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W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. APRIL 11. 2011

V O L UM E 1 0 0 . I S S U E 9

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

WCU goes bananas: B-Day 2011

IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS

OP-ED

FEATURES

ENT

SPORTS

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THE QUAD

Proposed budget cuts may affect WCU students By Jazzmine Carruth Special to The Quad

A message from President Weinstein addressed the many issues facing the campus, including its impending budget cut from Gov. Tom Corbett on March 8 for the 2011-12 academic years. It would cost students twice as much to attend West Chester University next year as a result in the proposed budget cut of 50 percent in funding for the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). Not only would current students of WCU be affected by this reduction, but staff as well. This budget cut would reduce the capacity of students being able to complete their degrees on time, end collaborations with community partners in the arts, community service and economic development. Higher education will have to raise tuition beyond capacity of many working families to afford college, destroying opportunity for many who have worked to earn it.

At WCU, the Governor’s proposal would result in at least a $26 million reduction, or approximately ,15 percent of the institutions operating budget. To cover the gap for the Governor’s plan, tuition would need to increase by nearly 30 percent. The school is Chester County’s seventh largest employer and, with the budget getting cut in half, cuts would include staff and faculty reductions. President Weinstein also stressed the hardships within the community. WCU students provide more than 230,000 hours of volunteer service in the community each year. The school alone attracts over 70,000 people to campus for cultural arts programs, and provides affordable performance space and opportunities for community groups as well. Many academic and outreach programs will get cut along with budget cuts; which includes programs such as the Business Technology center, a pre-med program that places nearly 100 percent of graduates

into medical school. The teacher education programs prepare more than 700 new teachers annually. Students who are soon leaving the institution feel affected by the new budget cut. “I would feel financially ripped-off if I couldn’t pay for my education for another year,” Shlonda Jones, an upcoming spring 2011 graduate, said. The costs of tuition would rise, and that does not include general fees, housing and eating expenses. The cost of living has been rapidly increasing, but the cost of being and becoming a college student will as well. As a WCU student, faculty, staff member, alumni or community member, stay informed with budget news and visit the updated budget page at http://www.wcupa.edu/ president/messages/facts.asp. Jazzmine Carruth is a fourthyear student majoring in professional studies with minors in journalism and education. She can be reached at JC659524@wcupa. edu.

Father Greg Boyle discusses Homeboy Industries By Ginger Rae Dunbar News Editor

Beginning with a bakery, Father Greg Boyle provided jobs for gang members in order to help wave them from a path of self-destruction and violence. Starting Homeboy Industries in 1992, Boyle has now worked with gang members for 25 years. This project has been a “privilege” in his life. He helps gang members find jobs and “restore their life,” though some people have “relapsed” and returned to old neighborhoods. Today, the project also includes Home Girl Café. The bakery is still in operation. Homeboy Industries is the largest gang intervention program. “At-risk kids don’t lack information, they lack hope,” Boyle said. The biggest misconception, he said, is that people believe adolescents do not know, when in reality it is that they do not care. Intervention programs attempt to tell kids they will

likely go to jail if not get killed by continuing the path they are on. Making visits to juvenile dentition centers, Boyle hands out his card to youths. This is one step he takes in order to allow them to find Homeboy Industries if they want to turn around their lives. Boyle keeps track of his past employees and former gang members that he has seen put six feet under. Last month he buried his 174th. By “telling the truth” which Boyle says is “all the same truth” he says: “No bullet can pierce it, no four prison walls can keep it out.” His motto for Homeboy Industries is “a job can stop a bullet.” The industry also provides free gang tattoo removal. This service began 17 years ago. It started with a doctor who offered to remove a tattoo of “f*** the world” from someone’s forehead. He gave several sessions of a free hour of tattoo removal until it was removed completely. After this, the man

was able to find a job working in security. Finding jobs would help gang members improve their life style choices, and allow them to earn money in a legitimate manor. Boyle laughed as he said they “searched for felony-friendly employments” before creating jobs having gang members work for him. “I want to remind you we’re in this world together,” Father Boyle said. “There is no us or them, it’s us.” Homeboy Industries is “aiming to bridge the distance that separates” people in the world. He is willing to meet people halfway. Boyle aims for “mutantility” between all as they develop their kinship. “No kinships, no justice,” said Boyle. “No kinship, no peace.” Boyle explained that the gang members that work for him are from rival gangs. He said gang members who used to shoot at each other now work the same shift together. see BOYLE page 3

News

APRIL 11, 2011

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

SGA candidates debate positions By T. J. Cromyak

the students informed of what is going on with On April 7, SGA held a Pennsylvania State System Higher Education debate in Sykes among the of candidates running for office (PASSHE). Vi c e Presidential for the 2011-2012 school year. Michelle The debate covered many c a n d i d a t e topics for the candidates to Strausbaugh said she would discuss and allowed them to like to see an increase of involvement on get their message to the student students in attendance. campus. As a result of a called “What’s Among the topics, diversity program proved to be the biggest Happening,” student involvetalking point with every ment has increased by 18 percent. She also said that candidate. Presidential candidate she would try to help unify Shaina Mason said she would the senate. Katie Kearney, candidate like to unify organizations and help co-sponsor programs for the office of treasurer, to save money. In addition, said that she would put the she said she would increase students’ best interest first. the amount of SGA program- One of the biggest concerns ming, and reach out to with the university is student students who usually do not involvement and Kearney said she would like to see get involved. Jessica Alicea, presiden- that change and keep gaining tial candidate, said that she student involvement. One of the charges to the would like to create a more transparent government for office of secretary is to boost the students, get students school spirit. Candidate more information on state Francis McDyer said that he issues and foster a strong would bring school spirit to senate and allow students to the forefront by promoting come to meetings to be other organizations and not just sports. involved. H o w e v e r, On the M a r k issue of being Cerofeci, visible, both secretarial candidates candidate, said they said he would not would take only make a school time to meet spirit iniw i t h tiative and students, but continue to also just say promote hello to sporting students as events and they passed other orgaon the way to nizations. class. Both candi“I have dates did great time they www.claytonstateradio.com say management would try skills and will be able to take on the to improve school spirit. On presidential position,” Mason the issue of student life, both said. “I can manage my time candidates said they would encourage active participaand listen to the students.” Mason also said she would tion for all students. In closing, Mason said that focus on all of the students and ask students what they she is running for the would like to see changed students and would like to within the school. Alicea said see West Chester to go from she would also like to keep see CANDIDATES page 4 Staff Writer


APRIL 11, 2011

THE QUAD

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CI hosts genocide conference to inform By T. J. Cromyak Staff Writer

