] allows us to do what we’re doing now at the club level,” coach Alray Johnson said. “Because they didn’t have to approve it, but they saw that there was enough interest in the program, so here we are and we’re doing well. It’s going to come when it’s supposed to come.” And until it does the only thing they can do is eat right, sleep right, live right, and above all wrestle right. Brian Johnson is a fourthyear student majoring in English. He can be reached at BJ669485@wcupa.edu.

Diving team has strong performance at Invitational By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor The men and women’s diving team earned several top placements at the Diving Invitational facing the University of Delaware and Towson, in the Carpenter Sports Building on Feb. 4. Ryan Kuser, the lone senior and standout star on the men’s team, dominated the Division I competition, earning the first place slot in the 1-meter and 3-meter dives to set an example for the three younger divers. Michelle Murphy and Kelsey Tennett led the effort for the women, switching fifth and sixth place slots in the 1m and 3m boards. On the men’s side, Kuser went head-to-head against Towson’s sophomore Alex Cohen in the 1m dive. Ultimately, Cohen’s score of 293.10 could not surpass

Kuser’s 325.6 on their six dives. He was the only diver to score above 300. WCU freshman Jonas Raider took the fifth place slot in the 1m, scoring 268.3. Sophomore Kurt van Mol took sixth with a 244.6, while freshman Zach Burns took seventh with a 241.05. The 3m yielded similar results, as Kuser conquered the opposition, taking first place with a score of 341.2, leaving Cohen behind, who posted 318.34. Raider came in fifth again with a 266.8, while van Mol took seventh with a 221.3, and Burns took ninth with a 209.3. “I wasn’t necessarily happy with how I did at the meet— it wasn’t once of my best performances,” Raider said of his fifth place ranking after the meet. “I did work on more skills at this meet, so I was happy with the fact that they helped me in some of my

dives that I hadn’t done well in before.” Van Mol discussed the healthy competition that Kuser provides as the team’s most consistent and high-scoring diver. “Kuser’s example definitely motivates me, as well as the rest of the team,” van Mol said of the NCAA qualifying senior. “Seeing someone competing harder dives than you are doing encourages you to keep pushing forward to try and reach that level. He performs well, not only in the pool, but also academically. We will all miss him as a friend and mentor next year.” Kuser, Raider and van Mol qualified for the NCAA’s, which occur next month. For the women’s team, Towson senior Caroline Baker earned first place in both the 1m and 3m dives. Murphy was the highest

scoring WCU diver taking fifth place in the 1m posting a 252.4. Tennett finished just behind her in sixth place with a 249.6. Michelle Heinemann trailed behind placing eighth with a 229.45. Murphy and Tennett swapped placements in the 3m, Tennett posting a 249.5 for fifth place and Murphy taking sixth with a 246.8. Heinemann placed seventh with a 244.35. “I was not too disappointed about my placement because we were competing against DI schools and the other girls were pretty consistent,” Murphy said. “However I did not do my best and I know I could have placed better than I did.” The team now preps for the NCAA’s which will take place in March. “There have been many challenges in my diving career that have made me a

stronger diver,” Murphy said. “The bigger competitions that I have either failed or succeeded in give me more motivation for the next time. It has become important to see how much I can improve over the years from meet to meet.” Murphy’s optimism will serve her team well when she and teammates Tennett and Heinemann take on Nationals. Although the team does not make another appearance for several weeks, the teams will be far from relaxing. “Preparing for NCAA’s will be anything but a break,” van Mol said. “We recently started lifting weights again and practicing more rigorously. Over the course of the next month leading up to nationals, we will keep practicing every day in hopes of performing well in Texas.”

Murphy expressed similar aspirations for the NCAA’s. “This year I am hoping to improve on my placing from the past two years so I know it will take a lot of hard work,” Murphy said. “I just have to focus a lot more at practice for the next few weeks.” While the diving team preps for nationals, the swimming team prepares for the PSAC’s which begin this Thursday and end on Sunday evening at Cumberland Valley High School. The men and women’s diving team will perform at the NCAA Swimming and Diving Championships in Texas from March 14 until March 17. Brynn Dougherty is a fourthyear student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@wcupa. edu.


