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W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M

MONDAY. OCTOBER 31, 2011

V O L UM E 1 0 1 . I S S U E 6

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS

OP-ED

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FEATURES

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ENT

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Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

SPORTS

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THE QUAD

Sister to Sister hosts “Love Your Body” fashion show By Clare Haggerty Special to The Quad

of Alpha Xi Delta, said that she would absolutely go to another event like the fashion show. “Body image is On Thursday, Oct. 27, what makes you yourself, West Chester Univerand you need to stay true sity held its annual Love to yourself,” Flynn said. Your Body Fashion Show One of the models in the in the Sykes Theater. fashion show, Courtney KaThe fashion show was linowski, became involved hosted by Sister to Sister, because she saw the fashion a WCUorganization which show last year and it made recruits and trains sorority her want to be a part of women to be mentors and Love Your positive role Body Day. models to othKalinowski, er women on also a sister campus, parof Alpha Xi ticularly in the Delta, said, areas of body “Ever yon e image, eating is differdisorders, and ent, and I self-esteem. think it’s This event important was part of that Sister Love Your to Sister Body Day, a promotes national camto be proud paign which, of what you according to look like.” their website, Another “challenges model, Liz the message O’Donn ell, that a womwho is a sisan’s value is ter of Zeta best measured Photo by Dominique Perry/The Quad Tau Alpha, through her Twenty sorority women modeled for the fashion show liked that willingness and ability to embody cur- pressure that the media puts walk, Sister to Sister showed Love Your Body day is full rent beauty standards.” on girls to be their definition another movie clip called of different things that focus Sister to Sister took more of “beautiful” all the time. Miss Representation about on learning to help others. “Even if you tried to change The fashion show then how women are still made than two months to plan the fashion show in order to show began, playing music that to feel unimportant in the it, your body would natutheir support of the Love centered on being beauti- business and political world; rally go back to what it is Your Body Day campaign. ful, such as “Just the Way this video also focused on the supposed to be,” O’Donnell “There is a devastatingly You Are,” “Born This Way,” fact that it needs to change. said. “But that’s beautiful. Audience member Mary You are what you are, and increasing number of women and “Who Says.” Twenty with low self-esteem or eat- girls modeled the clothes Flynn said that she liked the what you are is unique.” Clare Hoggerty is a firsting disorders. We, as a com- that they felt most comfort- videos and that they pormunity of sisters, need to able in, and each model had trayed women as leaders. “It year student majoring in band together to promote a specific thing she liked really opened up my eyes,” English. She can be reached CH757342@wcupa.edu. a healthy, positive body im- about herself—whether it she said. Flynn, a member at age for all women,” Lauren Bolden, vice president of the Panhellenic Council Executive Board, said. Before the event began, the room was buzzing with excitement and chatter. There were close to 200 girls in attendance, with a handful of fraternity brothers. Before the fashion show began, they showed a clip warning students to ignore the

was legs, skin, shoulders, teeth, hands, dimples, and many others. All of the models looked different: they were blonde, brunette, fair, dark, tall, and short. The only thing that they all had in common was that they were healthy-looking, which is a big difference from seeing models in the fashion industry. After all of the models walked the cat-

See photos from the “Love Your Body” on page 6

News OCTOBER 31, 2011

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Mike Dilbeck speaks against Bystander Behavior By Veronica Resa Special to The Quad Remember witnessing classmates making fun of the proverbial geek or nerd and you wanted to make them stop but didn’t speak up? Years later, you can still remember the sequence of events like it was yesterday and you wince because you did nothing. Mike Dilbeck empowers students to get involved and stop the cycle of abuse by eliminating bystander behavior. “It’s an amazing opportunity to have this rare conversation with students -one where they realize how much they want to make a difference, yet in those crucial moments, may hesitate from doing so. We all want to make a difference --to be an everyday hero to someone -- yet we freeze, stay silent or simply walk away from doing what our values would have us do,” Mike Dilbeck said. “My mission is to empower people to take actions that will make THE difference.” Dilbeck is a filmmaker turned advocate against bystander behavior that includes bullying, drug and alcohol abuse, sexual abuse and assault, discrimination, hazing and more. He is also founder of the RESPONSE ABILITY Project and an expert on this type of behavior. He has spoken to more than 30,000 students nationwide and visited West Chester University of Pennsylvania on Monday, Oct. 24, 2011. Dilbeck’s message is to empower people to say something when they see something wrong. He gives people the tools to feel empowered to intervene. A recent ex-

ample that illustrates the cause and effect of Bystander Behavior is: a student told Dilbeck he witnessed a teen being whipped with chains. The student could have called the police on his cell but did nothing. Later that evening, the news reported the victim had died from his injuries. Dilbeck explains that the guilt this student feels “runs deep and is something he will carry with him for the rest of his life.” Stories like this involve bystander behavior -- those times when we see or know about a crime or the situation and say nothing, do nothing. Dilbeck hopes to change this. While there are many psychologists, psychiatrists, academics, and others to speak on the subject of bystander behavior, Dilbeck offers the average person’s perspective to this phenomenon and makes it digestible for the listener or viewer to comprehend. Dilbeck has produced an award-winning educational program on Bystander Behavior and travels the country touching and impacting the hearts of people everywhere. Dilbeck is a member of the National Speakers Association and has been a keynote speaker at DePaul, Carnegie Mellon, Loyola, RPI and other great universities, colleges, and conventions throughout the United States. He has spoken and empowered thousands of college students to stop Bystander Behavior. For information on this project visit: www.raproject.org. Courtesy of Veronica Resa. Veronica Resa can be contacted at vresa70@hotmail.com


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THE QUAD

Political Science club hosts seminar on sexual oppression By Angela Thomas News Editor On Tuesday, Oct. 25, the Political Science club at WCU hosted a seminar on sexual oppression. The seminar, which was lead by guest speaker, Jill McDevitt, sexologist and owner of Feminique Boutique, was the first politically focused workshop that McDevitt designed. McDevitt focused on the anti-sex movement and ways that society has sexually oppressed people and how in return, we have sexually oppressed each other and where the history of oppression comes from. “I went to college to study sexuality. To do that, I actually had to go to a foreign country,” McDevitt said. “The step one of the crusade is that this country does not offer degrees in sexuality. You cannot get that education. You are denied that education at an undergraduate level.” McDevitt talked about the difficulties of finding a job in the United States for sexology after graduating from college. “There was nobody hiring sexologists,” McDevitt said. “So I started my own company.” McDevitt talked about her struggle with sexual oppression when opening her business, a sexpositive, feminist, womenpositive boutique in town. “I was not able to get a business permit,” McDevitt said. This resulted in her getting a lawyer and fighting her case. McDevitt couldn’t even gain access to a credit card machine, which required a whole sign up process. McDevitt had to sign a contract with a bank, which refused to allow her to sign because they considered her an “adult entertainer.” In 2008, McDevitt was able to open Feminique Boutique after going through many hurtles.

In order to understand the effects of sexual oppression in the US, McDevitt created an exercise for her guests to participate in. Guests were given different scenarios about situations regarding sex and censorship. Students were given the choice to place these scenarios in either “totally interested” or “totally uninterested” and “legal and unregulated” or “illegal and punishable by jail” or anywhere between. One situation included a scenario featuring an ex-

fuse to fill birth control prescriptions. McDevitt pointed out that the common denominator within all the examples given at the seminar was the effect on children. McDevitt gave a history of the “won’t people think of our children?’’ movement. McDevitt included examples from different eras including one from the 1950s using the social fear of powerful teens and unAmerican activities and tracing it to the rouse of rock n rollers perverting teens. “We had a cold war, we had the whole blacklisting, McCarthyism and this was right after World War II. Your typical teenagers’ allowance was the same as an entire familys’ during World War II so all of a sudden you have these teenagers’ that are loaded and forming their own identities. So what happens? Rock and rollers are pervertwestchester.patch.com ing our teens,” McDevitt said. McDevitt used cerpt from “The Diary of the example of Elvis PreAnne Frank” where Anne sley, who was ridiculed for discovers and becomes curi- his “provocative” dancing. ous about her female body. “So whatever the social Guests could decide whether fear, whether it is gay marthey would be interested in riage, Muslims, terrorists, reading this excerpt or com- housing market crashing, pletely uninterested in the whatever the social fear is, excerpt and whether it was it will be wrapped up in sex punishable by jail or should and children because the be completely unregulated. powers that be can guaranWhen asked about their re- tee that they will get you unactions, one guest said that comfortable,” McDevitt said. they had never been asked McDevitt encouraged to think about whether dif- guests to look at what their ferent scenarios should interests were and disrebe legal or unregulated. gard them. “It a constant The scenarios demonstrat- reflection on yourself. Just ed in McDevitt’s exercise because you have that gut were used to show students reaction of ‘I hate this,’ what the government has are you being an oppressor made illegal and legal. For when you have that feelexample, in 2010, a Virginia ing?” McDevitt concluded. school district pulled “The To learn more about Diary of Anne Frank” out McDevitt’s story, visit her of their curriculum because website at www.thesexa parent of a student com- ologist.org or email her plained that she “did not at jill@thesexologist.org. want her child to read a sexAngela Thomas is a fourth ually graphic book.” Another -year student majoring in example was given that it is Engish. She can be reached legal for pharmacists to re- at AT683005@wcupa.edu.

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Exam helps students teach their way through college Jen Mika Practicum Writer

In recent years, CLEP Exams have grown increasingly popular as a way to gain college credits without attending class. CLEP, also known as College-Level Exam Preparation, is a program in which individuals take an exam on material that they learned through independent study. Designed by the College Board as a series of standardized tests, CLEP is an alternative to taking undergraduate college courses, which allows individuals to demonstrate college-level achievement and still receive full credit. CLEP offers 33 exams in five subject areas, a majority being general education classes. The material includes subjects in History & Social Sciences, Composition & Literature, Science & Mathematics, Business, and World Languages. Most exams are designed to correspond with one-semester courses; however, some are alternatives for fullyear or two-year courses. In order to prepare for

a CLEP examination, one must first choose a subject. Most universities prefer it be a subject in which the student has not already taken. Then one must purchase the CLEP test book, which is available at bookstores or online. The book is an official study guide as it includes full length practice tests, answers, and reviews. Most suggest at least 20 hours of studying before the exam in order to feel fully prepared. Any student is eligible to take a CLEP exam i.e. college students, adults who are returning to school, or high school students wanting to advance to their sophomore level once attending college. It is a practical solution for gaining credit for someone in a hurry to earn a degree or to reduce the amount of courses needed. The amount of credits received depends on the course chosen or may depend on the university. Primarily, the exams are approximately three credits, sometimes six. For World Languages, credits may be six to 12 credits. Credits depend on university policy and may vary.