On Monday, April 4, the Contemporary Issues (CI) organization brought the issue of genocide to West Chester University through guest speakers. Many of the guests have either studied accounts of genocide or experienced the horrific accounts of genocide. The message of the day, however, was more important: genocide continues to this day. Keynote speaker from Villanova University, Dr. Timothy Horner, spoke about the current events of Rwanda and Darfur. Horner said we need to catch genocide before it starts because once it does, too many lives have been lost and it leads to military action. He continued with “YouTube” clips to illustrate to the audience the skewed view of the people within the country. The conference continued to inform the audience with other speakers from across the area. Two notable speakers at the conference shared their experiences of genocide. Leo Bretholz and Daravann Yi explained their primary accounts of genocide. Bretholz

is a holocaust survivor living in America and educating young Americans on the Holocaust through his writings. In another part of the world, and a different time, Daravann Yi shared his story of living in Cambodia in the 1970’s. He managed to escape the Khmer Rouge regime of Cambodia and fled to Thailand in 1980. He does not dwell on the past. Instead, he said that he learns from it and moves forward to live in the present and to plan for the future. In addition, Yi founded the Salt Seeker Foundation, which is dedicated to providing support to improve the quality of life for orphans living in Cambodia. The conference also offered audience questions and panel discussions. Each panel consisted of scholars who have been studying the topic of genocide and the ideals of these countries for quite some time. During this time audience members asked questions to find out more information on genocide, and what they could do in response to it. Colleen McHugh, president of Contemporary

this summer,

Issues, said that not many students at the university know what is going on, especially in Darfur. “We try to bring programs to make students aware of issues,” she said. McHugh also said that the U.N. does not recognize the genocide in Darfur. McHugh did offer some advice as to how students can get more informed. “Join Contemporary Issues club, read online news, just educate yourself on these issues and if there is something that you feel passionate about, post it on Facebook, Twitter, just get the message out.” McHugh said that she is very happy with the student turn out and she appreciates the support of the student body. As the organization looks toward the future, they plan to bring more information about current issues to the student body. They have already begun brainstorming for next year’s programming. T.J. Cromyak is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AC61771@wcupa.edu.

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President Colleen McHugh wants CI programs to go students awareness of on-going issues, such as the genocide in Darfur.

BOYLE from page 2 Giving gang members jobs helps build their resumes before they can find an employer that will hire them with their criminal records. Despite their pasts, Boyle believes everyone is “exactly what God intended for them to be.” After a gang member served his second sentence, he claimed “this time would be different.” This is something Boyle normally hears gang members say. For this one in particular, after his first week on the job, he was proud to receive a paycheck, proof of having a job and making a change in his life. With having a job, he said his kids would not be embarrassed about him, and his parents told him that they were proud. “As you stand at the margins with demonizing, people may tell you that you’re wasting your time . . .” Boyle said. He believes that even if he does not alter someone else’s life, they make a great impact on his. He recognizes that “these kids lack hope.” He said they cannot picture their futures and do not care if they inflict harm on themselves or others. It would not matter if they dodged a bullet or not. “No hopeful kid joins a gang,” Boyle said. When asked why people risk death and prison, he tells them that it’s “because they don’t care.” He recalled offering to help a young kid several times, one who had refused. Fifteen years later, he would come to Boyle

for help, telling him that he was tired of being tired. This man asked Boyle to bless his daughter before she left for college. Boyle was the only person he and his wife knew that had graduated from college. Boyle told him he was “proud of the man he chose to be, the steps he took.” Before this man got married with children and a stable home, people in his life had told him he was good for nothing.’ Throughout the night, Boyle repeated ideas of visions and telling stories that lead to mutual feelings occurring throughout a situation. His vision ended up being to help gang members. He gave an example of a drug addict coming to his office as he was leaving for an event. She began crying, saying she was a disgrace. He had “mistaken her for an interruption” while she stood there crying, saying she had wanted to stop using drugs since the day she started. He believed this was a mutual feeling between the two. “We all have visions,” Boyle said. “If it interrupts [our lives], wait for it . . . .” Boyle would like projects to include housing, instead of just concentrating on providing jobs. He considers housing to be the “next frontier.” He has helped people pay first and last month’s rent for an apartment. Many gang members live in their care, as homelessness is high among them. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa. edu.


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THE QUAD

APRIL 11, 2011

OCCA bridges students together with community By Dan Colon

Advertising Editor

www.shruti914.wordpress.com

Homeboy Industries is a non-profit organization started by Father Greg Boyle. He has been battling cancer for several years. The gang members that work for him told him it is their “chance to help” him now. Driving him to the hospital is a small favor in exchange for the help he has given them.

For the story on Father Boyle and the Home Boy Industries, see page 2

CANDIDATES from page 2

Sykes After Dark. Alicea is the executive director to RHA, an orientation leader and works with freshman adequate to spectacular. interest groups. Alicea said that she wants to Elections start Monday, give back to West Chester April 11 at 10 a.m. in Sykes. and wants to be able to reach T.J. Cromyak is a fourth-year out to the students. student majoring in communicaMason was responsible for tion studies with a minor in organizing Banana Day this journalism. He can be reached at year. She is also involved AC61771@wcupa.edu. with the events staff and

Photo by T. J. Cromyak

SGA candidates seated from left to right: Shaina Mason (Presidential Candidate), Francis McDyer (Secretary Candidate), Michelle Strausbaugh (VP Candidate), Katie Kearney (Treasure Candidate), Mark Cerofeci (Secretary Candidate), and Jessica Alicea (Presidential Candidate).

Recently, Off-Campus andCommuter Association (OCCA). OCCA sold Phillies tickets at a discounted rate for WCU students. As an organization, OCCA fulfills a broad mission for their students: lobbying the administration to address their needs and concerns, investigate issues that confront them, recommend solutions, promote understanding between them and the rest of the community and to lobby for or provide services and programs. The Phillies’ tickets come from this last point; however, the organization has an ongoing leadership campaign, and is also currently working on a letter-writing campaign. The letter-writing campaign is currently one of OCCA’s primary advocacy efforts. In an open letter to state legislators, students are given the opportunity to appeal for extra funding for several of West Chester’s public works projects, such as the repaving of Church St. By writing to state legislators, OCCA hopes to raise funding while lessening tensions between the borough and the students that live there. The campaign was precipitated by a number of factors, including the recent 20%

increase in property taxes and state-wide budget cuts. Paul Tamke, OCCA’s Vice President, wrote the following about why students should participate in this campaign: “As a student, I … do not pay taxes [in West Chester]. The fact that all university property is tax exempt compounds this issue, and while there are many valid reasons for such exemptions, I do not think it is fair that the borough should have to eat the cost of providing resources for over 13,000 students, faculty, and staff.” Renae Donald, OCCA’s Treasurer, backs up the organization’s goal with statistics: “West Chester does an estimated $20 million in alcohol sales in a given year at 40 different licensed locations. This statistic…is enormous, especially when one takes into account that the ratio of police to citizens is 2.56 per 1000, lower than the national average … Because of current tax laws in Pennsylvania, the borough pays out of pocket for this enforcement and receives nothing in the way of taxes to support the great demand for policing in the borough.” Donald said, “The 18% tax on alcohol…goes to the state and makes the state $3.6 million dollars per year: and again, the Borough of West

Chester receives no immediate benefit but has to assume the burden of enforcement and public safety that accompanies having the highest concentration of liquor licenses in Pennsylvania.” Hans van Mol, OCCA’s President, explains that OCCA’s efforts can only help strengthen relations between WCU and the surrounding community. “With over 60 percent of the campus body living in the Borough and nearby areas, OCCA is always trying to be the bridge that joins the University and public together,” Mol said. “Our constituents interact with permanent residents on a daily basis, and we strive not only to increase friendly neighbor relations, but to also to give our students a voice on campus & in the community.” OCCA is open to feedback and will try to offer help in any way that they can. OCCA has worked well with other groups and organizations. If you contact OCCA to help or feedback you can locate them at occawcu.com or at occa@wcupa. edu. Their general meetings are at Wednesday at noon in Sykes room 209, and are always open to all. Dan Colon is a fourth-year student majoring in English. He can be reached at DC741117@wcupa. edu.