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THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

Men’s basketball moves within two games of first place By Riley Wallace Staff Writer West Chester’s men’s basketball team completed its toughest week of the season by defeating two top teams in the PSAC East, Kutztown at home Wednesday night and winning at Bloomsburg Saturday afternoon. The Golden Rams started out fast against first-place Kutztown (14-7, 11-6), jumping out to a 7-2 lead behind a raucous crowd of over six hundred. The game was very fast paced as both teams were evenly matched. West Chester (13-9, 10-8) stayed true to what

has been successful for them over the past few weeks. Great team defense, ball movement, perimeter shooting, and perimeter defense have all been constants during West Chester’s recent hot streak. The Golden Rams’ team defense forced Kutztown into 17 turnovers to West Chester’s 13. They also assisted on more plays than the Golden Bears, recording 16 assists to Kutztown’s 10. The Rams were spot-on once again from behind the arc, shooting 50% while holding Kutztown to just 7 for 21. In the first half, guard Jaleel Mack came off the bench and got the Golden Rams going, scoring 10 of

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

Troy Hockaday receives a pass at from the back-court and looks for a play in the offensive zone.

his 17 in the opening half. West Chester did an excellent job of preventing Kutztown from getting into any sort of rhythm offensively and maintained the lead for most of the half, taking a 46-39 lead in the break. The Golden Rams opened up the second half on a 17-10 run which pushed their lead to double digits. Kutztown hung around though and battled right to the very end. West Chester practically lived at the foul line in the last twenty minutes, scoring just under a third of their points from the charity stripe. The Golden Bears cut the lead down to 10 with 2:43 remaining, but they just couldn’t keep up with West Chester as it shot an unprecedented 73% from the field after halftime. The Golden Rams went on to defeat Kutztown by a score of 103-88. This was the second time a team atop the PSAC East Division visited Hollinger Fieldhouse and left without a victory as Bloomsburg fell to the Rams back in mid-January. Senior forward Lance McDowell led the way with a season-high 29 points to accompany his eight rebounds. Junior guard Jon Breeden scored 17, while assisting on seven plays and recording three blocks. Guard Carl Johnson was the other West Chester player to reach double figures with 11, but the production was there from top to bottom as all nine Golden Ram players scored at least four points. West Chester’s second game of the week came on the road against the other team sitting atop the PSAC East standings, Bloomsburg (16-7, 12-6). The Golden Rams got off to a slow start and trailed 9-0

before they scored their first points. The lead was eventually stretched to ten at 22-12 just past the halfway point of the half. West Chester battled back though and trailed by only four going into the locker rooms. The second half was a much closer affair as neither team managed to extend a lead beyond seven. The Golden Rams took control late when Mack hit a critical three and the Rams defense forced a turnover at the other end. Breeden hit two free throws and West Chester went on to win 74-71. The difference in the game came from behind the

three point line as West Chester outscored Bloomsburg 27-9 and held the Huskies to just 3 of 15 shooting. McDowell led the team offensively as he scored 27 points and grabbed 12 rebounds. Johnson scored 12 to go along with a team-high five assists. Two other Golden Rams reached double figures as senior forward Khalif Foster and Breeden scored 11 and 10 respectively. With West Chester’s two wins this week over top teams, they now pull within one game of East Stroudsburg who stands alone in third place, and two games behind

Kutztown University and Bloomsburg for first. They look to continue on their hot streak as they now have won their last four games and seven of their last eight. The Golden Rams travel to take on a struggling Shippensburg team Wednesday night. On Saturday, West Chester returns to Hollinger Fieldhouse for a crucial game against East Stroudsburg. With only four games remaining, this may very well decide who takes home third place in the PSAC East Division. Riley Wallace is a third-year student at West Chester University. He can be reached at RW718681@wcupa.edu.

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

West Chester come back onto the floor just after taking a timeout.


THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

PAGE 21

Women’s basketball edged by Bloomsburg By Joey Samuel Staff Writer The West Chester University women’s basketball team lost more ground in the race for first place in the PSAC East as they lost to Bloomsburg, 84-76, on Saturday afternoon. Three-point shooting was the key to victory for Bloomsburg, who moved to 14-4 in conference on the year with the win. West Chester fell to 12-6 in the PSAC, and their spot in second place was put in danger as well. Junior forward Alex Lennon led the way for the Lady Golden Rams, going 8-for-14 from the field and 5-for-5 from the free throw line for a team-high 21 points. Lennon also grabbed seven rebounds. Senior guard Jillian Keefer added 16 points and four

assists. Bloomsburg was led by the outstanding performance of Dana Wieller, who went 11-for-21 from the field including 8-for-15 from three-point range for 32 points. Kayla Oxenrider chipped in with 19 points while Kelsey Gallagher added 17. The first half was marked by a startling difference in fouls called between the two teams. West Chester attempted five free throws throughout the entire half, while Oxenrider alone attempted 13 for Bloomsburg, making 12. That difference evened itself out somewhat in the second half, but Bloomsburg still went 22-for-24 from the charity stripe. In fact, Oxenrider went 15-for-17 by herself, while West Chester shot 15-for-18 as an entire team.