WCU students are eligible to take CLEP examinations as part of Experiential Learning or Life Learning Experience. Only degree credit is rewarded when students achieve qualifying scores, which are in the 50th percentile or above. Examinations are given every month of each semester except for December and are only given on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The exam is computer based and all questions are multiple choice. Like any college course, there is a small fee. WCU charges $89 and payment is acceptable through check or credit card. When one is ready to take the exam, simply contact the Office of the Registrar to set up an appointment. CLEP test books are approximately $35 and may be found at any local bookstore in the ‘College’ section. For other information including available test dates, contact the Office of the Registrar. Jen Mika is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at JM653231@wcupa.edu.

Alpha Kappa Delta: A Society Re-emerges By Kaitlyn Drabb Special to The Quad The International Sociology Honor Society, Alpha Kappa Delta, has been reestablished on the West Chester University Campus. Alpha Kappa Delta, founded in 1920 by University of Southern California sociologist Dr. Emory Bogardus, is built around scholarship and fellowship. AKD or Anthropos, Kathamanthano, and Daikaneo, translates into, “To investigate humanity for

the purpose of service.” The return of Alpha Kappa Delta to the WCU provides Sociology majors/ minors with an organization designed for them. A chance to enhance their knowledge, provide service, and meet people invested in the same interests. This organization also wants to provide opportunities and knowledge to all majors. Our first step is to host a graduate application workshop on Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. in Old Library. This workshop will present

the do’s and don’ts of graduate applications, the process, the key to deciding on a program, and much more. Sociology major/minor students and those interested in this organization or would like more information on the graduate workshop, contact the secretary Kaitlyn Drabb at KD672847@ wcupa.edu or the President Stephanie Needles at SN667215@wcupa.edu. Kaitlyn Drabb is a fourth -year student majoring in sociology and history. She can be reached at KD672847@wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD

Your vote, your voice! Election Day: Tuesday Nov 8th

By Mayor Carolyn Comitta and Courtney Potts Special to The Quad

Retention Election: Vote Yes or No (whether you think the person should keep their position) Judge of the Supreme Court J. Michael Eaken Judge of the Superior Court Mary Jane Bowes John T. Bender Judge of the Commonwealth Court Robert E. Simpson, Jr. Mary Hannah Leavitt

west-chester.com

Have you heard that local elections will be taking place in one week, next Tuesday, Nov. 8? While local elections may not be as “in your face” as Presidential elections, they are still important occasions that every citizen should participate in. Are you content to let other people make important decisions that impact your life for you? Would you want your little brother (or a random person on the street, for that matter), to select your outfit for a date, or would you want to choose it yourself? Why then, would you let someone else choose your local elected officials, such as District Attorney, your Council Members, and County Commissioners for you? To help yourself become an informed voter, take a look below for a brief overview of the candidates and their potential positions. For more detailed information, view the PA League of Women Voters’ Guide for Municipal Election 2011 at http://www.palwv.org/chesco/temp/votersguide2011fall.pdf

Judge of the Court of Common Pleas Anthony A. Sarcione Phyllis R. Streitel Regular Election Judge of the Superior Court Vic Stabile - Republican David N. Wecht - Democrat Judge of the Commonwealth Court Anne Covey - Republican Kathryn Boockvar - Democrat Sheriff Carolyn Bunny Welsh - Republican Alexander Catone - Democrat

Polling locations include Lawrence Hall, Wayne Hall, Borough Public Works and Borough Hall for all campus students and most of those living in campus neighborhoods. Visit www.chesco.org voter services to verify your polling location. Polls open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. You may vote as long as you are in line by 8 p.m. Particularly with the growing worldwide “Occupy” protests, the time is NOW to take a stand and vote! It is obvious that young people care about what is going on in the world, in our economy, and in our communities. Students should care

Court of Common Pleas Ann Marie Wheatcraft - Crossfiled Republican/Democrat Mark Tunnell - Crossfiled Republican/Democrat Fredda Denise Maddox - Democrat Tom Purl - Democrat County Commissioners Ryan A. Costello - Republican Terence Farrell - Republican Kathi Cozzone - Democrat Susan Bayne - Democrat District Attorney Tom Hogan - Republican Samuel C. Stretton - Democrat West Chester Area School District School Directors Please note: The school board race also has a group of six write-in candidates who are trying to challenge those on the ballot Maureen Snook - Crossfiled Republican/Democrat Karen Miller - Crossfiled Republican/Democrat Linda Railenu - Crossfiled Republican/Democrat Vincent Murphy - Republican Galen Plona - Republican Ted Diehl - Democrat Wayne Burton - Democrat

about the upcoming races because the decisions our elected officials make affects our communities and our lives. Voting is your voice in what happens with the government. It’s time to vote. So do it! It may be slightly inconvenient, it may take a little time out of your hectic day, but when you lay your head down to sleep next Tuesday night, will you be able to say that you fulfilled your civic duty and voiced your opinion? Or will you fall asleep knowing that you let someone else decide who should govern us?

OCTOBER 31 2011

WCU hosts study abroad fair

By Meghan Nieves Special to The Quad On Tuesday, Oct. 25, West Chester University held a Study Abroad Fair for students inside of the Sykes Ballrooms from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. This event gave students the chance to gain insight on a multitude of options when it comes to spending a summer, semester, or year in another country. Inside of the Sykes Ballrooms, tables were set up by different programs presented from different schools. Each table had a representative for students to talk to, and a great amount of information for them to take as you please. In charge of the event was Angela Howard, the director of study abroad programs.

This gives students the chance to separate themselves from others when applying for jobs. Whether students are studying abroad for a long period of time or a short one, studying abroad is something excellent to put onto ones resume. At the Study Abroad Fair there were alumni that students could speak to about their own experience. The Study Abroad program is an opportunity all students on campus are welcome to obtain. If students are interested in this life changing opportunity, students cango see their adviser studyabroad.nku.edu to get the information to make this happen. to enrich their lives and Meghan Nieves is a stunetwork with new people dent at West Chester Unithat could very well be- versity. She can be reached MN763344@wcupa.edu. come life long friends. at She stressed the importance of this event and the opportunities that it presented to students on campus. The study abroad program gives students the chance


OCTOBER 31, 2011

THE QUAD

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The Quad is looking for a Thoughts from the Mayor’s Intern business manager. E-mail quadeic@wcupa.edu to apply. By Courtney Potts Special to The Quad

Want an event covered? E-mail the News section at quadnews@wcupa.edu Take out hunger project begins by feeding locals By Ellen Howard Special to The Quad

Have you ever worried about where your next meal will come from? If you have, then you already know the agonizing pain of hunger that pierces your stomach without hesitation. If you have never felt this feeling, this is your chance to help. According to a 2010 statistic published in the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Chester County Food Bank serves meals to approximately 110,000 residents each year. Out of over 499,000 residents living in Chester County, approximately 22 percent of Chester County residents were in need of food last year. While this issue is a grave injustice in itself, the real problem is that, in many high schools and univer-

sities, extra food is simply wasted rather than donated to the people who actually need it. As students and faculty members of West Chester University, we are used to seeing the shelves and countertops at campus dining facilities fully stocked with nutritious fare. What many of us do not realize, however, is that any food left over at the end of the day is thrown out, regardless of whether or not the food even made it out of the kitchen. This semester, Aramark (the food service provider for WCU) and the Office of Student Leadership and Involvement, have created a project that takes the unused food from dining facilities and distributes it to local homeless shelters and food cupboards. The program, called Take-Out Hunger, is a

food rescue initiative that will provide meals to the hungry in the West Chester community. Through Take-Out Hunger, WCU volunteers, together with Aramark employees, package and transport untouched food to local shelters, such as Safe Harbor of Greater West Chester and the West Chester Salvation Army. Take-Out Hunger is an incredible volunteer opportunity for any student or faculty member interested in giving time to a charitable cause. The program begins every Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. at Lawrence Dining Hall. Volunteers are not required to provide their own transportation to the non-profit organizations. If you are interested in volunteering with TakeOut Hunger, please contact Ellen Howard at EH672679@wcupa.edu.

With the semester well under way, West Chester University’s campus is bustling. While lots of learning goes on inside the classroom, much occurs outside it as well. I am learning a great deal about how the community and local government function as Intern to Mayor Comitta. Lately, I’ve been finding out about the many wonderful resources West Chester has to offer. Mayor Comitta and I attended the Women in Service & Leadership’s Speed Networking Event in Sykes. A host of professional women from diverse career fields attended, along with many female WCU students. The exchange of stories, information, and advice that occurred in a mere two hours was astonishing. I left the event feeling uplifted and motivated, with good advice in tow. Several professionals advised me to pursue a career that I am passionate about and interested in. One even recommended pinpointing my interests by observing which news stories I focus on in my free time. After reflecting on my own CNN.com perusing habits, I

concluded that I should pursue a career that involves animals, children, the environment, and/or politics. I hope to shape my interests and experiences into a career path in the coming months, so I can find a job after I graduate in May. Which reminds me, I need to visit the Twardowski Career Development Center so we can review my resume and discuss future career options. You should visit the CDC too! I also attended the grand opening celebration of the Daily Local News’ Community Media Lab. This large, inviting room is designed with YOU in mind! Once used as office space and storage, the Community Media Lab now hosts six computers, a large, free space for any community groups to meet, and walls full of beautiful artwork, painted by local Chester County artists. The Daily Local News envisions the space being used to help the community engage in the news-making process. Be sure to visit the lab if you have a chance, which is located in the Daily Local News’ building at 250 East Bradford Ave. Interning with the Office of the Mayor has been a great resource, as well. Recently,

Mayor Comitta, Councilman Chuck Christie, and I traveled to State College, PA for the Pennsylvania League of Cities and Municipalities’ University Communities Conference. A wide variety of University and Borough personnel from all over the state gathered to discuss how both communities can work together. A highlight of the conference was hearing the Chancellor of PASSHE, Dr. John Cavanaugh, speak. I also enjoyed learning about how the State College Police and Penn State University police forces work in together unison along with students to promote “safer” and legal partying practices. Before a party begins, officers talk with students to discuss how they can avoid trouble with the law, their health, and their community. This proactive approach to law enforcement seems like a positive one to me. Stay tuned next month for tips on how West Chester University students can engage in “safer” and legal partying practices. Courtney Potts is a fourth year student majoring in political science and international relations with minors in Spanish and Latin American studies. She can be reached at CP678599@wcupa.edu.

The Quad would like to make a correction: In the editorial, “Israel should stop these prisoner exchanges” there was a misspelling of a name. The correct spelling is Gilad Shalit.