APRIL 11, 2011

Opinion

THE QUAD

&

Editorial The Quad turnover: a farewell

Sunday, April 10 marked the beginning of the awkward two-day time period between the last layout session of The Quad’s 2010-2011 staff, and the first meeting of the 2011-2012 staff. As a Quad veteran of several years, I can confidently say this is the largest turnover of staff I have ever seen.

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The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 Phone: 610.436.2375 | Fax: 610.436.3280 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Tara Tanzos

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Rae Dunbar News Editor Lisa Dellaporta Op-Ed Editor Angela Thomas Features Editor Mike Sheehan Entertainment Editor Amy Festa Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Photography Editor

EDITORIAL STAFF Steven Fisher Asst. Sports Editor Jess Guzzardo Asst. Photography Editor COPY EDITORS Sarah Gurgal Lauren Whitcomb Linda Charles

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Joshua Cash Business Manager Dan Colon Advertising Manager AVAILABLE Asst. Advertising Manager Brittany Silver Art Director

DISTRIBUTION Kyle Pesce Sarah Kemmerer ONLINE EDITION Kristin Solanick FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is ac-

For my last editorial, I have no witty lines or pathetic jokes. I merely want to praise The Quad for succeeding as a student-run publication, and for the honor I had in participating as a writer, section editor and student leader. I’ve seen several different staffs (filled with extremely different people) take on the tasks of managing writers, laying out editorial pages, handling communication with advertisers, keeping business and billing records and getting along while doing so. I admire every single staff member for being willing to take on this kind of work on top of academia, knowing full well that there will always be a chance of being called in for a last-minute fix up. Having worked at my local newspaper (in the Lehigh Valley), I can honestly say that The Quad strives to uphold the same journalistic standards and business practices—something that’s quite difficult when your entire staff is attending classes instead of working nine-to-five. My time working with The Quad has been one of my most educational experiences on this campus. I highly encourage every-and-anyone with a slight inclination for writing to pursue The Quad, if only to write one article every semester. After this issue, my duties will transfer to the newly-elected Editor-in-Chief, Rae Dunbar, and her 2011-2012 Quad staff. Ms. Dunbar will hold the last Quad meeting of the semester Tuesday, April 12 at 3:30p.m. Anyone who would like to know how to be involved in The Quad next semester should feel free to come by our office (2nd floor Sykes) and chat for a while. Thank you, past and present Quadlings, and to our wonderful staff advisor, Dr. Thompsen, for an enlightening, hysterical, sometimes-frustrating, continually fascinating experience. Best of luck in the future. peace to you, Tara Tanzos

cepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Copyright ©2011 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


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THE QUAD

APRIL 11, 2011

April: national organ donor month

Travis Pearson Practicum Writer

Do you remember the first time you made a promise? You were probably very young. In theory, a promise is one of the simplest things a child learns. Unlike the gray areas surrounding good and bad, a promise is forthright and basic. You give someone your word that you’ll do something,and then you do it, no matter what. Easy. Often times though, a promise is a whole lot more. A promise can bring an immense amount of work and anguish, and can take a lifetime to complete. It can mean more than anything in the world. I’ll get back to promises later, but for now, consider the short amount of time you may have spent trying to remember your first promise. In those fleeting moments, thousands upon thousands of people and their families agonizingly waited next to the phone for a call that may or may not come. This April brings another annual National Organ Donor Awareness Month, and as the month silently passes, the issues surrounding organ donation continue to get little press. The facts: only 38 percent of registered drivers in the United States are organ donors, according to a New Yo r k Ti m e s s t u d y. DonateLife-PA.org tracks P e n n s y l v a n i a ’s organ donation and provides information about the process of donating an organ. The site’s interactive map shows that less than 30 percent of Philadelphia County, the state’s most populous region, consents to organ donation. Scrolling over the state, the highest percentage in any county is around 56 percent. Overall, less than 43 percent of registered Pennsylvania drivers are organ donors. All religious denominations allow organ donation. Worldwide, it’s considered immensely beneficial. Unfortunately, in this country, television and other popular culture has propagated some nasty myths. The largest is the idea that doctors won’t save those in an accident if they’re organ donors. This is almost too absurd to merit explanation. For a simple explanation: emergency team doctors and paramedics try to save

people’s lives in the case of an emergency. Only after this team determines imminent death or pronounce the person dead do transplant doctors get involved. Why do I care that six out of 10 Americans aren’t organ donors? Should anyone care that 18 people die every day because they don’t get the organ they need to survive, as thousands of others perish and keep their organs with them? To answer those questions, I must return to promises. I recently made a big promise, and this article is my first step in keeping it. The roots of mine started a few years ago. I was 16 years old, and I had just successfully completed my driving test. I was ecstatic and still a little frazzled when the older woman at the counter asked me if I wanted to be an organ donor. Unsure and a little caught-off-guard, I looked over my shoulder to my dad. “Of course you want to. If you’re gone and can’t use them, then why shouldn’t you save a life?” he asked me. I quickly agreed and signed the form. At that point, I thought little of my actions. Being an organ donor seemed practical—it was the right thing to do; but it never had any personal meaning. That all changed along with my promise during my junior year at WCU. I was quietly unpacking in my room, having just arrived home for winter break, when Dad came in. We had lived together since my parents divorced when I was 13. He was always there for me—to go golfing, to talk or to tell jokes and share a laugh. I was 20 at the time, and our relationship had gone from father-son to that of best friends. By the serious look on his face I knew that something was wrong. He simply said, “I didn’t tell you because I didn’t want you to worry during your finals, so you’re the last one to know.” He paused for a deep breath. “I have liver cancer.” I couldn’t move or speak; I stood there stupidly in stunned silence. The next few months were a blur. I worked full-time over break, but took a lot of days off for long hospital visits, checkups and surgeries. I returned to

school, but as the months wore on the surgeries became more frequent. Finally, after all containment procedures failed, the only option left was a liver transplant. The doctors made it clear that he could live relatively comfortably for perhaps a few years in his current state, but that a transplant was a risky potential lease on a longer, healthier life. I felt relieved and nervous when he decided he’d do it. A few months later he had the transplant. He recovered normally and his returning home on his own accord coincided with my coming back from college for the summer. Due to my unemployment, Dad and I spent about a month together. At the time, not having a job was hard, but looking back I can honestly say that those were some of the happiest days of my life. He felt better than he had in years. I remembered all the hard times we’d had when it was only him, my brother and I, and I felt grateful that he was still in my life. These good times lasted about six weeks. That’s when things started to go wrong. Every week something new came up. The man who was the one constant figure in my life became the man who was never out of the hospital for more than two or three weeks. It was a ruptured artery here or his blood was too thin there. He was never healthy. Every day I went to work, got off work, showered, drove to the hospital and stayed there until visiting hours were up. The next day went exactly the same—my entire summer before senior year was a lot like the movie Groundhog Day. My promise progressed this past fall into winter. Describing what it’s like to watch someone slowly grow sicker with each passing day is extremely difficult. He lost muscle and other healthy-looking tissue, but looked a lot fatter and weighed more because fluid collected around his stomach. His body often got more yellow as the liver slowly failed. He was in agony a lot of the time, and when I think about Thanksgiving and Christmas from this past year I remember how miserable he felt, but how my entire family tried to keep his spirits up. He tried to laugh and joke as he always