But without a doubt, three-point shooting was what earned Bloomsburg the victory. They shot an astonishing 12-for-26 from long distance, with Wieller going 8-for-15 by herself. As a team, West Chester only made three of 15 attempts from three-point range. The loss was a crushing one for the Lady Golden Rams, who would have drawn level with Bloomsburg atop the PSAC East standings with a win. Instead, they fell two games behind the Huskies, with only four games to play on the season. Now, West Chester sits in a tie for second with Millersville, who won Saturday over Kutztown. This past Wednesday, the Lady Golden Rams had beaten Kutztown themselves at Hollinger Field House. Alex Lennon scored 21 points in that game too, leading

Brynn Pezzuti/ The Quad

West Chester to a 66-53 win. While both teams shot poorly, West Chester was able to get 18 more shots off than Kutztown, which played a large part in the Lady Golden Rams’ victory. West Chester’s depth also helped; no one on the team played more than 25 minutes, while four players for Kutztown had to play longer than that. West Chester led the entire game from start to finish. They also clinched a P S A C To u r n a m e n t playoff spot with the win. The happiness from the

securing of a playoff spot would only last so long, though, as the loss Saturday to Bloomsburg put their seeding in the playoffs in doubt. The difference between second and third in the PSAC East decides whether a team will host its playoff opener. This coming week will be an important one for the Lady Golden Rams, as they make one last push to regain first place from Bloomsburg. On Wednesday night, they will travel to Shippensburg, while on Saturday afternoon they will host East Stroudsburg. The East Stroudsburg game will have extra importance for West Chester. Festivities will be held before the game to support the team in the fight against breast cancer. Designated the “Pink Zone Game.” tip-off will be at 1 p.m., but the activities will begin at 12:30 p.m. in

the Pink Zone in Hollinger. Fans are encouraged to wear pink, which will earn them a free raffle ticket. This ticket will put fans in the running for special baskets donated by WCU student groups, offices, Barnaby’s, Wegman’s, and the Philadelphia Phillies. Drawings will take place after the game, and fans must be present to win. Fans that bring extra cash to buy special food will earn additional raffle tickets. All donations will benefit the Kay Yow Cancer Fund. Further donations may be made online at www.play4kay.org/goldenrams, at the Pink Zone game, or by contacting the women’s basketball team at 610436-3399. Joey Samuel is a thirdyear student majoring in political science and Spanish. He can be reached at JS719745@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 22

THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 13, 2012

Women’s hockey beats Nova 8-0 for second time By Deanna Vasso Staff Writer The women’s ice hockey team played a home game rematch against Villanova University last Sunday, one day after shutting out the Wildcats by a score of 8-0. Sunday’s game was very similar to the previous night since it also resulted in an identical 8-0 shutout win for West Chester. “Anytime your team comes off a big win like last night against Villanova, your team comes in with confidence. At times your team can come in a little over-confident and we made sure not to do that,” West Chester ’s goaltender Aly Golia said. “We know what we needed to do which was get another win in order to make playoffs and have a hope for nationals.” West Chester wasted no time in scoring goals

and defeating Villanova in this home ice rematch. Forward Becky Dobson was fast on the breakaway as she scored the first goal of the game for West Chester after a little less than a minute of the first period had been played. As the next few minutes of the period continued, West Chester spared Villanova no chances to score. Three minutes later, West Chester forward Karine Thibault scored the second goal assisted by teammates Virlen Reyes and Liz Petry. This gave West Chester an early lead of two goals before five minutes of play had occurred. Like the night before, Dobson remained an ever-present force on the ice with a pair of goals in the middle of the period. Dobson scored assisted by Daria Carzo around the eight-minute mark and then again unassisted at the twelfth

minute of the period, showing goal scoring that was eerily similar to the night before. Villanova was given an opportunity to score late in the first period after a West Chester body checking minor, but the offending team killed the penalty and West Chester was able to keep their 4-0 lead as the game went into the second period. Despite a few penalties in the second period, West Chester continued to remain on top. Dobson again was lighting up the scoreboard with her fourth goal of the game assisted by Carzo and Hall. Both Carzo and Hall also showed their prowess in keeping the puck at Villanova’s net when Carzo scored the sixth West Chester goal late in the period, which was again assisted by Hall. The game seemed like déjà vu for the two

teams, as things were again looking like West Chester was going to get a shutout win with a 6-0 lead as they headed into the final period. The home team widened the scoring gap even more when defenseman Amanda Vito scored three minutes into the third period. Following this goal, which gave West Chester even more of a weighted lead, there were two back-to-back West Chester penalties. This gave the visiting Villanova some room to breathe and the potential to score. Like the other power play chances that Villanova were given in this game, West Chester denied them since their defense was strong on the penalty kill in this game. West Chester goaltender Golia was also acting with quick reflexes by keeping any of these goals from going into the net behind her.