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THE QUAD

OCTOBER 31 2011

Photos from the Love Your Body fashion show From page 2

Photo by Ilana Berger/The Quad

Photo by Dominique Perry/The Quad

Photo by Dominique Perry/The Quad

Photo by Ilana Berger/The Quad


OCTOBER 31, 2011

THE QUAD

Opinion & Editorial

Snowy Halloween Weekend The snow fell early this year, but the typical people who go sledding with improvised tools for a sled have not been spotted. Maybe they went trick-or-treating in the snow instead. Snow is expected every year, whether or not it comes or even how much. In addition to shock, I sat in amazement as I watched the snow fall, covering our campus. It’s not often you see snow fall before you can’t escape from radio stations playing Holiday songs. Somehow it happened, even before Halloween. Seeing Elmo and Big Bird, along with Ernie and Burt, and other pairs such as Woody and Buzz Light Year dodging snow flakes with three aliens following behind them, that would be a new sight for most. While some people did last minute costume shopping, other people put together a last minute costume, working with the supplies they own. A fun part of Halloween is guessing what a costume is, or in some cases, guessing what that persons costume is suppose to represent. While playing such a guessing game, I found many friends reliving their childhood TV moments, as they attempted to recall cartoons and character names. Personally, I’ve always enjoyed a build up to Halloween with horror movies and theme related flicks. I’ll listen to Halloween music, until it scares me of course. During my trick or treating days, I would sort through my candy with friends, just like everyone else did when they ended their rounds for the night. One aspect I love most about Halloween is that you can have a different costume every year and do different activities for the Halloween weekend. You could always wear the same costume for another year, but what may change are the interactions you have. Strive to make every holiday better than the last. Enjoy the various articles for our Halloween edition. Have a safe and happy Halloween. ~ Ginger Rae Editor-in-Chief

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The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 Phone: 610.436.2375 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief QuadEIC@wcupa.edu EDITORIAL BOARD

EDITORIAL STAFF

Angela Thomas News Editor Bill Hanrahan Op-Ed Editor Rebekah Balmer Features Editor Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor Kenny Ayres Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Photography Editor

Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor Jess Guzzardo Asst. Photography Editor

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Art Director Britt Silver Business Editor Dan Colon Advertising Manager Mike Mills

COPY EDITORS Kelly Adams Sarah Gurgal Bethany Van De Water

DISTRIBUTION Alexis Caporizzo Mike Coia ONLINE EDITION Kristin Solanick FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/ artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Copyright ©2011 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


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THE QUAD

OCTOBER 31, 2011

Bystander behavior affects everyone -- instead take the hero pledge Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief Practicum Writer Mike Dilbeck, founder of RESPONSE ABILITY, described his friend as a hero after his friend did something for him that he didn’t have to. His friend had thrown him a surprise party, gathering their classmates to have a celebration of how proud they were of him. As I sat listening to his story, I found myself remembering Laura doing that for me. Laura has been my best friend since I met her in the third grade. Only after a dinner event had been cancelled that I found out it was actually a surprise birthday party for me. Laura called my friends and carried out the event as though she had planned it. She brought over pasta and cooked for all of us. She didn’t have to do that, but she did. She made my night. Dilbeck gave an inspiring speech to WCU students, informing us of how to not be a bystander. He taught lessons that are never too late to learn and never to late for someone to recognize as lacking a voice when they could have spoken up. He got students in the audience to think of a time they could have acted, when they didn’t. I’m sure I’ve been a bystander in the past and I didn’t react when someone needed help. In fact, I know I have been. But that was then, it matters what we do now, Dilbeck ensured those in the audience. He’s right, we can change our actions. We don’t have to be by-standers anymore. I think one of the most

valid points he made, encourages people to get over the fear of others when stepping up to help a friend, classmate, stranger, or whoever the person may be. He tells people to go beyond the barriers. He referred to someone taking action as an everyday hero. What he had to say made so much sense, that I think people will take action the next time they see something that needs to be addressed. The next time they see an altercation, they won’t be a bystander, they will be an everyday hero. Recently, after seeing an altercation escalade, I watched as people tried to break up a fight. My friends and I stopped walking, mostly due to shock, to watch what would happen next. People were yelling and their friends were threatening to call the police. Noticing alcohol bottles covering the porch they were hollering on, my friends and I felt uncomfortable as we watched the group migrate to the parking lot. One person, who clearly had consumed alcohol, got into his car and turned on the car. I heard a friend say something about a drunk driver and I reached for my cell phone. I’m sure most of the people there have a cell phone. Every one of my friends did too. And I’m sure everyone behind us, also watching from a distance, has a cell phone. I wasn’t going to put us in physical danger by intervening, but I could prevent someone else from being in harm’s way of a drunk driver. I called it in to the police as my

friends and I walked away. No one there had to see that I called it in. But I couldn’t just walk away without doing something at least. After hearing Dilbeck speak, I’m glad to realize I was not a bystander that night. When Dilbeck presented typical thoughts

of a bystander, I found them to be such a scary reality. We think someone else will do something. But what if no one does? It would take only one person to act. Sadly, it may be more common to hear a story of a person recalling no one helping them, rather than to

hear a story of someone who did do something. Silence is the biggest way a person remains a bystander. I’m guilty too. Unfortunately it seems it takes real conflicts to understand how you can help someone. It could be as simple as asking someone to stop,

or involving an authority figure, or it could be as hard as needing an individual to take the matter into their own hands to stop it. As we grow up, we build confidence and learn how to deal with conflict in situations. Dilbeck reminded the audiSee BYSTANDER on page 9

CAreer trAining. money for College.

And An entire teAm

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suCCeed. Serving part-time in the Air National Guard, you’ll have an entire team of like-minded individuals who want to help you get ahead. You can choose from nearly 200 career specialties, and develop the high-tech skills you need to compete in today’s world. You also train close to home, all while receiving a steady paycheck, benefits and tuition assistance. Talk to a recruiter today, and see how the Pennsylvania Air National Guard can help you succeed.


OCTOBER 31, 2011

Bystander from page 8

ence, it would be simple to not be a bystander, but it won’t be easy. He encouraged everyone: be that one person that does react and that does help. You’ll feel better knowing you did what you could to help. You never know when or who will do the same for you. I’ll always remember the night I helped out one of my friends. Sometimes when we talk about this night, she would say we saved her life that night. When I tell the story, I say how I was there for a friend when she needed someone. Walking to her house in a blizzard gives the story credibility. In all honesty, another friend and I walked to her house despite the blizzard because we wanted to be with her when she needed someone to talk to. Even to this day I simply tell her, that’s what friends do for each other. I like to think Dilbeck would agree in the sense we did something we didn’t have to do. What happened that night saved a life and gave me another best friend. My friends and I tell each other that we can call each other, any time of day or night, if we ever need anything. Even if we don’t take one another up on this, it’s comforting having that option. It’s nice to know you can call someone who will help walk you through any given situation. I encourage everyone to make the pledge to be an everyday hero. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth year student, majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.

THE QUAD

PAGE 9

Halloween costumes

By Patrick McFadden Practicum Writer All Hallow’s Eve is often looked at as a time when we can cast off all preconceived notions our friends and neighbors may harbor in relation to who and what we are as a person. It is a time to forget a recent heartbreak, unemployment, crippling debt, a plant that died because you didn’t water it enough (RIP Audrey II) or any number of other emotional inconveniences you’ve had to weather in recent months. We paint our faces, dye our hair and put on outfits we would never imagine wearing in our “real lives.” We leave all our baggage back at our respective homes, step out into the street and transform ourselves into a horse of a completely different color. It’s an unspoken but commonly held belief that what we dress up as on Halloween somehow reflects us as a person. This is not a difficult idea to defend, as, with most psychology, there’s a myriad number of avenues to take. A few years ago I attended a party where two gentlemen, who did not know each other, both dressed up as what was then the costume of the year: Steve Irwin with a stingray hanging from his chest. One of these men got belligerently drunk and eventually fell down a flight of stairs while the other remained mostly sober and ended up helping some of the more intoxicated guests find their way home. Now, despite wearing the exact same

costume, these men behaved in two totally different ways, and can have their behavior attributed to their costume choice. The drunkard clearly wore his costume in an unconscious attempt to alert his friends of his obvious death wish as shown through his excess drinking and defeat at the battle of the stairs. The sober Irwin dressed as such in an effort to mock death, something he evidently has a fear of in so much that he doesn’t trust himself to get drunk. I will be the first to admit that I am not a psychologist and that both examples I just gave would probably be torn apart by any second year psychology student. The point I’m trying to make is that we pass a judgment, consciously or unconsciously, on a person based on the costume they’re wearing. This judgment is often viewed as much more pure and unfiltered than one based on a person’s clothing, diction or enigmatic affinity for Adam Sandler movies because it is a conscious choice. You don’t choose what kind of music you prefer—it’s just whichever notes hit your ear just right that make you choose Dawes over Gershwin. It’s never deliberate. Halloween, on the other hand, is a day (or weekend) where every microcosm of your outfit is deliberate and carefully chosen by you. So, in theory, what a person wears on Halloween should unequivocally be a window into their soul. With that in mind, I’d like to dispel a few

myths often associated with some of the season’s most popular costumes. Steve Jobs – A big one this year, it’s very easy to make the assumption that the individual dressed as Jobs is a disrespectful person with very poor taste who wants to get a cheap laugh out of the death of one of the very few people left on this planet who actually knew what he was doing and does not understand that nobody wants to go home with a dead guy. In reality, most of the Steve Jobs you encountered this past weekend were more than likely wearing the official Apple Steve Jobs iCostume. The all sleek all black outfit is a sign of mourning with all proceeds going to Jobs’ family who’ve probably been buying their clothes at Goodwill and surviving on rice and beans for the past four weeks. The iCostume also does e-mail. The Sexy Schoolgirl and Mario & Luigi – I pair these two together as they both represent a beautiful yet tragic dream: reclaiming lost youth. While some might say that both outfits are terribly played-out, have outstayed their welcome and are sure signs of a person devoid of any originality— possibly even a personality. The schoolgirl clearly has daddy issues, as she needs to regress in both clothing and mental state in an attempt to gain the approval of men her actual age. Some would then add that the Mario Bros. are trapped in a perpetual state of arrested development, so terrified of becoming

men that they need to wrap themselves in the garbs of childhood obsession, their stunted emotional growth further exemplified by their need to wear a fake mustache. This is all, of course, a pack of lies. Both the schoolgirl and Mario Bros. are, in reality, merely yearning for two very different care-free days of youth. The schoolgirl is representative of the thirst for knowledge we only feel as children—the wide-eyed innocence that needs to know why the sky is blue and who the Prime Minister of Australia is, staying after school in uniform to hang out in the library and become a scholar. The Mario Bros., on the other end, show who we were when we weren’t learning. It represents hanging out with our best friends and family members, exploring, playing games and embracing the imagination that only exists before puberty. I could go on and on, but I think I’ve made my point. So next year, as October winds down and you prepare for another celebration of surrogacy, leave your judgments at home, along with your baggage. If you’re not bring-

ing yours out with you, chances are most other people aren’t either. Patrick McFadden is a fourth-year student majoring in literature with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at PM623279@ wcupa.edu