had, but something was never quite right. This situation was made all the more difficult when the complaints to his doctors only yielded answers that he was fine and that he would soon return to “normal” despite the obvious. As soon as I returned to school following winter break his liver began to fail rapidly. They instructed my family in mid-January that he would go back onto the transplant list, and that a new liver was the only thing that could save him. A promise is the feeling of laying down every single night after spending 12 hours next to a hospital bed, only to not sleep because all you can do is stare at the telephone and hope it rings. A promise is watching your father become extremely confused because the toxins that his liver is supposed to take care of move to his brain. A promise is him then moving into a coma because his body couldn’t handle being awake. A promise is doctors telling you that he has only 24-48 hours to live unless he gets a new liver, only to see him fight and live for a week. It’s watching a body deteriorate to the point that it’s barely recognizable. It’s hearing a doctor say that he’s been taken off the list, and that all hope is lost. It’s all of the things you realized you never got a chance to say, and it

being too late. And finally, a promise is saying goodbye. I promised my parent, guardian, confidant and best friend that I would do everything in my power to change this broken system. Dad not only made me the man I am today, but he laid the foundation for the man I hope to someday become. He was the kindest, friendliest and funniest person I’ve ever met, and not an hour of the day goes by that I don’t think about him. He was 57. I hope that as I start a lifetime of fulfilling my promise, that perhaps those who read this can make a promise of their own. Become an organ donor. If you’re already an organ donor, get someone you know to become an organ donor. Perhaps most importantly, don’t allow stupid myths to be perpetuated—despite their illogicality, people actually believe them. Every year 10,000-12,000 eligible organ donors die, but only about 6,000 actually donate. The reasons for this are incomprehensible and unnecessary. You can easily become an organ donor or gather more information at DonateLife-PA. org or your state’s Department of Transportation website. Travis Pearson is a student at West Chester University. He can be reached at TP651537@wcupa. edu.

Want to be a part of our publication team? Interested in being advertising manager for the Quad? Contact us at quadeic@wcupa.edu


APRIL 11, 2011

Features

THE QUAD

“April hath put a spirit of youth in everything”-William Shakespeare

April is “Distracted Driving Awareness Month” By Angela Thomas Features Editor

“April showers bring May flowers” is the popular phrase that people think of when April finally comes. Although April may be known for its rainy days, April is also the month for raising awareness on different causes that effect society. Recently April has been announced as “Distracted Driving Awareness Month.” Distracted driving can be anything from texting while driving, paying more attention to the radio dial, or even stretching to see that terrible car accident on the side of the road instead of paying attention to the road. It only takes one second of being distracting to cause accidents both fatal and critical. Sprint has joined in on creating awareness on the problem by creating an application for its customers called “Drive First: Safe Driving Solution.” “As a parent, I am proud that Sprint is offering distracted driv-

ing solutions like “Sprint Drive First,” which effectively helps wireless customers manage their usage, stay safe behind the wheel and focus their attention on driving,” CEO Dan Hesse said when discussing the new application in honor of Distracted Driving Awareness Month. This application will block text message alerts that might distract a driver but it will also screen and lock the driver’s incoming calls and direct those calls to voicemail. For more information on Sprint’s “Drive First” application, visit spring.com/focusondriving. Phi Sigma Pi has helped to inform WCU’s campus on distracted driving and the harmful consequences it can have. On Saturday, April 9 the Alpha Epsilon chapter of Phi Sigma Pi, hosted a benefit concert in honor of Casey Feldman. Feldman, a student at Fordham University was struck and killed by a vehicle while crossing a pedestrian crosswalk in Ocean City, N.J. The driver behind that vehicle was distracted.

“Casey died because a driver took his eyes off the road for just a few seconds. And after it happened, I knew I could easily have been that driver. I had driven while distracted many times. And it took losing Casey for me to realize how lucky I was not to have killed another family’s child, spouse, parent, or friend,” Joel Feldman, Casey’s father said. “I lost Casey, and I changed the way I drive. But most people don’t lose loved ones to distracted driving. They don’t realize the chances they take when they multi-task behind the wheel,” Feldman said. There are many ways to stay focused on driving and not get distracted. However, the best advice is to just leave the cell phones, the radio, and other devices alone and to keep your eyes on the road ahead at all times. Angela Thomas is a fourth year student majoring in English and with a minor in web technology. She can be reached at AT683005@ wcupa.edu.

Photos from the Conference on Genocide. For more photos see page 9 Contemporary Issues Club meets every Tuesday at 7p.m. in Sykes 210

All photos taken by Colleen McHugh

PAGE 7

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

WCU to host Transfeminism conference By Rebekah Balmer Staff Writer

On Friday April 15, West Chester students from Dr. Mandelia’s “Transnational Feminism” class will be hosting the 2011 Student Conference on Transnational Feminism. The title of the conference is “Intersecting Global Identities: Women in a Transnational World.” The conference will take place from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. in the Sykes theatre. Students have been in charge of planning the conference. The class was separated into different groups including publicity, program, schedule, and website.

Each group has a different task. While Dr. Mandelia guided the class through the process of creating the conference, she made sure to let her students know that the success of the conference would come out of the work they put into the conference. The students in the class are in charge of preparing and running the conference. The class contacted around 50 different universities with Women & Gender Studies programs in hopes of a good turnout. Rebekah Balmer is a fourth-year student majoring in women’s and gender studies and sociology . She can be reached at RB649636@ wcupa.edu.

Facts and statistics about distracted driving

* Twenty percent of injury crashes in 2009 involved reports of distracted driving. (NHTSA). * Of those killed in distracted-driving-related crashes, 995 involved reports of a cell phone as a distraction (18% of fatalities in distraction-related crashes). (NHTSA) * In 2009, 5,474 people were killed on U.S. roadways and an estimated additional 448,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes that were reported to have involved distracted driving. (FARS and GES) * The age group with the greatest proportion of distracted drivers was the under 20 age group - sixteen percent of all drivers younger than 20 involved in fatal crashes were reported to have been distracted while driving. (NHTSA) * Drivers who use hand-held devices are four times as likely to get into crashes serious enough to injure themselves. (Source: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety) * Using a cell phone while driving, whether it’s handheld or hands-free, delays a driver’s reactions as much as having a blood alcohol concentration at the legal limit of .08 percent. (Source: University of Utah) Taken from Mountain Home News, Elmore County Idaho.


PAGE 8

THE QUAD

Teacher feature presents... Dr. Martin Helmke dents travel to Yellowstone of this is to “do geology” and help

By Rebekah Balmer Staff Writer

Earning a Bachelors in environmental science and geology from Antioch College in Yellow Springs Ohio, Dr. Martin Helmke is an Associate Professor of Hydrogeology and Soils in the Department of Geology and Astronomy. Helmke continued his education at Iowa State University of Science and Technology and earned his Ph.D. in Geology and Water Resources. He was a teacher’s assistant for seven years and has been a teacher for 11 years, six of which at West Chester University. Helmke teaches “Introduction to Geology, Hydrogeology, and Soils.” He also teaches Geology of National Parks which is taught during the summer semester. During the class, he and his stu-

National Park in Wyoming for two weeks. Helmke has many publications including a chapter in a book on soil, water quality and human health. The other publication is a scientific article on contaminant chemicals in drinking water and health risks. He has earned many awards too. Helmke won the “American Geophysical Union Horton Award” for his research. He also won “Firefighter of the Year” in 2010 at the Fame Fire Company. Another accomplishment Helmke is proud of is when Helmke and his students helped the university write part of a fivemillion-dollar grant that was awarded to the university to convert the energy system at West Chester to geothermal energy. His best academic achievement is service learning. The objective

At Cecil College you’re more than just a face in a crowd. Summer courses at Cecil offer small class sizes, which means you enjoy individual attention from highly qualified faculty who know you well. This summer you can maximize your learning opportunities at an affordable cost and transfer your credits. For more information, go to www.cecil.edu/summerstudies or call 410-287-1000.