Halfway into the last period, West Chester forward Thibault scored the eighth goal of the game that was assisted by Vito and Dalziel. Despite a late penalty on Villanova, which gave West Chester another chance to score on the power play, they were unable to score after this point. They spent the last half of the period fighting hard to keep Villanova out of their zone and from scoring. West Chester did not need any more goals as they ended the game with another shutout victory against Villanova with an identical 8-0 score. “My defense played solid in front of me both games and the team played well as a unit. I’m glad we got two shutouts against Villanova because the team worked hard both games. Since the break, we’ve played solid team hockey that’s helped us

get these wins and we need to continue our strong team play going into the playoffs,” Golia said. West Chester has been neck and neck with California University of Pennsylvania for the third seed spot in the Ashley Moyer Memorial division. West Chester is currently 8-4-0-0 with 16 points in the standings and is poised for a spot in the championship rounds, which are set to take place from Feb. 17-19 in Hagerstown, Maryland. We s t Chester University returns for their last game of the regular season and matches up against American University Feb. 12 for their final home game at Ice Line Arena. Deanna Vasso is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in creative writing. She can be reached at DV670502@ wcupa.edu.

WCU gymnastics starts second half with loss By Emily Seigel Special to The Quad On Saturday, Jan. 28, the West Chester University’s gymnastics team traveled to SUNYBrockport where they unfortunately experienced a difficult loss, scoring a 181.525. Despite the team score, Junior Melissa Voskian came in third on the vault, sophomore Paige Griffin came in third on the uneven bars, and Junior Kaley Lafleur won first place on the balance beam.

This past weekend, on Feb. 5, the Lady Rams redeemed themselves when they traveled to Temple University where they placed second in the Ken Anderson tri-meet with a record-breaking team score of 189.775. The Temple meet was an outstanding weekend for the Golden Rams in which seven of their school records were broken. The team started on the balance beam, a tricky event to begin the meet with. Junior Kaley

Lafleur beat the school’s beam record with a huge score of 9.775, also giving her a win on the event. “There is no better feeling than knowing you just hit a solid beam routine and that all your hard work had finally paid off. Breaking the beam record this past weekend means the world to me and knowing that I now hold the record is incredible,” said Lafleur. The Rams then moved on to the floor and completed the event

with no falls, leading to a record-breaking team score of 47.025. Following the floor came an extremely successful event for the team, the vault. Freshman Stephanie Schuler tied West Chester’s previous vault record with a big score of 9.75. The vault line-up also worked together to beat the total vault score with a 47.9. To conclude the meet, the Rams finished with a strong performance on the uneven bars. Schuler beat the schools individ-

ual bar record with a score of 9.675. The bar line-up also accomplished a team bar score of 47.425, which is yet another school record that was broken during the day’s competition. Additionally, Schuler beat the individual all around record with a 38.325, which also secured her a first place finish in the meet. “I love being a part of such an amazing team and it’s great to have them rooting for me,” Stephanie Schuler said. “Our team’s energy is

awesome. I am honored to be a part of such a strong line-up.” Many gymnasts on the Lady Ram’s gymnastics team were also able to record their season high score on multiple events. The Rams are looking forward to their next competition on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Big Red Invitational at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. Emily Seigel is a secondyear student majoring in early childhood education. She can be reached at ES734640@wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD SPORTS

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Men’s hockey loses second series to Delaware By Kenny Ayres Sports Editor In any sport, a strong finish to the regular season is extremely important. Whether that finish prepares a team for the playoffs, gives them playoff berth, or even is just a high point in a tough season, ending strong is how every team wants to finish the year. The West Chester men’s club hockey team may look back on their 2-4 end to the regular season and wish they had been able to somehow squeeze out a win against Delaware, who with a 7-3 win Friday and 6-2 win Saturday may have dashed the Rams’ hopes at earning a spot in the National Tournament. Delaware took all four games they played against West Chester in the last three weeks, outscoring them 25-8 in those games. Despite Delaware posting a 29-2-1 record on the year, West Chester had their chance to pull out a win two weeks ago at home after leading 1-0 for two periods and had another shot at a win on Friday. West Chester’s offense was strong early in Friday’s game, tallying three goals in the first period. Tim Higgins started the scoring around the 7minute mark. Higgins displayed incredible puck control with defenders surrounding him and beat Delaware goaltender Nick Casella with a high backhand shot. Later in the period with the score tied at one, the Rams found that the stretch pass was working against the Delaware defense. First it was Steve Meade who was camped out at the Delaware blue line. Bob McInerney hit him with a pass from the