Source: partycity.com


PAGE 10

THE QUAD

OCTOBER 31, 2011

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THE QUAD

Cult Fiction, a new genre? By Dominique Perry Practicum Writer

This past Friday, Sykes after Dark had its ninth entertainment event, kicking off the Halloween weekend with a performance of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” The film originally began as a musical play, but in 1975 the stage production ignited more viewers to see this movie repeatedly. Its appeal has much to do with the content and how it defies a mainstream outlook on society. Much of this movie focuses on the sexual initiation of an American couple entering a world of eroticism in Transylvania. The peculiar movie fits into the “cult classic genre.” In most cases cult classics can be found under various genres such as science fiction, hor-

ror or even romance. In the article “Tapping into the Appeal of Cult Fiction,” Kelly Fann and Barry Trott discuss and explore what cult classics are and what makes them fit into the genre. According to the article “Tapping into the Appeal of Cult Fiction,” cult fiction is a growing trend in publishing and film making. Cult fiction is not the horror’s genre “occult,” or an idea from a religious perspective. “Cult classic” is simply a work in literature or film that has received the highest degree of phenomenon. Fann goes on to explain how cult fiction tends to be ground breaking either through its prose style or through the subject matter the writer has chosen to explore. Subjects often include sex, drugs, controversial

content, or criticism of an establishment through exploration of the human condition or creation of dystopian societies (Fann). Whether it is a mystery with a vampire detective, a futuristic romance or inspirational thriller, film goers and readers are enjoying movies and literature that defy standard genre classification; yet instead they gravitate to cult fiction which inspires, amuses, mesmerizes and captivates a viewer or readers attention. In the book, “Classic Cult Fiction,” Thomas R. Whissen discusses a loose criteria in placing movies and books under the cult fiction genre. According to Whissen, the first aspect to cult fiction literature or film is alienation. In most plots, the main character(s) is separated from the world

Features PAGE 11

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

around them. Similarly, the movie “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” the main characters, Brad and Janet are lost and end up at a castle of the transsexual Transylvanians. The next aspect to cult fictions is what Whissen refers to as the Egoreinforcement. According to Whissen, Spectators and readers identify with the alienated character(s) and connect with their displacement. Cult fiction appeals to people who feel cut off, socially disenfranchised or deprived of their rightful place in society. The next piece to cult fiction criterion is a behavior

modification. Whissen believes a change in the person’s outlook on life will begin to take place after reading or seeing a cult fiction. According to Whissen, cult fiction offers an opportunity for readers to experience a pivotal moment of clarity to see the world beyond the stereotypical or mainstream consciousness. The last facet to cult fictions is vulnerability. Whissen identifies vulnerability in the sense that readers or film spectators blindly accept the message in the plot. This message will stir the public and ultimately make these peculiar titles fit the cult classic genre.

In a nutshell, a title achieves cult fiction status based on its reception by people. This sets these titles apart from other genres. Authors knowingly write books that fit in typical genres, but they do not knowingly write a cult fiction book or screenplay. Cult fictions reach their status when numerous people see the movie or read the book, and afterwards the plot either speaks to them or for them.

Dominique Perry is a fifth-year student majoring in professional studies and minoring in journalism and studio art. She can be reached at DP633925@wcupa.edu.

Want to nominate a professor for the “Teacher feature?” E-mail quadfeatures@wcupa.edu

Good Cause Cafe returns By Julianne Spadine Special to The Quad

Today one in eight people will go without food. Currently over 70,000 individuals in Chester County are struggling to make ends meet. On Nov. 1 and 2 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. in Sykes Ballrooms; WCU students can help provide a nicer Thanksgiving for families affected by HIV/AIDS in Chester County. Visit the Good Cause Café

to find bargains while helping others. All proceeds from the book sale and employee bake sale will go to Family Services of Chester County Project ONE. Keith Burress, AIDS Case Manager commented on the book sale and said, “This is so much more than a good cause… it is a lifesaver. Thank you in advance for the lives you will touch” Book prices range from

25 cents to $1. Genres include romance, suspense, cookbooks, scifi, fiction, non-fiction, home and garden, children’s books and much more. Not only are there great deals on books, but there will be baked goods for sale donated by WCU’s employees. Now in its eleventh year, expect the relaxing music to be playing and the aroma of coffee to calm students as

they stroll through the aisless in search of the perfect winter break or summer read at the “Good Cause Cafe.” Come help families in need by supporting this “Good Cause.” For more information call the Office of Service-Learning and Volunteer programs at 610-436-3379. Julianne Spadine is a first-year graduate student majoring in counseling. She can be reached at JS658801@wcupa.edu

bookcase-sale.blogspot.com


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OCTOBER 31, 2011

Got ice cream? Get Scooped By Hannah Burner Practicum Writer

Just because it’s Fall now doesn’t mean people have to dismiss ice cream as a dessert until Spring. For some people it is ice cream, gelato and sorbet season all year round. As customers walk into either locations of Scooped Ice Cream they imme-

diately feel like they’ve entered into an old fashion Mom & Pop Store. Located in the historic villages of West Chester and Chester Springs, these gourmet ice cream shops provide an experience unlike most shops in the area. Customers can eat homemade ice cream in either of the two historic settings, including the Chester Springs location where an old historic house was literally picked up and moved across the street to save it from being destroyed. The profitability of ice cream prompted the owner, John Reece, to open up a second store the summer of 2010. Two stores would equal more productivity

out of the equipment Reece has to make his homemade ice cream. Because of this, he and his wife, Liz Reece, felt like they were ready to handle two stores. When deciding on a location for their second store, the Reeces knew they wanted it to be in West Chester. West Chester is considered a restaurant town and can be very good for business. In addition, Reece also aimed for a corner location at an intersection with a light where people would have to stop and look around. After observing several different locations in West Chester, the Reece’s found a corner location on High Street. They now have two stores- the one located in West Chester is on its second year and the one located in Chester Springs is on its third year. When asked about any obstacles they had to overcome and what it took to get the business started, Reece said, “(The store is) more of a ‘Mom & Pop’ (and I’m) trying

to figure it all out still.” Reece felt The Board of Health was tough, but dealing with the Historic Architectural Review Board (HARB) in West Chester was even tougher. When presenting some of his proposals to HARB before opening his second store in West Chester he said, “I was shaking like the cowardly lion in the ‘Wizard of Oz.’” Learning the whole ins and outs of the food business took a while for Reece who had no prior background in the food industry but rather in retail management. “One problem can set a business awry… you need the ability to react to the unforeseen,” he said, recalling the time last year when his main freezer broke down at the West Chester store causing the store to open up later in the season than planned. Reece and his wife decided to open their own business after he was laid off from his job as a GM of Sephora. They came to

Scooped is located at 100 S. High St. and is open all year long. Courtsey of Dominique Perry

the conclusion that they would open an ice cream shop. “I was looking for a vehicle to take into retirement,” he said. “I was looking at my retirement and I was thinking I could make it work for me.” The Reece’s son had worked at a homemade ice cream parlor in Virginia back in college which led to their inspiration. After deciding that they wanted to open up their own business, Reece and his wife Googled ice cream parlors up and down the East coast and visited them. During these visits they tasted a wide variety of ice cream, eventually ending up with two locations that inspired them.

Out of all the locations visited, Reece consulted with the owners of the two ice cream parlors they liked best and discussed the products they used to make their ice cream. The owners of these shops did not reveal their recipes but they did allow the Reece’s to observe their stores. Here they learned that the equipment to make homemade ice cream was essential. For their equipment, the Reece’s decided upon a Carpigiani ice cream machine produced by an Italian company.

see SCOOPED on page 13

Courtesy of Dominique Perry

Teacher Feature Presents: Joy Fritschle

By Rebekah Balmer Features Editor

Joy Fritschle earned her undergraduate degree from Humboldt State University on the north coast of California. She started as a Wildlife Management major and then during her third-year she changed her major to Geography when she discovered the study of

Environmental Geography. She continued her education at the University of Memphis, where she earned her master’s degree and earned her doctorate from the University of Wi s c o n s i n - M a d i s o n , where she studied geography, specifically biogeography, environmental geography, and environmental history. “A lot of geographers

discover geography later in their schooling – I’m one of the rare people who has all three degrees in geography,” Fritschle said. Fritschle has been teaching at WCU for four years. She started as a Teaching Assistant in grad school 16 years ago, and then started teaching courses on her own about 12 years ago. Before coming to

WCU, she was at the University of Connecticut as an instructor while she worked on her dissertation. Informally she has contributed to the LGBTQA student club and Fritschle is friends with several E.A.R.T.H. club members, but she doesn’t formally advise any clubs. Fritschle teaches upper and lower divison

classes in environmental geography and sustainability. She also teaches world geography, sustainable living and environmental crises. She teaches graduate classes in environmental geography and environmental planning. Fritschle manages the Facebook pages for the Department of Geography & Planning and the Sustainability Advisory

Council (Green Light on Sustainability at WCU). Fritschle has published articles on forest restoration, reconstruction of past landscapes, and climate change mitigation through urban forests. Several of her publications are in top-tier international journals,

see FRITSCHLE on page 13

Fritsc from p


OCTOBER 31, 2011

Scooped from page 12

“Equipment was one of the pillars… it was the Ferrari of ice cream making,” Reece said. After learning some valuable tips and information on ice cream making, the Reece’s set out to establish their first store in Chester Springs. year long. After arriving home, Reece invited vendors to a distribution center in locationsWarminster, Pa. to make consultedice cream. During this rs of theevent, Liz took notes arlors theyon the vendors’ activdiscussedity and the ingredients hey usedthey used. Afterwards ce cream.they came back to their hese shopsstore and played with intheir reci-gredients until they credid allowated their own recipes. o observeMuch of their ingredients Here theycome from a free- range he equiphomemade Fritschle essential. quipment, from page 12 ided upon ce creamincluding the Annals of uced bythe Association of American company.Geographers, Landscape

Ecology, and Restoration Ecology. She was also invited to publish an essay on forest restoration in the “Encyclopedia of Geography.” She has won awards for contributing to LGBTQ visibility on campus, lifetime membership in a social sciences honors society (Pi Gammu Mu), and several grants for research from the Save the Redwoods League and WCU. Her best academic achievement is her dissertation. “It was one of the hardest things I have ever done, but I worked really hard on it and it turned out great!” Fritschle said. Her best life

THE QUAD farm in Lancaster, Pa. Reece appreciates the fact that the farm uses grass fed, hormone-free cows which he feels makes the ice cream taste better. In addition, the Reece’s also buy the world’s finest organic chocolates and nuts from countries around the world such as Italy to provide customers with the top gourmet ice cream experience. As for production, Reece said, “I keep a close hand in production because I don’t want to see it slip.” Only him and two other trained employees are allowed to make the ice cream his stores sell. While Reece manages inventory, Liz is involved with the marketing side of the business. “My wife is the pillar- she keeps everything work-

ing and is really into systems and organization,” he said. “You’ve got to acknowledge what you’re not strong at and surround yourself with people with those strengths.” Reece was a business major in college and knew that he eventually wanted to own his own business. He worked for two men out of college who started their own Wi-fi shop and from there the desire to own his own business only grew. When he was asked what advice he’d offer young people interested in owning a business of their own someday he said, “Pursue your dream early.” Reece wished he would have opened his business 10 to 15 years ago so he would have been farther along. He hopes to open up a

couple more stores in the future and continue growing as a business. His short term goal: “To continue to develop the brand.” His long term goal: “To maintain and be true to the vision.” “I want that individuality in each store,” Reece said. “If I have a picture of the band Kiss on the wall in this store (Chester Springs), I’m going to have a different picture on the wall in the other store (in West Chester).” Although both stores locations have their fair share of history, Reece went into depth about the building the West Chester store is located in. He explained that the house on Miner St. which the store is located in has only been owned by three parties. At one time the base-