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the community. The service learning he does with his students involves his students doing research in the community and writing reports about their findings in order to better this region. Some of the most successful service learning projects was flood risks in Chester County, drinking water availability in housing developments, rain gardens and geothermal energy. Helmke’s academic goal is “striving to become a better teacher.” “I am always seeking opportunities to conduct geologic research with my students that will improve the community,” Helmke said. At 16, Helmke hiked the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine by himself. This is what he describes as his best life achievement. Helmke explained how he has achieved his life goals and is now enjoying life and making the most of it while always trying to better himself. “Seeing students realize how important geology is to everyone and helping them know they are able to make a real difference,” Helmke said when explaining what he loved most about teaching. “I love the focus on the learning; there are extraordinary educators here who are rewarded by the university. Service learning is also rewarded. The alumni support is great too,” Helmke said about WCU. He explained how many geology students stay in the area and contribute back to WCU and the community. Helmke’s advice to students is, “take full advantage of your time here at West Chester, it will be gone before you know it.” “Once you are out of college you may not have the time to be active and pursue your interests. You will have family obligations and a full time job.” He also added, “please, make smart choices.” Dr. Helmke can be located in Merion Science Center, room 211. Rebekah Balmer is a fourth-year student majoring in women’s and gender studies and sociology . She can be reached at RB649636@ wcupa.edu..

APRIL 11, 2011

Random facts about the month of April:

• The birthstone of April is the diamond. • The Romans named the month April from the Latin word aperire meaning to open. • Earth day is celebrated on April 22. However, Earth Day started as a student movement, and was originally held on March 21. • The daisy and sweetpea are the official flowers for April

Facts on April found at www.funtrivia.com

Want to nominate a WCU professor for the teacher feature? E-mail quadfeatures@wcupa.edu

| CECIL COLLEGE | REAL STUDENTS. REAL SUCCESS.


APRIL 11, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 9

Contemporary Issues conference on Genocide, Monday, April 4 See story page 3

All Photos taken by Colleen McHugh


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PAGE 12

THE QUAD

Follow the Quad online! @TheQuadWCU

A Brief Review of the GRBJ Jennifer Berlin

Special to The Quad

Last Saturday I had the pleasure of going to the Great Ram Band Jam, an event that showcases local talent in and around the area of West Chester. The event featured eight local bands. It was $5 to get in and the money went to the Invisible Children foundation. I spoke with Adam Barnard of the West Chester University Radio (WCUR) about the event and he said that he was super stoked. “We have a great charity, Invisible Children, and we have a lot of great bands playing. The staff is really helping out a lot, and it’s going to be a good day.” Although I could only stay for about half of the bands, the ones that I saw made a big impression. First up was the Oddessay, a local band that plays what I call easy listening coffee house music. They were followed by the

Snails who have a kind of jazz element to their music mixed with an island feel. The band told me that they have a show coming up on the 21st of April at The Note in West Chester. Stay Up Entertainment is a hip-hop group that promotes the message of stay up and be positive. Spotted Atrocious, despite being down three members, did really well. If you want to check them out, they play locally pretty often. Aayu, a local rap artist, comment on the event. “I’m really happy to be supporting independent music, and it’s a great cause.” His debut album comes out May 31. When asked about the GRBJ, Sam Krepps, General Manager for WCUR said,“This is a big event we look forward to every year. We like to get local talent out to showcase what they do, and it’s for a good cause.” Jennifer Berlin can be reached at JB629094@wcupa.edu.

APRIL 11, 2011

Entertainment

QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

Hookah and Moroccan Tea Anyone? Michael Sheehan Entertainment Editor

Cozy Hookah and Cigar Bar, located at 122. E. Gay St., opened it doors to the public in late 2010 and has been described as a "chill" and "relaxing" place to hang out on the weekdays, while making a transformation into a fun, upbeat nightclub during the weekend. The 18 and over establishment is associated with Cozy Cafe in New York's East Village, the first hookah bar to open in the United States 25 years ago. If you're looking for a new place to hang out, wander up into West Chester's diverse downtown, and stop by for a taste of a Middle Eastern tradition. Smoking hookah is a cultural social activity very common in the Middle East. Hookah tobacco, called shisha, is a mixture of tobacco, honey or molasses, distilled water and fruit flavors. Shisha tobacco is not like tobacco in cigarettes or cigars. It is a very light smoke with a

pleasant fruitful aroma, and a single smoking session can last from 30 minutes to two hours. From India to Egypt, people go to hookah bars to drink tea or coffee, smoke hookah, and engage in friendly conversation. The effects of smoking shisha are very peaceful and relaxing, and it's even been used to treat mild headaches and stomach pains. Cozy has 69 different flavors to choose from and offers a small menu of food as well. Moroccan and Egyption tea are available upon request, and pair nicely with a fine hookah smoke. During the week, if you have a laptop and are looking for a place to do your homework, free wi-fi is available. Televisions line the wall so you can keep track of whatever game is on, and if you're over 21, you can bring your own alcohol for a $5 corking fee per person. Mahrous, the very hospitable owner, offers a special discount during the week from 10a.m.-6p.m. where "everything is half-price." Hookah, food, and

drinks are all 50% off. The staff is quick to take your order and may even offer you food and drinks "on the house" if you give them enough business. Cozy also offers cigars for sale, courtesy of G&G Cigar on High St., so if hookah isn't your steeze, try out their quality selection of fine cigars. Maybe you're not into the whole chill-out atmosphere though, don't worry because on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights there is a live DJ that plays all the club hits and really transforms the place into a party atmosphere. Belly dancers entertain guests on Friday and Saturday nights and, if you like to dance, the staff will most certainly dance with you and you can't help but have a good time. So, next time you're bored or looking for something new to do, check out Cozy Hookah and Cigar Bar on Gay St. for a taste of Egyptian culture and friendly service. Michael Sheehan is a fourth-year student majoring in Respiratory Care. He can be reached at MS656728@wcupa.edu.

M.Sheehan/ The Quad

Artwork by: David Niemeyer

Some WCU students enjoy some pineapple and strawberry shisha on saturday night.


APRIL 11, 2011

THE QUAD

Dave Matthews Band to stage 3-day festival on Chicago lakefront Greg Kot

Chicago Tribune

jambands.com

Upcoming Shows

The Dave Matthews Band will headline a three-day, multiact, multi-stage festival July 8-10 on Chicago’s South Side lakefront, promoters announced Thursday. The Dave Matthews Band Caravan will include performances by the headliner each night, plus David Gray, Ray LaMontagne, O.A.R., The Flaming Lips (performing Pink Floyd’s classic album “Dark Side of the Moon”), Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros, Amos Lee, Emmylou Harris, Ben Folds, G. Love & Special Sauce, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Gomez, Drive-By Truckers, Michael Franti & Spearhead, The Jayhawks, Soja, Soulive, The Wailers, Blind Pilot, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, TR3, Vieux Farka Toure, Alberta Cross, Mariachi El Bronx, Bobby Long, Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk, Jeff Coffin’s Mu’tet and Gary Clark Jr. In addition, Dave Matthews Band members Carter Beauford and Stefan Lessard will perform, and Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds will play an acoustic set. A Summer Camp Saturday Stage will feature artists who performed at the Summer Camp Music Festival May 27-29 in Chillicothe, Ill. The festival would be held at Lakeside, the site of the former U.S. Steel Southworks, between 79th and 87th Streets along Lake Michigan. Chicago Lakeside Development LLC is seeking to convert the property into a residential and retail hub. Currently the site is little more than dirt and rubble, one of the largest vacant parcels of land in the city.