defensive zone and Meade had an uncontested chance to beat Casella, which he did giving the Rams a 2-1 advantage. The goal was Meade’s 24th on the year, and his 43rd point, which tied his personal best that he set during the 2010-11 season. Less than 30 seconds later Chris Gentile executed the exact same play, scoring his 15th goal of the season and putting West Chester up by two. For a while the Rams held off the Delaware attack, but their defense began to falter late in the period. With Jeff Dugan and Matt Feeney out for the game, West Chester was missing their two most imposing players. The Delaware power forwards jumped on the opportunity to basically do what they wanted physically while in the offensive zone. Delaware scored twice in less than a minute toward the end of the first period as they took advantage on some defensive miscues to tie the game at three. “We did not execute in our defensive zone and

that led to a lot of our troubles,” head coach Shawn Dorsey said. “Delaware is a big, physical and fast team. Our objective was to try to take away the middle of the ice and force them to the outside. We didn’t do a good job of that. I thought that we were trying to chase them around our defensive zone, and that left a lot of gaps.” Despite the defensive problems faced in the first period, Randy Japchen kept Delaware from taking the lead as he steered aside 17 of 20 shots he faced in the first period. West Chester hung in the game for almost half of the second period, but things went downhill when Delaware took a 4-3 lead. West Chester lost all discipline and seemingly lost all confidence that they could win the game. “We got really down on ourselves,” Dorsey said. “Mistakes happen and bad bounces happen but you have to have a short term memory. We took it to heart and got down on ourselves and Delaware took advantage…Our guys have to learn to bring the

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

Bob McInerney stretches the ice with a pass from the defensive zone to Steve Meade, who scored on the play.

same intensity on a consistent basis, for 60 minutes.” Delaware managed another goal in the second before scoring two more late in the third to go up 7-3. They held West Chester’s offense in check, and when the Rams began to show their frustration with the game, the score, and the refs, Delaware used it all to their advantage. “Delaware knew that if they played physical and p u s h e d around some of our top guys that they could get under their skin. And we responded in a negative way to that,” Dorsey said. The Blue Hens went on to win Friday’s Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad contest by a final of 7-3, and West Tim Margadonna and Steve Meade mix it up with some Delaware Chester could players in front of the net as the Blue Hens captain looks on. only hope to

get back at it Saturday and pull out a much needed win. However, they were not able to get it. West Chester did get Feeney back for the second game, but lost a top scorer in Harrison Welch after a questionable hit the night before, which injured his shoulder. A spearing major and misconduct early in the game somehow left Delaware with a 10minute power play, in which they scored five goals and took a 6-2 lead. Who knows what would have happened if Delaware had never gone on the extended power play. If West Chester had been able to hold them scoreless for those ten minutes, they could have possibly won the game 2-1. The lone bright spot that came out of the game was the strong offensive performance of McInerney and Meade. In what was his last regular season game as a Golden Ram, McInerney tallied his third goal in the last four games giving him

seven on the season. “Mac has a great shot from the point that leads to a lot of our goals. He has really stepped up since coming back from injuries and is a huge help on defense as well,” Feeney said. Meade scored the other goal, his 25th of the year and he surpassed his previous season high in points by one point. Although they both surely would have traded individual stats for a win, it is a good sign for West Chester that Meade and McInerney are on fire if they manage to earn a bid to Nationals. At this point, it all depends on how the other teams do. The Rams can only sit and wait until Friday when the final rankings come out. Regardless of whether they earn the bid or not, West Chester will take part in the ESCHL playoffs beginning next Friday. Kenny Ayres is a secondyear student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD SPORTS

Despite a strong effort Saturday from Claude Giroux in which he scored his 62nd point of the season, the Flyers’ struggles against the Rangers continued as they fell by a final score of 5-3. Sporting their Winter Classic jerseys, the Flyers hoped to end a winless drought against New York that dates back to Feb. 20 of last year, but fell short to the Rangers for the seventh straight game. With the win, New York now holds a six point lead over the Flyers in the division.

Sports FEBRUARY 13, 2012

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Men’s basketball beats Kutztown and Bloomsburg Page-20

WCU Diving team prepares for Championships Page-19 Women’s hockey earns shutout win over Villanova Page-22 Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

Quad 102-03  

The Quad issue of February 13, 2012