PAGE 13 ment is said to have been a speakeasy that was visited by two famous people: Amelia Earhart and Babe Ruth. The original hardwood floors and large stone fireplace still remain in the basement in addition to a filled in stairwell. This hidden stairwell was used as an escape during the prohibition period if ever the speakeasy was detected. It is apparent that Reece is excited about the historic locations of both stores and appreciates the history of each. He is also proud of the success he and his wife have had so far with their homemade ice cream. Scooped Ice Cream was named “Best Homemade Ice Cream” by the critics of Main Line Today. In addition, they earned the

“Readers Choice” award for “Best Ice Cream for 2009” in Chester County along with praise from the West Chester Dish website and Downingtown Dish website. A few of his ice cream creations have not succeeded but Reece has learned that it is okay to make mistakes. “Everybody’s going to fail at least once,” he said. “It is how you take that failure and learn from it.” In the end, the Reeces have ended up with some of the best ice cream flavors around, including Coffee with Bailey’s Irish Cream and the Reeces’ favorite, Mint Chocolate Chip. Hannah Burner is a fourthyear student majoring in English, minoring in journalism. She can be reached at HB674784@wcupa.edu.

http://www.wcupa.edu/_academics/sch_sba.geo/fritschle.asp

achievement is the birth of her daughter, Edyth. Fritschle’s current academic goal is “to keep doing what I love – teaching great students about sustainability and environmental geography.” She continued, and “Publishing research on forests, and raising awareness on campus about sustainability and LGBTQ visibility.” She encourages students to check out the “Green Light on Sustainability at WCU facebook page.

Her current non-academic goal is to keep learning how to grow new things in her garden and to be the best mother and spouse she can be. She loves many things about teaching although she mentioned grading isn’t fun. “I love getting to know such interesting people in my classes, helping students discover what interests them the most in environmental geography,” Fritschle said. She also loves to inspire stu-

dents to become more involved in sustainability, both personally and professionally. She loves being paid to read the latest interesting books and then talking about them with other people that find them interesting too. What Fritschle loves most about WCU is the trees and historic buildings on campus, her colleagues and friends in geography & planning, women’s and gender studies, and biology. She

loves the classes she teaches and the Gordon Natural Area forest on south campus where she takes her classes, the coffee truck on Church Street and the fact that we have such an active LGBTQ Ally program on campus. Her advice to students is “life is short – don’t let yourself get bogged down in other people’s petty politics. And don’t listen to people that say you can’t have a job that you love.” She said,

“It may not be the first job you get, but don’t give up on getting a job that you enjoy and find fulfilling. For me, my job is not just a job, it’s a lifestyle that I love.” Fritschle’s office is located in Ruby Jones room 207A, she encourages students to come on by and say hi. Rebekah Balmer is a fifth-year student majoring in women’s and gender studies and sociology. She can be reached at RB649636@ wcupa.edu.


THE QUAD

Check out the Quad online! wcuquad.com

The horror behind “American Horror Story” Jennifer Mika Special to The Quad

“American Horror Story” is just that-- a story that focuses on all things horror including deception, spirits, and murder. The FX Network presents a new television series, which revolves around the Harmons, a troubled family who moves from Boston to Los Angeles in order to resolve past issues. However, rather than escaping their own problems, the Harmons find themselves dealing with unknown mysteries. Ben Harmon (Dylan McDermott) plays a psychiatrist who is caught cheating on his wife, Vivien (Connie Britton). Deciding to reconcile their anguish, they move across the country with their teenage daughter Violet (Taissa Farmiga). While settling in, they begin to notice an uneasiness about the house and begin experiencing unusual disturbances. They soon discover that the house is known as “The Murder House” and that it has a troubled past of its own.

Adding to the bizarre occurrences are the constant visits by their neighbor, Constance (Jessica Lange), and her daughter who repeatedly warns the Harmons that they are going to die. Deciding to dismiss the abnormalities, the family attempts to bring comfort into their home. Ben constantly has patients coming through the house and Vivien occupies herself by redecorating. She’s learning to cope with the unfaithfulness of her husband and after a brutal miscarriage, they find out that Vivien is expecting once again. Although, things are anything but normal. Ben travels back to Boston to fix a mistake between him and his mistress. While he’s out of town, three strangers break into the Harmon’s home while Vivien and her daughter are there. They intend to kill the two in such a way eerily similar to a murder that happened in the house years before. However, the spirits lurking between the walls have a different plan. “The Murder House”

was built in 1922 and was originally seen as a noble home. Many scenes from the past are shown to show the history of the house and the residents that were once there. Viewers become aware of the torture, horror, and murders that occurred throughout the years and the dead residents reappear as they haunt the Harmon family. Director Ryan Murphy (“Nip/Tuck”) brilliantly wrote “American Horror Story” as a horrordrama television series. It’s a psychosexual thriller with a creepy edge that will keep viewers in suspense. With every episode, viewers discover more secrets about the house and the strange hauntings. With its captivating style, “American Horror Story,” is a new television experiment full of all scare and all screams. “American Horror Story” airs on the FX Network every Wednesday at 10 p.m. Jennifer Mika is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at JM653231@wcupa.edu.

OCTOBER 31, 2011

Entertainment QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

Electric Boa strikes West Chester

him to Bowie and creates an interesting, gripping atmosphere Performing at the of sound. music venue The Note Their music is on East Market Street guitar oriented, with in downtown West chords and hooks that Chester is a musical the musicians want to artiste of rock, The hook the people. Electric Boa. “ T h e Experience lyrics are “a laser beam reflective, fired at pointlike Bob blank range” Dylan, Dr. when the Seuss, and band takes Nikki Sixx the stage, for had a baby its sound is and that raw and baby was our artful rock. m u s i c , ” Electric Cornwell Boa bassist said. G r e g T h e Cornwell band’s first gave The a l b u m Quad the “ C a n d y inside scoop C o d e d and stamina Cyanide,” behind the under the band and band name what to “The Electric expect at the Boa” was show. released last “ W e N o v e m b e r. embrace our Songs for musical influtheir next ences and a l b u m , throw them which the in a pot and band hopes The Electric Boa will perform at The Note on Nov. 12. mix it up, to release and out next year, comes us. We don’t try to hide that,” it’s cool, it doesn’t are in production. “Ink in My Skin,” matter what kind of Cornwell said. The band members clothes you put on it,” released on the album Coated include Higgsy on Cornwell said. With “Candy vocals and music and front man Higgsy Cyanide” is a love song thoughtful that pulls at listeners’ lyric writer, Johnny writing Dee on drums, Joe lyrics to a vocal melody heart strings, which Fortino on guitar, that fits his own style make them want to Morten G.P. on guitar, of voice, it makes the laugh and cry at the time; the and Cornwell on bass. songs focused with a same They describe their strong vocal melody. audience can really sound as a melting pot Higgsy envelops a sort See ELECTRIC BOA of art. Many artists of androgynous front page 16 from different genres man figure that relates Elizabeth Knode Special to The Quad

have stimulated the sound of Electric Boa from David Bowie and Chris Robinson, Motley Crue, Nikki Sixx, to Willie Nelson. “We cheat on rock n’ roll with other stuff. If

Photo credit: theelectricboa.com

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OCTOBER 31, 2011

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PAGE 15

Jay Z and Kanye West cannot be thrown off of the “Throne”

Jay-Z and Kanye West are only contributing to their already attained stadium status with their highly anticipated joint album, “Watch the Throne.” Individually, each artist has solidified his spot among the greatest rappers alive in most hip-hop debates. However, as everyone just beared witness to, when they come together, there is no extinguishing their flames. Firing away at lames and naysayers, they sit atop their nest of success and watch the millions roll in. The album highlights several issues surrounding politics and the troubles that

have overtaken the black community which, in some ways, are equivalent to such events as “the Holocaust,” according to Kanye. “Watch the Throne” allows listeners to sit back and not only marvel at their achievements, but enjoy the fruits of their labor and hopefully, meet them at the top. The song “No Church in the Wild,” is arguably one of the best on the album, which evokes the feeling that they’re unstoppable. “Church” is the metaphorical sanctuary that contains the door to a savior from the pit of the world. This album makes several references to the wild or jungle, being a place in which you’re

on your own. “The Wild” can be relative to the

rap game, the world or wherever you see fit but

Photo credit: manidiots.com

Emerald Thomas Special to The Quad

“Watch the Throne” art cover features Jay Z and Kanye West for their joint album.

no matter the context, they are portraying the notion that no one can save you. God is generally the one entity that is able to rescue you, but “…what’s a God to a non-believer, who don’t believe in, anything?” “New Day” is the focal point of the album. It is where wrong is held accountable by fault. Fault meets change. And change equals better. Kanye speaks on his outlandish opinions, bad choice in women, and unwillingness to constrain his tongue. This track was penned with intent to right their wrongs so that their unborn sons can have a chance to undone those “dropped the ball”-isms that their fathers did with them. Though neither

of their fathers were present in their lives, they are preparing to not make those same mistakes. Jay-Z apologizes to his son for already ruining his life, in that a sense of normalcy is unfathomable. He gives him fatherly advice that he never received as a child. This track is perhaps the most vulnerable on the album; blending introspection with promises for the future, all with hopes for a “new day.” With the track records and album sales of these two artists, is it wrong for them to ask, “Who Gon Stop Me?” Emerald Thomas is a fourth-year student majoring in psychology. He can be reached at ET682650@wcupa.edu.