ELECTRIC FACTORY: April 21- Iron and Wine April 26- Coheed and Cambria April 29 - Rusko May 2/3 - Rise Against May 7- Cage the Elephant May 10 - Deftones May 18 - Arctic Monkeys

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PAGE 13

Interested in advertising?

The Quad is looking for motivated individuals interested in marketing and business to add to our Advertising Team.

Contact quadeic@wcupa.edu if interested.


PAGE 14

THE QUAD

APRIL 11, 2011

With 14 million musical acts on MySpace, are any great band names left? Mark Caro

Chicago Tribune

Snowflakes fluttered down, lightning flashed and inspiration for a brilliant new band name struck: Thundersnow. Mind you, I don’t actually have a band, but in my rock-geek fantasy life, I’m constantly in search of the perfect band name, so I vetted this one in the commonly accepted 21st century method: I Googled it. Sure enough, not only is there a Madison, Wis., rock band called Thundersnow on MySpace but also a Rochester, N.Y., metal band named ThunderSnow. Sigh. This seems to be the case with just about any clever band name you might come up with. Say, completely hypothetically, of course, that you’re enthralled by Charlie Sheen. Sorry, but MySpace already features an Austin, Texas, guitar-rock band called Tiger Blood, and an experimental outfit from Vancouver, British Columbia, Winning, and there’s an LA psychedelic band, the Warlocks _ plus the Warlocks, a Norwegian rap group, in addition to Warlock, an ‘80s German metal band. While thinking about the

space shuttle launch, I decided I should call my theoretical band the Astronaughties. I subsequently found the Web page for the four-piece Scottish band Astro Naughty. The other day I passed some gnarly roadkill and wondered whether there was a band called Flattened Rabbit. Guess what? Flat Rabbit was a ‘90s Denver thrash metal band that apparently has split up, and West Virginia singer-songwriter Todd Coyle calls his company Flat Rabbit Music. OK, but what about Crushed Bunny? Well, there’s a Phoenix rock band called Crushed, plus other acts named Bunny Band, Gin Bunny, Nobunny, Skibunny, Boo Boo Bunny, Nathen Maxwell and the Original Bunny Gang and the Steve Bunny Band _ but apparently no Crushed Bunny. Pay dirt! And so we see the thought process that would lead someone to a band name as stupid as Crushed Bunny. No wonder the Billboard Rock Songs chart is populated by such acts as Cage the Elephant, Shinedown, Foster the People, Avenged Sevenfold, Young the Giant, Stone Sour and Alter Bridge. Unfathomable

band names are nothing new (Procol Harum, anyone?), but in the olden days they felt more like a matter of choice than necessity _ there were still plenty of things living (Animals, Beatles, Byrds, Crickets, Eagles, Flamingoes, Monkees ...), nonliving (Doors, Kinks, Platters, Rolling Stones, Seeds, Temptations, Four Seasons, Four Tops ...) and in between (Zombies) from which to choose. A friend recently popped by my cubicle, and I bet her that any three nouns she gave me would turn out to be band names. She said “hippos,” “snow globe” and “zucchini,” and guess what? The Hippos, Snowglobe and Zucchini are all on MySpace. The other key factor: The world used to be smaller. Way back when, you could have a Chicago band with a name like the Catapults _ again, speaking hypothetically _ never knowing that there might have been other Catapults playing in other cities here and abroad. (For what it’s worth, MySpace now features pages for Catapult, American Catapult, the Catapult Club, Catapult the Smoke and Elizabeth and the Catapult.) In the late ‘60s, separate bands called Kaleidoscope were based on the

West Coast and in England with no Internet to bridge the distance and befuddle listeners. “The essence of trademark law is confusion in the eyes of the public,” Chicago entertainment lawyer E. Leonard Rubin says. “If you don’t have confusion, there’s no problem.” But now, about 14 million musical acts are registered on MySpace (according to a representative), everyone is everywhere and all it takes is a mouse click to learn that the idea you thought was original is just more recycling. “Google is a dream crusher,” says Jim Powers, who runs the Chicago-based Minty Fresh label (and also is a friend). He says one band on his label, Champaign, Ill.’s the Blackouts, wound up becoming the Living Blue “because there was already another Blackouts out there that had a record out.” Minty Fresh’s roster also includes Ape on the Roof, Suburban Kids with Biblical Names,

Sugarplastic, We Are Standard and White Shoes & the Couples Company. “You almost need to get a random word generator, which you can do on the Internet, or get out a legal pad and start throwing out words and start coupling them together,” Powers said. “That seems like the best way to roll now.”

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APRIL 11, 2011

THE QUAD

Classifieds

Placing Classifieds

Child Care Available To place a classified ad in The Childcare needed Quad, visit www.wcuquad.com, and click “classified ads.” Our website makes it easy to enter your ad exactly as you wish it to appear, select a category, choose dates of publication, and add special features. Pay for your ad with any major credit card on our secure server. The rate for classified advertising is 30 cents per word, with a minimum of 20 words ($6 minimum charge). Please note that all classified ads must be placed at The Quad’s website at www.wcuquad. com. Deadline for placing classified advertisements in The Quad is 12 noon on the Sunday before publication.

Occasional childcare needed Monday and Thursday nights and weekends for working mom and student dad. Nonsmoker. References needed. Email: amyvalle1606@comcast.net or call 610-269-4378

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Rams continue to bring home the gold PAGE 16

THE QUAD

By Jillian Morgan Staff Writer

The West Chester track and field teams competed at the Danny Curran Invitational April 1 and 2 at Widener University to warm-up for their next big home meet, the West Chester Invitational which took place on April 8 and 9. Once again, Leighon Johnson set the standards high with three first place finishes. Johnson won the 100-meter and the 200-meter, completing the races in 10.88 and 21.85, respectively. Johnson also assisted in the 4x100 relay first place win alongside teammates, Adam Heath, Eric Atkins and Anthony Jackson, completing

the race in 43.77. Tyler Real won the 110-meter hurdles with a time of 14.98 and also came in fifth place in the 400-meter hurdles (58.36). Teammate, Ryan Carli finished fourth in the 110-meter hurdles behind Real (16.00) and placed third in the 400-meter hurdles (57.57). Matt Langdale won the 1500meter race with a time of 4:05.05 and placed third in the 800-meter (1:56.83). Heath received first place in the triple jump, leaping 42—8 ¾ inches. He also placed fourth in the long jump (20—9 ¾). Tim Thiry was runner-up in the 400-meter, finishing the race in 50.94, while Craig Espenshade came in right