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OCTOBER 31, 2011

“The Walking Dead” walks out alive Alanna Smothers Practicum Writer

Fans of “The Walking Dead” were eagerly anticipating the return of the AMC’s hit zombie themed television series. For those not in the know, the show premiered last year on Oct. 31, with a slew of rave reviews. TV Guide stated that it was a zombie show “with more heart than brains.” As a fan and an avid viewer of the show myself, I would have to agree with that. The first season’s fi nale left viewers with Rick and the gang escaping from the CDC explosion. The season two premiere catches up with them a day after that. The episode starts off with Rick talking to Morgan over the radio (who he presumably still has not heard from) telling him of the danger he will encounter if he goes to Atlanta and informs him where the group is headed next. The group then travels down the highway leaving Atlanta behind. They head toward Ft. Benning but do not really make it that far as they run into a pileup of abandoned cars, essentially making it a graveyard. Rick, being the leader that he is, tells them to start scavenging for supplies. In the midst of this, a herd of Walkers are spotted and the gang is left to scramble under cars (or hide in a bathroom

in Andrea’s case) for safety. Just when they think they are safe and start to emerge from their hiding places, a justly frightened Sophia comes out a bit too soon and is hunted by two hungry Walkers. She flees into the woods for safety, and of course, Rick is the one who does not hesitate and goes right after her. He catches up to her and hides her in a little spot by a lake and gets the Walkers to follow him, after which he quickly ends them. However, in the time it takes him to kill the Walkers and return to where he left the others, Sophia has gone missing. And this is where it starts to get good. At this point, the audience is still relatively early into the 90-minute premiere. A major character has already been lost, and the rest of the group is clearly on edge. The feeling of anxiety can be felt among them, and as the tension rises, so does the expectation of where the episode is heading. With Darryl leading, they go search for Sophia. The first day ends, and they see no sign of her, even stopping to search inside the belly of a zombie for her remains, which was very disgusting, might I add. The next day, the majority of the group goes off into the woods to search for little Sophia. Dale and T-Dog stay behind; Dale with the excuse

that he needs to fix the broken radiator. He actually confides in T-Dog that the radiator has been fixed, and the only reason he has not told the rest of the group is because he knows it will force them to continue searching for the missing girl. In the woods, the group (including Rick and Lori’s son, Carl – the last kid standing) stumbles upon a tent while searching for Sophia. Darryl stealthily searches it, finding only a dead man. They hear bells ring in the distance, and run off, hoping that maybe it is Sophia calling for help. They find out the bells ringing are church bells, and they are on a timer. How disappointing. However, the church does strange things to the group, as they begin to realize that perhaps things are hopeless. Earlier, Shane and Lori have an argument, during which Shane declares his plan to split as soon as possible.

A n d r e a overhears this, and confronts Shane at the church and practically begs him to take her along, proclaiming the two of them are the o b v i o u s outsiders of the bunch. She may have a point there. Shane is not able to give an Photo credit: horrorsociety.com answer, as The second season premiered just in time for Halloween. they are interrupted, but it is unclear Caught up in the of made everything whether he is moment, Carl starts else non-important. What a way to end convinced or not. The moving closer to it group then decides to when suddenly he gets a show. As far as split up. Shane, Rick, shot in the chest. Talk season premieres and and Carl stay behind about a “WTF” cliffhangers go, “The Walking Dead” has as the rest head backs moment. to “camp.” All in all, though outdone itself. “The Walking Dead” Before Rick goes off the episode is fairly to continue searching long, it moves along airs on the AMC for Sophia, he takes a quickly and with the network every Sunday moment to “pray” to anticipation of what is at 10 p.m. Alanna Smothers is a the Jesus statue in the going to come next. student church, in a plea of There were a lot of second-year majoring in early grades desperation. He asks added twists and for a sign, and they surprises, and though preparation education think they’ve found it nothing major was with a minor in reading. when they stumble revealed, the shock of She can be reached at across a lone deer. Carl getting shot kind AS620230@wcupa.edu.

ELECTRIC BOA From page 14

of happened but is partly a birth of David Bowie, has the presence of pure representation-- they get on stage to show themselves entirely. They arouse an audience ranging from babyboomers to young children and strive to make their songs stick in the minds and hearts of the people who hear them. “My 6-year-old son walks around the house humming the tune of the intro song

connect with the uncut lyrics. Other shining songs are “Ma’ Lawd” for the lyrics and “Heavy” for its instrumentals and hard-driving guitar solo. “‘Heavy’ is ironic, because it’s actually a somber song but gives me goosebumps every time I hear it,” Cornwell said. The Electric Boa, whose name just sort

on “Cyanide” called “Sissy.” He does it out of the blue, and it makes me feel so good. Our goal is to corrupt children,” Cornwell jokes. Most importantly, the goal is for the audience to make their own interpretation and connection to the music. One song can hold three or four different meanings and they all will make sense. The Electric Boa show is on Saturday,

Nov. 12 at 8 p.m. at The Note. Tickets for the show can be purchased online or at The Note for $10. Come and embrace the sounds of The Electric Boa, “where every line and chord is as cinematic as a David Lynch film while astoundingly pure in heart-felt love.” Elizabeth Knode is a student at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. She can be reached at EK755213@wcupa.edu.


THE QUAD

Post-Halloween movie marathon

By Patrick McFadden Practicum Writer

With October now officially over, the decorations taken down and everyone’s costumes in frumpled messes at the bottom of piles of clothes, everyone probably thinks that the time for scares is over--not true. Every once in a while magazines, websites and sometimes even television channels (looking at you, AMC) will celebrate the respective “Big Holiday” of the season by playing a marathon of films revolving around said holiday (Lord knows I’ve sat through my share of Arbor Day marathons). To continue the scares, why not have 24 hours of entertainment for the weekend following Halloween? So someone who did not get his or her fix of knife-wielding children and reanimated corpses can spend a day trying to forget all those dreadful embodiments of fear and terror encountered this past weekend (i.e. pretty much everyone out socializing). I have tried to pick movies that take place primarily during the time period viewers would be watching them. Most of the time there will be about 10 minutes of downtime between movies for bathroom breaks and the like. Also included are several polarizing titles in case a food run or a nap is necessary. And lastly, this is in no way a comprehensive list of The Best Horror Movies or anything like that-- I simply just wrote down a list of my 25 favorites. I tried to weed out ones that

were either too long (“Grindhouse”), too stupid (“Troll 2”) or in another language (“High Tension”) because reading seems to be unpopular, let alone reading subtitles. If anyone actually attempts this, please send in any and all accounts of the journey.

~12:00 p.m. “Dawn of the Dead” (1978) An excellent starting point, this is still the all-time best zombie film. There are so many things to say about this one, I could write an entire article just about it alone so I’ll just say this: it is centered around just four characters whom viewers really start to care about and will actually care about when they start to get picked off willy-nilly. ~2:30 p.m. “Creepshow” (1982) I will be the first to admit that Creepshow is not a perfect movie by any stretch of the imagination. The fivestory valentine that Stephen King and George Romero crafted to horror comics of the ‘50s and ‘60s will probably go over most viewers’ heads at this point with many of the effects hopelessly out of date on purpose. Regardless, it’s still terribly fun, terribly scary and sometimes just terrible. ~5:00 p.m. “Trick ‘r Treat” (2007) Continuing with our anthology theme, this presents four dark spins on old favorites with enough pitch black humor to balance all the, well, murder. ~6:30 p.m. “Let Me In” (2010) Celebrate the disappearance of the sun with this stylized American remake of a

2008 Swedish vampire film. For those feeling vamp fatigue (there is a loss of blood joke in there somewhere, I just know it), trust me, this is great. It’s moody, atmospheric and has more quiet-loud-quiet moments than a Pixies album. And it starts with a guy setting himself on fire. ~8:30 p.m. “Evil Dead II” (1987) There is no reason for you to not watch this movie. End of discussion. ~10:00 p.m. “Scream” (1996) Holding up surprisingly well 15 years and 3 sequels (that only get progressively worse) later, “Scream” still has all the meta-charm it had when it reminded everyone that horror movies can actually be good.

~12:00 a.m. “Requiem for a Dream” (2000) This is still, hands down, the scariest movie I have ever seen. ~2:00 a.m. “The Simpsons: Treehouse of Horror V” (1994) Without question, the quintessential “Simpsons” Halloween episode, it is both the funniest and most gruesome. ~2:30 a.m. “Sleepaway Camp” (1983) Continue back into a world not populated by diet-pill addicted old Jewish women with this over-the-top, generic camp (figuratively and literally) slasher. While at first it may seem like the time to take that hardearned nap, stay tuned for the indescribable ending. ~4:00 a.m. “Audition”

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Upcoming Shows

OCTOBER 31, 2011

(1999) “ A u d i t i o n ” initially paints itself as comedy of errors as a lonely Japanese businessman is talked into finding a girlfriend by his best friend and teenage son. It is not until about halfway through when things go completely sideways. Also, I know it is rough to read subtitles this early in the morning, so just send the most squeamish of the group out for coffee. ~6:30 a.m. “The Thing” (1982) So if one made it out to the cinematorium at some point in the past two weeks and saw the new “Thing,” this movie is actually the sequel to that. The blinding, stark white snow of the Antarctica will wake one up, and Kurt Russell has a tremendous beard.

8:30 a.m. “Funny Games” (2007) One last nail bitter, “Funny Games” is pure psychological torture with hope becoming bleaker and bleaker as the antagonist of the tale literally dares viewers to keep watching. 10:30 a.m. “Shaun of the Dead” (2004) Congratulations on making it through 24 hours of terror. Celebrate by snuggling up with a blanket, a cup of tea, a best mate and watch the funniest zombie apocalypse ever.

Patrick McFadden is a student minoring in journalism. He can be reached at PM623279@wcupa. edu.

ELECTRIC FACTORY: November 11 - Manchester Orchestra November 20 - Airborne Toxic Event November 22 - Five Finger Death Punch November 23 - Badfish November 27 - Simple Plan December 10 - The Devil Wears Prada

THE TROCADERO: November 3 - Panic! at the Disco November 4 - Mayhem November 5 - Cold Fronts November 11 - Michael Ian Black November 15 - The Kooks November 20 - Mastodon

THE TLA: November 3 - Yellowcard November 6 - Noah and the Whale November 12 - Fitz and the Tantrums November 16 - Mike Doughty November 19 - Drive-By Truckers November 30 - Steel Panther

THE NOTE: November 2 - Tribal Seeds November 12 - The Electric Boa November 16 - Fu Manchu November 20 - Exit 34 November 25 - Splintered Sunlight

Interested in writing for the Quad Entertainment section? E-mail: quadentertainment @wcupa.edu


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Fill in the grid so that each of the numbers 1 - 9 appears once and only once in each row, each column, and each 3x3 square.The solution will appear in the next issue of The Quad.