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behind Thiry, placing third (51.50). William Breiner placed sixth in the shot put, throwing 37 – 3 ¾. Brian Pellechia came in sixth as well in both the hammer throw (142-05) and the javelin (168-11). The men’s 4x100 wasn’t the only relay to receive first place. The women’s 4x100 and 4x400 came in first at the Danny Curran Invitational. Melanie Ruff, Melinda Wentz, Sam Smarkola and Nicole Smith made up the winning relay teams. They finished the 4x100 in 49.04 and the 4x400 in 4:01.01. Ruff also placed first in the 100-meter and the 200-meter. Ruff completed the 100-meter in 12.53, while crossing the finish line in 23.32 for the 200meter. Smarkola and Smith placed sixth and seventh, respectively, in the 200-meter. Nicole Smith received second place in the 400meter, completing the race in 58.32. Teammate, Wentz placed third in the 100-meter hurdles (15.59). Brigid Gallagher finished in eighth place in the 100-meter hurdles behind Wentz. “As a team, we know [winning] is capable of happening from all the hard work we put in every practice, learning from mistakes, practicing till we get it right, and having a great coach guide our team to having outstanding performances this season, and many more to come,” Smith said. Lyndsey Ratasiewicz came in third the 800-meter (2:22.21) and finished in second place in the 1500-meter (4:46.72). Kaitlin Carpenter took eighth in the 5000-meter, finishing the race in 19:07.87. Kamber Schrann came in fourth in the pole vault, clearing 9—6 ¼ inches. Brittany Foye finished second in the triple jump (35—6 ¼), while Dana Dietrich followed close behind, leaping 35—0 ¼. Mackenzie Lauro came in fifth place behind Foye and Dietrich. Lauro also competed in the long jump, leaping 15—9 ½ inches. Teammate, Wentz came in fifth in the high jump (4—9 ¾). Nicole Reaves and Miriam Hughes placed eighth and ninth in the long jump, respec-

APRIL 11, 2011

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

tively. The Golden Rams are off to a good start so far this outdoor season. They competed in their next home meet April 8 and 9 at John A. Farrell Stadium. Both teams have high hopes for the rest of the season, as they are improving more and more each week. The West Chester Invitational took place on Friday afternoon. The runners had to deal with heavy downpours all afternoon. After the first day, West Chester had a couple first and second place finishes. Sean Sebeck came in second in the 5000-meter finishing in 16:01.18. Ed Brittingham finished right behind him with a time of 16:05.13. On the field, Heath placed second in the triple jump after jumping 41—1 ½ inches. Pellechia and Breiner were second and third in the hammer throw with throws of 129-11

and 113-10, respectively. The women’s side took home another couple of first place wins. Wentz won the heptathlon after earning 2,483 points. Dietrich earned first place honors in the triple jump after leaping 33—7 ½ inches. Three other West Chester jumpers placed in the triple jump behind Dietrich. Lauro just barely missed first place with a jump of 33—7 ¼. Reaves came in third (31—8 ¾) while Aimee Stitch finished fourth (31—6 ¾). Kristina Koutsouros also had a good first day for the Rams and was the runner up in the 5000-meter (18:42.99). The West Chester Invitational finished up on Saturday afternoon and did not finish in time to make it into this week’s issue of The Quad. Jillian Morgan is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at JM652349@wcupa.edu.


APRIL 11, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 17

Women’s tennis sink Ship By Brian Johnson Staff Writer

When we last left the West Chester University women’s tennis team, they were coming off of a comfortable 7-2 Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) Eastern Division win over East Stroudsburg University. However, this win needed to be quickly forgotten in the face of matching up against division powerhouse Bloomsburg later in the week. The April 2 match against Bloomsburg started out promising with the first doubles team of Brittany Counts and Luisiana Souto

taking a 9-7 victory over their opponents. The Huskies, unfortunately, took the two other doubles match-ups despite the efforts of Kara Shumock and Nicole Paller at third doubles, who fell 8-6 and went into the singles competition up 2-1. Things were looking good for the Golden Rams after Claire Afrassiabian improved her record with a 6-0, 6-1 win at fourth singles to make the score 3-2 (after a Bloomsburg victory at sixth singles). H o w e v e r, Bloomsburg continued to pull away with three more singles victories in succession to effectively put the match out of reach.

WCU’s women had a fantastic chance to steal another point at second singles with a fantastic showing from Souto, who fell in a third set tie-breaker as the team dropped to 1-1 in the PSAC Eastern Division. They rebounded again from a loss with a 9-0 demolishing of the University of the Sciences in a non-conference match just two days later. The Golden Rams then notched another PSAC win with another 9-0 rout, this time against Shippensburg. Performances were stellar all around, with all nine victories coming in straight sets. Of the six singles matches, five of them were straight set shutouts, with only one game being dropped in the other. The three doubles teams combined only gave up three games, with the second doubles team of Allie Fetter and Alex Santoro putting forth an 8-0 shutout performance and helping the women’s record to 2-1 in the

conference and 10-8 overall. “I think our season has been going pretty well,” said team captain Shumock. “We have two big matches coming up this weekend [April 8-9] against Millersville and Kutztown. They’re both PSAC matches which are necessary for post-season play.” Head Coach Tina Tharp couldn’t have agreed more. “The matches coming up are Millersville, Kutztown, and Cheyney,” she said. “We need to win all three to clinch second place in the east and make post-season play.” All the anticipation building up to the important match against Millersville this past Friday was dissipated as the weather, which has continually affected both practice time and match play, postponed the match for a later date. This let down did not linger as the Golden Rams made their way to the south campus courts to take on Kutztown on Saturday. Faced with the

opportunity to better their chances of a playoff appearance they cruised to their third consecutive 9-0 victory and improved to 3-1 in conference play. Much like their victory over Shippensburg all victories came in straight sets with Souto, Fetter, Afrassiabian and Santoro winning their singles matches in shutout fashion. West Chester’s score was padded at sixth singles and third doubles with forfeits from the Raiders. With only four matches remaining, two being conference play (including the make-up against Millersville), the Golden Rams will be looking to guarantee their appearance in the PSAC playoffs and continue to build on their current form in order to make a run at an appearance in the Division II NCAA Tournament. Brian Johnson is a third-year student majoring in English. He can be reached at BJ669485@ wcupa.edu.

CHESTER COUNTY

RALLY FOR EDUCATION WEDNESDAY APRIL 20, 2011 7 p.m. Chester County Courthouse Join K-12 educators, West Chester University faculty, students & staff, and other supporters of high quality public education to protest Governor Corbett’s proposed massive education funding cuts. Learn about this rally, other events, and the state budget at:

apscufwcu.wordpress.com www.pastudentsvoice.org www.pafacultyvoice.org www.wcupa.edu/president/messages

Photo courtesy of wcupagoldenrams.com


PAGE 18

THE QUAD

APRIL 11, 2011

Grimwood helps Rams remain perfect in PSAC By Brynn Dougherty Staff Writer No. 7 West Chester ran away with a 16-3 victory against host Shippensburg preserving their 67 regularseason conference win and nine-game 2011 winning streak in a PSAC league match on Saturday afternoon. The streak continued on the following Saturday after a 21-5 triumph over Edinboro. Only dropping one contest this season, West Chester (10-1, 8-0 PSAC) won their eighth consecutive game of the 2011 season on Saturday, April 2 against Shippensburg. Claire Grimwood was the star of the game with four goals and six points overall. Her success did not go unnoticed, as the league named her the PSAC athlete of the week earlier in the week. The honor marked the first weekly award for a Golden Rams player in the 2011 season. Grimwood added to each of West Chester ’s wins last week. Against Bloomsburg, she tallied two goals, recorded a single ground ball and one draw control. Against Gannon, she put up six goals, recorded two ground balls, four draw controls and a caused turnover. It took her a mere four minutes to register a hat