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THE QUAD

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OCTOBER 31, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 19

Young runners stepping up for cross country By Alex Einhorn Staff Writer The PSAC Championships were held Oct. 22 in Lock Haven Pa. The Rams took on the course with enthusiasm, and it seemed to pay off. The men finished 11th overall out of 15 teams, missing 10th place by just one point. Despite graduating three extraordinary runners last season, the men still finished one

place higher than their last trip to the championships. Freshman Zach Musselman finished 55th overall, the best finish for WCU since 2008. Curran Kneebone finished 58th, Jake Perry 74th, Sean Sebeck 75th, Chriss Bucci 88th, Cody Borders 100th, Jack Barnett 112th and Adam Farence 130th. “For the men to move up a place in the team standings despite graduating three of our top five

is superb,” said head coach Andrew Huber. The team has no seniors to graduate, so the future looks bright for these young Rams. Huber could not agree more, “I am really looking forward to what these guys can do in the future.” A proud finish for the women runners gave them 9th overall out of 16 teams. This was the best finish for WCU since 2002. Kristina Koutsouros

finished 10th and good enough for the highest individual Ram runner since 2000. Due to injury, this was her first race since early September. Kristina Koutsouros and Cathleen Kasey finished first and second and both ran the course in under 22 minutes. This was only the second and third time in school history that WCU runners finished a 6K race in that time block. Kathleen McManus

finished 71st, Brittany Boyer 81st, Julie Clappsy 89th, Nichole Del Grasso 111th, Trish Evans 115th, Rachel Wynn 120th and Breezy Sweeney 136th. There were a total of 152 runners. Coach Huber could not be more proud of his women squad. “We raced six freshmen out of our 10 runners, so I was very nervous about the outcome, but they stepped up and

performed like I asked them to and really helped us to our highest finish in 10 years.” The NCAA East Regional’s will be held on Nov. 5 at Slippery Rock University. The time is TBA and more information can be found at the West Chester Athletic website. Alex Einhorn is a secondyear student majoring in writing with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AE744379@wcupa.edu.

Volleyball fighting for home game in playoffs By Amy Festa Practicum Writer With only three games left in the season, West Chester needs these last couple crucial wins to guarantee themselves a home game in the postseason. The Rams’ first match up of the week was a non-league bout with Georgian Court. The team ventured to Lakewood, New Jersey for their third of eight straight road games. The Rams handled the first set easily, taking it 25-10. Georgian Court put up a stronger effort for the subsequent two sets, but West Chester ended up taking the match, 25-10, 25-19, 25-19. Lexi Kegerise had nine kills for the Golden Rams to go along with Julie Boblits’ six. Cara Reese also had six kills for West Chester. Helen Fitzpatrick assisted on 24 points and had 10

digs to register the double-double for West Chester. Kelly Martin served up five aces. We s t C h e s t e r ’s following game was a rematch with PSAC East rival, East Stroudsburg. Earlier in the season, West Chester had beaten the Warriors

Reese had three. Lisa Campbell had 20 digs for West Chester. Fitzpatrick had 21 assists, while Mary Faust contributed an additional 13. Boblits added nine kills to the stat charts in the win for the Golden Rams. West Chester’s final match of the week would prove to be the most difficult. They found themselves matched up against PSAC East powerhouse, Lock Haven. The Eagles sit atop the PSAC East with a 13-4 conference record and a 16-8 overall record. But after three straight wins, two of which came against conference rivals, Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad West Chester

in straight sets. West Chester put together an exact mimic of that match, taking down the Warriors again in a three set sweep. Kegerise led the Golden Rams with a team-high 13 kills. Martin had five blocks for West Chester while

had the confidence they needed to come out strong against Lock Haven. West Chester started off strong and played close with Lock Haven, but they eventually dropped the first set 25-22. They were unable to recover in the second set, losing 25-20. Lock Haven’s momentum carried them through the third set as well as they knocked off the Golden Rams in straight sets, 25-22, 25-20, 25-19 Boblits had seven kills and Kegerise added six in the loss. Faust matched Fitzpatrick’s 11 assists, and Campbell recorded 10 digs. Gao Xuan had a stand out game for the Eagles. She had 19 kills and hit .326. The loss against Lock Haven gives West Chester a 7-9 conference record and a 19-12 overall record heading into the final week of the regular season. With three games left

in the season and a 7-9 conference record, West Chester can end their season with a winning record in the conference. They finished their season with a double header against Cheyney. They will travel down the street to play the cross-town rivals on Nov. 1. They will then wrap up the regular season when they are finally able to come back home for a finale in Hollinger Field House. They will host Kutztown on Nov. 5 who beat the Golden Rams in straight sets earlier in the season. The Golden Rams will then have three days to prepare for the PSAC quarterfinals, which start on Nov. 8 at a location to be determined and against an opponent which has yet to be decided. Amy Festa is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at AF649219@wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD

OCTOBER 31, 2011

Field hockey drops PSAC game in 2OT By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor The Golden Rams dropped their first PSAC Quarterfinal game against C.W. Post 2-1 in double-overtime on Tuesday afternoon at Vonnie Gros Field. Second-seeded West Chester (14-4) will now wait until Monday for the NCAA Selection Show to determine if they will advance in the national tournament. Third-seeded C.W. Post (10-7) automatically advanced to the conference semifinals, and took a 4-1 loss against Shippensburg on Friday afternoon.

The Golden Rams will qualify for the NCAA Division II Field Hockey Championships if they maintain their thirdplace position in the NCAA regional ranking. Despite their loss, the Golden Rams ruled the field for much of the game, with the advantage of PSAC East athlete of the week, senior back, Brynn Adams. Adams became the third player on the team, along with Nicole Fiorilla and Michele Shrift, to receive the recognition. Adams served an important role in the Rams’ victories over East Stroudsburg and Kutztown in the prior

week, and has eight goals and five assists this season. Although We s t Chester is comprised of some of the most talented players in the division, their efforts fell just short of a win on Friday. Carlee Dragon, the second highest goal scorer in the nation, netted the game-winning goal in the double-overtime win. Alisha Moran set the tone eight minutes into the first half, knocking in the first tally of the game, her sixth of the season, off of a rebound shot from Nancy Stehman. The Golden Rams maintained control

throughout regulation, keeping a 1-0 hold over their competitors. Helene Bruckner broke through West Chester’s defense, taking an assist from Lyn-Marie Wilson with less than a minute remaining in play to send the game into overtime. The exciting goal was Bruckner’s 11th of the year. Although We s t Chester was yellow carded, putting them at a one-player deficit, they remained in control by holding possession of the ball for much of the first overtime. With strong defense on both ends, neither team scored in the first

overtime, which extended the game to double-overtime. After breaking down the Rams’ defense, Dragon sent a solo shot towards the net in the 95th minute, when goalkeeper, Kristin Arnold, made a diving save. When the ball bounced to her left, Dragon regained control and netted her 21st goal of the season for the win. Though they were unable to pull out a win, West Chester held a 23-8 advantage in penalty corners, with an 11-2 hold in the first half and a 7-1 lead in the second. In the first 70 minutes, West Chester’s aggressive defense and

active offense held the Pioneers to just nine shots. Arnold made three saves in the first half, and four in the second. C.W. Post’s Devon Trenkle was credited with 14 saves for the win. The top three seeds in the North and South will comprise the six teams to play in the NCAA Tournament. The Rams will now wait until Monday for their fate to be determined when the field of six will be revealed. Brynn Dougherty is a fourth-year student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@wcupa.edu.


OCTOBER 31, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 21

One goal is plenty for women’s soccer By Deanna Vasso Staff Writer Last Wednesday the Golden Rams women’s soccer team played an away match against The Philadelphia University Rams, in a non-league match that ended with a 1-0 West Chester win. The Golden Rams started on the attack early in the match by scoring the first goal within the first 56 seconds of play. Forward/midfielder Melissa McKeary scored the turnover goal unassisted and gained an early lead for the Golden Rams. Most of the action that occurred within the first half was on the Golden Rams’ part, as they dominated the field in shots and corner kicks. After McKeary’s goal, the Golden Rams proceeded to shut the Philadelphia Rams out by keeping play in their rival’s territory. There were a variety of shots after the first goal that either went wide or were blocked by the rival team’s defense-

men. Despite these failed attempts to score, this was not stopping the golden rams from continuing to try to get a second goal in. Despite the Golden Rams’ persistence to keep the ball in their opponents sector, the Philadelphia Rams were finally able to make a play in the Golden Rams’ goal area. Trisha Sileo made the first Philadelphia Ram attempt at a goal at the 25th minute of play, but Golden Rams goalkeeper Shannon Fedyk was quick to shut down the Philadelphia Ram’s offense with a quick save. Following this play the Golden Rams continued to attempt another goal. While they were unable to do this before half time, they were successful in keeping their opponents from scoring. For the majority of the first half, the only action the Philadelphia Rams were seeing was in terms of fouls. The Golden Rams occupied the field for the first half by out shooting Philadelphia Rams in shots by 7-2 and in corner

kicks by 3-0. When the second half began, the Golden Rams were again quick to react, with an early attempt on goal by McKeary that was blocked by Philadelphia Ram’s defense. Learning their lesson from the first half, the Philadelphia Rams began to push back against the dominating Golden Rams defense with another shot on goal by Melissa Copeland. The shot went wide, and the Golden Rams were fast to retaliate with an attempt on goal, carried out by Jen Hutchinson. Philadelphia Rams keeper Kelli Kowalewski made the save and prevented the Golden Rams from scoring another goal. In the second half of the match, the Philadelphia Rams were determined to score, as illustrated by a series of attempted shots on the Golden Ram’s goal. These shots were attempted by Copeland but were unsuccessful from either being too wide or blocked by the Golden Ram’s defense.

Following these attempts, the Golden Rams had three attempts on goal in a row, but were also unsuccessful. The first of the three attempts occurred at the 76th minute of play. Cara Deola almost scored for a second time in the match, but rival keeper Kowalewski was there to stop the play with a save. The other two shots were not as close, as both of them went wide at the goalpost. For the rest of the match, there was a constant struggle on the field for someone to score a goal. The Golden Rams were determined for another goal to shutout their opponents, whereas the Philadelphia Rams were desperate to get a goal past Fedyk so they could tie the match and have a better opportunity to win. Despite the willingness of both teams, neither team was able to score in the rest of the match, which granted the golden rams the shutout win 1-0. While the Philadelphia Rams started to fight back

against the Golden Rams, they were unable to get a better opportunity to score due to the Golden Ram’s persistence to be at their opponent’s goal. The Golden Rams again out-shot the Philadelphia Rams in the second half by 7-4. This forced the Philadelphia Rams’ defense to be on top of things, as keeper Kowalewski stopped four goals as opposed to Fedyk’s two. Following this match, the Golden Rams were supposed to play in their last conference game of the regular season before the quarterfinals last Saturday. Due to inclement weather the match had to be postponed. However, since the scheduled match was supposed to also be Senior Day where the team intended to honor their seniors, it was rescheduled for Sunday. The games were not played in time to be included in this publication, but the score can found on The Quad’s Facebook page, Twitter, and the WCU Athletics

website. Following the rescheduled match, the Golden Rams will continue to prepare to duel the other eight teams competing in the PSAC conference quarterfinals. Since they are the sixth placed team, the Golden Rams have their work cut out for them on their road to victory. The PSAC quarterfinals begin Nov. 1, and the championships on Nov. 4 and 5. Deanna Vasso is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in creative writing. She can be reached at DV670502@ wcupa.edu. Scan this code with your phone to link to The Quad’s Facebook page.