trick in the game. When facing Mercyhurst, Grimwood scored two goals, had a draw control and caused one turnover. In total for last week, Grimwood contributed to West Chester’s 3-0 week with 10 goals, three ground balls, six draw controls and two caused turnovers. Although Grimwood’s accomplishments added to the win over Shippensburg on Saturday, she was not the only contributor to the team’s 13 point advantage over their hosts. Tori Dugan posted another hat trick—her fourth in the last four games, earning her four points on the day. Lauren Glassey put up two goals with two assists, while Erin Oczkowski and Jackie Hoover each scored twice as well. MacKenzie O’Keefe (7-1) took the win in the cage, making five saves in the process. Meghan Kearney made 11 saves in the cage, taking the loss for Shippensburg. The Lady Rams had a one week reprieve before they traveled to Edinboro for another PSAC match on Saturday at 1 p.m. The Rams were well equipped to dismantle the Fighting Scots over the weekend, especially with the asset of the PSAC athlete of the week, Grimwood. West Chester took down

the Fighting Scots with a final score of 21-5. Hoover, Jacki Patterson Nicole Pyle and Grimwood each scored to contribute to the Rams’ 21 earned points. H o o v e r initiated scoring 26 seconds into the game, giving West Chester an early 1-0 lead. Edinboro’s Zajak took an assist from Kaitlin Magee evened the score 25 minutes later. West Chester put up two more goals, while E d i n b o r o responded with one. West Chester answered then with two more goals enlarging their advantage to 5-2. With nearly 16 m i n u t e s remaining in the first half, E d i n b o r o ’ s Shannon Rohrich scored to shrink the Rams’ lead to 5-3. Before the half came to a close, the Rams tallied six goals. West Chester extended the scoring into the second

half, scoring five more goals before the Scots responded. During that run, Shannon Hayes scored three goals with three assists. Patterson took an assist from Grimwood, giving the Rams a 16-3 lead with nearly 20 minutes of play remaining. Edinboro’s Courtney Hey ended the Rams’ scoring streak with 27 minutes into the second half, making the score 17-4. Grimwood responded with another goal nearly three minutes later. After Zajak put up Edinboro’s final goal, the Rams finished up scoring with four goals to solidify the score at 21-5. The Golden Rams had a 43-12 advantage on shots and a 16-12 edge in draw controls. Edinboro dropped six of their 12 clear attempts. The Fighting Scots also had 19 turnovers, allowing West Chester to maintain control for a majority of Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad the game. Edinboro has a 3-8 Claire Grimwood finished this week with 10 goals, three ground balls, six draw controls and two caused turnovers to help West Chester go 3-0 since Saturday and stay perfect in the PSAC. overall record and is 0-7

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

in PSAC league play. The victory improved the Rams’ record to 10-1 in the regular season and 8-0 in PSAC league play. “I think it is very possible for us to keep a perfect PSAC record, we are undefeated so far and we really want that PSAC trophy back on our home turf,” Patterson said of the Rams’ flawless league record. The Golden Rams will face Dowling on Tuesday in Oakdale, NY at 4 p.m. The Golden Lions are 7-2 overall, and 3-0 in conference play. Although Dowling looks like a good match up for the Rams, the Golden Lions will likely be no match for West Chester ’s perfect PSAC record. “The future for our team looks really promising,” Patterson said. “We are so close as a team and we really mesh on and off the field. We are going to be unstoppable and will see Adelphi again on their home field in May, no doubt.” Brynn Dougherty is a thirdyear student at West Chester University. She can be reached at BD670913@wcupa.edu.


Warriors silence West Chester bats APRIL 11, 2011

By Steven Fisher Asst. Sports Editor

The Golden Rams diamondmen took it on the chin against East Stroudsburg Saturday afternoon as they lost both ends of their PSAC East baseball doubleheader at Serpico stadium. East Stroudsburg accumulated 27 hits and rode the arms of its top two starters to sweep the Golden Rams. WCU was able to put together just eight hits off of ESU’s two aces. WCU dropped game one, 7-2, and lost the nightcap, 6-2. Joe Wendle broke up Jeremy Gigliotti’s (4-1) perfect game in the opener with a two-out single to right field in the bottom half of the fourth inning. Chris Pula doubled off the wall in left field in the seventh, scoring WCU’s second run of the game. Wendle finished 1-for-2 with a run scored. Joe Gunkel (3-2) tossed a complete-game for Mark Jackson’s squad. He gave up two runs in the first inning on four hits. Later on, Brian Ernst hit a three-run homer in the fifth, all of the runs that scored were unearned. Ernst finished the opener 2-for-4 with a

THE QUAD

team high five RBI for ESU. Mike Raimo went 2-for-3 with a RBI and a run scored in game two. He tripled which scored Dylan Zigman in the fifth for one of WCU’s two runs that inning. Wendle later would knock in Raimo with a single to right field. Matt Zielinksi (1-3) took the loss for WCU in the nightcap. Zielinksi lasted four innings, allowing three runs on 11 hits. He was able to work himself out of trouble in each of the first three innings as the Warriors left nine runners on base. Dylan Porter came on in relief and allowed three runs on six hits in three innings of work. The Golden Rams went up against arguably two of the best arms that the PSAC has to offer. Coming into Saturday’s games the East Stroudsburg Warriors were ranked 30 in all of Division II baseball. East Stroudsburg relies heavily on their top pitchers who have been carrying them all year long. The Golden Rams non-conference contest against Chestnut Hill was delayed on three different occasions for a grand total of one hour due to technical

difficulties with the lights at Latchshaw Field in Norristown. WCU defeated Chestnut Hill (8-13) by a final score of 5-1 last Monday night. The Golden Rams got the best of Chestnut Hill this season as they swept their regular-season, home-and-home series, following a 5-3 win earlier this year at Serpico Stadium. On Monday, West Chester scored three runs in the top of the first inning to get out to an early lead. Later in the game they would add two insurance runs in the sixth and seventh innings to solidify the win. Dylan Porter had his best outing this season against Chestnut Hill. Porter (3-2) threw a complete-game four-hitter; the only blemish on his line was one unearned run in the bottom of the sixth inning. He walked one and struck out seven Chestnut Hill batters. Jack Provine finished the day 3-for-4 while Joe Wendle went 2-for-5. Reid Pulford finished with a pair of RBI, despite not getting a base hit. He walked with the bases loaded in the first inning to force in a run, and then

PAGE 19

hit a sacrifice fly in the sixth inning to add an insurance run for WCU. Freshman Dylan Zigman finished the day 1-for-3 with a RBI. The Golden Rams are back in action on Tuesday, March 12 when they will compete against Wilmington at Citizens Bank Park in the championship round of the Bill Giles Tournament at 3:30 p.m. On Wednesday, March 13 WCU will host University of the Sciences at 3:30p.m.

After 17 full s Ramirez abru after only pla season. Ram and won a W Red Sox in 2 after he was the weekend WCU willof a drug pol home-and-home double-100-game su

Over begin a header with Mansfield starting on Friday, March 15 at Serpico stadium. On Saturday, March 16 WCU will conclude their series with two games at Mansfield. (The statistics in this article exclude the results from Sunday March 10 contests at ESU.) Steven Fisher is a fourth-year student majoring in communications. He can be reached at sf674180@ wcupa.edu.

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

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After 17 full seasons in the MLB, Manny Ramirez abruptly retired from baseball after only playing six games of the 2011 season. Ramirez was a 12-time all-star and won a World Series with the Boston Red Sox in 2004. His retirement came just after he was informed he was in violation of a drug policy and could face a potential 100-game suspension.

THE QUAD

Sports

APRIL 11, 2011

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Beasts of the east

Runners bring home gold - Page 17

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

Warriors silence West Chester bats - Page 19


Quad 100-09