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad


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THE QUAD

OCTOBER 31, 2011

Men’s soccer rolls to 5-1 win By Joey Samuel Staff Writer

In the penultimate game of what has been a mostly disappointing 2011 campaign, the West Chester men’s soccer team defeated visiting Felician College, 5-1, in a non-conference game in front of a sparse crowd in Farrell Stadium on Thursday. Kevin McCann scored two goals and Roberto Silva added a goal and an assist for West Chester (5-8-3, 0-5-3 PSAC). Jeff Signora and Conor Malarney also scored in the second half for West Chester. Despite rainy and cold conditions on what served as Senior Night for the team, the Golden Rams were able to gain the lead when McCann scored in the 18th minute. He took a cross from freshman midfielder Tommy Ryan, settled

the ball in the penalty area, and fired it past the Felician goalkeeper. Felician, however, would tie the game up only eleven minutes later when Daniel Camargo volleyed in a cross past West Chester goalkeeper Garrett Bleiler West Chester came out in the second half with a different mentality, and were able to contain Felician’s sharp passing and off-the-ball runs. Five minutes into the second half, the game changed completely when Felician defender Chris Giordano hauled down West Chester senior forward Kyle Miller. The referee awarded the Golden Rams a penalty kick and sent off Giordano with a straight red card. Neil Gallagher would end up seeing his penalty kick saved and the score remained 1-1, but the one-man advantage and the

new shift in focus for West Chester would be enough to break the game open. Within three minutes, West Chester had regained the lead as Jeff Signora received a weighted pass from Roberto Silva in behind the Felician defense and the freshman slotted the ball into the net for his second career goal in only his second game. Seven minutes later, sophomore forward Conor Malarney made it 3-1 when he scored an unasissted goal. In the 73rd minute, Silva got a goal of his own when he created space for himself in the left side of the penalty area and curled a shot around the Felician goalkeeper to stretch the score to 4-1. West Chester had another crack at a penalty shot in the 80th minute when Felician committed another foul in the box, but

defender Taylor Eisenhauer saw his attempt saved as well. Just three minutes later, though, the Golden Rams made up for it when McCann received a low cross from Ryan Dicce and scored his second goal of the game to make it 5-1 and seal West Chester’s best performance since their 13-0 thrashing of lowly Lincoln University on the opening day of the season. “We gave them a little too much respect at the beginning of the game,” McCann said after the game. “We do that to a lot of teams. We have the skill to beat a lot of these teams, we just have to show it, and I think we did that in the second half.” “The halftime talk was centered around their foreign players and how they work the ball around well,” said Gallagher, who

played well despite missing a penalty early in the second half. “Basically, the talk was to turn it into a physical game, because they don’t like that as much. It actually turned out in our favor.” The result won’t mean much in the long run for a team already eliminated from playoff contention, but the result gives the team confidence as they look to earn that elusive conference win in their final PSAC game, which was rescheduled after being snowed out on Saturday. It was great for seniors Kyle Miller and Ryan Dicce as well, who, despite not scoring themselves, gave strong contributions to the team. “They definitely stepped their game up, even more than they have in past games,” McCann said. “They definitely came to play today.”

West Chester also managed to display an ability to play well despite tough conditions, including heavy rain early in the game and low temperatures throughout. “Once you’re out there, you get warmed up. You don’t really realize it. You just get warm and focus on the game,” McCann said. The Golden Rams’ final game will be at home against PSAC rivals Millersville, and their main goal has to be earning a conference win in their final PSAC game. West Chester is 3-5-0 in their conference match-ups. The Millersville match that was scheduled for Saturday was postponed due to inclement weather. Joey Samuel is a third-year student majoring in political science and Spanish. He can be reached at JS719745@wcupa. edu.

Flyers’ first line off to teriffic start By Kenny Ayres Sports Editor It is tough to judge this early in the season how the Flyers are going to turn out. So many faces on the team are new and the Flyers have had some inconsistencies in this young campaign. There are things that look good sometimes, that turn bad a day later, and vice versa. However, one thing that has been brilliant day in and day out for the Flyers is their first line. The line consists of the speedy and crafty Claude Giroux, the future hall of famer and offseason gamble, Jaromir Jagr, and Scott Hartnell who, well, is Scott Hartnell. Most everybody expected Giroux to be doing pretty much what he is doing so far in the 2011-12 season. He is even

exceeding those expectations. Giroux is tied for second in the NHL in points with Thomas Vanek, behind only the torrid Phil Kessel, and in goals Giroux ranks fourth. Now, Giroux has talent, and he proved that last year. He can pass, score and he uses his body as if he were 220 pounds rather than 175. But Giroux is not doing this alone. He is getting help from somebody who knows a bit about scoring himself: someone who has done it over 1,600 times in his storied NHL career. That someone is Jaromir Jagr. Jagr was a huge question mark coming into this season. Everybody knew his brains and expertise would still be there, but would his 39-year-old body that had

not played NHL hockey in three years? The answer is yes. In fact, at times this season, he is out skating the younger guys and outworking them for the puck. Jagr is the second key to why this line is so effective. Giroux is the rising star, but Jagr is the slowly fading one that brings the experience along with all that talent. Sure, he is not what he used to be, but even that is still good enough to be one of the best players on the team. The third key is the chemistry that links Giroux and Jagr. It’s almost like they know what the other one is thinking on the ice, and give credit to Giroux for thinking like a smart veteran. The duo pull off moves and passes unmatched by many combos in the league this year. The lone exception

may be the Sedin twins, but they are twins, and can do some incredible things on the ice. The most refreshing thing about Jagr is that he does not have to score to be effective. He did not score until the ninth game of the season but he made his mark in other ways. Jagr works hard on the fore-check and uses that large frame to protect the puck and look for the perfect pass. In those first nine games he tallied four assists, two of them on Giroux’s goals. Many would have been fine with the way he was playing before he started scoring goals, given his age. But Jagr stepped it up to another level in the last four games, scoring five goals and assisting another two in that stretch. Not to mention he has been

averaging around 15 minutes per game, which is about a minute more than James van Riemsdyk has been averaging, and van Riemsdyk is 17 years younger. Jagr has shown he still has what it takes to play effectively at the NHL level. The fourth key to the line’s success is Scott Hartnell, the agitator who can flourish when put with the right line mates. And what better line mates than one who can pass and shoot and another who can pass, shoot, and will be a hall of famer? When van Riemsdyk was on the first line, it just was not working. Maybe it was because three great scorers on one line was just too much. Whatever the reason, when the lines were switched and Hartnell

joined Jagr and Giroux, he took off offensively. The extent of Hartnell’s scoring was two assists through the first seven games. In the last four, he has four goals and five assists, and it is not a coincidence that he broke out when he was moved to that line. Giroux, Jagr, and Hartnell are the most consistently strong aspect of the Flyers right now, and one of the most productive lines in the NHL. Between the three of them, they have tallied 16 goals and 21 assists so far, good for a total of 37 points. They are on fire, and there is no sign of them cooling down. Kenny Ayres is a secondyear student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.


OCTOBER 31, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 23

Golden Bears out-shine Golden Rams By Sean Breen Special to The Quad

On Saturday, the West Chester University Golden Rams hosted the Kutztown University Golden Bears in another PSAC East matchup. The Golden Rams came into the game with an overall record of 4-4 (3-2 in the PSAC east) and the Golden Bears came into the game with an overall record of 7-1 (5-1 in the PSAC east). It was a blistering cold and windy day, with a constant snowfall at John A. Farrell Stadium. There were more fans sitting in the Kutztown bleachers than West Chester’s, making it feel like an away game. On a better note, a memorial flag was presented before the game to honor Michael Horrocks. Horrocks, a former marine, and quarterback at WCU, was the co-pilot of the United Flight 175 that was hijacked and flown into the south tower of the Twin Towers on Sept. 11, 2001. John A. Farrell stadium was a cold, wet, quiet winter wonderland and it stayed that way a majority of the game. The West Chester Golden Rams were looking to bounce back after an embarrassing loss to Bloomsburg, in which they blew a 35 point lead and lost 55-42. The Golden Bears received the ball first and on their second play from scrimmage fumbled turning the ball over to the Rams in their own territory. Quarterback Matt Carroll got the start for the Rams for the second consecutive

week, even after being benched in the third quarter last week. Carroll looked shaky early on almost throwing an interception, and then being sacked on third down to force a

punt by the Golden Rams. The following punt on fourth down was blocked by Kutztown which led to a touchdown when Kutztown quarterback Kevin Morton, took the

ball up the middle, untouched, making the score 7-0 Bears. The Rams looked like they did last week after the first quarter, very sloppy. Turnovers, dropped

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

Rondell White tries to put WCU on the scoreboard during Saturday’s loss to Kutztown.

passes, penalties, are things this team has been plagued by the past two weeks. Kutztown, on the other hand, was not having any trouble moving the ball with their running game. They had the ball in Rams territory and, on a third and eleven, sophomore outside linebacker Mike Labor made a terrific play, batting a pass down that would have led to another Kutztown touchdown but instead held them to just a field goal. Kutztown led the game after one quarter 10-0. In the second quarter the rams had a little more success moving the ball led by senior runningback Jackson Fagan who converted a big fourth down play. On the very next play Fagan caught a 29 yard pass from Carroll, and what could have been a spark for the offense turned into disaster. The Rams had multiple penalties that moved them back out of Bear territory and put them out of field goal range. That momentum was as much as the Rams would get the rest of the game. The Bears got the ball back and continued to run the ball all over the Rams’ defense. The running game for the Bears set up a perfect play call when Kutztown scored another touchdown on a play action pass that was completed for 36 yards. The Bears led the Rams 17-0 going into halftime. The second half was much of the same from the Rams. Carroll was benched once again, and was replaced by Sean McCartney. Sloppy play plagued them the entire

second half. McCartney threw two interceptions in the second half, while Kutztown just kept the clock running with their rushing attack. The Rams were dominated the entire game, losing the home contest 24-0. The Bears improved their record to 8-1 overall while the Rams fell to a 4-5 record. After the game, sophomore tight end/ fullback Jared Bonaquisti commented on what was stopping the offense from moving the ball. “I would say little mistakes by us and some good game playing by them. Little mistakes hurt us the most,” Bonaquisti said. Football games come down to which team executes better, which is something the Golden Rams have been struggling with lately. Many people expected the team to recover and come out fired up after last week’s hiccup, even the players. “I definitely was. I was expecting our team to come back and dominate,” sophomore defensive end Nick Garcia said when asked if he expected his team to come out and handle business differently this week. The Golden Rams (4-5) travel to Millersville next week to take on the Marauders (3-6) in another PSAC East matchup. This will be their final away game of the season as they will return home in two weeks for their season finale against Indiana University of Pa. Sean Breen is a thirdyear student majoring in English. He can be reached at SB718728@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 24 The St. Louis Cardinals, who have been facing elimination since early September, won the World Series on Friday in seven games. This championship was the eleventh in the history of the franchise, and David Freese took MVP of the series. Freese’s walk-off homer in game 6 capped the Cardinals’ incredible comeback and forced a game 7.

THE QUAD

Sports OCTOBER 31, 2011

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Volleyball improves to 19-12 heading into final week - Page 19

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

Quad 101-06  

The Quad issue of October 31, 2011

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